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History of Rutlandshire

Rutlandshire is in Midlands

Ashwell

On 12 Dec 1897 Tom Cecil Noel 1897-1918 was born to Gerard Cecil Noel at Ashwell.

Barleythorpe Hall

On 06 Dec 1867 Henry Cecil Lowther 1790-1867 (77) died at Barleythorpe Hall.

Buckden

Buckden Place, Buckden

On 02 Jan 1514 William Smyth Bishop of Lincoln 1460-1514 (54) died at Buckden Place, Buckden.

Cottesmore

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 14 Aug 1654. I took a journey into the Northern parts, riding through Oakham, a pretty town in Rutlandshire, famous for the tenure of the Barons (Ferrers), who hold it by taking off a shoe from every nobleman's horse that passes with his lord through the street, unless redeemed with a certain piece of money. In token of this, are several gilded shoes nailed up on the castle gate, which seems to have been large and fair. Hence, we went by Brook, a very sweet seat and park of the old Lady Camden's. Next, by Burleigh House, belonging to the Duke of Buckingham, and worthily reckoned among the noblest seats in England, situate on the brow of a hill, built à la moderne near a park walled in, and a fine wood at the descent.
Now we were come to Cottsmore, a pretty seat belonging to Mr. Heath, son of the late Lord Chief Justice of that name. Here, after dinner, parting with the company that conducted us thus far, I passed that evening by Belvoir Castle, built on a round mount at the point of a long ridge of hills, which affords a stately prospect, and is famous for its strenuous resistance in the late civil war.
Went by Newark-on-Trent, a brave town and garrison. Next, by Wharton House, belonging to the Lord Chaworth, a handsome seat; then by Home, a noble place belonging to the Marquis of Dorchester (48), and passed the famous River Trent, which divides the South from the North of England; and so lay that night at Nottingham.
This whole town and county seems to be but one entire rock, as it were, an exceedingly pleasant shire, full of gentry. Here, I observed divers to live in the rocks and caves, much after the manner as about Tours, in France. The church is well built on an eminence; there is a fair house of the Lord Clare's, another of Pierrepont's; an ample market place; large streets, full of crosses; the relics of an ancient castle, hollowed beneath which are many caverns, especially that of the Scots' King, and his work while there.
This place is remarkable for being the place where his Majesty first erected his standard at the beginning of our late unhappy differences. The prospects from this city toward the river and meadows are most delightful.

Edith Weston

See St Mary's Church, Edith Weston

Empingham

Exton

Around 1384 Robert Harrington 1384-1419 was born to John Harrington 1369-1421 (15) at Exton.

In 1403 Thomas Culpepper 1403-1464 was born to Thomas Culpepper 1360-1429 (43) at Exton.

In 1414 John Harrington 1414-1481 was born to Robert Harrington 1384-1419 (30) at Exton.

In 1419 Robert Harrington 1384-1419 (35) died at Exton.

In 1421 John Harrington 1369-1421 (52) died at Exton.

In 1448 Henry Southill 1448- was born in Exton.

In 1450 Catherine Culpepper 1450-1476 was born to Thomas Culpepper 1403-1464 (47) at Exton.

Around 1464 Thomas Culpepper 1403-1464 (61) died at Exton.

Around 1465 Robert Harrington 1465-1501 was born to John Harrington 1414-1481 (51) and Catherine Culpepper 1450-1476 (15) at Exton.

Around 1476 Catherine Culpepper 1450-1476 (26) died at Exton.

After 1480 John Harrington 1480-1524 was born to Robert Harrington 1465-1501 at Exton. Date adjusted from 1473 to 1480 to be consistent with father's birth in 1465.

In 1481 John Harrington 1414-1481 (67) died at Exton.

Around 1497 John Alexander Harrington 1497-1553 was born to John Harrington 1480-1524 (16) at Exton.

On 10 Feb 1501 Robert Harrington 1465-1501 (36) died at Exton.

Around 1511 James Harrington 1511-1592 was born to John Alexander Harrington 1497-1553 (14) at Exton.

On 05 Nov 1524 John Harrington 1480-1524 (44) died at Exton.

Around 1591 Lucy Sidney 1520-1591 (71) died at Exton.

See Church of St Peter and St Paul, Exton

Hambleton

Margaret Clifford Baroness Mauley 1307- died at Hambleton.

On 18 Oct 1314 Giles Badlesmere 2nd Baron Badlesmere 1314-1338 was born to Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (39) and Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (27) at Hambleton.

