History of Northamptonshire

In 1230 Eudes Zouche 1230-1296 was born to William Zouche 1215-1271 (20) and Maud Trailly at Northamptonshire.

On 06 Apr 1492 Maud Green Baroness Vaux Harrowden 1492-1531 was born to Thomas Green 1461-1506 (31) and Joan Fogge at Northamptonshire.

William Tresham -1450 was born to Thomas Tresham at Northamptonshire.

Apethorpe

On 11 May 1589 Walter Mildmay 1521-1589 (68) died at Apethorpe.

In Aug 1614 George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 (21) caught the eye of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (48) at hunt at Apethorpe. Opponents of the king's favourite Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset (27), saw an opportunity to displace Somerset and began promoting Villiers. Money was raised to purchase Villiers a new wardrobe.

Apethorpe Hall, Apethorpe

In 1633 Grace Fane Countess Home -1633 died at Apethorpe Hall, Apethorpe.

Death of Princess Charlotte

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter V: Country House Visits. After my dear mother's death I visited a great deal with my father (53), and one year we went for the shooting to Lord Huntingfield's place, Heveningham Hall. I slept in the bedroom once occupied by the famous Chevalier d'Éon, who had been a frequent guest at Heveningham, and about whom there were many stories told. It was said that the Chevalier was the one and only lover of cross-grained Queen Charlotte, and that her son, George IV, was the result of their intimacy, although his paternity was of course admitted by King George III. The animosity always displayed by the old Queen to her grand-daughter, Princess Charlotte, was supposed to arise from the fact that as heiress to the throne she innocently dispossessed the other Royal Dukes from the succession. It is certainly a fact that the Princess's untimely death in childbirth was attributed to foul play at the time, and when later the accoucheur Sir Richard Croft, committed suicide, all classes of society were loud in condemnation of the Queen and the Prince Regent. I do not vouch for the accuracy of Queen Charlotte's love affair. I only give the Heveningham gossip as I heard it.
As D'Eon was undoubtedly one of the most picturesque and mysterious personages ot the eighteenth century I was naturally interested in these somewhat scandalous stories.
The ChevalierChevalier wrote his secret cipher communications, and I wondered whether the brocade crowns and frills and furbelows that he wore as a woman had ever hung in the old wardrobe which I used.
My father and I also stayed with the Westmorlands at Apethorpe Hall ; we visited the Earl (38) and Countess of Chichester (36) at Stanmer Park, and we were welcome guests at Cadlands, Silverlands, Chiswick House, West Park, and my uncle Lord Stradbroke's place, Henham Hall, which was afterwards burnt down.
I had visited Deene Park with my mother in 1842, but I must deal with my future home in the chapter devoted to Deene and its associations.

Around 1766 Johan Joseph Zoffany Painter 1733-1810 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (21).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (23).

1777. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820 (38). Portrait of the Charlotte Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen Consort England 1744-1818 (32).

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (19).

Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.

In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (33). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (29) when Prince of Wales.

In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (48). Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (44) in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.

In 1754 Jean-Etienne Liotard 1702-1789 (51). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (15).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (53). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (42).

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788 (54). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (43).

Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance-Holland Painter 1735-1811 (32). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (29).

In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 (40). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (65).

Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839 (46). Portrait of George III King Great Britain and Ireland 1738-1820 (61).

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter IX: Deene and its History. Lord Cardigan hated the idea of being put underground, so his coffin was placed immediately under his effigy inside the tomb and not in a vault. He had always intended to have a monument erected during his lifetime in the Rectory grounds, and actually had some stone brought from his Stanion quarries for this purpose. One day Lord Westmorland called, and noticing the quantity of stone, asked what it was to be used for. Cardigan told him. "Nonsense," said Lord Westmorland, "give the stone to me instead. I want to make an entrance-hall at Apethorpe, and it will be the very thing!" My husband very good-naturedly gave him the Stanion stone, and the low entrance-hall at Apethorpe was built of it.
The late Queen Victoria greatly admired the design for the monument, and I was told on good authority that she even had her own figure modelled in her lifetime for her memorial tomb but that when search was made after her death the figure had disappeared and nobody knew what had become of it.

1845 Francis Grant 1803-1878 (41). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25).

1833. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (13).

Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painting 1792-1871 (45). Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (19).

Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (34). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20). Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.

Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (40). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (26) and Prince Albert Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819-1861 (26) and their children.

In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868 (39). Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (20).

Ashby St Ledgers

In 1470 William Catesby 1408-1470 (62) died at Ashby St Ledgers.

In 1473 George Catesby 1473-1507 was born to William Catesby 1450-1485 and Margaret Zouche 1459- at Ashby St Ledgers.

Around 1500 Richard Catesby 1500-1553 was born to George Catesby 1473-1507 (27) and Elizabeth Empson at Ashby St Ledgers.

On 20 May 1507 George Catesby 1473-1507 (34) died at Ashby St Ledgers.

On 09 Jun 1566 William Catesby 1547-1598 (19) and Anne Throckmorton -1605 were married at Ashby St Ledgers.

See Saint Leodegarius Church, Ashby St Ledgers

Aston le Walls

In 1541 John Dudley 1461-1541 (80) died at Aston le Walls.

Astwel

On 29 Oct 1571 Dorothy Giffard 1490-1571 (80) died at Astwel.

Barnwell

Richard Dudley 1378- was born at Barnwell.

Boughton

On 06 Aug 1369 Henry Green -1369 died at Boughton. He was buried at Church of St John the Baptist, Boughton. Henry Green 1347-1399 (22) inherited at Drayton House, Drayton, Lowick.

On 29 Aug 1391 Thomas Green 1345-1391 (46) died at Boughton.

Around 1563 Henry Montagu 1st Earl Manchester 1563-1642 was born to Edward Montagu 1530-1602 (33) and Elizabeth Harrington 1545-1618 (18) at Boughton.

On 29 May 1638 John Manners 1st Duke Rutland 1638-1711 was born to John Manners 8th Earl Rutland 1604-1679 (33) and Frances Montagu Countess Rutland 1614-1671 (24) at Boughton.

