Twenty Trees

email@twentytrees.co.uk

History of Surrey

Surrey is in Home Counties

In 1615 Charles Howard 1615-1672 was born to Francis Howard 1585-1651 (29) and Jane Monson 1588-1685 (27) at Surrey.

On 20 Mar 1672 Charles Howard 1615-1672 (57) died at Surrey.

Albury

Albury House

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 November. 7th November, 1641. After receiving the Sacrament at Wotton church, I visited my Lord Marshal (56) at Albury.

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 September. 28th September 1648. I went to Albury, to visit the Countess of Arundel (38), and returned to Wotton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 February. 26th February 1649. Came to see me Captain George Evelyn, my kinsman, the great traveler, and one who believed himself a better architect than really he was; witness the portico in the Garden at Wotton; yet the great room at Albury is somewhat better understood. He had a large mind, but over-built everything.

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 August. 10th August 1655. To Albury, to visit Mr. Howard (27), who had begun to build, and alter the gardens much. He showed me many rare pictures, particularly the Moor on horseback; Erasmus, as big as the life, by Holbein; a Madonna, in miniature, by Oliver; but, above all, the skull, carved in wood, by Albert Durer, for which his father was offered £100; also Albert's head, by himself, with divers rare agates, intaglios, and other curiosities.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 September. 19 Sep 1667. To London, with Mr. Henry Howard (39), of Norfolk, of whom I obtained the gift of his Arundelian marbles, those celebrated and famous inscriptions, Greek and Latin, gathered with so much cost and industry from Greece, by his illustrious grandfather, the magnificent Earl of Arundel, my noble friend while he lived. When I saw these precious. Monuments miserably neglected, and scattered up and down about the garden, and other parts of Arundel House, and how exceedingly the corrosive air of London impaired them, I procured him to bestow them on the University of Oxford. This he was pleased to grant me; and now gave me the key of the gallery, with leave to mark all those stones, urns, altars, etc., and whatever I found had inscriptions on them, that were not statues. This I did; and getting them removed and piled together, with those which were incrusted in the garden walls, I sent immediately letters to the Vice-Chancellor of what I had procured, and that if they esteemed it a service to the University (of which I had been a member), they should take order for their transportation.
This done 21st, I accompanied Mr. Howard (39) to his villa at Albury, where I designed for him the plot of his canal and garden, with a crypt through the hill.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 September. 23 Sep 1670. To Albury, to see how that garden proceeded, which I found exactly done to the design and plot I had made, with the crypta through the mountain in the park, thirty perches in length. Such a Pausilippe [Note. A word created by Evelyn meaning an underground passage.] is nowhere in England. The canal was now digging, and the vineyard planted.

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 August. 05 Aug 1687. I went to see Albury, now purchased by Mr. Finch (38) (the King's Solicitor and son to the late Lord Chancellor); I found the garden which I first designed for the Duke of Norfolk, nothing improved.

Ashford

On 28 Jul 1758 George Henry Hay 8th Earl Kinnoull 1689-1758 (69) died in Ashford. His son Thomas Hay 9th Earl Kinnoul 1710-1787 (48) succeeded 9th Earl Kinnoull.

Ashtead

John Evelyn's Diary 1684 May. 10 May 1684. I went to visite my brother in Surrey. Call'd by the way at Ashted, where Sr Rob Howard (58) (Auditor of the Exchequer) entertain'd me very civilly at his new built house, which stands in a Park on the Downe, the avenue South ; tho' downe hill to the house, which is not greate, but with the outhouses very convenient. The stairecase is painted by Verrio (48) with the storie of Astrea; amongst other figures is the Picture of the Painter himselfe, and not unlike him ; the rest is well done, onely the columns did not at all please me ; there is also Sir Robert's own Picture in an oval ; the whole in fresca. The place has this greate defect, that there is no water but what is drawn up by horses from a very deepe well.

Ashtead House, Surrey

John Evelyn's Diary 1687 July. 19 Jul 1687. I went to Wotton. In the way, I dined at Ashted, with my Baroness Mordaunt (65).

Bagshot

Bagshot Manor, Bagshot

Around 27 Mar 1534 Lucy Neville 1468-1534 (66) died at Bagshot Manor, Bagshot.

Bagshot Park, Bagshot

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 October. 22 Oct 1685. I accompanied my Lady Clarendon to her house at Swallowfield in Berks, dining by the way at Mr. Graham's (36) lodge at Bagshot; the house, new repair'd and capacious enough for a good family, stands in a Park. Hence we went to Swallowfield; this house is after the antient build ing of honourable gentlemen's houses, when they kept up antient hospitality, but the gardens and waters as elegant as 'tis possible to make a flat, by art and industrie, and no meane expence, my lady being so extraordinarily skill'd in ye flowery part, and my lord in diligence of planting; so that I have hardly seene a seate whrch shews more tokens of it than what is to be found here, not only in the delicious and rarest fruits of a garden, but in those innumerable timber trees in the ground about the seate, to the greatest ornament and benefit of the place. There is one orchard of 1000 golden, and other cider pippins; walks and groves of elms, limes, oaks, and other trees. The garden is so beset with all manner of sweete shrubbs, that it per fumes the aire. The distribution also of the quarters, walks, and parterres, is excellent. The nurseries, kitchin garden full of ye most desireable plants; two very noble Orangeries well furnished; but above all, the canall and fishponds, the one fed with a white, the other with a black running water, fed by a quick and swift river, so well and plen tifully stor'd with fish, that for pike, carp, breame and tench, I never saw any thing approching it. We had at every meale carp and pike of size fit for the table of a Prince, and what added to ye delight was to see the hundreds taken by the drag, out of which, the cooke standing by, we pointed out what we had most mind to, and had carp that would have ben worth at London twenty shillings a piece. The waters are flagg'd about with Calamus aromaticus, with wch my lady has hung a closet, that retains the smell very perfectly. There is also a certaine sweete willow and other exotics : also a very fine bowllng-greene, meadow, pasture, and wood; in a word, all that can render a country seate delightful. There is besides a well furnish'd library in ye house.

On 30 Nov 1834 William Frederick Hanover 2nd Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1776-1834 (58) died at Bagshot Park, Bagshot. He was buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 16 Jan 1942 Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (91) died at Bagshot Park, Bagshot. His grandson Alastair Windsor 2nd Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1914-1943 (27) succeeded 2nd Duke Connaught and Strathearn.

1937. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937 (67). Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (86).

In 1908 John Singer-Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (51). Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942 (57).

Banstead

Before 05 May 1243 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain, 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 died at Banstead. He was buried at Blackfriars Church, Holborn.

Battersea

On 09 Apr 1632 Robert Rich 3rd Earl Warwick 1611-1659 (20) and Anne Cavendish Countess Warwick 1611-1638 (21) were married at Battersea. Anne Cavendish Countess Warwick 1611-1638 (21) by marriage Countess Warwick (3C 1618).

Beddington

In May 1356 Nicholas Carew 1356-1432 was born to Nicholas Carew 1322-1390 (34) in Beddington.

In 1405 Nicholas Carew 1405-1458 was born to Nicholas Carew 1356-1432 (48) at Beddington.

On 04 Sep 1432 Nicholas Carew 1356-1432 (76) died in Beddington.

On 20 Apr 1458 Nicholas Carew 1405-1458 (53) died at Beddington.

In 1469 Richard Carew 1469-1520 was born to James Carew 1445-1493 (24) and Eleanor Hoo at Beddington.

In 1493 James Carew 1445-1493 (48) died at Beddington.

On 23 May 1520 Richard Carew 1469-1520 (51) died at Beddington.

In 1586 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle 1536-1610 (50) was knighted at Beddington.

On Jun 1603 Nicholas Carew -1644 was knighted at Beddington.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 21st October, 1632. My eldest sister (18) was married to Edward Darcy, Esq, who little deserved so excellent a person, a woman of so rare virtue. I was not present at the nuptials; but I was soon afterward sent for into Surrey, and my father (45) would willingly have weaned me from my fondness of my too indulgent grandmother, intending to have placed me at Eton College; but, not being so provident for my own benefit, and unreasonably terrified with the report of the severe discipline there, I was sent back to Lewes; which perverseness of mine I have since a thousand times deplored. This was the first time that ever my parents had seen all their children together in prosperity. While I was now trifling at home, I saw London, where I lay one night only. The next day, I dined at Beddington, where I was much delighted with the gardens and curiosities. Thence, we returned to the Baroness Darcy's (18), at Sutton; thence to Wotton; and, on the 16th of August following, 1633, back to Lewes.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 September. 27th September 1658. To Beddington, that ancient seat of the Carews, a fine old hall, but a scambling house, famous for the first orange garden in England, being now overgrown trees, planted in the ground, and secured in winter with a wooden tabernacle and stoves. This seat is rarely watered, lying low, and environed with good pastures. The pomegranates bear here. To the house is also added a fine park. Thence, to Carshalton, excellently watered, and capable of being made a most delicious seat, being on the sweet downs, and a champaign about it full planted with walnut and cherry trees, which afford a considerable rent.
Riding over these downs, and discoursing with the shepherds, I found that digging about the bottom near Sir Christopher Buckle's, near Banstead, divers medals have been found, both copper and silver, with foundations of houses, urns, etc. Here, indeed, anciently stood a city of the Romans. See Antonine's "Itineraries.".

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 20 Sep 1700. I went to Beddington, the ancient seat of the Carews, in my remembrance a noble old structure, capacious, and in form of the buildings of the age of Henry VIII. and Queen Elizabeth, and proper for the old English hospitality, but now decaying with the house itself, heretofore adorned with ample gardens, and the first orange trees that had been seen in England, planted in the open ground, and secured in winter only by a tabernacle of boards and stoves removable in summer, that, standing 120 years, large and goodly trees, and laden with fruit, were now in decay, as well as the grotto, fountains, cabinets, and other curiosities in the house and abroad, it being now fallen to a child under age, and only kept by a servant or two from utter dilapidation. The estate and park about it also in decay.

Carew Manor, Beddington

Around 1445 James Carew 1445-1493 was born to Nicholas Carew 1405-1458 (40) and Margaret Fiennes at Carew Manor, Beddington.

St Mary's Church, Beddington

In Feb 1644 Nicholas Carew -1644 died. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Beddington.

Bletchingley

Before 1516 Richard "The Great Black Knight of the North" Cholmondeley 1515-1563 was born at Bletchingley.

In 1625 Thomas Gresham 1547-1630 (78) was elected MP Bletchingly.

In 1685 Ambrose Browne 1659-1688 (25) was elected MP Bletchingly.

On Feb 1789 Benjamin Hobhouse 1st Baronet Hobhouse 1757-1831 (32) was elected MP Bletchingly.

Marden Park

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 13 Jul 1700. I went to Harden, which was originally a barren warren bought by Sir Robert Clayton (71), who built there a pretty house, and made such alteration by planting not only an infinite store of the best fruit; but so changed the natural situation of the hill, valleys, and solitary mountains about it, that it rather represented some foreign country, which would produce spontaneously pines, firs, cypress, yew, holly, and juniper; they were come to their perfect growth, with walks, mazes, etc., among them, and were preserved with the utmost care, so that I who had seen it some years before in its naked and barren condition, was in admiration of it. The land was bought of Sir John Evelyn, of Godstone, and was thus improved for pleasure and retirement by the vast charge and industry of this opulent citizen. He and his lady received us with great civility. The tombs in the church at Croydon of Archbishops Grindal, Whitgift, and other Archbishops, are fine and venerable; but none comparable to that of the late Archbishop Sheldon, which, being all of white marble, and of a stately ordinance and carvings, far surpassed the rest, and I judge could not cost less than £700 or £800.

Bletchworth

Bletchworth Castle, Bletchworth

Box Hill

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 August. 27th August 1655. I went to Boxhill, to see those rare natural bowers, cabinets, and shady walks in the box copses: hence we walked to Mickleham, and saw Sir F. Stidolph's seat, environed with elm trees and walnuts innumerable, and of which last he told us they received a considerable revenue. Here are such goodly walks and hills shaded with yew and box, as render the place extremely agreeable, it seeming from these evergreens to be summer all the winter.

Brockham

Betchworth, Brockham

Betchworth Castle

In 1402 Thomas Browne Lord Treasurer Lord Chancellor 1402-1460 was born at Betchworth Castle.

Around 1433 William Browne 1433-1506 was born to Thomas Browne Lord Treasurer Lord Chancellor 1402-1460 (31) and Eleanor Fitzalan at Betchworth Castle.

In 1440 George Browne 1440-1483 was born to Thomas Browne Lord Treasurer Lord Chancellor 1402-1460 (38) and Eleanor Fitzalan at Betchworth Castle.

On 29 Jun 1443 Anthony Browne 1443-1506 was born to Thomas Browne Lord Treasurer Lord Chancellor 1402-1460 (41) and Eleanor Fitzalan at Betchworth Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 October. 15th October, 1654. To Betchworth Castle, to Sir Ambrose Browne, and other gentlemen of my sweet and native country.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 August. 18th August 1658. To Sir Ambrose Browne, at Betchworth Castle, in that tempestuous wind which threw down my greatest trees at Sayes Court, and did so much mischief all over England. It continued the whole night; and, till three in the afternoon of the next day, in the southwest, and destroyed all our winter fruit.

Brookwood

Byfleet

On 06 May 1548 Anthony Browne 1500-1548 (48) died at Byfleet. He was buried at Senlac Hill, Hastings, East Sussex.

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 August. 24th August 1678. I went to see my Lord of St. Alban's (73) house, at Byfleet, an old, large building. Thence, to the papermills, where I found them making a coarse white paper. They cull the rags which are linen for white paper, woolen for brown; then they stamp them in troughs to a pap, with pestles, or hammers, like the powder mills, then put it into a vessel of water, in which they dip a frame closely wired with wire as small as a hair and as close as a weaver's reed; on this they take up the pap, the superfluous water draining through the wire; this they dexterously turning, shake out like a pancake on a smooth board between two pieces of flannel, then press it between a great press, the flannel sucking out the moisture; then, taking it out, they ply and dry it on strings, as they dry linen in the laundry; then dip it in alum water, lastly, polish and make it up in quires. They put some gum in the water in which they macerate the rags. The mark we find on the sheets is formed in the wire.
25th August 1678. After evening prayer, visited Mr. Sheldon (nephew to the late Archbishop of Canterbury), and his pretty melancholy garden; I took notice of the largest arbor thuyris I had ever seen. The place is finely watered, and there are many curiosities of India, shown in the house.
There was at Weybridge the Duchess of Norfolk (35), Lord Thomas Howard (a worthy and virtuous gentleman, with whom my son (23) was sometime bred in Arundel House), who was newly come from Rome, where he had been some time; also one of the Duke's daughters, by his first lady. My Lord (50) leading me about the house made no scruple of showing me all the hiding places for the Popish priests, and where they said mass, for he was no bigoted Papist. He told me he never trusted them with any secret, and used Protestants only in all businesses of importance.
I went this evening with my Lord Duke (50) to Windsor, where was a magnificent Court, it being the first time of his Majesty's (48) removing thither since it was repaired.

Camberwell

In 1653 William Parr Vicar 1617-1691 (36) was appointed Vicar of Camberwell.

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 September. 1st September 1657. I visited Sir Edmund Bowyer, at his melancholy seat at Camberwell. He has a very pretty grove of oaks, and hedges of yew in his garden, and a handsome row of tall elms before his court.

John Evelyn's Diary 1681 October. 02 Oct 1681. I went to Camberwell, where that good man Dr. Parr (late chaplain to Archbishop Usher) preached on Acts xvi. 30.

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 October. 27 Oct 1685. At the Royal Society an Urn full of bones was presented, dug up in an highway, whilst repairing it, in a field in Camberwell in Surrey; it was found intire with its cover, amongst many others, be liev'd to be truly Roman and antient. Sir Richd Bulkeley described to us a model of a charriot he had invented, wch it was not possible to overthrow in whatever uneven way it was drawn, giving us a wonderfull relation of what it had perform'd in that kind, for ease, expedition, and safety; there were some incon veniencies yet to be remedied — it would not contain more than one person; was ready to take fire every 10 miles, and being plac'd, and playing on no fewer than 10 rollers, it made a most prodigious noise, almost intolerable. A remedy was to be sought for these inconveniencies.

John Evelyn's Diary 1686 April. 18 Apr 1686. In the afternoone I went to Camberwell to visit Dr. Parr (69). After sermon I accompanied him (69) to his house, where he shew'd me the Life and Letters of the late learned Primate of Armagh (Usher), and among them that letter of Bp. Bramhal's to the Primate, giving notice of the Popish practices to pervert this Nation, by sending an hundred priests into England, who were to conforme themselves to all sectaries and conditions for the more easily dispersing their doctrine amongst us. This letter was the cause of yfc whole impression being seiz'd, upon pretence that it was a political or historical account of things not re lating to theology, tho' it had ben licens'd by ye Bishop; which plainely shew'd what an interest the Papists now had, that a Protestant booke, containing the life and le'tters of so eminent a man, was not to be pub lish'd. There were also many letters to and from most of ye learned persons his correspondents in Europe. The book will, I doubt not, struggle through this unjust impediment. Several Judges were put out, and new complying ones put in.

