Crossed Legs

Before 1260 . The Early Medieval Period describes knights wearing a single piece of Chain Mail that covered the head, torso, arms and legs to the knees. Commonly associated with Crusader knights. There are theories crossed-legs mean the knight had been on Crusade, the number of times described by whether the legs are crossed at the ankles, the calves or the knees. None of these theories appear consistent with the extant examples. There are further theories about whether the meaning of Crossed Legs being crossed Right Leg over Left or vice-verse. These, also, do not appear consistent with extant examples.


After 17 Jun 1282 William "The Younger" Valence -1282 was buried at Dorchester Priory, Dorchester, Oxfordshire. His monument Early Medieval with Crossed Legs. A particularly fine effigy with some remnants of its original colouring.


After 17 Jun 1282 William "The Younger" Valence -1282 was buried at Dorchester Priory, Dorchester, Oxfordshire. His monument Early Medieval with Crossed Legs. A particularly fine effigy with some remnants of its original colouring.

After 17 Jun 1282 William "The Younger" Valence -1282 was buried at Dorchester Priory, Dorchester, Oxfordshire. His monument Early Medieval with Crossed Legs. A particularly fine effigy with some remnants of its original colouring.

After 17 Jun 1282 William "The Younger" Valence -1282 was buried at Dorchester Priory, Dorchester, Oxfordshire. His monument Early Medieval with Crossed Legs. A particularly fine effigy with some remnants of its original colouring.

In 1325 Richard Bugge 1261-1325 was buried at St Mary & All Saints Church, Willoughby on the Wolds, Nottinghamshire. Early Medieval. Crossed Legs.


See Right Leg over Left