Boughton Castle, Boughton

Around 1614 Frances Montagu Countess Rutland 1614-1671 was born to Edward Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1563-1644 (51) and Frances Cotton 1578-1620 (36) at Boughton Castle, Boughton.

In 1616 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619 (65). Portrait of (possibly) Frances Cotton 1578-1620 (38).

In 1618 Christopher Montagu 1618-1641 was born to Edward Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1563-1644 (55) and Frances Cotton 1578-1620 (40) at Boughton Castle, Boughton.

Brigstock, Boughton

Around 1530 Edward Montagu 1530-1602 was born to Edward Montagu 1485-1557 (45) and Helen Roper 1500-1563 (30) at Brigstock, Boughton.

On 26 Jan 1602 Edward Montagu 1530-1602 (72) died at Brigstock, Boughton.

On 10 Nov 1873 Robert Vernon 1st Baron Lyveden 1800-1873 (73) died. He was bured in Brigstock, Boughton.

Church of St John the Baptist, Boughton

On 06 Aug 1369 Henry Green -1369 died at Boughton. He was buried at Church of St John the Baptist, Boughton. Henry Green 1347-1399 (22) inherited at Drayton House, Drayton, Lowick.

Brackley

In 1628 John Curzon 1st Baronet Curzon 1598-1686 (29) was elected MP Brackley.

On 05 Jun 1654 Dorothy Shirley 1654-1682 was born to Robert Shirley 4th Baronet Staunton Harold 1623-1656 (31) at Brackley.

Third Protectorate Parliament

In 1659 Thomas Crew 2nd Baron Crew 1624-1697 (35) was elected MP Brackley during the Third Protectorate Parliament.

Convention Parliament (1C2)

In 1660 Thomas Crew 2nd Baron Crew 1624-1697 (36) was elected MP Brackley during the Convention Parliament (1C2).

Cavalier Parliament (2C2)

In 1661 Thomas Crew 2nd Baron Crew 1624-1697 (37) was elected MP Brackley during the Cavalier Parliament (2C2).

In 1679 Richard Wenman 4th Viscount Wenman 1657-1690 (22) was elected MP Brackley which seat he held for eleven years.

In 1682 Dorothy Shirley 1654-1682 (27) died at Brackley.

In 1695 Charles Egerton 1654-1717 (40) was elected MP Brackley.

1768 General Election

In 1768 William Egerton 1730-1783 (38) was elected MP Brackley during the 1768 General Election.

1774 General Election

In 1774 William Egerton 1730-1783 (44) was elected MP Brackley during the 1774 General Election.

Brington

On 22 Jun 1532 William Spencer 1496-1532 (36) died at Brington. He was buried at Brington.

On or before 04 Jan 1591 William Spencer 2nd Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1591-1636 was born to Robert Spencer 1st Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1570-1627 (21) and Margaret Willoughby 1566-1597 (24) at Althorp House, Daventry. He was baptised on 04 Jan 1591 at Brington.

On 17 Aug 1597 Margaret Willoughby 1566-1597 (30) died at Brington.

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 October. 2d October, 1656. Came to visit me my cousin, Stephens, and Mr. Pierce (since head of Magdalen College, Oxford), a learned minister of Brington, in Northamptonshire, and Captain Cooke (40), both excellent musicians.

Cadnam

In 1510 Robert Hungerford 1510-1556 was born to Robert Hungerford 1485-1517 (25) and Eleanor Yorke 1489-1517 at Cadnam.

Around 1558 John Hungerford 1558-1636 was born to Walter Hungerford -1565 at Cadnam.

Around 1620 John Hungerford 1620-1636 was born to Thomas Hungerford 1602-1675 (17) at Cadnam.

Edward Hungerford -1667 was born to John Hungerford 1620-1636 at Cadnam.

Castle Ashby

In 1280 Robert Peverell 1280-1318 was born to Richard Peverell 1250-1341 (30) at Castle Ashby.

On 29 Sep 1306 Edmund Peverell 1306-1331 was born to Robert Peverell 1280-1318 (26) at Castle Ashby.

Around 1339 John Pole 1339-1379 was born to William Pole 1302-1366 (37) and Katherine Norwich 1306-1381 (33) at Castle Ashby.

On 23 Apr 1851 William George Spencer Scott Compton 5th Marquess Northampton 1851-1913 was born to William Compton 4th Marquess Northampton 1818-1897 (33) at Castle Ashby.

On 01 Jun 1902 Mary Florence Baring Marchioness Northampton 1860-1902 (41) died in Castle Ashby.