Saint Giles Church

On or before 03 Jun 1685 Thomas Bond 1st Baronet 1620-1685 (65) died. He was buried 03 Jun 1685 at Saint Giles Church.

Cheam

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 September. 26th September 1658. Mr. King preached at Ashted, on Proverbs xv. 24; a Quaker would have disputed with him. In the afternoon, we heard Dr. Hacket (66) (since Bishop of Litchfield) at Cheam, where the family of the Lumleys lie buried.

Lumley Chapel, Cheam

On 27 Jul 1578 Jane Fitzalan Baroness Lumley 1537-1578 (41) died. He was buried at Lumley Chapel, Cheam.

Nonsuch Park, Cheam

Nonsuch Palace, Nonsuch Park, Cheam

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 January. Mr. Packer's, and took an exact view of the plaster statues and bass-relievos inserted between the timbers and puncheons of the outside walls of the Court; which must needs have been the work of some celebrated Italian. I much admired how they had lasted so well and entire since the time of Henry VIII., exposed as they are to the air; and pity it is they are not taken out and preserved in some dry place; a gallery would become them. There are some mezzo-relievos as big as the life; the story is of the Heathen Gods, emblems, compartments, etc. The palace consists of two courts, of which the first is of stone, castle like, by the Lord Lumleys (of whom it was purchased), the other of timber, a Gothic fabric, but these walls incomparably beautiful. I observed that the appearing timber-puncheons, entrelices, etc., were all so covered with scales of slate, that it seemed carved in the wood and painted, the slate fastened on the timber in pretty figures, that has, like a coat of armor, preserved it from rotting. There stand in the garden two handsome stone pyramids, and the avenue planted with rows of fair elms, but the rest of these goodly trees, both of this and of Worcester Park adjoining, were felled by those destructive and avaricious rebels in the late war, which defaced one of the stateliest seats his Majesty had.

Elizabeth's Royal Progress 1591

On 02 Aug 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (57) left at Nonsuch Palace, Nonsuch Park, Cheam to commence her Royal Progress. She travelled south to Mansion House, Leatherhead ; the home of Edmund Tilney 1536-1610 (55).

In Sep 1599 when the Queen (65) moved her Court to Nonsuch Palace, Nonsuch Park, Cheam Margaret Radclyffe of Ordsall Hall 1573-1599 (26) returned to her childhood home of Ordsall Hall, Ordsall where her condition continued to deteriorate.

Robert Devereux Earl Essex loses the Plot

On 28 Sep 1599 Robert Devereux 2nd Earl Essex 1565-1601 (33) presented himself to Elizabeth (66) in her bedchamber at Nonsuch Palace, Nonsuch Park, Cheam where he found the queen newly up, the hair about her face. Elizabeth had just a simple robe over her nightdress, her wrinkled skin was free of cosmetics and, without her wig. Essex saw her bald head with just wisps of thinning grey hair 'hanging about her ears'. The Queen confined the Earl to his rooms with the comment that "an unruly beast must be stopped of his provender.".

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 January. 03 Jan 1666. I supped in Nonesuch House, whither the office of the Exchequer was transferred during the plague, at my good friend.

Chertsey

On 01 Jul 1175 Reginald de Dunstanville Fitzroy 1st Earl Cornwall 1110-1175 (65) died at Chertsey. He was buried at Reading Abbey.

Chertsey Abbey

In 989 Aelfstan aka Lyfing Unknown Archbishop of Canterbury -1020 was appointed Abbot Chertsey Abbey.

Chobham Place

Clapham

John Evelyn's Diary 1679 July. 22d July 1679. Dined at Clapham, at Sir D. Gauden's; went thence with him to Windsor, to assist him in a business with his Majesty (49). I lay that night at Eton College, the Provost's lodgings (Dr. Craddock), where I was courteously entertained.

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 23 Sep 1700. I went to visit Mr. Pepys (67) at Clapham, where he has a very noble and wonderfully well-furnished house, especially with Indian and Chinese curiosities. The offices and gardens well accommodated for pleasure and retirement.

In 1703 Henry Cheere 1st Baronet St Margaret's Sculptor 1703-1781 was born in Clapham.

Gauden House, Clapham

John Evelyn's Diary 1692 July. 25 Jul 1692. To Mr. Hewer's (50) at Clapham, where he has an excellent, useful, and capacious house on the Common, built by Sir Den. Gauden, and by him sold to Mr. Hewer, who got a very considerable estate in the Navy, in which, from being Mr. Pepys's (59) clerk, he came to be one of the principal officers, but was put out of all employment on the Revolution, as were all the best officers, on suspicion of being no friends to the change; such were put in their places, as were most shamefully ignorant and unfit. Mr. Hewer (50) lives very handsomely and friendly to everybody. Our fleet was now sailing on their long pretense of a descent on the French coast; but, after having sailed one hundred leagues, returned, the admiral and officers disagreeing as to the place where they were to land, and the time of year being so far spent,—to the great dishonor of those at the helm, who concerted their matters so indiscreetly, or, as some thought, designedly.
This whole summer was exceedingly wet and rainy, the like had not been known since the year 1648; while in Ireland they had not known so great a drought.

Croydon

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 09 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To Alice, late wife of Roger Bigod, earl of Norfolk and Marshall of England. Order to meet the king at Dover on his return from France with his consort about Sunday next after the Feast of the Purification of St Mary. Witnessed by Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).
The like to:
Elizabeth, countess of Hereford and Essex (25).
Henry de Lancastre (27)
Robert de Monte Alto
Almaric de Sancto Amando[Ibid]
To R Archbishop of Canterbury (63). Order to attend the king's coronaion on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine [14 Feb] at Westminster, to execute what pertains to his office.
To the Sheriff of Surrey. Order to proclaim in market towns, etc., that no knight, esquire, or other shall, under pain of forfeiture, pressure to tourney or make jousts or bordices (torneare, justos seu burdseicas facere), or otherwise go armed at Croydon or elsewhere before the king's coronation.

On 02 Sep 1600 Francis Howard 1540-1600 (60) died at Croydon.

Addiscombe

John Evelyn's Diary 1695 September. 29 Sep 1695. Very cold weather. Sir Purbeck Temple, uncle to my son Draper, died suddenly. A great funeral at Addiscombe. His lady being own aunt to my son Draper, he hopes for a good fortune, there being no heir. There had been a new meeting of the commissioners about Greenwich Hospital, on the new commission, where the Lord Mayor, etc. appeared, but I was prevented by indisposition from attending. The weather very sharp, winter approaching apace. The King (44) went a progress into the north, to show himself to the people against the elections, and was everywhere complimented, except at Oxford, where it was not as he expected, so that he hardly stopped an hour there, and having seen the theater, did not receive the banquet proposed. I dined with Dr. Gale (60) at St. Paul's school, who showed me many curious passages out of some ancient Platonists' MSS. concerning the Trinity, which this great and learned person would publish, with many other rare things, if he was encouraged, and eased of the burden of teaching.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

John Evelyn's Diary 1700. 13 Mar 1700. I was at the funeral of my Lady Temple, who was buried at Islington, brought from Addiscombe, near Croydon. She left my son-in-law Draper (her nephew) the mansion house of Addiscombe, very nobly and completely furnished, with the estate about it, with plate and jewels, to the value in all of about £20,000. She was a very prudent lady, gave many great legacies, with £500 to the poor of Islington, where her husband, Sir Purbeck Temple, was buried, both dying without issue.

John Evelyn's Diary 1702. 27 Jun 1702. I went to Wotton with my family for the rest of the summer, and my son-in-law, Draper, with his family, came to stay with us, his house at Addiscombe being new-building, so that my family was above thirty. Most of the new Parliament were chosen of Church of England principles, against the peevish party. The Queen (37) was magnificently entertained at Oxford and all the towns she passed through on her way to Bath.

John Evelyn's Diary 1703. 11 Jul 1703. I went to Addiscombe, sixteen miles from Wotton, to see my son-in-law's new house, the outside, to the coving, being such excellent brickwork, based with Portland stone, with the pilasters, windows, and within, that I pronounced it in all the points of good and solid architecture to be one of the very best gentlemen's houses in Surrey, when finished. I returned to Wotton in the evening, though weary.

Croydon Palace

On 25 Nov 1718 Elizabeth Tulse 1661-1718 (57) died at Croydon Palace.

Around 1680 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Elizabeth Tulse 1661-1718 (19).

Halling House

On 21 Oct 1585 Francis Howard 1585-1651 was born to Francis Howard 1540-1600 (45) and Frances Gouldwell at Halling House.

Dorking

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. The distance from London little more than twenty miles, and yet so securely placed, as if it were one hundred; three miles from Dorking, which serves it abundantly with provision as well of land as sea; six from Guildford, twelve from Kingston. I will say nothing of the air, because the pre-eminence is universally given to Surrey, the soil being dry and sandy; but I should speak much of the gardens, fountains, and groves that adorn it, were they not as generally known to be among the most natural, and (till this later and universal luxury of the whole nation, since abounding in such expenses) the most magnificent that England afforded; and which indeed gave one of the first examples to that elegancy, since so much in vogue, and followed in the managing of their waters, and other elegancies of that nature. Let me add, the contiguity of five or six manors, the patronage of the livings about it, and what Themistocles pronounced for none of the least advantages—the good neighborhood. All which conspire here to render it an honorable and handsome royalty, fit for the present possessor, my worthy brother, and his noble lady, whose constant liberality gives them title both to the place and the affections of all that know them. Thus, with the poet:
Nescio quâ natale solum dulcedine cunctos
Ducit, et immemores non sinit esse sui.

In 1599 Christopher Hussey 1599-1686 was born to John Hussey -1632 and Mary Wood at Dorking.

Before 24 May 1632 John Hussey -1632 died. On 24 May 1632 John Hussey -1632 was buried at Dorking.

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 August. 1st August 1655. I went to Dorking, to see Mr. Charles Howard's (26) amphitheater, garden, or solitary recess, being fifteen acres environed by a hill. He showed us divers rare plants, caves, and an elaboratory.

On Jul 1688 Ambrose Browne 1659-1688 (29) died. On 24 Jul 1688 Ambrose Browne 1659-1688 (29) was buried at Dorking.

Deepdene House

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 August. 9th August 1664. Went with my brother Richard (41) to Wotton, to visit and comfort my disconsolate brother (47); and on the 13th saw my friend, Mr. Charles Howard, at Dipden, near Dorking.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 September. 13 Sep 1670. To visit Sir Richard Lashford, my kinsman, and Mr. Charles Howard (40), at his extraordinary garden, at Deepden.

Ockley, Dorking

On 23 Aug 1420 Thomas Hoo 1370-1420 (50) died at Ockley, Dorking.

Westcott, Dorking

On 12 Aug 1233 Eleanor Vitre Countess Salisbury 1158-1233 (75) died in Westcott, Dorking.

East Clandon

East Horsley

On 30 Mar 1547 Henry Knyvet of Charlton Wiltshire 1510-1547 (37) died at East Horsley.

Elizabeth's Royal Progress 1591

After 02 Aug 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland arrived at East Horsley where she stayed with Thomas Cornwallis 1518-1604.

East Molesey

In 1886 Esmond Burton Sculptor 1886-1964 was born at East Molesey.

On 14 Jan 1952 Florence Elisabeth "Anthi" Laing 1854-1952 (98) died at East Molesey.

1925. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937 (55). Portrait of Florence Elisabeth "Anthi" Laing 1854-1952 (71).

Effingham

On 03 Mar 1564 Elizabeth Howard Countess Carrick 1564-1646 was born to Charles Howard 1st Earl Nottingham 1536-1624 (28) and Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (14) at Effingham. Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (30) was her Godmother.

Elmbridge

Walton-on-Thames, Elmbridge

On 31 Jan 1603 the will of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (68) was proved. He asked to be buried in St George's Church, Esher. He appointed his son Francis Drake -1634 as his executor. He left his widow Ursula Stafford 1553- the lease on the manor of Walton-on-Thames, Elmbridge, as well as a house on Fetter Lane and his coach and horses.

Around 1577 George Gower Painter 1540-1596 (37). Portrait of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (42). The heraldic escutcheon shows seven quarters as follows:
1: . Drake of Ash in the parish of Musbury, Devon
2: Argent, on a chief gules three cinquefoils of the first; Billet of Ash
3: Gules, on a fess argent two mullets sable; Hamton of Rockbere and Ash
4: Ermine, on a chief indented sable three crosslets fitchee or; Orwey of Orwey and Ash
5: Barry of seven argent and sable.
6: Azure, six lions rampant argent crowned Gules, 3, 2, 1; Forde of Forde.
7: Argent, two chevrons sable (Esse/Ash of Ash); Esse or Ash of Ash.

Epsom

On 31 Aug 1701 Edward Henry Calvert 1701-1730 was born to Benedict Calvert 4th Baron Baltimore 1679-1715 (22) and Charlotte Lee Baroness Baltimore 1679-1721 (22) at Epsom.

On 19 Jul 1703 Jane Calvert 1703-1778 was born to Benedict Calvert 4th Baron Baltimore 1679-1715 (24) and Charlotte Lee Baroness Baltimore 1679-1721 (24) at Epsom.

On 28 Jun 1716 George Fitzroy 1st Duke Northumberland 1665-1716 (50) died at Epsom.

Carshalton, Epsom

Sibylle Flanders -1223 was born to Guillaume Flanders 1088-1130 at Carshalton, Epsom.

Durdans

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 August. 14th August 1658. We went to Durdans [at Epsom] to a challenged match at bowls for £10, which we won.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 September. 1st September 1662. Being invited by Lord Berkeley (34), I went to Durdans, where dined his Majesty (32), the Queen (23), Duke, Duchess (25), Prince Rupert (42), Prince Edward, and abundance of noblemen. I went, after dinner, to visit my brother (45) of Woodcot, my sister having been delivered of a son a little before, but who had now been two days dead.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 February. 24th February 1664. My Lord George Berkeley (36), of Durdans, and Sir Samuel Tuke (49) came to visit me. We went on board Sir William Petty's (40) double-bottomed vessel, and so to London.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 August. 04 Aug 1665. I went to Wotton with my Son and his tutor, Mr. Bohun, Fellow of New College (recommended to me by Dr. Wilkins (51), and the President of New College, Oxford), for fear of the pestilence, still increasing in London and its environs. On my return, I called at Durdans, where I found Dr. Wilkins (51), Sir William Petty (42), and Mr. Hooke (30), contriving chariots, new rigging for ships, a wheel for one to run races in, and other mechanical inventions; perhaps three such persons together were not to be found elsewhere in Europe, for parts and ingenuity.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 August. 13 Aug 1673. I rode to Durdans, where I dined at my Lord Berkeley's (45) of Berkeley Castle, my old and noble friend, it being his wedding anniversary [Note. 11 Aug 1646 he married Elizabeth Massingberd Couness Berkeley -1708], where I found the Duchess of Albemarle (19), and other company, and returned home on that evening late.

Woodcote Park

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 August. 16th August 1648. I went to Woodcote (in Epsom) to the wedding of my brother, Richard (25), who married the daughter (19) and coheir of Esquire Minn (67), lately deceased; by which he had a great estate both in land and money on the death of a brother. The coach in which the bride and bridegroom were, was overturned in coming home; but no harm was done.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 September. 1st September 1662. Being invited by Lord Berkeley (34), I went to Durdans, where dined his Majesty (32), the Queen (23), Duke, Duchess (25), Prince Rupert (42), Prince Edward, and abundance of noblemen. I went, after dinner, to visit my brother (45) of Woodcot, my sister having been delivered of a son a little before, but who had now been two days dead.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 March. 06 Mar 1670. Dr. Patrick preached in Covent Garden Church. I participated of the Blessed Sacrament, recommending to God the deplorable condition of my dear brother (47), who was almost in the last agonies of death. I watched late with him this night. It pleased God to deliver him out of this miserable life, toward five o'clock this Monday morning, to my unspeakable grief. He was a brother whom I most dearly loved, for his many virtues; but two years younger than myself, a sober, prudent, worthy gentleman. He had married a great fortune, and left one only daughter, and a noble seat at Woodcot, near Epsom. His body was opened, and a stone taken out of his bladder, not much bigger than a nutmeg. I returned home on the 8th, full of sadness, and to bemoan my loss.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 March. 21 Mar 1670. We all accompanied the corpse of my dear brother to Epsom Church, where he was decently interred in the chapel belonging to Woodcot House. A great number of friends and gentlemen of the country attended, about twenty coaches and six horses, and innumerable people.

Esher

On 06 Jan 1782 Louisa Maria La Coast Hanover 1782-1835 was born illegitimately to William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (38) and Almeria Carpenter 1745-1809 (37) at Esher.

In 1775 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (47). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (31).

Around 1804. John Opie Painter 1761-1807 (42). Portrait of William Henry Hanover 1st Duke Gloucester and Edinburgh 1743-1805 (60).