Normanton

Oakham

On 15 Sep 1649 Titus Oates 1649-1705 was born to Samuel Oates 1610-1683 (39) in Oakham.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 14 Aug 1654. I took a journey into the Northern parts, riding through Oakham, a pretty town in Rutlandshire, famous for the tenure of the Barons (Ferrers), who hold it by taking off a shoe from every nobleman's horse that passes with his lord through the street, unless redeemed with a certain piece of money. In token of this, are several gilded shoes nailed up on the castle gate, which seems to have been large and fair. Hence, we went by Brook, a very sweet seat and park of the old Lady Camden's. Next, by Burleigh House, belonging to the Duke of Buckingham, and worthily reckoned among the noblest seats in England, situate on the brow of a hill, built à la moderne near a park walled in, and a fine wood at the descent.
Now we were come to Cottsmore, a pretty seat belonging to Mr. Heath, son of the late Lord Chief Justice of that name. Here, after dinner, parting with the company that conducted us thus far, I passed that evening by Belvoir Castle, built on a round mount at the point of a long ridge of hills, which affords a stately prospect, and is famous for its strenuous resistance in the late civil war.
Went by Newark-on-Trent, a brave town and garrison. Next, by Wharton House, belonging to the Lord Chaworth, a handsome seat; then by Home, a noble place belonging to the Marquis of Dorchester (48), and passed the famous River Trent, which divides the South from the North of England; and so lay that night at Nottingham.
This whole town and county seems to be but one entire rock, as it were, an exceedingly pleasant shire, full of gentry. Here, I observed divers to live in the rocks and caves, much after the manner as about Tours, in France. The church is well built on an eminence; there is a fair house of the Lord Clare's, another of Pierrepont's; an ample market place; large streets, full of crosses; the relics of an ancient castle, hollowed beneath which are many caverns, especially that of the Scots' King, and his work while there.
This place is remarkable for being the place where his Majesty first erected his standard at the beginning of our late unhappy differences. The prospects from this city toward the river and meadows are most delightful.

Ryall

In 1197 Hugh Despencer 1197-1238 was born to Thomas Despencer 1169-1218 (28) and Recuara Harcourt 1162-1200 (35) at Ryall.

In 1197 Aliva Quincy 1197-1219 was born to Saer Quincy 1st Earl Winchester 1170-1219 (27) and Margaret Beaumont Countess Winchester at Ryall.

In 1254 Philip Despencer 1254- was born to Hugh Despencer 1st Baron Despencer 1223-1265 (30) and Aline Basset 1221-1281 (33) at Ryall.

In 1358 Anne Despencer Baroness Hastings, Baroness Marshal, Baroness Morley 1358-1426 was born to Edward Despencer 1st Baron Despencer, 3rd Baron Burghesh 1335-1375 (22) and Elizabeth Burghesh Countess Kildare 1342-1402 (16) at Ryall.

Stretton

Stocken Hall, Stretton

Uppingham

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 07 Aug 1654. Went to Uppingham, the shire town of Rutland, pretty and well built of stone, which is a rarity in that part of England, where most of the rural parishes are but of mud; and the people living as wretchedly as in the most impoverished parts of France, which they much resemble, being idle and sluttish. The country (especially Leicestershire) much in common; the gentry free drinkers.

A History of the County of Leicestershire: Volume 5 Gartree Hundred: Horninghold. Horninghold lies seven miles north-east of Market Harborough and four miles south-west of Uppingham. The parish, which is 1,217 a. in area, extends over the Middle Lias clays which underlie the hills on the borders of Rutland. The soil is chiefly clay and largely devoted to pasture. The road from Hallaton to Uppingham, on which the village stands, crosses the parish from west to east; it is joined at the east end of the village by a road from Great Easton. There are two field tracks, one to Blaston, and one which crosses the road from Hallaton to Allexton and continues to Keythorpe.
Before the Conquest Horninghold was one of a group of estates apparently held by four thegns, Osulf, Osmund, Roulf, and Levrick. In 1086 the vill was said to be held by Robert de Todeni, lord of Belvoir, though it may have been given before this date to Robert's priory of Belvoir, which had been founded in 1076. At the beginning of the 12th century it was farmed by William D'Aubigny. Horninghold formed part of the original endowment of the priory and remained in its possession until the Dissolution. It was confirmed to the priory at various times during the Middle Ages.
At the Dissolution the manor passed to the Crown, and in 1545 Henry VIII licensed Edward Elrington and Humphrey Metcalfe, to whom he had previously sold it, to alienate the manor and the rest of the former priory's property in the parish to John Beaumont and Henry Alycock. There was a lease of the manor outstanding for 41 years from 1531 which had been made by Belvoir Priory to Anthony Bewell, the priory's bailiff. On Beaumont's forfeiture the manor once more passed to the Crown, and in 1553 it was purchased for £566 by Edward Griffin, the Attorney-General, whose family owned the nearby manor of Gumley. In 1590 William Turpin of Knaptoft -1617, whose father had owned land in Horninghold, purchased the manor from Edward Griffin's heir. Turpin was knighted in 1603 and died in 1617; his widow held the manor until her death about the end of 1633, and was succeeded by her daughter Elizabeth, who married Sir John Pretyman of Loddington (64).
The estate was settled upon their eldest son John and his wife Margaret on their marriage in 1649. John Pretyman died in 1658 leaving his widow as owner of the estate, which she brought to her second husband Sir John Heath, the second son of Sir Robert Heath of Brasted Place (Kent) and M.P. for Clitheroe (Lancs.) from 1661 to 1679. She died in 1676 and the available evidence suggests that Horninghold manor did not descend to her daughter and heir. It appears to have been sold by Heath to Sir Edward Hungerford (43), who was in possession by 1676 and presented to the living. Thereafter the manorial descent is lost. Sir Edward Hungerford died in 1711, but it is by no means certain that he could or would have retained the manor of Horninghold for more than a few years, for his extravagance was notorious and he is said to have disposed of more than thirty manors during his lifetime.