Castle Ashby House

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 August. 18 Aug 1688. Dr. Jeffryes, the minister of Althorpe, who was my Lord's chaplain when ambassador in France, preached the shortest discourse I ever heard; but what was defective in the amplitude of his sermon, he had supplied in the largeness and convenience of the parsonage house, which the doctor (who had at least £600 a year in spiritual advancement) had newly built, and made fit for a person of quality to live in, with gardens and all accommodation according therewith.
My lady (42) carried us to see Lord Northampton's (23) Seat, a very strong, large house, built with stone, not altogether modern. They were enlarging the garden, in which was nothing extraordinary, except the iron gate opening into the park, which indeed was very good work, wrought in flowers painted with blue and gilded. There is a noble walk of elms toward the front of the house by the bowling green. I was not in any room of the house besides a lobby looking into the garden, where my Lord (23) and his new Countess (19) (Sir Stephen Fox's (61) daughter, whom I had known from a child) entertained the Countess (42) and her daughter the Countess of Arran (21) (newly married to the son (30) of the Duke of Hamilton (53)), with so little good grace, and so dully, that our visit was very short, and so we returned to Althorpe, twelve miles distant.
The house, or rather palace, at Althorpe, is a noble uniform pile in form of a half H, built of brick and freestone, balustered and à la moderne; the hall is well, the staircase excellent; the rooms of state, galleries, offices and furniture, such as may become a great prince. It is situated in the midst of a garden, exquisitely planted and kept, and all this in a park walled in with hewn stone, planted with rows and walks of trees, canals and fish ponds, and stored with game. And, what is above all this, governed by a lady (42), who without any show of solicitude, keeps everything in such admirable order, both within and without, from the garret to the cellar, that I do not believe there is any in this nation, or in any other, that exceeds her (42) in such exact order, without ostentation, but substantially great and noble. The meanest servant is lodged so neat and cleanly; the service at the several tables, the good order and decency—in a word, the entire economy is perfectly becoming a wise and noble person. She is one who for her distinguished esteem of me from a long and worthy friendship, I must ever honor and celebrate. I wish from my soul the Lord (46), her husband (whose parts and abilities are otherwise conspicuous), was as worthy of her, as by a fatal apostasy and court-ambition he (46) has made himself unworthy! This is what she deplores, and it renders her as much affliction as a lady of great soul and much prudence is capable of. The Countess of Bristol (68), her mother, a grave and honorable lady, has the comfort of seeing her daughter and grandchildren under the same economy, especially Mr. Charles Spencer (13), a youth of extraordinary hopes, very learned for his age, and ingenious, and under a Governor of great worth. Happy were it, could as much be said of the elder brother, the Lord Spencer, who, rambling about the world, dishonors both his name and his family, adding sorrow to sorrow to a mother, who has taken all imaginable care of his education. There is a daughter (17) very young married to the Earl of Clancarty (20), who has a great and fair estate in Ireland, but who yet gives no great presage of worth,—so universally contaminated is the youth of this corrupt and abandoned age! But this is again recompensed by my Lord Arran (30), a sober and worthy gentleman, who has espoused the Lady Ann Spencer (21), a young lady of admirable accomplishments and virtue.

Castor

Chacombe Priory

On 04 Oct 1325 John Segrave 2nd Baron Segrave 1256-1325 (69) died at Chacombe Priory. His son Stephen Segrave 3rd Baron Segrave 1285-1325 (40) succeeded 3rd Baron Segrave (2C 1295).

Chaucombe

On 12 Nov 1295 Nicholas Segrave 1st Baron Segrave 1238-1295 (57) died at Chaucombe. His son John Segrave 2nd Baron Segrave 1256-1325 (39) succeeded 2nd Baron Segrave (2C 1295). Christiana Plessey Baroness Segrave by marriage Baroness Segrave (2C 1295).

Collyweston

Around 1475 John Stokesley Bishop of London 1475-1539 was born at Collyweston.

In 1499 Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 (55) took a vow of chastity in the presence of Richard FitzJames, Bishop of London with, apparently, the permission of her husband; it was always a marriage of convenience. Thereafter the Countess (55) lived at Collyweston.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge, St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

After 27 Jun 1503 Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 stayed at Collyweston.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (35).

Corby

Around 1251 Alicia Ledet Baroness Latimer Corby 1251-1316 was born to Walter Ledet 1230-1256 (21) and Ermentrude Lisle 1228- at Corby.

Around 1256 Walter Ledet 1230-1256 (26) died at Corby.

On 05 Dec 1304 William Latimer 1st Baron Latimer Corby 1243-1304 (61) died at Corby. His son William Latimer 2nd Baron Latimer Corby 1276-1327 (28) succeeded 2nd Baron Latimer Corby.

Pipewell, Corby

Richard I Appoints his Bishops

On 15 Sep 1189 Richard "Lionheart" I King England 1157-1199 (32) held a Council meeting at Pipewell, Corby at which he appointed a number of Bishops:
William Longchamp Bishop of Ely -1197 was elected Bishop of Ely
Godfrey Lucy Bishop of Winchester -1204 was elected Bishop of Winchester
Richard Fitzneal Bishop of London 1130-1198 (59) was elected Bishop of London
Hubert Walter Archbishop of Canterbury 1160-1205 (29) was elected Bishop of Salisbury.

Rockingham, Corby

On 01 Mar 1617 Edward Watson of Rockingham Castle 1549-1617 (68) died at Rockingham, Corby.

Rockingham Castle, Rockingham, Corby

1220. Letter VIII. Isabella Angoulême Queen Consort England 1188-1246 to her son Henry III King England 1207-1272. 1220. Letter VIII. Isabella Angoulême Queen Consort England 1188-1246 (32) to her son Henry III King England 1207-1272 (12).
To her dearest son Henry, by the grace of God king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, earl of Anjou, Isabella, by the same grace queen of England, lady of Ireland, duchess of Normandy and Aquitaine, countess of Anjou and Angoulême, sends health and her maternal benediction.
We hereby signify to you that when the Earls of March and Eu departed this life, the lord Hugh de Lusignan (37) remained alone and without heirs in Poitou, and his friends would not permit that our daughter should be united to him in marriage, because her age is so tender, but counselled him to take a wife from whom he might speedily hope for an heir; and it was proposed that he should take a wife in France, which if he had done, all your land in Poitou and Gascony would be lost. We, therefore, seeing the great peril that might accrue if that marriage should take place, when our counsellors could give us no advice, ourselves married the said Hugh earl of March (37); and God knows that we did this rather for your benefit than our own. Wherefore we entreat you, as our dear son, that this thing may be pleasing to you, seeing it conduces greatly to the profit of you and yours; and we earnestly pray you that you will restore to him his lawful right, that is Niort, the castles of Exeter and Rockingham, and 3500 marks, which your father, our former husband, bequeathed to us; and so, if it please you, deal with him, who is so powerful, that he may not remain against you, since he can serve you well — for he is wdl-disposed to serve you faithfully with all his power; and we are certain and undertake that he shall serve you well if you will restore to him his rights, and, therefore, we advise that you take opportune counsel on these matters; and, when it shall please you, you may send for our daughter, your sister, by a trusty messenger and your letters patent, and we will send her to you.

Culworth

In 1449 Margery Danvers 1449-1510 was born to Richard Danvers 1428-1489 (21) at Culworth at Culworth.