Claremont House, Esher

Death of Princess Charlotte

On 06 Nov 1817 Princess Charlotte Augusta Hanover 1796-1817 (21) died in childbirth at Claremont House, Esher. He buried at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

On 19 Jul 1884 Charles Edward Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1884-1954 was born to Leopold Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1st Duke Albany 1853-1884 and Helena Waldeck Duchess Albany at Claremont House, Esher.

On 23 Jan 1906 Princess May of Teck 1906-1994 was born to Alexander Teck 1st Earl Athlone 1874-1957 (32) and Princess Alice Countess Athlone 1883-1981 (22) at Claremont House, Esher.

St George's Church, Esher

On 31 Jan 1603 the will of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (68) was proved. He asked to be buried in St George's Church, Esher. He appointed his son Francis Drake -1634 as his executor. He left his widow Ursula Stafford 1553- the lease on the manor of Walton-on-Thames, Elmbridge, as well as a house on Fetter Lane and his coach and horses.

Around 1577 George Gower Painter 1540-1596 (37). Portrait of Richard Drake 1535-1603 (42). The heraldic escutcheon shows seven quarters as follows:
1: . Drake of Ash in the parish of Musbury, Devon
2: Argent, on a chief gules three cinquefoils of the first; Billet of Ash
3: Gules, on a fess argent two mullets sable; Hamton of Rockbere and Ash
4: Ermine, on a chief indented sable three crosslets fitchee or; Orwey of Orwey and Ash
5: Barry of seven argent and sable.
6: Azure, six lions rampant argent crowned Gules, 3, 2, 1; Forde of Forde.
7: Argent, two chevrons sable (Esse/Ash of Ash); Esse or Ash of Ash.

Ewell

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 03 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Ewell. To the Treasurer and the Barons of the Exchequer. Whereas the king lately commanded them to put into execution all the writs of the late King pending in the exchequer, and although the late King commanded his treasurer and barons of the exchquer, at the supplication of the burgesses of Great Yarmouth, by his writ now in the exchequer, as the said burgesses assert, to allow them 1,000 marks in which the late king was bound to them for a loan in the time when John de Kirkeby was his treasurer, and 1,760l. for the arrears of the wages of divers men sent by them to the late King's command into Gascony for the expedition of this war and for remaining there for a great time, and also for 250l.which they expended, by the order of the late King, in the making of two galleys (galiarum) in the said town, and also 780l. for the wages of certain sailors and divers other costs expended by them at divers times for the expedition of the war in Scotland, to be allowed to them out of the debts owing by them to the said late King, as well as the tenth, eleventh, sixth, seventh, twentieth, and thirtieth granted by the community of the kingdom to the late King, as from other causes whatsoever; they are ordered to execute the said writs. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Gatton

On 07 Oct 1771 Charles Bennet 4th Earl Tankerville 1743-1822 (27) and Emma Colebrooke Countess Tankerville 1752-1836 (19) were married at Gatton. Emma Colebrooke Countess Tankerville 1752-1836 (19) by marriage Countess Tankerville (3C 1714).

Godstone

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 2d July 1649. I went from Wotton to Godstone (the residence of Sir John Evelyn (58)), where was also Sir John Evelyn of Wilts. (47), when I took leave of both Sir Johns and their ladies. Mem. the prodigious memory of Sir John of Wilts' (47) daughter, since married to Mr. W. Pierrepont [Note. Mr R Pierrepoint], and mother of the present Earl of Kingston. I returned to Sayes Court this night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 August. 3d August 1658. Went to Sir John Evelyn at Godstone. The place is excellent, but might be improved by turning some offices of the house, and removing the garden. The house being a noble fabric, though not comparable to what was first built by my uncle, who was master of all the powder mills.

John Evelyn's Diary 1659 November. 24th November, 1659. Sir John Evelyn [of Godstone] invited us to the forty-first wedding-day feast, where was much company of friends.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 October. 14th October, 1677. I went to church at Godstone, and to see old Sir John Evelyn's DORMITORY, joining to the church, paved with marble, where he and his Lady lie on a very stately monument at length; he in armor of white marble. The inscription is only an account of his particular branch of the family, on black marble.

Great Bookham

Before 17 Sep 1643 Francis Howard 5th Baron Howard 1643-1695 was born to Charles Howard 1615-1672 and Frances Courthope at Great Bookham. On 17 Sep 1643 Francis Howard 5th Baron Howard 1643-1695 was baptised at Great Bookham.

On 07 Jul 1651 Francis Howard 1585-1651 (65) died at Great Bookham.

In 1672 William Howard 1672- was born to William Howard 1616-1686 (56) at Great Bookham.

On 13 Aug 1684 Thomas Howard 1684-1753 was baptised at Great Bookham.

On 13 Mar 1702 Lodowick Howard 1632-1702 (69) died at Great Bookham.

On 31 Mar 1753 Thomas Howard 1684-1753 (68) died at 8 Savile Street, Savile Street, Savile Row. He was buried at Great Bookham.

Guildford

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. The distance from London little more than twenty miles, and yet so securely placed, as if it were one hundred; three miles from Dorking, which serves it abundantly with provision as well of land as sea; six from Guildford, twelve from Kingston. I will say nothing of the air, because the pre-eminence is universally given to Surrey, the soil being dry and sandy; but I should speak much of the gardens, fountains, and groves that adorn it, were they not as generally known to be among the most natural, and (till this later and universal luxury of the whole nation, since abounding in such expenses) the most magnificent that England afforded; and which indeed gave one of the first examples to that elegancy, since so much in vogue, and followed in the managing of their waters, and other elegancies of that nature. Let me add, the contiguity of five or six manors, the patronage of the livings about it, and what Themistocles pronounced for none of the least advantages—the good neighborhood. All which conspire here to render it an honorable and handsome royalty, fit for the present possessor, my worthy brother, and his noble lady, whose constant liberality gives them title both to the place and the affections of all that know them. Thus, with the poet:
Nescio quâ natale solum dulcedine cunctos
Ducit, et immemores non sinit esse sui.

Murder of Aelfred "Ætheling" Wessex by Godwinson

In 1036 Aelfred "Ætheling" Wessex 1005-1036 (31) returned to England where he and his men were met by Godwin Godwinson 1st Earl Kent, Earl Wessex 1001-1053 (35) at Guildford; ostensibly friendly. The following day, however, Godwin Godwinson 1st Earl Kent, Earl Wessex 1001-1053 (35) 's men attacked Aelfred's (31) men murdering most of them. Aelfred (31) was taken to Ely where he was blinded and died shortly thereafter.

14 Oct 1274. Letter XV. Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England to Robert Burnell Lord Chancellor. 14 Oct 1274. Note. The year could be 1274-1279. Letter XV. Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 (33) to Robert Burnell Lord Chancellor (35).
Eleanora, by God's grace qaeen of England, lady of Ireland, and duchess of Aquitaine to lord Robert Burnell, sends loving greeting.
We require and affectionately entreat you to give counsel and assistance to this affair, that the transgression injuriously committed against the bearer of these presents, the servant of the lady Constance1 our cousin, which Master John Painter Clarell will shew you, may be reasonably redressed. For the confidence which we have in your benevolence is the cause why we so often direct to you our prayers on behalf of our friends. And do you for love of us give such diligence in this affair, that we may henceforth be bound to you by special favour. Given at Guildford, xiiij day of October.
1. There is much discussion among historians as to which Constance is being referred to here. Also which Eleanor wrote the letter: Eleanor of Provence or Eleanor of Castile..

Around 1512 John Parkhurst Bishop of Norwich 1512-1575 was born in Guildford.

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 7th July 1640. My brother George (23) and I, understanding the peril my father (53) was in upon a sudden attack of his infirmity, rode post from Guildford toward him, and found him extraordinary weak; yet so as that, continuing his course, he held out till the 8th of September, when I returned home with him (53) in his litter.

John Evelyn's Diary 1699. 04 Oct 1699. My worthy brother (82) died at Wotton, in the 83d year of his age, of perfect memory and understanding. He was religious, sober, and temperate, and of so hospitable a nature, that no family in the county maintained that ancient custom of keeping, as it were, open house the whole year in the same manner, or gave more noble or free entertainment to the county on all occasions, so that his house was never free. There were sometimes twenty persons more than his family, and some that stayed there all the summer, to his no small expense; by this he gained the universal love of the county. He was born at Wotton, went from the free school at Guildford to Trinity College, Oxford, thence to the Middle Temple, as gentlemen of the best quality did, but without intention to study the law as a profession. He married the daughter of Colwall, of a worthy and ancient family in Leicestershire, by whom he had one son; she dying in 1643, left George her son an infant, who being educated liberally, after traveling abroad, returned and married one Mrs. Gore, by whom he had several children, but only three daughters survived. He was a young man of good understanding, but, over-indulging his ease and pleasure, grew so very corpulent, contrary to the constitution of the rest of his father's relations, that he died. My brother afterward married a noble and honorable lady, relict of Sir John Cotton, she being an Offley, a worthy and ancient Staffordshire family, by whom he had several children of both sexes. This lady died, leaving only two daughters and a son. The younger daughter died before marriage; the other afterward married Sir Cyril Wych (67), a noble and learned gentleman (son of Sir —— Wych), who had been Ambassador at Constantinople, and was afterward made one of the Lords Justices of Ireland. Before this marriage, her only brother married the daughter of —— Eversfield, of Sussex, of an honorable family, but left a widow without any child living; he died about 1691, and his wife not many years after, and my brother resettled the whole estate on me. His sister, Wych, had a portion of £6,000, to which was added £300 more; the three other daughters, with what I added, had about £5,000 each. My brother died on the 5th of October, in a good old age and great reputation, making his beloved daughter, Lady Wych, sole executrix, leaving me only his library and some pictures of my father, mother, etc. She buried him with extraordinary solemnity, rather as a nobleman than as a private gentleman. There were, as I computed, above 2,000 persons at the funeral, all the gentlemen of the county doing him the last honors. I returned to London, till my lady should dispose of herself and family.

East Horlsey, Guildford

Great Tangley Manor, Guildford

Times Newspaper Marriages. 21 Feb 1930. THE DUKE OF WESTMINSTER AND MISS PONSONBY. The marriage of the Duke of Westminster (50) and Miss Loelia Mary Ponsonby (28), daughter of Sir Frederick (62) and Lady Ponsonby, of Great Tangley Manor, Guildford, and St. James's Palace, took place at Prince's-row Register Office yesterday. Among those present were Mr. Winston Churchill (55), Lady Serena James (28), Mrs Walter Rubens, Colonel (65) and Mrs. Guy Wyndham, Captain and Mrs. Cowes, Mrs. Basil Kerr, 2ir. and Mrs. George Drunmaond, and AMr. and Mrs. Richard Guinness. The Duke and Duchess left for their honey- uoon in the Duke's steam yacht the Cutty i Sark, wlhich was moored at Deptford.

Holy Trinity Church

In 1636 Robert Parkhurst Lord Mayor 1569-1636 (67) died. He was buried at Holy Trinity Church.

Loseley Park, Guildford

Red Lion, Guildford

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 August. 22 Aug 1653. We all went to Guildford, to rejoice at the famous inn, the Red Lion, and to see the hospital, and the. Monument of Archbishop Abbot, the founder, who lies buried in the chapel of his endowment.

Sheere

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 July. 26 Jul 1677. I dined at Mr. Duncomb's, at Sheere, whose house stands environed with very sweet and quick streams.

St Nicholas' Church, Guildford

Loseley Chapel, St Nicholas' Church, Guildford

Around 06 Feb 1626 Robert More 1581-1626 (44) died. He was buried at Loseley Chapel, St Nicholas' Church, Guildford.

West Horsley

West Horsley Place

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 September. 14 Sep 1665. I went to Wotton; and on 16th September, to visit old Secretary Nicholas (72), being now at his new purchase of West Horsley, once mortgaged to me by Lord Viscount Montague (55): a pretty dry seat on the Down. Returned to Wotton.

Haling

On 20 Oct 1587 Robert Gage 1504-1587 (83) died at Haling.

On 29 Aug 1597 Henry Gage 1597-1645 was born to John Gage 1563- and Margaret Copley 1532- at Haling.

Henley Park

Kew

On 11 Jul 1818 William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (52) and Adelaide Saxe-Meiningen Queen Consort England (25) were married at Kew. Adelaide Saxe-Meiningen Queen Consort England (25) by marriage Duchess Clarence and St Andrews.

Around 1830. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (76). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

1830. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (52). Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (64).

Capel House, Kew

John Evelyn's Diary 1685 September. 05 Sep 1685. I accompanied his Lordship to Windsor (dining by the way at Sir Henry Capel's (47) at Kew), where his Ma* (51) receiving me with extra ordinary kindnesse, I kiss'd his hand. I told him how. sensible I was of his Ma*s (51) gracious favour to me, that I would endeavour to serve him with all sincerity, diligence, and loyalty, not more out of my duty than inclination. He said he doubted not of it, and was glad he had the opportunity to shew me the kindnesse he had for me. After this came aboundance of greate men to give me joy.

Kew Palace, Kew

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 August. 27th August 1678. I took leave of the Duke (50), and dined at Mr. Henry Bruncker's (51), at the Abbey of Sheene, formerly a monastery of Carthusians, there yet remaining one of their solitary cells with a cross. Within this ample inclosure are several pretty villas and fine gardens of the most excellent fruits, especially Sir William Temple's (lately Ambassador into Holland), and the Lord Lisle's (29), son to the Earl of Leicester (59), who has divers rare pictures, above all, that of Sir Brian Tuke's, by Holbein.
After dinner I walked to Ham, to see the house and garden of the Duke of Lauderdale (62), which is indeed inferior to few of the best villas in Italy itself; the house furnished like a great Prince's; the parterres, flower-gardens, orangeries, groves, avenues, courts, statues, perspectives, fountains, aviaries, and all this at the banks of the sweetest river in the world, must needs be admirable.
Hence, I went to my worthy friend, Sir Henry Capel (40) [at Kew], brother to the Earl of Essex (47); it is an old timber-house; but his garden has the choicest fruit of any plantation in England, as he is the most industrious and understanding in it.

On 11 Jul 1818 Edward Augustus Hanover 1st Duke Kent and Strathearn 1767-1820 (50) and Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (31) were married at Kew Palace, Kew.

In 1787 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (59). Portrait of Edward Augustus Hanover 1st Duke Kent and Strathearn 1767-1820 (19).

1835. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871 (42). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (48).

Around 1857. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (51). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (70).

Around 1832. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (31). Portrait of Marie Luise Victoria Saxe-Coburg-Gotha Duchess Kent and Strathearn 1786-1861 (45).

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 March. 24 Mar 1688. I went with Sir Charles Littleton (60) to Sheen, a house and estate given him by Lord Brounker; one who was ever noted for a hard, covetous, vicious man; but for his worldly craft and skill in gaming few exceeded him. Coming to die, he bequeathed all his land, house, furniture, etc., to Sir Charles (60), to whom he had no manner of relation, but an ancient friendship contracted at the famous siege of Colchester, forty years before. It is a pretty place, with fine gardens, and well planted, and given to one worthy of them, Sir Charles (60) being an honest gentleman and soldier. He is brother to Sir Henry Littleton (64) of Worcestershire, whose great estate he is likely to inherit, his brother being without children. They are descendants of the great lawyer of that name, and give the same arms and motto. He is married to one Mrs. Temple, formerly Maid of Honour to the late Queen (49), a beautiful lady, and he has many fine children, so that none envy his good fortune.
After dinner, we went to see Sir William Temple's near to it; the most remarkable things are his orangery and gardens, where the wall-fruit-trees are most exquisitely nailed and trained, far better than I ever noted.
There are many good pictures, especially of Vandyke's, in both these houses, and some few statues and small busts in the latter.
From thence to Kew, to visit Sir Henry Capel's (50), whose orangery and myrtetum are most beautiful and perfectly well kept. He was contriving very high palisadoes of reeds to shade his oranges during the summer, and painting those reeds in oil.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Royal Cottage, Kew

On 11 Mar 1916 Eliza Amelia Gore Countess Erroll 1829-1916 (87) died in Royal Cottage, Kew.

St Anne's Church, Kew

On 12 Jun 1866 Francis Teck 1837-1900 (28) and Princess Mary Adelaide Hanover 1833-1897 (32) were married at St Anne's Church, Kew.

Kingston Upon Thames

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. The distance from London little more than twenty miles, and yet so securely placed, as if it were one hundred; three miles from Dorking, which serves it abundantly with provision as well of land as sea; six from Guildford, twelve from Kingston. I will say nothing of the air, because the pre-eminence is universally given to Surrey, the soil being dry and sandy; but I should speak much of the gardens, fountains, and groves that adorn it, were they not as generally known to be among the most natural, and (till this later and universal luxury of the whole nation, since abounding in such expenses) the most magnificent that England afforded; and which indeed gave one of the first examples to that elegancy, since so much in vogue, and followed in the managing of their waters, and other elegancies of that nature. Let me add, the contiguity of five or six manors, the patronage of the livings about it, and what Themistocles pronounced for none of the least advantages—the good neighborhood. All which conspire here to render it an honorable and handsome royalty, fit for the present possessor, my worthy brother, and his noble lady, whose constant liberality gives them title both to the place and the affections of all that know them. Thus, with the poet:
Nescio quâ natale solum dulcedine cunctos
Ducit, et immemores non sinit esse sui.

After 14 May 1471 Thomas "Bastard of Fauconberg" Neville 1429-1471 made his way to Kingston Upon Thames to cross the river.

In 1841 George Edward Waldegrave 7th Earl Waldegrave 1816-1846 (24) was imprisoned for six months at Newgate Prison for having having drunkenly assaulted a police officer in Kingston Upon Thames. His wife Frances Braham Countess Waldegrave 1821-1879 (19) and servants joined him during his imprisonment.

On 05 Dec 1865 Everard Baring 1865-1932 was born to Edward Baring 1st Baron Revelstoke 1828-1897 (37) and Louisa Emily Charlotte Bulteel Baroness Revelstoke 1839-1892 (26) at Kingston Upon Thames.

Long Ditton

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. The place of my birth was Wotton, in the parish of Wotton, or Blackheath, in the county of Surrey, the then mansion-house of my father, left him by my grandfather, afterward and now my eldest brother's. It is situated in the most southern part of the shire; and, though in a valley, yet really upon part of Leith Hill, one of the most eminent in England for the prodigious prospect to be seen from its summit, though by few observed. From it may be discerned twelve or thirteen counties, with part of the sea on the coast of Sussex, in a serene day. The house is large and ancient, suitable to those hospitable times, and so sweetly environed with those delicious streams and venerable woods, as in the judgment of strangers as well as Englishmen it may be compared to one of the most pleasant seats in the nation, and most tempting for a great person and a wanton purse to render it conspicuous. It has rising grounds, meadows, woods, and water, in abundance.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. Of Evelyn's attempt to bring Colonel Morley (Cromwell's Lieutenant of the Tower, immediately preceding the Restoration) over to the King's interest, an imperfect account is given in the "Biographia." The fact is, that there was great friendship between these gentlemen, and Evelyn did endeavor to engage the Colonel in the King's interest. He saw him several times, and put his life into his hands by writing to him on 12th January 1659-60; he did not succeed, and Colonel Morley was too much his friend to betray him; but so far from the Colonel having settled matters privately with Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper, or General Monk, as there described, he was obliged, when the Restoration took place, actually to apply to Evelyn to procure his pardon; who obtained it accordingly, though, as he states, the Colonel was obliged to pay a large sum of money for it. This could not have happened, if there had been any previous negotiation with General Monk.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. Evelyn's Diary practically begins where many think he had no business to be diarising, beyond the seas. The position of a loyalist who solaces himself in Italy while his King is fighting for his crown certainly requires explanation: it may be sufficient apology for Evelyn that without the family estates he could be of no great service to the King, and that these, lying near London, were actually in the grasp of the Parliament. He was also but one of a large family and it was doubtless convenient that one member should be out of harm's way. His three years' absence (1643-6) has certainly proved advantageous to posterity. Evelyn is, indeed, a mere sight-seer, but this renders his tour a precise record of the objects which the sight-seer of the seventeenth century was expected to note, and a mirror not only of the taste but of the feeling of the time. There is no cult of anything, but there is curiosity about everything; there is no perception of the sentiment of a landscape, but real enjoyment of the landscape itself; antiquity is not unappreciated, but modern works impart more real pleasure. Of the philosophical reflections which afterward rose to the mind of Gibbon there is hardly a vestige, and of course Evelyn is at an immeasurable distance from Byron and De Staël. But he gives us exactly what we want, the actual attitude of a cultivated young Englishman in presence of classic and renaissance art with its background of Southern nature. We may register without undue self-complacency a great development of the modern world in the æsthetical region of the intellect, which implies many other kinds of progress. It is interesting to compare with Evelyn's narrative the chapters recording the visit to Italy supposed to have been made at this very period by John Inglesant, who inevitably sees with the eyes of the nineteenth century. Evelyn's casual remarks on foreign manners and institutions display good sense, without extraordinary insight; in description he is frequently observant and graphic, as in his account of the galley slaves, and of Venetian female costumes. He naturally regards Alpine scenery as "melancholy and troublesome.".

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. Museums, nevertheless, have their uses, and Evelyn's comparatively jejune record has laid us under no small obligation. But for Pepys's amazing indiscretion and garrulity, qualities of which one cannot have too little in life, or too much in the record of it, Evelyn would have been esteemed the first diarist of his age. Unable for want of these qualifications to draw any adequate picture of the stirring life around him, he has executed at least one portrait admirably, his own. The likeness is, moreover, valuable, as there is every reason to suppose it typical, and representative of a very important class of society, the well-bred and well-conducted section of the untitled aristocracy of England. We may well believe that these men were not only the salt but the substance of their order. There was an ill-bred section exclusively devoted to festivity and sport. There was an ill-conducted section, plunged into the dissipations of court life. But the majority were men like Evelyn: not, perhaps, equally refined by culture and travel, or equally interested in literary research and scientific experiment, but well informed and polite; no strangers to the Court, yet hardly to be called courtiers, and preferring country to town; loyal to Church and King but not fanatical or rancorous; as yet but slightly imbued with the principles of civil and religious liberty, yet adverse to carry the dogma of divine right further than the right of succession; fortunate in having survived all ideas of serfdom or vassalage, and in having few private interests not fairly reconcilable with the general good. Evelyn was made to be the spokesman of such a class, and, meaning to speak only for himself, he delivers its mind concerning the Commonwealth and the Restoration, the conduct of the later Stuart Kings and the Revolution.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. October, 1699, his elder brother, George Evelyn, dying without male issue, aged eighty-three, he succeeded to the paternal estate; and in May following, he quitted Sayes Court and went to Wotton, where he passed the remainder of his life, with the exception of occasional visits to London, where he retained a house. In the great storm of 1703, he mentions in his last edition of the "Sylva," above one thousand trees were blown down in sight of his residence.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. From the numerous authors who have spoken in high terms of Mr. Evelyn, we will select the two following notices of him.
In the "Biographia Britannica" Dr. Campbell says, "It is certain that very few authors who have written in our language deserve the character of able and agreeable writers so well as Mr. Evelyn, who, though he was acquainted with most sciences, and wrote upon many different subjects, yet was very far, indeed the farthest of most men of his time, from being a superficial writer. He had genius, he had taste, he had learning; and he knew how to give all these a proper place in his works, so as never to pass for a pedant, even with such as were least in love with literature, and to be justly esteemed a polite author by those who knew it best."
Horace Walpole (afterward Earl of Orford), in his Catalogue of Engravers, gives us the following admirably drawn character: "If Mr. Evelyn had not been an artist himself, as I think I can prove he was, I should yet have found it difficult to deny myself the pleasure of allotting him a place among the arts he loved, promoted, patronized; and it would be but justice to inscribe his name with due panegyric in these records, as I have once or twice taken the liberty to criticise him. But they are trifling blemishes compared with his amiable virtues and beneficence; and it may be remarked that the worst I have said of him is, that he knew more than he always communicated. It is no unwelcome satire to say, that a man's intelligence and philosophy is inexhaustible. I mean not to write his biography, but I must observe, that his life, which was extended to eighty-six years, was a course of inquiry, study, curiosity, instruction, and benevolence. The works of the Creator, and the minute labors of the creature, were all objects of his pursuit. He unfolded the perfection of the one, and assisted the imperfection of the other. He adored from examination; was a courtier that flattered only by informing his Prince, and by pointing out what was worthy of him to countenance; and really was the neighbor of the Gospel, for there was no man that might not have been the better for him. Whoever peruses a list of his works will subscribe to my assertion. He was one of the first promoters of the Royal Society; a patron of the ingenious and the indigent; and peculiarly serviceable to the lettered world; for, besides his writings and discoveries, he obtained the Arundelian Marbles for the University of Oxford, and the Arundelian Library for the Royal Society. Nor is it the least part of his praise, that he who proposed to Mr. Boyle the erection of a Philosophical College for retired and speculative persons, had the honesty to write in defense of active life against Sir George Mackenzie's 'Essay on Solitude.' He knew that retirement, in his own hands, was industry and benefit to mankind; but in those of others, laziness and inutility.".

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. The place of my birth was Wotton, in the parish of Wotton, or Blackheath, in the county of Surrey, the then mansion-house of my father, left him by my grandfather, afterward and now my eldest brother's. It is situated in the most southern part of the shire; and, though in a valley, yet really upon part of Leith Hill, one of the most eminent in England for the prodigious prospect to be seen from its summit, though by few observed. From it may be discerned twelve or thirteen counties, with part of the sea on the coast of Sussex, in a serene day. The house is large and ancient, suitable to those hospitable times, and so sweetly environed with those delicious streams and venerable woods, as in the judgment of strangers as well as Englishmen it may be compared to one of the most pleasant seats in the nation, and most tempting for a great person and a wanton purse to render it conspicuous. It has rising grounds, meadows, woods, and water, in abundance.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. The place of my birth was Wotton, in the parish of Wotton, or Blackheath, in the county of Surrey, the then mansion-house of my father, left him by my grandfather, afterward and now my eldest brother's. It is situated in the most southern part of the shire; and, though in a valley, yet really upon part of Leith Hill, one of the most eminent in England for the prodigious prospect to be seen from its summit, though by few observed. From it may be discerned twelve or thirteen counties, with part of the sea on the coast of Sussex, in a serene day. The house is large and ancient, suitable to those hospitable times, and so sweetly environed with those delicious streams and venerable woods, as in the judgment of strangers as well as Englishmen it may be compared to one of the most pleasant seats in the nation, and most tempting for a great person and a wanton purse to render it conspicuous. It has rising grounds, meadows, woods, and water, in abundance.

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 November. 16th November, 1676. My son and I dining at my Lord Chamberlain's, he showed us among others that incomparable piece of Raphael's, being a Minister of State dictating to Guicciardini, the earnestness of whose face looking up in expectation of what he was next to write, is so to the life, and so natural, as I esteem it one of the choicest pieces of that admirable artist. There was a woman's head of Leonardo da Vinci; a Madonna of old Palma, and two of Vandyke's, of which one was his own picture at length, when young, in a leaning posture; the other, an eunuch, singing. Rare pieces indeed!.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. Evelyn was buried in the Dormitory adjoining Wotton Church.
On a white marble, covering a tomb shaped like a coffin, raised about three feet above the floor, is inscribed:

Here lies the Body
of John Evelyn, Esq,
of this place, second son
of Richard Evelyn, Esq;
who having serv'd the Publick
in several employments, of which that
of Commissioner of the Privy-Seal in the
Reign of King James the 2d was most
honourable, and perpetuated his fame
by far more lasting monuments than
those of Stone or Brass, his learned
and usefull Works, fell asleep the 27 day
of February 1705-6, being the 86 year
of his age, in full hope of a glorious
Resurrection, thro' Faith in Jesus Christ.
Living in an age of extraordinary
Events and Revolutions, he learnt
(as himself asserted) this Truth,
which pursuant to his intention
is here declared—
That all is vanity which is not honest,
and that there is no solid wisdom
but in real Piety.
Of five Sons and three Daughters
born to him from his most
vertuous and excellent Wife,
Mary, sole daughter and heiress
of Sir Rich. Browne of Sayes
Court near Deptford in Kent,
onely one daughter, Susanna,
married to William Draper
Esq, of Adscomb in this
County, survived him; the
two others dying in the
flower of their age, and
all the Sons very young, except
one named John, who
deceased 24 March 1698-9,
in the 45 year of his age,
leaving one son, John, and
one daughter, Elizabeth.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. As to his answer to Sir George Mackenzie's panegyric on Solitude, in which Mr. Evelyn takes the opposite part and urges the preference to which public employment and an active life is entitled,—it may be considered as the playful essay of one who, for the sake of argument, would controvert another's position, though in reality agreeing with his own opinion; if we think him serious in two letters to Mr. Abraham Cowley, dated 12th March and 24th August 1666, in the former of which he writes: You had reason to be astonished at the presumption, not to name it affront, that I, who have so highly celebrated recess, and envied it in others, should become an advocate for the enemy, which of all others it abhors and flies from. I conjure you to believe that I am still of the same mind, and that there is no person alive who does more honor and breathe after the life and repose you so happily cultivate and advance by your example; but, as those who praised dirt, a flea, and the gout, so have I public employment in that trifling Essay, and that in so weak a style compared with my antagonist's, as by that alone it will appear I neither was nor could be serious, and I hope you believe I speak my very soul to you.
'Sunt enim Musis sua ludicra mista Camœnis
Otia sunt——'
In the other, he says, "I pronounce it to you from my heart as oft as I consider it, that I look on your fruitions with inexpressible emulation, and should think myself more happy than crowned heads, were I, as you, the arbiter of mine own life, and could break from those gilded toys to taste your well-described joys with such a wife and such a friend, whose conversation exceeds all that the mistaken world calls happiness." But, in truth, Mr. Evelyn's mind was too active to admit of solitude at all times, however desirable it might appear to him in theory.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

Before 1651 Jane Evelyn -1651 died in childbirth.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. It may be not altogether incurious to observe, that though Mr. Evelyn's father was a man of very considerable fortune, the first rudiments of this son's learning were acquired from the village schoolmaster over the porch of Wotton Church. Of his progress at another school, and at college, he himself speaks with great humility; nor did he add much to his stock of knowledge, while he resided in the Middle Temple, to which his father sent him, with the intention that he should apply to what he calls "an impolished study," which he says he never liked.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. It may be not altogether incurious to observe, that though Mr. Evelyn's father was a man of very considerable fortune, the first rudiments of this son's learning were acquired from the village schoolmaster over the porch of Wotton Church. Of his progress at another school, and at college, he himself speaks with great humility; nor did he add much to his stock of knowledge, while he resided in the Middle Temple, to which his father sent him, with the intention that he should apply to what he calls "an impolished study," which he says he never liked.

John Evelyn's Diary 1699. Jan 1699. My cousin Pierrepoint died. She was daughter to Sir John Evelyn, of Wilts, my father's nephew; she was widow to William Pierrepoint, brother to the Marquis of Dorchester, and mother to Evelyn Pierrepoint, Earl of Kingston; a most excellent and prudent lady.
The House of Commons persist in refusing more than 7,000 men to be a standing army, and no strangers to be in the number. This displeased the Court party. Our county member, Sir R. Onslow, opposed it also; which might reconcile him to the people, who began to suspect him.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. Dr. Campbell took some pains to vindicate Mr. Evelyn's book, entitled, "Navigation and Commerce, their Origin and Progress," from the charge of being an imperfect work, unequal to the expectation excited by the title. But the Doctor, who had not the information which this Journal so amply affords on this subject, was not aware that what was so printed was nothing more than an Introduction to the History of the Dutch War; a work undertaken by Evelyn at the express command of King Charles II., and the materials for which were furnished by the Officers of State. The completion of this work, after considerable progress had been made in it, was put a stop to by the King himself, for what reason does not appear; but perhaps it was found that Evelyn was inclined to tell too much of the truth concerning a transaction, which it will be seen by his Journal that he utterly reprobated. His copy of the History, as far as he had proceeded, he put into the hands of his friend, Mr. Pepys, of the Admiralty, who did not return it; but the books and manuscripts belonging to Mr. Pepys passed into the possession of Magdalen College, Cambridge.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. Evelyn lived in the busy and important times of King Charles I, Oliver Cromwell, King Charles II., King James II., and King William, and early accustomed himself to note such things as occurred, which he thought worthy of remembrance. He was known to, and had much personal intercourse with, the Kings Charles II. and James II.; and he was in habits of great intimacy with many of the ministers of these two monarchs, and with many of the eminent men of those days, as well among the clergy as the laity. Foreigners distinguished for learning, or arts, who came to England, did not leave it without visiting him.
The following pages contribute extensive and important particulars of this eminent man. They show that he did not travel merely to count steeples, as he expresses himself in one of his Letters: they develop his private character as one of the most amiable kind. With a strong predilection for monarchy, with a personal attachment to Kings Charles II. and James II., formed when they resided at Paris, he was yet utterly averse to the arbitrary measures of these monarchs.
Strongly and steadily attached to the doctrine and practice of the Church of England, he yet felt the most liberal sentiments for those who differed from him in opinion. He lived in intimacy with men of all persuasions; nor did he think it necessary to break connection with anyone who had ever been induced to desert the Church of England, and embrace the doctrines of that of Rome. In writing to the brother of a gentleman thus circumstanced, in 1659, he expresses himself in this admirable manner: "For the rest, we must commit to Providence the success of times and mitigation of proselytical fervors; having for my own particular a very great charity for all who sincerely adore the Blessed Jesus, our common and dear Saviour, as being full of hope that God (however the present zeal of some, and the scandals taken by others at the instant [present] affliction of the Church of England may transport them) will at last compassionate our infirmities, clarify our judgments, and make abatement for our ignorances, superstructures, passions, and errors of corrupt times and interests, of which the Romish persuasion can no way acquit herself, whatever the present prosperity and secular polity may pretend. But God will make all things manifest in his own time, only let us possess ourselves in patience and charity. This will cover a multitude of imperfections.".