Around 1452 John Danvers 1452-1514 was born to Richard Danvers 1428-1489 (24) at Culworth.

See St Mary the Virgin Church, Culworth

Daventry

Around 1090 Saer Quincy 1090-1158 was born at Daventry.

Althorp House, Daventry

On 04 May 1549 Alice Spencer Countess Derby 1549-1637 was born to John Spencer 1524-1586 (25) and Katherine Kitson 1524-1586 (25) at Althorp House, Daventry.

On 29 Jun 1552 Elizabeth Spencer Baroness Hunsdon, Baroness Eure 1552-1618 was born to John Spencer 1524-1586 (28) and Katherine Kitson 1524-1586 (28) at Althorp House, Daventry.

Around 1570 Robert Spencer 1st Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1570-1627 was born to John Spencer 1549-1600 (21) and Mary Caitlin Unknown at Althorp House, Daventry.

Before 24 Aug 1588 Mary Spencer 1588-1658 was born to Robert Spencer 1st Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1570-1627 and Margaret Willoughby 1566-1597 at Althorp House, Daventry.

On or before 04 Jan 1591 William Spencer 2nd Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1591-1636 was born to Robert Spencer 1st Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1570-1627 (21) and Margaret Willoughby 1566-1597 (24) at Althorp House, Daventry. He was baptised on 04 Jan 1591 at Brington.

The Entertainment at Althorp

On 25 Jun 1603 the Ben Johnson Playwright 1572-1637 Masque the The Entertainment at Althorp was performed at Althorp House, Daventry to welcome the new Royal Family on their journey from Edinburgh to London following the death of Queen Elizabeth. The performance was attended by Anne of Denmark Queen Consort Scotland, England and Ireland 1574-1619 (28) and her son Henry Frederick Stewart Prince Wales 1594-1612 (9).

After 07 Feb 1612 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662. Elizabeth's standing collar of reticella is worked with the Royal coat of arms with its lion and unicorn supporters. She wears a gown of Italian silk brocade. The black armband is thought to be a sign of mourning for her brother Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales who died on 07 Feb 1612.

Before 23 Nov 1620 Henry Spencer 1st Earl of Sunderland 1620-1643 was born to William Spencer 2nd Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1591-1636 and Penelope Wriothesley Baroness Spencer Wormleighton 1598-1667 at Althorp House, Daventry.

Before 02 Feb 1629 Robert Spencer 1st Viscount Teviot 1629-1694 was born to William Spencer 2nd Baron Spencer Wormleighton 1591-1636 and Penelope Wriothesley Baroness Spencer Wormleighton 1598-1667 at Althorp House, Daventry.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 July. 14 Jul 1675. I went to see my Lord Sunderland's (33) Seat at Althorpe, four miles from the ragged town of Northampton (since burned, and well rebuilt). It is placed in a pretty open bottom, very finely watered and flanked with stately woods and groves in a park, with a canal, but the water is not running, which is a defect. The house, a kind of modern building, of freestone, within most nobly furnished; the apartments very commodious, a gallery and noble hall; but the kitchen being in the body of the house, and chapel too small, were defects. There is an old yet honorable gatehouse standing awry, and out-housing mean, but designed to be taken away. It was moated round, after the old manner, but it is now dry, and turfed with a beautiful carpet. Above all, are admirable and magnificent the several ample gardens furnished with the choicest fruit, and exquisitely kept. Great plenty of oranges, and other curiosities. The park full of fowl, especially herons, and from it a prospect to Holmby House, which being demolished in the late civil wars, shows like a Roman ruin shaded by the trees about it, a stately, solemn, and pleasing view.

John Evelyn's Diary 1678 January. 23d January 1678. Dined with the Duke of Norfolk (49), being the first time I had seen him since the death of his elder brother, who died at Padua in Italy, where he had resided above thirty years. The Duke (49) had now newly declared his marriage to his concubine (35), whom he promised me he never would marry. I went with him to see the Duke of Buckingham (49), thence to my Lord Sunderland (36), now Secretary of State, to show him that rare piece of Vosterman's (son of old Vosterman), which was a view, or landscape of my Lord's palace, etc., at Althorpe in Northamptonshire.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 August. 15 Aug 1688. I went to Althorpe, in Northamptonshire, seventy miles. A coach and four horses took up me and my son at Whitehall, and carried us to Dunstable, where we arrived and dined at noon, and from thence another coach and six horses carried us to Althorpe, four miles beyond Northampton, where we arrived by seven o'clock that evening. Both these coaches were hired for me by that noble Countess of Sunderland (42), who invited me to her house at Althorpe, where she entertained me and my son with very extraordinary kindness; I stayed till the Thursday.