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. My father, named Richard, was of a sanguine complexion, mixed with a dash of choler: his hair inclining to light, which, though exceedingly thick, became hoary by the time he had attained to thirty years of age; it was somewhat curled toward the extremities; his beard, which he wore a little peaked, as the mode was, of a brownish color, and so continued to the last, save that it was somewhat mingled with gray hairs about his cheeks, which, with his countenance, were clear and fresh-colored; his eyes extraordinary quick and piercing; an ample forehead,—in sum, a very well-composed visage and manly aspect: for the rest, he was but low of stature, yet very strong. He was, for his life, so exact and temperate, that I have heard he had never been surprised by excess, being ascetic and sparing. His wisdom was great, and his judgment most acute; of solid discourse, affable, humble, and in nothing affected; of a thriving, neat, silent, and methodical genius, discreetly severe, yet liberal upon all just occasions, both to his children, to strangers, and servants; a lover of hospitality; and, in brief, of a singular and Christian moderation in all his actions; not illiterate, nor obscure, as, having continued Justice of the Peace and of the Quorum, he served his country as High Sheriff, being, as I take it, the last dignified with that office for Sussex and Surrey together, the same year, before their separation. He was yet a studious decliner of honors and titles; being already in that esteem with his country, that they could have added little to him besides their burden. He was a person of that rare conversation that, upon frequent recollection, and calling to mind passages of his life and discourse, I could never charge him with the least passion, or inadvertency. His estate was esteemed about £4000 per annum, well wooded, and full of timber.

John Evelyn's Diary 1694 May. Lord Falkland, grandson to the learned Lord Falkland, Secretary of State to King Charles I., and slain in his service, died now of the smallpox. He was a pretty, brisk, understanding, industrious young gentleman; had formerly been faulty, but now much reclaimed; had also the good luck to marry a very great fortune, besides being entitled to a vast sum, his share of the Spanish wreck, taken up at the expense of divers adventurers. From a Scotch Viscount he was made an English Baron, designed Ambassador for Holland; had been Treasurer of the Navy, and advancing extremely in the new Court. All now gone in a moment, and I think the title is extinct. I know not whether the estate devolves to my cousin Carew. It was at my Lord Falkland's, whose lady importuned us to let our daughter be with her some time, so that that dear child took the same infection, which cost her valuable life.

John Evelyn's Diary 1699. Jan 1699. My cousin Pierrepoint died. She was daughter to Sir John Evelyn, of Wilts, my father's nephew; she was widow to William Pierrepoint, brother to the Marquis of Dorchester, and mother to Evelyn Pierrepoint, Earl of Kingston; a most excellent and prudent lady.
The House of Commons persist in refusing more than 7,000 men to be a standing army, and no strangers to be in the number. This displeased the Court party. Our county member, Sir R. Onslow, opposed it also; which might reconcile him to the people, who began to suspect him.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. There is little else in the Diary equally striking, though Evelyn's description of Whitehall on the eve of the death of Charles the Second ranks among the memorable passages of the language. It is nevertheless full of interesting anecdotes and curious notices, especially of the scientific research which, in default of any adequate public organization, was in that age more efficaciously promoted by students than by professors. De Quincey censures Evelyn for omitting to record the conversation of the men with whom he associated, but he does not consider that the Diary in its present shape is a digest of memoranda made long previously, and that time failed at one period and memory at the other. De Quincey, whose extreme acuteness was commonly evinced on the negative side of a question, saw the weak points of the Diary upon its first publication much more clearly than his contemporaries did, and was betrayed into illiberality by resentment at what he thought its undeserved vogue. Evelyn has in truth been fortunate; his record, which his contemporaries would have neglected, appeared (1818) just in time to be a precursor of the Anglican movement, a tendency evinced in a similar fashion by the vindication, no doubt mistaken, of the Caroline authorship of the "Icon Basilike." Evelyn was a welcome encounter to men of this cast of thought, and was hailed as a model of piety, culture, and urbanity, without sufficient consideration of his deficiencies as a loyalist and a patriot. It also conduced to his reputation that all his other writings should have virtually perished except his "Sylva," like his Diary a landmark in the history of improvement, though in a widely different department. But for his lack of diplomatic talent, he might be compared with an eminent and much applauded, but in our times somewhat decrescent, contemporary, Sir William Temple. Both these eminent persons would have aroused a warmer feeling in posterity, and have effected more for its instruction and entertainment, if they could occasionally have dashed their dignity with an infusion of the grotesqueness, we will not say of Pepys, but of Roger North. To them, however, their dignity was their character, and although we could have wished them a larger measure of geniality, we must feel indebted to them for their preservation of a refined social type.

Richard Garnett.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. Mr. Evelyn's employment as a Commissioner for the care of the Sick and Wounded was very laborious; and, from the nature of it, must have been extremely unpleasant. Almost the whole labor was in his department, which included all the ports between the river Thames and Portsmouth; and he had to travel in all seasons and weathers, by land and by water, in the execution of his office, to which he gave the strictest attention. It was rendered still more disagreeable by the great difficulty which he found in procuring money for support of the prisoners. In the library at Wotton, are copies of numerous letters to the Lord Treasurer and Officers of State, representing, in the strongest terms, the great distress of the poor men, and of those who had furnished lodging and necessaries for them. At one time, there were such arrears of payment to the victuallers, that, on landing additional sick and wounded, they lay some time in the streets, the publicans refusing to receive them, and shutting up their houses. After all this trouble and fatigue, he found as great difficulty in getting his accounts settled.2 In January 1665-6, he formed a plan for an Infirmary at Chatham, which he sent to Mr. Pepys, to be laid before the Admiralty, with his reasons for recommending it; but it does not appear that it was carried into execution.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. Of Evelyn's children, a son, who died at the age of five, and a daughter, who died at the age of nineteen, were almost prodigies. The particulars of their extraordinary endowments, and the profound manner in which he was affected at their deaths, may be seen in these volumes.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. His grandfather, George, was not the first of the family who settled in Surrey. John, father of this George, was of Kingston, in 1520, and married a daughter of David Vincent, Esq, Lord of the Manor of Long Ditton, near Kingston, which afterward came in the hands of George, who there carried on the manufacture of gunpowder. He purchased very considerable estates in Surrey, and three of his sons became heads of three families, viz, Thomas, his eldest son, at Long Ditton; John, at Godstone, and Richard at Wotton. Each of these three families had the title of Baronet conferred on them at different times, viz, at Godstone, in 1660; Long Ditton, in 1683; and Wotton, in 1713.
The manufacture of gunpowder was carried on at Godstone as well as at Long Ditton; but it does not appear that there ever was any mill at Wotton, or that the purchase of that place was made with such a view.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. The two chief diarists of the age of Charles the Second are, mutatis mutandis, not ill characterized by the remark of a wicked wit upon the brothers Austin. "John Austin," it was said, "served God and died poor: Charles Austin served the devil, and died rich. Both were clever fellows. Charles was much the cleverer of the two." Thus John Evelyn and Samuel Pepys, the former a perfect model of decorum, the latter a grievous example of indecorum, have respectively left us diaries, of which the indecorous is to the decorous as a zoölogical garden is to a museum: while the disparity between the testamentary bequests of the two Austins but imperfectly represents the reputation standing to Pepys's account with posterity in comparison with that accruing to his sedate and dignified contemporary.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. Evelyn's memoirs thus possess a value far exceeding the modest measure of worth allowed them by De Quincey: "They are useful as now and then enabling one to fix the date of a particular event, but for little besides." The Diary's direct contribution to historical accuracy is insignificant; it is an index, not to chronological minutiæ, but to the general progress of moral and political improvement. The editor of 1857 certainly goes too far in asserting that "All that might have been excluded from the range of his opinions, his feelings and sympathies embraced"; but it is interesting to observe the gradual widening of Evelyn's sympathies with good men of all parties, and to find him in his latter days criticising the evidence produced in support of the Popish Plot on the one hand, and deploring the just condemnation of Algernon Sydney on the other. It is true that, so far as the sufferings of his country are concerned, his attitude is rather that of the Levite than of the Samaritan; but more lively popular sympathies would have destroyed the peculiar value attaching to the testimony of the reluctant witness. We should, for example, have thought little of such a passage as the following from the pen of Burnet, from Evelyn it is significant indeed:—
October 14, 1688. The King's birthday. No guns from the Tower as usual. The sun eclipsed at its rising. This day signal for the victory of William the Conqueror against Harold, near Battel in Sussex. The wind, which had been hitherto west, was east all this day. Wonderful expectation of the Dutch fleet. Public prayers ordered to be read in the churches against invasion.
It might be difficult to produce a nearer approximation in secular literature to Daniel's "Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin.".

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. Returned to England, Evelyn strictly follows the line of the average English country gentleman, execrating the execution of Charles I., disgusted beyond measure with the suppression of the Church of England service, but submissive to the powers that be until there are evident indications of a change, which he promotes in anything but a Quixotic spirit. Although he is sincerely attached to the monarchy, the condition of the Church is evidently a matter of greater concern to him: Oliver Cromwell would have done much to reconcile the royalists to his government, had it been possible for him to have restored the liturgy and episcopacy. The same lesson is to be derived from his demeanor during the reigns of Charles and James. The exultation with which the Restoration is at first hailed soon evaporates. The scandals of the Court are an offense, notwithstanding Evelyn's personal attachment to the King. But the chief point is not vice or favoritism or mismanagement, but alliances with Roman Catholic powers against Protestant nations. Evelyn is enraged to see Charles missing the part so clearly pointed out to him by Providence as the protector of the Protestant religion all over Europe. The conversion of the Duke of York is a fearful blow, James's ecclesiastical policy after his accession adds to Evelyn's discontent day by day, while political tyranny passes almost without remark. At last the old cavalier is glad to welcome the Prince of Orange as deliverer, and though he has no enthusiasm for William in his character as King, he remains his dutiful subject. Just because Evelyn was by no means an extraordinary person, he represents the plain straightforward sense of the English gentry. The questions of the seventeenth century were far more religious than political. The synthesis "Church and King" expressed the dearest convictions of the great majority of English country families, but when the two became incompatible they left no doubt which held the first place in their hearts. They acted instinctively on the principle of the Persian lady who preferred her brother to her husband. It was not impossible to find a new King, but there was no alternative to the English Church.

John Evelyn's Diary Editor's Introduction. When the Czar of Muscovy came to England, in 1698, proposing to instruct himself in the art of shipbuilding, he was desirous of having the use of Sayes Court, in consequence of its vicinity to the King's dockyard at Deptford. This was conceded; but during his stay he did so much damage that Mr. Evelyn had an allowance of £150 for it. He especially regrets the mischief done to his famous holly hedge, which might have been thought beyond the reach of damage. But one of Czar Peter's favorite recreations had been to demolish the hedges by riding through them in a wheelbarrow.

Around 1530 George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 was born to John Evelyn of Kingston.

In 1551 Thomas Evelyn of Long Ditton 1551- was born to George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (21).

In 1551 Thomas Evelyn of Long Ditton 1551- was born to George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (21).

In 1555 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 was born to George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (25).

In 1555 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 was born to George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (25).

On or before 20 Aug 1581 George Evelyn of West Dean 1581-1664 was born to John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (26). He was baptised 20 Aug 1581.

On or before 20 Aug 1581 George Evelyn of West Dean 1581-1664 was born to John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (26). He was baptised 20 Aug 1581.

In 1587 Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 was born to George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (57).

In 1587 Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 was born to George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (57).

On 12 Aug 1587 Thomas Evelyn 1587-1659 was born to Thomas Evelyn of Long Ditton 1551-.

On 12 Aug 1587 Thomas Evelyn 1587-1659 was born to Thomas Evelyn of Long Ditton 1551-.

In 1591 John Evelyn 1591-1664 was born to John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (36).

In 1591 John Evelyn 1591-1664 was born to John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (36).

On 11 Aug 1601 John Evelyn of Wiltshire 1601-1685 was born to George Evelyn of West Dean 1581-1664 (19).

On 11 Aug 1601 John Evelyn of Wiltshire 1601-1685 was born to George Evelyn of West Dean 1581-1664 (19).

On 30 May 1603 George Evelyn of Long Ditton 1530-1603 (73) died.

In 1614 Elizabeth Evelyn 1614-1634 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (27) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (15).

In 1614 Elizabeth Evelyn 1614-1634 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (27) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (15).

Before 18 Jun 1617 Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 were married.

On 18 Jun 1617 George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (30) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (18).

On 18 Jun 1617 George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (30) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (18).

On 31 Oct 1620 John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (33) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. I was born at Wotton, in the County of Surrey, about twenty minutes past two in the morning, being on Tuesday the 31st and last of October, 1620, after my father (33) had been married about seven years, and that my mother (21) had borne him three children; viz, two daughters and one son, about the 33d year of his age, and the 23d of my mother's.

On 31 Oct 1620 John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (33) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (21).

On 09 Nov 1622 Richard Evelyn 1622-1670 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (35) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (23).

On 09 Nov 1622 Richard Evelyn 1622-1670 was born to Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (35) and Eleanor Stansfield 1598-1635 (23).

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 1623. The very first thing that I can call to memory, and from which time forward I began to observe, was this year (1623) my youngest brother, being in his nurse's arms, who, being then two days and nine months younger than myself, was the last child of my dear parents.

1625 Plague

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 1625. I was this year (being the first of the reign of King Charles (24)) sent by my father (38) to Lewes, in Sussex, to be with my grandfather, Standsfield (58), with whom I passed my childhood. This was the year in which the pestilence was so epidemical, that there died in London 5,000 a week, and I well remember the strict watches and examinations upon the ways as we passed; and I was shortly after so dangerously sick of a fever that (as I have heard) the physicians despaired of me.

On 25 Jan 1626 Edward Evelyn 1st Baronet Long Ditton 1626-1692 was born to Thomas Evelyn 1587-1659 (38).

On 25 Jan 1626 Edward Evelyn 1st Baronet Long Ditton 1626-1692 was born to Thomas Evelyn 1587-1659 (38).

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (72) died at West Dean. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church.

On Feb 1630 Elizabeth Evelyn -1630 died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 21st October, 1632. My eldest sister (18) was married to Edward Darcy, Esq, who little deserved so excellent a person, a woman of so rare virtue. I was not present at the nuptials; but I was soon afterward sent for into Surrey, and my father (45) would willingly have weaned me from my fondness of my too indulgent grandmother, intending to have placed me at Eton College; but, not being so provident for my own benefit, and unreasonably terrified with the report of the severe discipline there, I was sent back to Lewes; which perverseness of mine I have since a thousand times deplored. This was the first time that ever my parents had seen all their children together in prosperity. While I was now trifling at home, I saw London, where I lay one night only. The next day, I dined at Beddington, where I was much delighted with the gardens and curiosities. Thence, we returned to the Baroness Darcy's (18), at Sutton; thence to Wotton; and, on the 16th of August following, 1633, back to Lewes.

Around 21 Oct 1632 Edward Darcy and Elizabeth Evelyn 1614-1634 (18) were married.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 21st October, 1632. My eldest sister (18) was married to Edward Darcy, Esq, who little deserved so excellent a person, a woman of so rare virtue. I was not present at the nuptials; but I was soon afterward sent for into Surrey, and my father (45) would willingly have weaned me from my fondness of my too indulgent grandmother, intending to have placed me at Eton College; but, not being so provident for my own benefit, and unreasonably terrified with the report of the severe discipline there, I was sent back to Lewes; which perverseness of mine I have since a thousand times deplored. This was the first time that ever my parents had seen all their children together in prosperity. While I was now trifling at home, I saw London, where I lay one night only. The next day, I dined at Beddington, where I was much delighted with the gardens and curiosities. Thence, we returned to the Baroness Darcy's (18), at Sutton; thence to Wotton; and, on the 16th of August following, 1633, back to Lewes.

On 12 Mar 1633 John Evelyn 1st Baronet of Godstone 1633-1671 was born to John Evelyn 1591-1664 (42).

On 12 Mar 1633 John Evelyn 1st Baronet of Godstone 1633-1671 was born to John Evelyn 1591-1664 (42).

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 15th December, 1634: My dear sister, Darcy, departed this life, being arrived to her 20th year of age; in virtue advanced beyond her years, or the merit of her husband, the worst of men. She had been brought to bed the 2d of June before, but the infant died soon after her, the 24th of December. I was therefore sent for home the second time, to celebrate the obsequies of my sister (20); who was interred in a very honorable manner in our dormitory joining to the parish church, where now her monument stands.

On 15 Dec 1634 Elizabeth Evelyn 1614-1634 (20) died. She was buried in St John's Church, Wotton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 1635. But my dear mother (36) being now dangerously sick, I was, on the 3d of September following, sent for to Wotton. Whom I found so far spent, that, all human assistance failing, she in a most heavenly manner departed this life upon the 29th of the same month, about eight in the evening of Michaelmas-day. It was a malignant fever which took her away, about the 37th of her age, and 22d of her marriage, to our irreparable loss and the regret of all that knew her. Certain it is, that the visible cause of her indisposition proceeded from grief upon the loss of her daughter, and the infant that followed it; and it is as certain, that when she perceived the peril whereto its excess had engaged her, she strove to compose herself and allay it; but it was too late, and she was forced to succumb. Therefore summoning all her children then living (I shall never forget it), she expressed herself in a manner so heavenly, with instructions so pious and Christian, as made us strangely sensible of the extraordinary loss then imminent; after which, embracing every one of us she gave to each a ring with her blessing and dismissed us. Then, taking my father (48) by the hand, she recommended us to his care; and, because she was extremely zealous for the education of my younger brother (12), she requested my father (48) that he might be sent with me to Lewes; and so having importuned him that what he designed to bestow on her funeral, he would rather dispose among the poor, she labored to compose herself for the blessed change which she now expected. There was not a servant in the house whom she did not expressly send for, advise, and infinitely affect with her counsel. Thus she continued to employ her intervals, either instructing her relations, or preparing of herself.
Though her physicians, Dr. Meverell, Dr. Clement, and Dr. Rand, had given over all hopes of her recovery, and Sir Sanders Duncombe (65) had tried his celebrated and famous powder, yet she was many days impairing, and endured the sharpest conflicts of her sickness with admirable patience and most Christian resignation, retaining both her intellectuals and ardent affections for her dissolution, to the very article of her departure. When near her dissolution, she laid her hand on every one of her children; and taking solemn leave of my father (48), with elevated heart and eyes, she quietly expired, and resigned her soul to God. Thus ended that prudent and pious woman, in the flower of her age, to the inconsolable affliction of her husband, irreparable loss of her children, and universal regret of all that knew her. She was interred, as near as might be, to her daughter Darcy, the 3d of October, at night, but with no mean ceremony.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 1635. But my dear mother (36) being now dangerously sick, I was, on the 3d of September following, sent for to Wotton. Whom I found so far spent, that, all human assistance failing, she in a most heavenly manner departed this life upon the 29th of the same month, about eight in the evening of Michaelmas-day. It was a malignant fever which took her away, about the 37th of her age, and 22d of her marriage, to our irreparable loss and the regret of all that knew her. Certain it is, that the visible cause of her indisposition proceeded from grief upon the loss of her daughter, and the infant that followed it; and it is as certain, that when she perceived the peril whereto its excess had engaged her, she strove to compose herself and allay it; but it was too late, and she was forced to succumb. Therefore summoning all her children then living (I shall never forget it), she expressed herself in a manner so heavenly, with instructions so pious and Christian, as made us strangely sensible of the extraordinary loss then imminent; after which, embracing every one of us she gave to each a ring with her blessing and dismissed us. Then, taking my father (48) by the hand, she recommended us to his care; and, because she was extremely zealous for the education of my younger brother (12), she requested my father (48) that he might be sent with me to Lewes; and so having importuned him that what he designed to bestow on her funeral, he would rather dispose among the poor, she labored to compose herself for the blessed change which she now expected. There was not a servant in the house whom she did not expressly send for, advise, and infinitely affect with her counsel. Thus she continued to employ her intervals, either instructing her relations, or preparing of herself.
Though her physicians, Dr. Meverell, Dr. Clement, and Dr. Rand, had given over all hopes of her recovery, and Sir Sanders Duncombe (65) had tried his celebrated and famous powder, yet she was many days impairing, and endured the sharpest conflicts of her sickness with admirable patience and most Christian resignation, retaining both her intellectuals and ardent affections for her dissolution, to the very article of her departure. When near her dissolution, she laid her hand on every one of her children; and taking solemn leave of my father (48), with elevated heart and eyes, she quietly expired, and resigned her soul to God. Thus ended that prudent and pious woman, in the flower of her age, to the inconsolable affliction of her husband, irreparable loss of her children, and universal regret of all that knew her. She was interred, as near as might be, to her daughter Darcy, the 3d of October, at night, but with no mean ceremony.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 1635. But my dear mother (36) being now dangerously sick, I was, on the 3d of September following, sent for to Wotton. Whom I found so far spent, that, all human assistance failing, she in a most heavenly manner departed this life upon the 29th of the same month, about eight in the evening of Michaelmas-day. It was a malignant fever which took her away, about the 37th of her age, and 22d of her marriage, to our irreparable loss and the regret of all that knew her. Certain it is, that the visible cause of her indisposition proceeded from grief upon the loss of her daughter, and the infant that followed it; and it is as certain, that when she perceived the peril whereto its excess had engaged her, she strove to compose herself and allay it; but it was too late, and she was forced to succumb. Therefore summoning all her children then living (I shall never forget it), she expressed herself in a manner so heavenly, with instructions so pious and Christian, as made us strangely sensible of the extraordinary loss then imminent; after which, embracing every one of us she gave to each a ring with her blessing and dismissed us. Then, taking my father (48) by the hand, she recommended us to his care; and, because she was extremely zealous for the education of my younger brother (12), she requested my father (48) that he might be sent with me to Lewes; and so having importuned him that what he designed to bestow on her funeral, he would rather dispose among the poor, she labored to compose herself for the blessed change which she now expected. There was not a servant in the house whom she did not expressly send for, advise, and infinitely affect with her counsel. Thus she continued to employ her intervals, either instructing her relations, or preparing of herself.
Though her physicians, Dr. Meverell, Dr. Clement, and Dr. Rand, had given over all hopes of her recovery, and Sir Sanders Duncombe (65) had tried his celebrated and famous powder, yet she was many days impairing, and endured the sharpest conflicts of her sickness with admirable patience and most Christian resignation, retaining both her intellectuals and ardent affections for her dissolution, to the very article of her departure. When near her dissolution, she laid her hand on every one of her children; and taking solemn leave of my father (48), with elevated heart and eyes, she quietly expired, and resigned her soul to God. Thus ended that prudent and pious woman, in the flower of her age, to the inconsolable affliction of her husband, irreparable loss of her children, and universal regret of all that knew her. She was interred, as near as might be, to her daughter Darcy, the 3d of October, at night, but with no mean ceremony.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 03 Nov 1635. It was the 3d of the ensuing November, after my brother George (18) was gone back to Oxford, ere I returned to Lewes, when I made way, according to instructions received of my father (48), for my brother Richard (13), who was sent the 12th after.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 03 Nov 1635. It was the 3d of the ensuing November, after my brother George (18) was gone back to Oxford, ere I returned to Lewes, when I made way, according to instructions received of my father (48), for my brother Richard (13), who was sent the 12th after.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 03 Nov 1635. It was the 3d of the ensuing November, after my brother George (18) was gone back to Oxford, ere I returned to Lewes, when I made way, according to instructions received of my father (48), for my brother Richard (13), who was sent the 12th after.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620-1636 Birth and Childhood. 10 Dec 1636. The 10th of December my father (49) sent a servant to bring us necessaries, and the plague beginning now to cease, on the 3d of April 1637, I left school, where, till about the last year, I have been extremely remiss in my studies; so as I went to the University rather out of shame of abiding longer at school, than for any fitness, as by sad experience I found: which put me to re-learn all that I had neglected, or but perfunctorily gained.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 10th May 1637. I was admitted a Fellow-commoner of Baliol College, Oxford; and, on the 29th, I was matriculated in the vestry of St. Mary's, where I subscribed the Articles, and took the oaths: Dr. Baily, head of St. John's, being vice-chancellor, afterward bishop. It appears by a letter of my father's (50), that he was upon treaty with one Mr. Bathurst (17) (afterward Doctor and President), of Trinity College, who should have been my tutor; but, lest my brother's tutor, Dr. Hobbs, more zealous in his life than industrious to his pupils, should receive it as an affront, and especially for that Fellow-commoners in Baliol were no more exempt from exercise than the meanest scholars there, my father (50) sent me thither to one Mr. George Bradshaw (nomen invisum! yet the son of an excellent father, beneficed in Surrey). I ever thought my tutor had parts enough; but as his ambition made him much suspected of the College, so his grudge to Dr. Lawrence, the governor of it (whom he afterward supplanted), took up so much of his time, that he seldom or never had the opportunity to discharge his duty to his scholars. This I perceiving, associated myself with one Mr. James Thicknesse (then a young man of the foundation, afterward a Fellow of the house), by whose learned and friendly conversation I received great advantage. At my first arrival, Dr. Parkhurst was master: and after his decease, Dr. Lawrence, a chaplain of his Majesty's and Margaret Professor, succeeded, an acute and learned person; nor do I much reproach his severity, considering that the extraordinary remissness of discipline had (till his coming) much detracted from the reputation of that College.
There came in my time to the College one Nathaniel Conopios, out of Greece, from Cyrill, the patriarch of Constantinople, who, returning many years after, was made (as I understand) Bishop of Smyrna. He was the first I ever saw drink coffee; which custom came not into England till thirty years after.
After I was somewhat settled there in my formalities (for then was the University exceedingly regular, under the exact discipline of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, then Chancellor), I added, as benefactor to the library of the College, these books—"ex dono Johannis Evelyni, hujus Coll. Socio-Commensalis, filii Richardi Evelyni, è com. Surriæ, armigr."—
"Zanchii Opera," vols. 1, 2, 3.
"Granado in Thomam Aquinatem," vols. 1, 2, 3.
"Novarini Electa Sacra" and "Cresolii Anthologia Sacra"; authors, it seems, much desired by the students of divinity there.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge, St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 18th July 1637. I accompanied my eldest brother (20), who then quitted Oxford, into the country; and, on the 9th of August, went to visit my friends at Lewes, whence I returned the 12th to Wotton. On the 17th of September, I received the blessed Sacrament at Wotton church, and 23d of October went back to Oxford.

After 1638 William Glanville 1618-1702 and Jane Evelyn -1651 were married.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 13th April 1638. My father (51) ordered that I should begin to manage my own expenses, which till then my tutor had done; at which I was much satisfied.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 9th July 1638. I went home to visit my friends, and, on the 26th, with my brother (21) and sister to Lewes, where we abode till the 31st; and thence to one Mr. Michael's, of Houghton, near Arundel, where we were very well treated; and, on the 2d of August, to Portsmouth, and thence, having surveyed the fortifications (a great rarity in that blessed halcyon time in England), we passed into the Isle of Wight, to the house of my Baroness Richards, in a place called Yaverland; but were turned the following day to Chichester, where, having viewed the city and fair cathedral, we returned home.

John Evelyn's Diary 1637-1639 University. 9th July 1638. I went home to visit my friends, and, on the 26th, with my brother (21) and sister to Lewes, where we abode till the 31st; and thence to one Mr. Michael's, of Houghton, near Arundel, where we were very well treated; and, on the 2d of August, to Portsmouth, and thence, having surveyed the fortifications (a great rarity in that blessed halcyon time in England), we passed into the Isle of Wight, to the house of my Baroness Richards, in a place called Yaverland; but were turned the following day to Chichester, where, having viewed the city and fair cathedral, we returned home.

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 21st January 1640. Came my brother, Richard (17), from school, to be my chamber-fellow at the University. He was admitted the next day and matriculated the 31st.

Short Parliament

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 11th April 1640. I went to London to see the solemnity of his Majesty's (39) riding through the city in state to the Short Parliament, which began the 13th following,—a very glorious and magnificent sight, the King (39) circled with his royal diadem and the affections of his people: but the day after I returned to Wotton again, where I stayed, my father's (53) indisposition suffering great intervals, till April 27th, when I was sent to London to be first resident at the Middle Temple: so as my being at the University, in regard of these avocations, was of very small benefit to me. Upon May the 5th following, was the Parliament unhappily dissolved; and, on the 20th I returned with my brother George to Wotton, who, on the 28th of the same month, was married at Albury to Mrs. Caldwell (an heiress of an ancient Leicestershire family, where part of the nuptials were celebrated).

Attack on Lambeth Palace

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 10th June 1640. I repaired with my brother (17) to the term, to go into our new lodgings (that were formerly in Essex-court), being a very handsome apartment just over against the Hall-court, but four pair of stairs high, which gave us the advantage of the fairer prospect; but did not much contribute to the love of that impolished study, to which (I suppose) my father (53) had designed me, when he paid £145 to purchase our present lives, and assignments afterward.
London, and especially the Court, were at this period in frequent disorders, and great insolences were committed by the abused and too happy City: in particular, the Bishop of Canterbury's (66) Palace at Lambeth was assaulted by a rude rabble from Southwark, my Lord Chamberlain (55) imprisoned and many scandalous libels and invectives scattered about the streets, to the reproach of Government, and the fermentation of our since distractions: so that, upon the 25th of June, I was sent for to Wotton, and the 27th after, my father's (53) indisposition augmenting, by advice of the physicians he repaired to the Bath.

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 10th June 1640. I repaired with my brother (17) to the term, to go into our new lodgings (that were formerly in Essex-court), being a very handsome apartment just over against the Hall-court, but four pair of stairs high, which gave us the advantage of the fairer prospect; but did not much contribute to the love of that impolished study, to which (I suppose) my father (53) had designed me, when he paid £145 to purchase our present lives, and assignments afterward.
London, and especially the Court, were at this period in frequent disorders, and great insolences were committed by the abused and too happy City: in particular, the Bishop of Canterbury's (66) Palace at Lambeth was assaulted by a rude rabble from Southwark, my Lord Chamberlain (55) imprisoned and many scandalous libels and invectives scattered about the streets, to the reproach of Government, and the fermentation of our since distractions: so that, upon the 25th of June, I was sent for to Wotton, and the 27th after, my father's (53) indisposition augmenting, by advice of the physicians he repaired to the Bath.

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 7th July 1640. My brother George (23) and I, understanding the peril my father (53) was in upon a sudden attack of his infirmity, rode post from Guildford toward him, and found him extraordinary weak; yet so as that, continuing his course, he held out till the 8th of September, when I returned home with him (53) in his litter.

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 7th July 1640. My brother George (23) and I, understanding the peril my father (53) was in upon a sudden attack of his infirmity, rode post from Guildford toward him, and found him extraordinary weak; yet so as that, continuing his course, he held out till the 8th of September, when I returned home with him (53) in his litter.

On 24 Dec 1640 Richard Evelyn of Wotton 1587-1640 (53) died.

Treaty of Ripon

John Evelyn's Diary 1640. 30th December, 1640. I saw his Majesty (40) (coming from his Northern Expedition) ride in pomp and a kind of ovation, with all the marks of a happy peace, restored to the affections of his people, being conducted through London with a most splendid cavalcade; and on the 3d of November following (a day never to be mentioned without a curse), to that long ungrateful, foolish, and fatal Parliament, the beginning of all our sorrows for twenty years after, and the period of the most happy monarch in the world: Quis talia fando!
But my father being by this time entered into a dropsy, an indisposition the most unsuspected, being a person so exemplarily temperate, and of admirable regimen, hastened me back to Wotton, December the 12th; where, the 24th following, between twelve and one o'clock at noon, departed this life that excellent man and indulgent parent, retaining his senses and piety to the last, which he most tenderly expressed in blessing us, whom he now left to the world and the worst of times, while he was taken from the evil to come.

John Evelyn's Diary 1641 January. 02 Jan 1641. It was a sad and lugubrious beginning of the year, when, on the 2nd of January 1641, we at night followed the mourning hearse to the church at Wotton; when, after a sermon and funeral oration by the minister, my father was interred near his formerly erected monument, and mingled with the ashes of our mother, his dear wife. Thus we were bereft of both our parents in a period when we most of all stood in need of their counsel and assistance, especially myself, of a raw, vain, uncertain, and very unwary inclination; but so it pleased God to make trial of my conduct in a conjuncture of the greatest and most prodigious hazard that ever the youth of England saw; and, if I did not amidst all this impeach my liberty nor my virtue with the rest who made shipwreck of both, it was more the infinite goodness and mercy of God than the least providence or discretion of mine own, who now thought of nothing but the pursuit of vanity, and the confused imaginations of young men.

On 04 Dec 1641 George Evelyn of Nutfield 1641-1699 was born.

In 1642 Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 was born to John Evelyn of Wiltshire 1601-1685 (40) and Elizabeth Coxe.

In 1642 Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 was born to John Evelyn of Wiltshire 1601-1685 (40) and Elizabeth Coxe.

Around 1644. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658 (45). Portrait of John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (23).

John Evelyn's Diary 1647 October. 5th October, 1647. I came to Wotton, the place of my birth, to my brother (30), and on the 10th to Hampton Court where I had the honor to kiss his Majesty's (46) hand, and give him an account of several things I had in charge, he being now in the power of those execrable villains who not long after murdered him. I lay at my cousin, Sergeant Hatton's at Thames Ditton, whence, on the 13th, I went to London.

John Evelyn's Diary 1647 November. 9th November, 1647. My sister opened to me her marriage with Mr. Glanville (29).

John Evelyn's Diary 1648. 14th January 1648. From London I went to Wotton to see my young nephew; and thence to Baynards [in Ewhurst], to visit my brother Richard (25).