John Evelyn's Diary 1688 August. 18 Aug 1688. Dr. Jeffryes, the minister of Althorpe, who was my Lord's chaplain when ambassador in France, preached the shortest discourse I ever heard; but what was defective in the amplitude of his sermon, he had supplied in the largeness and convenience of the parsonage house, which the doctor (who had at least £600 a year in spiritual advancement) had newly built, and made fit for a person of quality to live in, with gardens and all accommodation according therewith.
My lady (42) carried us to see Lord Northampton's (23) Seat, a very strong, large house, built with stone, not altogether modern. They were enlarging the garden, in which was nothing extraordinary, except the iron gate opening into the park, which indeed was very good work, wrought in flowers painted with blue and gilded. There is a noble walk of elms toward the front of the house by the bowling green. I was not in any room of the house besides a lobby looking into the garden, where my Lord (23) and his new Countess (19) (Sir Stephen Fox's (61) daughter, whom I had known from a child) entertained the Countess (42) and her daughter the Countess of Arran (21) (newly married to the son (30) of the Duke of Hamilton (53)), with so little good grace, and so dully, that our visit was very short, and so we returned to Althorpe, twelve miles distant.
The house, or rather palace, at Althorpe, is a noble uniform pile in form of a half H, built of brick and freestone, balustered and à la moderne; the hall is well, the staircase excellent; the rooms of state, galleries, offices and furniture, such as may become a great prince. It is situated in the midst of a garden, exquisitely planted and kept, and all this in a park walled in with hewn stone, planted with rows and walks of trees, canals and fish ponds, and stored with game. And, what is above all this, governed by a lady (42), who without any show of solicitude, keeps everything in such admirable order, both within and without, from the garret to the cellar, that I do not believe there is any in this nation, or in any other, that exceeds her (42) in such exact order, without ostentation, but substantially great and noble. The meanest servant is lodged so neat and cleanly; the service at the several tables, the good order and decency—in a word, the entire economy is perfectly becoming a wise and noble person. She is one who for her distinguished esteem of me from a long and worthy friendship, I must ever honor and celebrate. I wish from my soul the Lord (46), her husband (whose parts and abilities are otherwise conspicuous), was as worthy of her, as by a fatal apostasy and court-ambition he (46) has made himself unworthy! This is what she deplores, and it renders her as much affliction as a lady of great soul and much prudence is capable of. The Countess of Bristol (68), her mother, a grave and honorable lady, has the comfort of seeing her daughter and grandchildren under the same economy, especially Mr. Charles Spencer (13), a youth of extraordinary hopes, very learned for his age, and ingenious, and under a Governor of great worth. Happy were it, could as much be said of the elder brother, the Lord Spencer, who, rambling about the world, dishonors both his name and his family, adding sorrow to sorrow to a mother, who has taken all imaginable care of his education. There is a daughter (17) very young married to the Earl of Clancarty (20), who has a great and fair estate in Ireland, but who yet gives no great presage of worth,—so universally contaminated is the youth of this corrupt and abandoned age! But this is again recompensed by my Lord Arran (30), a sober and worthy gentleman, who has espoused the Lady Ann Spencer (21), a young lady of admirable accomplishments and virtue.

John Evelyn's Diary 1689 July. 11 Jul 1689. I dined at Lord Clarendon's, it being his lady's wedding day, when about three in the afternoon there was an unusual and violent storm of thunder, rain, and wind; many boats on the Thames were overwhelmed, and such was the impetuosity of the wind as to carry up the waves in pillars and spouts most dreadful to behold, rooting up trees and ruining some houses. The Countess of Sunderland (43) afterward told me that it extended as far as Althorpe at the very time, which is seventy miles from London. It did no harm at Deptford, but at Greenwich it did much mischief.

John Evelyn's Diary 1690 October. 12 Oct 1690. The French General, with Tyrconnel (60) and their forces, gone back to France, beaten out by King William. Cork delivered on discretion. The Duke of Grafton was there mortally wounded and dies. Very great storms of wind. The 8th of this month Lord Spencer (49) wrote me word from Althorpe, that there happened an Earthquake the day before in the morning, which, though short, sensibly shook the house. The "Gazette" acquainted us that the like happened at the same time, half-past seven, at Barnstaple, Holyhead, and Dublin. We were not sensible of it here.

John Evelyn's Diary 1695 November. 13 Nov 1695. Famous fireworks and very chargeable, the King (45) being returned from his progress. He stayed seven or eight days at Lord Sunderland's (54) at Althorpe, where he was mightily entertained. These fireworks were shown before Lord Romney (54), Master of the Ordnance, in St. James's great square, where the King (45) stood.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (24). Portrait of William III King England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (29) wearing his Garter Collar.

On 28 Sep 1702 Robert Spencer 2nd Earl of Sunderland 1641-1702 (61) died at Althorp House, Daventry. His son Charles Spencer 3rd Earl of Sunderland 1675-1722 (27) succeeded 3rd Earl of Sunderland (2C 1643), 5th Baron Spencer Wormleighton. Anne Churchill Countess Sunderland 1683-1716 (19) by marriage Countess of Sunderland (2C 1643).

On 19 Dec 1734 John Spencer 1st Earl Spencer 1734-1783 was born to John Spencer 1708-1746 (26) and Georgiana Caroline Carteret 1716-1780 (18) at Althorp House, Daventry.

On 20 Dec 1755 John Spencer 1st Earl Spencer 1734-1783 (21) and Margaret Georgiana Poyntz Countess Spencer 1737-1814 (18) were married at Althorp House, Daventry.

On 07 Jun 1757 Georgiana Spencer Duchess Devonshire 1757-1806 was born to John Spencer 1st Earl Spencer 1734-1783 (22) and Margaret Georgiana Poyntz Countess Spencer 1737-1814 (20) at Althorp House, Daventry.

On 31 Aug 1997 Diana Spencer Princess Wales 1961-1997 (36) died at Pitié-Salpetrière Hospital. She was buried at Althorp House, Daventry.

Cottesbroke

Cottesbrooke Hall

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824-1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. The beautiful and unfortunate Empress Elizabeth of Austria (39) rented Cottesbroke from my cousins the Langhams, and her exploits in the hunting-field are well known. Bay Middleton was always staying at Cottesbroke, and used generally to give the Empress a "lead."
The Empress found Sunday rather a dull day at Cottesbroke, so she had jumps made all round the park, and at 6 o'clock every Sunday morning she and Bay Middleton used to ride together, and taking the jumps became her unvarying Sunday amusement.
Her biographers have not flattered her when they describe her as being singularly handsome, for she was indeed a queenly figure, and I think her only personal defects were her hands and feet, which were large and ungainly. It is said that when Elizabeth (39) first met the Empress Eugenie (50) she was very jealous of her tiny extremities, for Eugenie's hands and feet were exceptionally small.

Around 1865. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (59). Portrait of Empress Elisabeth of Austria 1837-1898 (27).

Around 1854. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (48). Portrait of Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920 (27).

In 1853. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873 (47). Portrait of Empress Eugénie of France 1826-1920 (26).

See Deene

Drayton

On 16 Jun 1601 Lewis Mordaunt 3rd Baron Mordaunt 1538-1601 (62) died at Drayton. On 16 Jun 1601 His son Henry Mordaunt 4th Baron Mordaunt 1567-1608 (34) succeeded 4th Baron Mordaunt.