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 June. 27th June 1648. I purchased the manor of Hurcott, in Worcestershire, of my brother George (31), for £3,300.

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 August. 16th August 1648. I went to Woodcote (in Epsom) to the wedding of my brother, Richard (25), who married the daughter (19) and coheir of Esquire Minn (67), lately deceased; by which he had a great estate both in land and money on the death of a brother. The coach in which the bride and bridegroom were, was overturned in coming home; but no harm was done.

On 16 Aug 1648 Richard Evelyn 1622-1670 (25) and Elizabeth Mynne 1629-1692 (19) were married.

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 November. 29th November, 1648. Myself, with Mr. Thomas Offley, and Lady Gerrard, christened my niece Mary, eldest daughter of my brother, George Evelyn (31), by my Lady Cotton, his second wife. I presented my niece a piece of plate which cost me £18, and caused this inscription to be set on it—
In memoriam facti.
Anno cIc Ix. xliix. Cal. Decem. viii. Virginum castiss: Xtianorum innocentis: Nept: suavis: Mariæ. Johan. Evelynus Avunculus et Susceptor Vasculum hoc cum Epigraphe L. M. Q. D.
Ave Maria Gratiâ sis plena; Dominus tecum.

Trial of Charles I

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 January. 22d January 1649. I went through a course of chemistry, at Sayes Court. Now was the Thames frozen over, and horrid tempests of wind.
The villany of the rebels proceeding now so far as to try, condemn, and murder our excellent King (48) on the 30th of this month, struck me with such horror, that I kept the day of his martyrdom a fast, and would not be present at that execrable wickedness; receiving the sad account of it from my brother George (31), and Mr. Owen, who came to visit me this afternoon, and recounted all the circumstances.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 2d July 1649. I went from Wotton to Godstone (the residence of Sir John Evelyn (58)), where was also Sir John Evelyn of Wilts. (47), when I took leave of both Sir Johns and their ladies. Mem. the prodigious memory of Sir John of Wilts' (47) daughter, since married to Mr. W. Pierrepont [Note. Mr R Pierrepoint], and mother of the present Earl of Kingston. I returned to Sayes Court this night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 2d July 1649. I went from Wotton to Godstone (the residence of Sir John Evelyn (58)), where was also Sir John Evelyn of Wilts. (47), when I took leave of both Sir Johns and their ladies. Mem. the prodigious memory of Sir John of Wilts' (47) daughter, since married to Mr. W. Pierrepont [Note. Mr R Pierrepoint], and mother of the present Earl of Kingston. I returned to Sayes Court this night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 2d July 1649. I went from Wotton to Godstone (the residence of Sir John Evelyn (58)), where was also Sir John Evelyn of Wilts. (47), when I took leave of both Sir Johns and their ladies. Mem. the prodigious memory of Sir John of Wilts' (47) daughter, since married to Mr. W. Pierrepont [Note. Mr R Pierrepoint], and mother of the present Earl of Kingston. I returned to Sayes Court this night.

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 July. 12th July 1649. It was about three in the afternoon, I took oars for Gravesend., accompanied by my cousin, Stephens, and sister, Glanville, who there supped with me and returned; whence I took post immediately to Dover, where I arrived by nine in the morning; and, about eleven that night, went on board a barque guarded by a pinnace of eight guns; this being the first time the Packet-boat had obtained a convoy, having several times before been pillaged. We had a good passage, though chased for some hours by a pirate, but he dared not attack our frigate, and we then chased him till he got under the protection of the castle at Calais. It was a small privateer belonging to the Prince of Wales. I carried over with me my servant, Richard Hoare, an incomparable writer of several hands, whom I afterward preferred in the Prerogative Office, at the return of his Majesty. Lady Catherine Scott, daughter of the Earl of Norwich (64), followed us in a shallop, with Mr. Arthur Slingsby (26), who left England incognito. At the entrance of the town, the Lieutenant Governor, being on his horse with the guards, let us pass courteously. I visited Sir Richard Lloyd, an English gentleman, and walked in the church, where the ornament about the high altar of black marble is very fine, and there is a good picture of the Assumption. The citadel seems to be impregnable, and the whole country about it to be laid under water by sluices for many miles.

Around 1650 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671 (47). Portrait of John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (29).

John Evelyn's Diary 1650 July. 25th July 1650. I went by Epsom to Wotton, saluting Sir Robert Cook and my sister Glanville; the country was now much molested by soldiers, who took away gentlemen's horses for the service of the state, as then called.

John Evelyn's Diary 1651 January. 1st January 1651. I wrote to my brother (33) at Wotton, about his garden and fountains. After evening prayer, Mr. Wainsford called on me: he had long been Consul at Aleppo, and told me many strange things of those countries, the Arabs especially.

Before 1652 John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 and Mary Browne 1635-1708 were married by John Earle Bishop 1601-1665 at Paris.

Before 1652 George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 and Mary Offley -1664 were married.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 January. 02 Jan 1652. News of my sister Glanville's death in childbed, which exceedingly affected me.
I went to one Mark Antonio, an incomparable artist in enameling. He wrought by the lamp figures in boss, of a large size, even to the life, so that nothing could be better molded. He told us stories of a Genoese jeweler, who had the great ARCANUM, and had made projection before him several times. He met him at Cyprus traveling into Egypt; in his return from whence, he died at sea, and the secret with him, that else he had promised to have left it to him; that all his effects were seized on, and dissipated by the Greeks in the vessel, to an immense value. He also affirmed, that being in a goldsmith's shop at Amsterdam, a person of very low stature came in, and desired the goldsmith to melt him a pound of lead; which done, he unscrewed the pommel of his sword, and taking out of a little box a small quantity of powder, casting it into the crucible, poured an ingot out, which when cold he took up, saying, "Sir, you will be paid for your lead in the crucible," and so went out immediately. When he was gone the goldsmith found four ounces of good gold in it; but could never set eye again on the little man, though he sought all the city for him. Antonio asserted this with great obtestation; nor know I what to think of it, there are so many impostors and people who love to tell strange stories, as this artist did, who had been a great rover, and spoke ten different languages.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 March. 22 Mar 1652. I went with my brother Evelyn (34) to Wotton, to give him what directions I was able about his garden, which he was now desirous to put into some form; but for which he was to remove a mountain overgrown with huge trees and thicket, with a moat within ten yards of the house. This my brother immediately attempted, and that without great cost, for more than a hundred yards south, by digging down the mountain,and flinging it into a rapid stream; it not only carried away the sand, etc., but filled up the moat, and leveled that noble area, where now the garden and fountain is. The first occasion of my brother making this alteration was my building the little retiring place between the great wood eastward next the meadow, where, some time after my father's death, I made a triangular pond, or little stew, with an artificial rock after my coming out of Flanders.

Indemnity and Oblivion Act

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 April. 05 Apr 1652. My brother George (34) brought to Sayes Court Cromwell's (52) Act of Oblivion to all that would submit to the Government.

Before 13 Apr 1652 John Evelyn of Wotton 1652-1691 was born to George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 and Mary Offley -1664.

Before 13 Apr 1652 John Evelyn of Wotton 1652-1691 was born to George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 and Mary Offley -1664.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 April. 13 Apr 1652. News was brought me that Lady Cotton, my brother George's (34) wife was delivered of a son.
I was moved by a letter out of France to publish the letter which some time since I sent to Dean Cosin's (57) proselyted son; but I did not conceive it convenient, for fear of displeasing her Majesty (21), the Queen.

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 April. 13 Apr 1652. News was brought me that Lady Cotton, my brother George's (34) wife was delivered of a son.
I was moved by a letter out of France to publish the letter which some time since I sent to Dean Cosin's (57) proselyted son; but I did not conceive it convenient, for fear of displeasing her Majesty (21), the Queen.

On 24 Aug 1652 Richard Evelyn 1652-1658 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (31) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (17).

On 24 Aug 1652 Richard Evelyn 1652-1658 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (31) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (17).

John Evelyn's Diary 1652 August. 24 Aug 1652. My first child, a son, was born precisely at one o'clock.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 February. 22 Feb 1653. Was perfected the sealing, livery, and seisin of my purchase of Sayes Court. My brother (35), George Glanville, Mr. Scudamore, Mr. Offley, Co. William Glanville (son to Sergeant Glanville, sometime Speaker of the House of Commons), Co. Stephens, and several of my friends dining with me. I had bargained for £3,200, but I paid £3,500.

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 June. 08 Jun 1653. Came my brother George (35), Captain Evelyn, the great traveler, Mr. Muschamp, my cousin, Thomas Keightly, and a virtuoso, fastastical Simons, who had the talent of embossing so to the life.

On 11 Oct 1653 John Stansfield Evelyn 1653-1654 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (32) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (18).

On 11 Oct 1653 John Stansfield Evelyn 1653-1654 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (32) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (18).

John Evelyn's Diary 1653 October. 11 Oct 1653. My son, John Stansfield, was born, being my second child, and christened by the name of my mother's father, that name now quite extinct, being of Cheshire. Christened by Mr. Owen, in my library, at Sayes Court, where he afterward churched my wife (18), I always making use of him on these occasions, because the parish minister dared not have officiated according to the form and usage of the Church of England, to which I always adhered.

On 25 Jan 1654 John Stansfield Evelyn 1653-1654 died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 January. 25 Jan 1654. Died my son, J. Stansfield, of convulsion fits; buried at Deptford on the east corner of the church, near his mother's great-grandfather, and other relatives.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 October. 10th October, 1654. To my brother (37) at Wotton, who had been sick.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 November. 30th November, 1654. My birthday, being the 34th year of my age: blessing God for his providence, I went to London to visit my brother (37).

Around 1655 Evelyn Pierrepoint 1st Duke Kingston upon Hull 1655-1726 was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1666 and Elizabeth Evelyn -1699.

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 January. 1st January 1655. Having with my family performed the public offices of the day, and begged a blessing on the year I was now entering, I went to keep the rest of Christmas at my brother's, R. Evelyn (32), at Woodcot.

On 19 Jan 1655 John The Younger Evelyn 1655-1699 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (34) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (20).

John Evelyn's Diary 1655 January. 19th January 1655. My wife (20) was brought to bed of another son, being my third, but second living. Christened on the 26th by the name of John.

On 19 Jan 1655 John The Younger Evelyn 1655-1699 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (34) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (20).

Samuel Pepys to John Evelyn. 27 Apr 1655.
Sir (34),
From a letter this day come to my hand from a Shipp of ours (the little Guift) that in a Conflict with a Hollander on the Irish Coast (wherein shoe though much over matched hath acquitted her selfe very well) hath had severall Men wounded, who are putt on shoare for care at Galloway, give me leave to aske you whether any Provision for sick and wounded men is made in Ireland, not with respect to theis Men only, but to the future ocasions in Generall which wee may Probably have of useing it there. You will Pardon this enquiry from one that hath soe little Right to offer you trouble as.
Your humble servant
S:P (22)
Source: NMM Letter-Book 8, 199.

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 April. 25th April 1657. I had a dangerous fall out of the coach in Covent Garden, going to my brother's (39), but without harm; the Lord be praised!.

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 May. 5th May 1657. I went with my cousin, George Tuke, to see Baynard, in Surrey, a house of my brother Richard's (34), which he would have hired. This is a very fair, noble residence, built in a park, and having one of the goodliest avenues of oaks up to it that ever I saw: there is a pond of 60 acres near it; the windows of the chief rooms are of very fine painted glass. The situation is excessively dirty and melancholy.

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 June. 7th June 1657. My fourth son was born, christened George (after my grandfather); Dr. Jeremy Taylor (44) officiated in the drawing-room.

On 07 Jun 1657 George Evelyn 1657-1658 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (36) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (22).

On 07 Jun 1657 George Evelyn 1657-1658 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (36) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (22).

John Evelyn's Diary 1657 June. 7th June 1657. My fourth son was born, christened George (after my grandfather); Dr. Jeremy Taylor (44) officiated in the drawing-room.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 January. 27th January 1658. After six fits of a quartan ague, with which it pleased God to visit him, died my dear son, Richard, to our inexpressible grief and affliction, five years and three days old only, but at that tender age a prodigy for wit and understanding; for beauty of body, a very angel; for endowment of mind, of incredible and rare hopes. To give only a little taste of them, and thereby glory to God, who "out of the mouths of babes and infants does sometimes perfect his praises," he had learned all his catechism; at two years and a half old, he could perfectly read any of the English, Latin, French, or Gothic letters, pronouncing the first three languages exactly. He had, before the fifth year, or in that year, not only skill to read most written hands, but to decline all the nouns, conjugate the verbs regular, and most of the irregular; learned out "Puerilis," got by heart almost the entire vocabulary of Latin and French primitives and words, could make congruous syntax, turn English into Latin, and vice versâ, construe and prove what he read, and did the government and use of relatives, verbs, substantives, ellipses, and many figures and tropes, and made a considerable progress in Comenius's "Janua"; began himself to write legibly, and had a strong passion for Greek. The number of verses he could recite was prodigious, and what he remembered of the parts of plays, which he would also act; and, when seeing a Plautus in one's hand, he asked what book it was, and, being told it was comedy, and too difficult for him, he wept for sorrow. Strange was his apt and ingenious application of fables and morals; for he had read Æsop; he had a wonderful disposition to mathematics, having by heart divers propositions of Euclid that were read to him in play, and he would make lines and demonstrate them. As to his piety, astonishing were his applications of Scripture upon occasion, and his sense of God; he had learned all his catechism early, and understood the historical part of the Bible and New Testament to a wonder, how Christ came to redeem mankind, and how, comprehending these necessaries himself, his godfathers were discharged of their promise.
These and the like illuminations, far exceeding his age and experience, considering the prettiness of his address and behavior, cannot but leave impressions in me at the memory of him. When one told him how many days a Quaker had fasted, he replied that was no wonder; for Christ had said that man should not live by bread alone, but by the Word of God. He would of himself select the most pathetic psalms, and chapters out of Job, to read to his maid during his sickness, telling her, when she pitied him, that all God's children must suffer affliction. He declaimed against the vanities of the world, before he had seen any. Often he would desire those who came to see him to pray by him, and a year before he fell sick, to kneel and pray with him alone in some corner. How thankfully would he receive admonition! how soon be reconciled! how indifferent, yet continually cheerful! He would give grave advice to his brother, John, bear with his impertinences, and say he was but a child. If he heard of or saw any new thing, he was unquiet till he was told how it was made; he brought to us all such difficulties as he found in books, to be expounded. He had learned by heart divers sentences in Latin and Greek, which, on occasion, he would produce even to wonder. He was all life, all prettiness, far from morose, sullen, or childish in anything he said or did. The last time he had been at church (which was at Greenwich), I asked him, according to custom, what he remembered of the sermon; two good things, Father, said he, bonum gratiæ and bonum gloriæ, with a just account of what the preacher said.
The day before he died, he called to me: and in a more serious manner than usual, told me that for all I loved him so dearly I should give my house, land, and all my fine things to his brother Jack, he should have none of them; and, the next morning, when he found himself ill, and that I persuaded him to keep his hands in bed, he demanded whether he might pray to God with his hands unjoined; and a little after, while in great agony, whether he should not offend God by using his holy name so often calling for ease. What shall I say of his frequent pathetical ejaculations uttered of himself: "Sweet Jesus, save me, deliver me, pardon my sins, let thine angels receive me!" So early knowledge, so much piety and perfection! But thus God, having dressed up a saint fit for himself, would not longer permit him with us, unworthy of the future fruits of this incomparable hopeful blossom. Such a Child I never saw: for such a child I bless God, in whose bosom he is! May I and mine become as this little child, who now follows the child Jesus that Lamb of God in a white robe, whithersoever he goes; even so, Lord Jesus, fiat voluntas tua! Thou gavest him to us, thou hast taken him from us, blessed be the name of the Lord! That I had anything acceptable to thee was from thy grace alone, seeing from me he had nothing but sin, but that thou hast pardoned! blessed be my God for ever, Amen.
In my opinion, he was suffocated by the women and maids that attended him, and covered him too hot with blankets as he lay in a cradle, near an excessive hot fire in a close room. I suffered him to be opened, when they found that he was what is vulgarly called liver-grown. I caused his body to be coffined in lead, and deposited on the 30th at eight o'clock that night in the church at Deptford, accompanied with divers of my relations and neighbors, among whom I distributed rings with this motto: "Dominus abstulit;" intending, God willing, to have him transported with my own body to be interred in our dormitory in Wotton Church, in my dear native county of Surrey, and to lay my bones and mingle my dust with my fathers, if God be gracious to me, and make me as fit for him as this blessed child was. The Lord Jesus sanctify this and all other my afflictions, Amen.
Here ends the joy of my life, and for which I go even mourning to the grave.

On 15 Feb 1658 George Evelyn 1657-1658 died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 February. 15th February 1658. The afflicting hand of God being still upon us, it pleased him also to take away from us this morning my youngest son, George, now seven weeks languishing at nurse, breeding teeth, and ending in a dropsy. God's holy will be done! He was buried in Deptford Church, the 17th following.

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 August. 3d August 1658. Went to Sir John Evelyn at Godstone. The place is excellent, but might be improved by turning some offices of the house, and removing the garden. The house being a noble fabric, though not comparable to what was first built by my uncle, who was master of all the powder mills.

John Evelyn's Diary 1659 May. 5th May 1659. I went to visit my brother (41) in London; and next day, to see a new opera, after the Italian way, in recitative music and scenes, much inferior to the Italian composure and magnificence; but it was prodigious that in a time of such public consternation such a vanity should be kept up, or permitted. I, being engaged with company, could not decently resist the going to see it, though my heart smote me for it.

John Evelyn's Diary 1659 May. 19th May 1659. Came to dine with me my Lord Galloway (49) and his son, a Scotch Lord and learned: also my brother (41) and his lady, Lord Berkeley and his lady, Mrs. Shirley, and the famous singer, Mrs. Knight, and other friends.

John Evelyn's Diary 1659 June. 7th June 1659. To London, to take leave of my brother (41), and see the foundations now laying for a long street and buildings in Hatton Garden, designed for a little town, lately an ample garden.

On 04 Oct 1659 Thomas Evelyn 1587-1659 (72) died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1659 November. 24th November, 1659. Sir John Evelyn [of Godstone] invited us to the forty-first wedding-day feast, where was much company of friends.

Around 1660 Robert Pierrepoint 3rd Earl Kingston 1660-1682 was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1666 and Elizabeth Evelyn -1699.

Charles II Proclaimed enters London

On 29 May 1660 John Evelyn 1st Baronet of Godstone 1633-1671 (27) was created 1st Baronet Evelyn of Godstone.

After Jun 1660 Thomas Fanshawe 2nd Viscount Fanshawe 1632-1674 and Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 were married.

John Evelyn's Diary 1660 December. 6th December, 1660. I waited on my brother (43) and sister Evelyn to Court. Now were presented to his Majesty (30) those two rare pieces of drollery, or rather a Dutch Kitchen, painted by Dowe, so finely as hardly to be distinguished from enamel. I was also shown divers rich jewels and crystal vases; the rare head of Jo. Bellino, Titian's master; Christ in the Garden, by Hannibal Caracci; two incomparable heads, by Holbein; the Queen-Mother (51) in a miniature, almost as big as the life; an exquisite piece of carving; two unicorn's horns, etc. This in the closet.

John Evelyn's Diary 1660 December. 13th December, 1660. I presented my son, John (5), to the Queen-Mother (51), who kissed him, talked with and made extraordinary much of him.

Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (35). Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (15).

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

Around 1662 William Pierrepoint 4th Earl Kingston 1662-1690 was born to Robert Pierrepoint -1666 and Elizabeth Evelyn -1699 at West Dean.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 August. 1st August 1662. Mr. H. Howard (34), his brothers Charles (32), Edward (25), Bernard (21), Philip (33), now the Queen's (23) Almoner (all brothers of the Duke of Norfolk, still in Italy), came with a great train, and dined with me; Mr. H. Howard (34) leaving with me his eldest and youngest sons, Henry (7) and Thomas, for three or four days, my son, John (7), having been sometime bred up in their father's house.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 September. 1st September 1662. Being invited by Lord Berkeley (34), I went to Durdans, where dined his Majesty (32), the Queen (23), Duke, Duchess (25), Prince Rupert (42), Prince Edward, and abundance of noblemen. I went, after dinner, to visit my brother (45) of Woodcot, my sister having been delivered of a son a little before, but who had now been two days dead.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (60).

Before 26 Sep 1662 John Wray 1662-1662 was born to John Wray 3rd Baronet Glentworth 1619-1664 and Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717.

Before 26 Sep 1662 John Wray 3rd Baronet Glentworth 1619-1664 and Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 were married. Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 by marriage Lady Glentworth.

Before 27 Feb 1663 Elizabeth Wray 1663-1714 was born to John Wray 3rd Baronet Glentworth 1619-1664 and Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717. On 27 Feb 1663 Elizabeth Wray 1663-1714 was baptised.

John Evelyn's Diary 1663 October. 24th October, 1663. Mr. Edward Phillips came to be my son's (8) preceptor: this gentleman was nephew to Milton, who wrote against Salmasius's "Defensio"; but was not at all infected with his principles, though brought up by him.

John Evelyn's Diary 1663 November. 6th November, 1663. To Court, to get Sir John Evelyn (30), of Godstone, off from being Sheriff of Surrey.

In 1664 George Evelyn of West Dean 1581-1664 (82) died.

In 1664 John Evelyn 1591-1664 (73) died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 August. 8th August 1664. Came the sad and unexpected news of the death of Lady Cotton, wife to my brother George (47), a most excellent lady.

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 August. 9th August 1664. Went with my brother Richard (41) to Wotton, to visit and comfort my disconsolate brother (47); and on the 13th saw my friend, Mr. Charles Howard, at Dipden, near Dorking.

John Evelyn's Diary 1664 August. 9th August 1664. Went with my brother Richard (41) to Wotton, to visit and comfort my disconsolate brother (47); and on the 13th saw my friend, Mr. Charles Howard, at Dipden, near Dorking.

In 1665 Mary Evelyn 1665-1685 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (44) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (30).

In 1665 Mary Evelyn 1665-1685 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (44) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (30).

On 30 Mar 1665 Thomas Fanshawe 1st Viscount Fanshawe 1596-1665 (69) died. His son Thomas Fanshawe 2nd Viscount Fanshawe 1632-1674 (33) succeeded 2nd Viscount Fanshawe. Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 (23) by marriage Viscountess Fanshawe.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 October. 01 Oct 1665. This afternoon, while at evening prayers, tidings were brought me of the birth of a daughter at Wotton, after six sons, in the same chamber I had first taken breath in, and at the first day of that month, as I was on the last, forty-five years before.

John Evelyn's Diary 1665 December. 25 Dec 1665. Kept Christmas with my hospitable brother (48), at Wotton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 06 Sep 1666. Thursday. I represented to his Majesty (36) the case of the French prisoners at war in my custody, and besought him that there might be still the same care of watching at all places contiguous to unseized houses. It is not indeed imaginable how extraordinary the vigilance and activity of the King (36) and the Duke (32) was, even laboring in person, and being present to command, order, reward, or encourage workmen; by which he showed his affection to his people, and gained theirs. Having, then, disposed of some under cure at the Savoy, I returned to Whitehall, where I dined at Mr. Offley's [Note. Not clear who Mr Offley is? John Evelyn's (45) brother George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 (49) was married to Mary Offley -1664], the groom-porter, who was my relation.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 September. 06 Sep 1666. Thursday. I represented to his Majesty (36) the case of the French prisoners at war in my custody, and besought him that there might be still the same care of watching at all places contiguous to unseized houses. It is not indeed imaginable how extraordinary the vigilance and activity of the King (36) and the Duke (32) was, even laboring in person, and being present to command, order, reward, or encourage workmen; by which he showed his affection to his people, and gained theirs. Having, then, disposed of some under cure at the Savoy, I returned to Whitehall, where I dined at Mr. Offley's [Note. Not clear who Mr Offley is? John Evelyn's (45) brother George Evelyn of Wotton 1617-1699 (49) was married to Mary Offley -1664], the groom-porter, who was my relation.

John Evelyn's Diary 1666 November. 17 Nov 1666. I returned to Chatham, my chariot overturning on the steep of Bexley Hill, wounded me in two places on the head; my son, Jack (11), being with me, was like to have been worse cut by the glass; but I thank God we both escaped without much hurt, though not without exceeding danger.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 January. 24 Jan 1667. Visited my Lord Clarendon, and presented my son, John (12), to him, now preparing to go to Oxford, of which his Lordship was Chancellor. This evening I heard rare Italian voices, two eunuchs and one woman, in his Majesty's (36) green chamber, next his cabinet.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 January. 29 Jan 1667. To London, in order to my son's (12) Oxford journey, who, being very early entered both in Latin and Greek, and prompt to learn beyond most of his age, I was persuaded to trust him under the tutorage of Mr. Bohun, Fellow of New College, who had been his preceptor in my house some years before; but, at Oxford, under the inspection of Dr. Bathurst (47), President of Trinity College, where I placed him, not as yet thirteen years old. He was newly out of long coats.

John Evelyn's Diary 1667 September. 13 Sep 1667. Between the hours of twelve and one, was born my second daughter, who was afterward christened Elizabeth.

On 13 Sep 1667 Elizabeth Evelyn 1667-1685 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (46) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (32).

On 13 Sep 1667 Elizabeth Evelyn 1667-1685 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (46) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (32).

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 November. 08 Nov 1668. Being at dinner, my sister Evelyn sent for me to come up to London to my continuing sick brother (45).

John Evelyn's Diary 1668 November. 14 Nov 1668. To London, invited to the consecration of that excellent person, the Dean of Ripon, Dr. Wilkins (54), now made Bishop of Chester; it was at Ely House, the Archbishop of Canterbury (70), Dr. Cosin (73), Bishop of Durham, the Bishops of Ely (77), Salisbury (51), Rochester (43), and others officiating. Dr. Tillotson (38) preached. Then, we went to a sumptuous dinner in the hall, where were the Duke of Buckingham (40), Judges, Secretaries of State, Lord-Keeper, Council, Noblemen, and innumerable other company, who were honorers of this incomparable man, universally beloved by all who knew him.
This being the Queen's birthday, great was the gallantry at Whitehall, and the night celebrated with very fine fireworks.
My poor brother (66) continuing ill, I went not from him till the 17th, when, dining at the Groom Porters, I heard Sir Edward Sutton play excellently on the Irish harp; he performs genteelly, but not approaching my worthy friend, Mr. Clark, a gentleman of Northumberland, who makes it execute lute, viol, and all the harmony an instrument is capable of; pity it is that it is not more in use; but, indeed, to play well, takes up the whole man, as Mr. Clark has assured me, who, though a gentleman of quality and parts, was yet brought up to that instrument from five years old, as I remember he told me.

In 1669 Susannah Evelyn 1669-1754 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (48) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (34).

In 1669 Susannah Evelyn 1669-1754 was born to John Evelyn Diarist 1620-1706 (48) and Mary Browne 1635-1708 (34).

John Evelyn's Diary 1669 May. 20 May 1669. This evening, at 10 o'clock, was born my third daughter, who was baptized on the 25th by the name of Susannah.

John Evelyn's Diary 1669 June. 10 Jun 1669. Came my Lord Cornbury, Sir William Pulteney (45), and others to visit me. I went this evening to London, to carry Mr. Pepys (36) to my brother Richard (46), now exceedingly afflicted with the stone, who had been successfully cut, and carried the stone as big as a tennis ball to show him, and encourage his resolution to go through the operation.

John Evelyn's Diary 1669 October. 26 Oct 1669. My dear brother (46) continued extremely full of pain, the Lord be gracious to him!.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 March. 03 Mar 1670. Finding my brother (47) in such exceeding torture, and that he now began to fall into convulsion-fits, I solemnly set the next day apart to beg of God to mitigate his sufferings, and prosper the only means which yet remained for his recovery, he being not only much wasted, but exceedingly and all along averse from being cut (for the stone); but, when he at last consented, and it came to the operation, and all things prepared, his spirit and resolution failed.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 March. 06 Mar 1670. Dr. Patrick preached in Covent Garden Church. I participated of the Blessed Sacrament, recommending to God the deplorable condition of my dear brother (47), who was almost in the last agonies of death. I watched late with him this night. It pleased God to deliver him out of this miserable life, toward five o'clock this Monday morning, to my unspeakable grief. He was a brother whom I most dearly loved, for his many virtues; but two years younger than myself, a sober, prudent, worthy gentleman. He had married a great fortune, and left one only daughter, and a noble seat at Woodcot, near Epsom. His body was opened, and a stone taken out of his bladder, not much bigger than a nutmeg. I returned home on the 8th, full of sadness, and to bemoan my loss.

On 07 Mar 1670 Richard Evelyn 1622-1670 (47) died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 March. 21 Mar 1670. We all accompanied the corpse of my dear brother to Epsom Church, where he was decently interred in the chapel belonging to Woodcot House. A great number of friends and gentlemen of the country attended, about twenty coaches and six horses, and innumerable people.

1670 Secret Treaty of Dover

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 May. 26 May 1670. Receiving a letter from Mr. Philip Howard (41), Lord Almoner to the Queen, that Monsieur Evelin, first physician to Madame (who was now come to Dover to visit the King (39) her brother), was come to town, greatly desirous to see me; but his stay so short, that he could not come to me, I went with my brother (52) to meet him at the Tower, where he was seeing the magazines and other curiosities, having never before been in England: we renewed our alliance and friendship, with much regret on both sides that, he being to return toward Dover that evening, we could not enjoy one another any longer. How this French family, Ivelin, of Evelin, Normandy, a very ancient and noble house is grafted into our pedigree, see in the collection brought from Paris, 1650.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 June. 29 Jun 1670. To London, in order to my niece's marriage, Mary, daughter to my late brother Richard, of Woodcot, with the eldest son of Mr. Attorney Montague, which was celebrated at Southampton-House chapel, after which a magnificent entertainment, feast, and dancing, dinner and supper, in the great room there; but the bride was bedded at my sister's lodging, in Drury-Lane.

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 June. 29 Jun 1670. To London, in order to my niece's marriage, Mary, daughter to my late brother Richard, of Woodcot, with the eldest son of Mr. Attorney Montague, which was celebrated at Southampton-House chapel, after which a magnificent entertainment, feast, and dancing, dinner and supper, in the great room there; but the bride was bedded at my sister's lodging, in Drury-Lane.

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 January. 10 Jan 1671. Mr. Bohun, my son's (15) tutor, had been five years in my house, and now Bachelor of Laws, and Fellow of New College, went from me to Oxford to reside there, having well and faithfully performed his charge.

On 10 Aug 1671 John Evelyn 1st Baronet of Godstone 1633-1671 (38) died.

John Evelyn's Diary 1672 May. 02 May 1672. My son, John (17), was specially admitted of the Middle Temple by Sir Francis North (34), his Majesty's (41) Solicitor-General, and since Chancellor. I pray God bless this beginning, my intention being that he should seriously apply himself to the study of the law.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 March. 29 Mar 1673. I carried my son (18) to the Bishop of Chichester, that learned and pious man, Dr. Peter Gunning (59), to be instructed by him before he received the Holy Sacrament, when he gave him most excellent advice, which I pray God may influence and remain with him as long as he lives; and O that I had been so blessed and instructed, when first I was admitted to that sacred ordinance!.

John Evelyn's Diary 1673 May. 25 May 1673. My son (18) was made a younger brother of the Trinity House. The new master was Sir J. Smith, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, a stout seaman, who had interposed and saved the Duke (39) from perishing by a fire ship in the late war.

After 1674 George Saunderson 5th Viscount Castleton 1631-1714 and Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 were married. His second wife, her third husband. Sarah Evelyn Viscountess Fanshawe and Castleton 1642-1717 by marriage Viscountess Castleton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1674 July. 22 Jul 1674. I went to Windsor with my wife (39) and son (19) to see my daughter Mary (9), who was there with my Lady Tuke and to do my duty to his Majesty (44). Next day, to a great entertainment at Sir Robert Holmes's (52) at Cranbourne Lodge, in the Forest; there were his Majesty (44), the Queen (35), Duke (40), Duchess (15), and all the Court. I returned in the evening with Sir Joseph Williamson (40), now declared Secretary of State. He was son of a poor clergyman somewhere in Cumberland, brought up at Queen's College, Oxford, of which he came to be a fellow; then traveled with ... and returning when the King (44) was restored, was received as a clerk under Mr. Secretary Nicholas. Sir Henry Bennett (56) (now Lord Arlington) succeeding, Williamson is transferred to him, who loving his ease more than business (though sufficiently able had he applied himself to it) remitted all to his man Williamson; and, in a short time, let him so into the secret of affairs, that (as his Lordship himself told me) there was a kind of necessity to advance him; and so, by his subtlety, dexterity, and insinuation, he got now to be principal Secretary; absolutely Lord Arlington's creature, and ungrateful enough. It has been the fate of this obliging favorite to advance those who soon forgot their original. Sir Joseph was a musician, could play at Jeu de Goblets, exceedingly formal, a severe master to his servants, but so inward with my Lord O'Brien (32), that after a few months of that gentleman's death, he married his widow (34), who, being sister and heir of the Duke of Richmond, brought him a noble fortune. It was thought they lived not so kindly after marriage as they did before. She was much censured for marrying so meanly, being herself allied to the Royal family.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (44). Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 (36) depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza (24). Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two Putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (26).

Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696 (37). Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (31).

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (28).

In 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730 (52). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (39).

Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (29). Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26).

Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England, Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (21).

John Evelyn's Diary 1674 July. 22 Jul 1674. I went to Windsor with my wife (39) and son (19) to see my daughter Mary (9), who was there with my Lady Tuke and to do my duty to his Majesty (44). Next day, to a great entertainment at Sir Robert Holmes's (52) at Cranbourne Lodge, in the Forest; there were his Majesty