Farmingwood or Farming Woods

On 14 Dec 1841 Anne Fitzpatrick -1841 died at Farmingwood or Farming Woods. Monument in St James the Apostle Church, Grafton Underwood sculpted by Richard "The Younger" Sculptor Westmacott 1799-1892 (42).

Farthinghoe

Before 03 Oct 1646 Roland Egerton 1st Baronet Egerton and Oulton -1646 died. On 03 Oct 1646 he was buried at Farthinghoe. His son John Egerton 2nd Baronet Egerton and Oulton -1674 succeeded 2nd Baronet Egerton and Oulton.

On 28 Jul 1648 Bridget Grey Baronetess Egerton and Oulton -1648 died. She was buried at Farthinghoe.

See Church of St Michael, Farthinghoe

Fawsley

In 1455 Richard Knightley 1455-1534 was born in Fawsley.

In 1514 William Spencer 1496-1532 (18) and Susan Knightley were married at Fawsley.

On 08 Dec 1534 Richard Knightley 1455-1534 (79) died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.
Monument to sculpted by Richard Parker of Burton on Trent in St Mary's Church, Fawsley. Gabled Headress. Lancastrian Esses Collar.

On 08 May 1566 Valentine Knightley 1495-1566 (71) died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.
On 12 Dec 1554 Anne Ferrers 1495-1554 (59) died.
Monument in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

On 03 Apr 1623 Lucius Knightley 1623-1691 was born to Richard Knightley 1580-1691 (43) in Fawsley.

On 24 Feb 1658 Richard Knightley 1658-1728 was born to Lucius Knightley 1623-1691 (34) in Fawsley.

In 1684 Lucius Knightley 1684-1738 was born to Richard Knightley 1658-1728 (25) in Fawsley.

On 22 Oct 1691 Lucius Knightley 1623-1691 (68) died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

On 22 Oct 1691 Richard Knightley 1580-1691 died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

On 01 Sep 1718 Valentine Knightley 1718-1754 was born to Lucius Knightley 1684-1738 (34) in Fawsley.

On 09 Jul 1728 Richard Knightley 1658-1728 (70) died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

On 20 Aug 1738 Lucius Knightley 1684-1738 (54) died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

On 02 May 1754 Valentine Knightley 1718-1754 (35) died in Fawsley. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

Fawsley Hall, Fawsley

In 1575 Richard Knightley 1532-1615 (43) entertained Queen Elizabeth I (41) at Fawsley Hall, Fawsley. The Queen stayed in the Jane Skenard Room,Fawsley Hall, Fawsley.

See St Mary's Church, Fawsley

Fotheringhay

Fotheringay Castle

On 10 Aug 1439 Anne York Duchess Exeter 1439-1476 was born to Richard 3rd Duke York 1411-1460 (27) and Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (24) at Fotheringay Castle.

On 03 May 1446 Margaret Duchess of Burgundy 1446-1503 was born to Richard 3rd Duke York 1411-1460 (34) and Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (31) at Fotheringay Castle.

On 02 Oct 1452 Richard III King England 1452-1485 was born to Richard 3rd Duke York 1411-1460 (41) and Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (37) at Fotheringay Castle.

On May 1554 Edward Courtenay 1st Earl Devon 1527-1556 (27) was imprisoned at Fotheringay Castle.

In Nov 1586 Robert Beale Clerk 1541-1601 (45) was sent with Thomas Sackville 1st Earl Dorset 1536-1608 (50) to Fotheringay Castle to notify Mary Queen of Scots (43) that sentence of death had been passed upon her.

Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

The Letter Books of Amias Paulet Keeper of Mary queen of Scots Published 1874 Marys Execution. Execution of Mary Queen of Scots.The inventory of the property of the Queen of Scots (44), alluded to in the foregoing letter, is printed in Prince Labanoff's collection, in which it occupies more than twenty pages. Poulet (54) compiled it by summoning Mary's servants before him, and requesting each of them to give him a written note of all that the Queen (44) had given them. A comparison of this inventory, made after Mary's death, with a former one, dated June 13, 1586, which Prince Labanoff found amongst M. de Chateauneuf's papers enables us to see that Mr. Froude has been led into a curious error respecting Mary Stuart's dress at the scaffold by the anonymous writer whose account he follows in preference to the narratives drawn up by responsible witnesses. It may seem to be of little importance, but as Mr. Froude has chosen to represent the last moments of Mary's life as "brilliant acting throughout," he should at least have been accurate in his details. He even goes so far as to say that she was deprived of the assistance of her chaplain for "fear of some religious melodrame." As to her dress, he says, "She (44) stood on the black scaffold with the black figures all around her, blood-red from head to foot. Her reasons for adopting so extraordinary a costume must be left to conjecture. It is only certain that it must have been carefully studied, and that the pictorial effect must have been appalling." And he quotes from the Vray Rapport the words, "Ainsy fut executee toute en rouge. [Translation: So was executed all in red.]"
The rouge was not " blood-red," but a dark red brown. Blackwood says that she wore, with a pourpoint or bodice of black satin, "une Juppe de vellours cramoisi brun," and the narrative called La Mort de la Royne d'Escosse says the same. There it is in the June inventory, "Une juppe de velloux cramoisy brun, bandee de passement noir, doublee de taffetas de couleur brune." In the inventory taken after her death it is wanting. As it happens, if she had wished to be "blood-red," she might have been so, for in the wardrobe there was "satin figure incarnat," " escarlate," and " satin incarnate." These figure both in the June and February inventories. When she was dressed "le plus proprement qu'elle put et mieux que de coutume," she said to her maids of honour, "Mes amies, je vous eusse laisse plustost cet accoustrement que celui d'hier, sinon qu'il faut que j'aille a la mort un peu honnorablement, et que j'aye quelque chose plus que le commun." "La tragedie finie," continues Blackwood, " les pauvres damoiselles, soigneuses de rhonneur de leur maistresse s'adresserent a Paulet son gardien, et le prierent que le bourreau ne touchast plus au corps de sa Majeste, et qu'il leur fust permis de la despouiller, apres que le monde seroit retire, afin qu'aucune indignite ne fust faitte au corps, promettant de luy rendre la despouille, et tout ce qu'il pourroit demander. Mais ce maudict et espou- ventable Cerbere les renvoya fort lourdement, leur commandant de sortir de la salle. Cependant le bourreau la dechausse, et la manie a sa discretion. Apres qu'il eust fait tout ce qu'il voulust, le corps fut porte en une chambre joignante celle de ces serviteurs, bien fermee de peur qu'ils n'y entrassent pour luy rendre leurs debvoirs. Ce qui augmenta grandement leur ennuy, ils la voyoient par le trou de la serrure demy couverte d'un morceau de drop de bure qu'on avoit arrache de la table du billard, dont nous avous parle cy dessus, et prioyent Dieu a la porte, dont Paulet (54) s'appercevant fist boucher le trou."
The executioner snatched from her hand the little gold cross that she took from her neck. "Sa Majeste osta hors de son col line croix d'or, qu'elle vouloit bailler a mie de ses filles, disant au maistre d'oeuvres, Mon amy, cecy n'est pas k vostre usage, laissez la a cette damoiselle elle vous baillera en Argent plus qu'elle ne vaut; il luy arracha d'entre les mains fort rudement, disant, C'est mon droit. C'eust este merveille qu'elle eust trouve courtoisie en un bourreau Anglois, qui ne I'avoit jamais sceu trouver entre les plus honestes du pais, sinon tant qu'ils en pouvoient tirer de profit." It was worthy of Poulet (54) to insist that, even though everything Mary wore was to be burnt and the headsman was to lose his perquisites lest he should sell them for relics, it was to be by his hands that they should be taken from the person of his victim.
Several narratives of the execution exist. The most complete, attributed to Bourgoin, is printed in Jebb. Sir H. Ellis and Robertson print the official report of the Commissioners. Then there is Chateauneuf's Report to Henry III., February 27, 1587, N.S., in Teulet, and a narrative drawn up for Burghley by R. W. (Richard Wigmore). Blackwood also furnishes an interesting and trustworthy description. The anonymous Vray Rapport will be found in Teulet. Mr. Froude appears to have selected it, partly because it was possible to expand the Realistic description of the dissevered head, and in particular the inevitable contraction of the features, into the gross and pitiless caricature which he permits himself of the poor wreck of humanity; partly too, because the Vray Rapport, in direct contradiction to the other accounts, supports his assertion that Mary was "dreadfully agitated" on receiving the message of death from the two Earls. To convey the impression that the writer was bodily present on that occasion, Mr. Froude introduces him as "evidently an eye-witness, one of the Queen of Scots' (44) own attendants, probably her surgeon." But the narrative shows us that the writer, whoever he was, could not have been one of Mary's attendants, nor even acquainted with them, for he designates the two ladies who assisted their mistress at the scaffold as "deux damoiselles, I'une Francoise nommee damoiselle Ramete, et l'autre Escossoise, qui avait nom Ersex." There were no such names in Mary's household. The two ladies were both Scottish, Jane Kennedy and Elspeth Curie, Gilbert Curle's sister. Mr. Froude says, "Barbara Mowbray bound her eyes with a handkerchief." It was Jane Kennedy who performed for her this last service.
Poulet's (54) inventory, amongst other things, contains the following entry : "Memorandum that the Priest claimeth as of the said late Queen's gift, a silver chalice with a cover, two silver cruets, four images, the one of our Lady in red coral, with divers other vestments and necessaries belonging to a Massing Priest." When the scaffold had been taken away, the Priest was allowed to leave his room and join the rest of the household. On the morning after the execution he said Mass for Mary's soul; but on the afternoon of that day Melville and Bourgoin were sent for by Poulet, who gave orders that the altar should be taken down, and demanded an oath that Mass should not be said again. Melville excused himself as he was a Protestant and not concerned; the physician stoutly refused. Poulet (54) sent for the Priest, and required the coffer in which the vestments were kept to be brought to him. Du Preau, who was evidently a timid man, took the oath that Poulet (54) insisted on, little thinking that he was pledging himself for six months. "II jura sur la bible de ne faire aucune office de religion, craignant d'estre resserre en prison."
The household of the late Queen (44) were not allowed to depart as soon as Poulet (54) expected. They were detained at Fotheringay, from motives of policy, till the 3rd of August, when the funeral of their mistress having been at last performed, they were set free. Some of them were taken to Peterborough to accompany the corpse and to be present at the funeral ceremonies on the 1st of August. Amongst them, in the order of the procession, it is surprising to find Mary's chaplain, "Monsieur du Preau, aumosnier, en long manteau, portant une croix d'Argent en main." The account of the funeral from which this is taken, written by one of the late Queen's (44) household, takes care to mention that when they reached the choir of Peterborough Minster, and the choristers began "a chanter a leur fagon en langage Anglois," they all, with the exception of Andrew Melville and Barbara Mowbray, left the church and walked in the cloisters till the service was finished. "Si les Anglois," he says, "et principalement le Roy des heraux . . . estoit en extreme cholere, d'autant estoient joieux et contents les Catholiques."
Poulet left for London, and as long as Mary's servants were detained at Fotheringay, he seems to have retained jurisdiction over them. It was to him, therefore, that Melville and Bourgoin applied in March for leave to sell their horses and to write into France respecting the bequests made to them by the Queen of Scots ; and to him that Darrell forwarded in June "the petition of the whole household and servants of the late Queen of Scotland remaining at Fotheringay," begging to be released from their prison and to be allowed to leave the country.
Poulet (54), as has already been said, was made Chancellor of the Garter in April, 1587, but he did not retain this preferment for a whole year. He continued in the Captaincy of Jersey up to his death, but he appears to have resided in and near London. In the British Museum are two letters from him of small importance. One, addressed to the Lord High Admiral, is dated, "From my poor lodging in Fleet Street, the 14th of January, 1587," about "right of tenths in Jersey, belonging to the Government." The other, "From my little lodge at Twickenham, the 24th of April, 1588," "on behalf of Berry," whose divorce was referred by the Justices of the Common Pleas to four Doctors of the Civil Law, of whom Mr. Doctor Caesar, Judge of the Admiralty, to whom the letter was written, was one.
His name also occurs in a letter, from Walsingham to Burghley, dated May 23, 1587, while Elizabeth still kept up the farce of Burghley's disgrace for despatching Mary Stuart's death-warrant. "Touching the Chancellorship of the Duchy, she told Sir Amias Poulet that in respect of her promise made unto me, she would not dispose of it otherwise. But yet hath he no power to deliver the seals unto me, though for that purpose the Attorney is commanded to attend him, who I suppose will be dismissed hence this day with- out any resolution." And on the 4th of January following, together with the other lords of the Council, he signed a letter addressed by the Privy Council to the Lord Admiral and to Lord Buckhurst, the Lieutenants of Sussex, against such Catholics as "most obstinately have refused to come to the church to prayers and divine service," requiring them to " cause the most obstinate and noted persons to be committed to such prisons as are fittest for their safe keeping : the rest that are of value, and not so obstinate, are to be referred to the custody of some -ecclesiastical persons and other gentlemen well affected, to remain at the charges of the recusant, to be restrained in such sort as they may be forthcoming, and kept from intelligence with one another." On the 26th of September, in the year in which this letter was written, 1588, Sir Amias Poulet died.
Poulet was buried in St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London.When that church was pulled down to be rebuilt, his remains, with the handsome. Monument erected over them, were Removed to the parish church of Hinton St. George. After various panegyrics in Latin, French, and English inscribed on his. Monument, a quatrain, expressive apparently of royal favour, pays the following tribute to the service rendered by him to the State as Keeper of the Queen of Scots: Never shall cease to spread wise Poulet's fame; These will speak, and men shall blush for shame: Without offence to speak what I do know, Great is the debt England to him doth owe.

Presence Chamber, Fotheringay Castle

Trial of Mary Queen of Scots

On 14 Oct 1586 Henry Compton 1st Baron Compton 1544-1589 (42), Lewis Mordaunt 3rd Baron Mordaunt 1538-1601 (48), Henry Wentworth 3rd Baron Wentworth 1558-1593 (28), Christopher Wray 1524-1592 (62), John Stourton 9th Baron Stourton 1553-1588 (33) and Edward Zouche 11th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1556-1625 (30) sat in judgement on Mary Queen of Scots (43) in the Presence Chamber, Fotheringay Castle.
Anthony Browne 1st Viscount Montague 1528-1592, George Clifford 3rd Earl Cumberland 1558-1605 (28), Henry Clinton 2nd Earl Lincoln 1539-1616 (47), Henry Grey 6th Earl Kent 1541-1615 (45), Edward Manners 3rd Earl Rutland 1549-1587 (37), Henry Stanley 4th Earl Derby 1531-1593 (55), Ambrose Dudley 3rd Earl Warwick 1530-1590 (56), George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury, 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (58), Edward Vere 17th Earl Oxford 1550-1604 (36), William Somerset 3rd Earl Worcester 1526-1589 (60), William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (66), Henry Herbert 2nd Earl Pembroke 1538-1601 (48) and Thomas Bromley Lord Chancellor 1530-1587 (56) were present on the side of the Presence Chamber, Fotheringay Castle.
John St John 2nd Baron St John Bletso -1596 was present on the left side of the Presence Chamber, Fotheringay Castle.
John Stourton 9th Baron Stourton 1553-1588 (33) was a juror.

In 1568 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Henry Wentworth 3rd Baron Wentworth 1558-1593 (9).

In 1582 Seventtenth Century copy.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Christopher Wray 1524-1592 (58).

Around 1576 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart I Queen Scotland 1542-1587 (33).

Around 1590 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Unknown Man. Possibly George Clifford 3rd Earl Cumberland 1558-1605 (31).

Around 1575 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Henry Stanley 4th Earl Derby 1531-1593 (43).

Around 1650 based on a work of 1575.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Edward Vere 17th Earl Oxford 1550-1604.

Around 1565 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (44). His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

After 1590 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His left-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Great Hall, Fotheringay Castle

Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

Original Letters Illustrative of English History Second Series Volume III. Ellis notes that "the present narrative is from the Lansdowne MS. 51. art. 46. It is indorsed in Lord Burghley's hand, "8 Feb. 1586. The Manner of the Q. of Scotts death at Fodrynghay, wr. by Ro. Wy.
A Reporte of the manner of the execution of the Sc. Q. performed the viijth. of February, Anno 1586 [modern dating 1587] in the great hall of Fotheringhay, with relacion of speeches uttered and accions happening in the said execution, from the delivery of the said Sc. Q. to Mr Thomas Androwes Esquire Sherife of the County of Northampton unto the end of said execution.
THE READER shall now be presented with the Execution of the Queen of Scots (44) which was to the Court or three Statements of this Transaction were There was a Short one copies of which are Manuscripts Jul F vi foll 246 266 b and b Another a Copy of the Account of the Earl to the Lords of the Council dated on the day is MS Calig C ix fol 163 And there is a Office somewhat longer said to have been drawn evidently one of her servants present Narrative is from the Lansdowne MS in Lord Burghley s hand 8 Feb 1586 of Scotts death at Fodrynghay wr by Ro Wy Queen s death have been dressed up from writers but it is here given accurate and entire.
First, the said Scottish Queen, being carried by two of Sir Amias Paulett's (54) gentlemen, and the Sheriff (46) going before her, came most willingly out of her chamber into an entry next the Hall, at which place the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), commissioners for the execution, with the two governors of her person, and divers knights and gentlemen did meet her, where they found one of the Scottish Queen's servants, named Melvin [NOTE. Possibly Andrew Melville of Garvock Steward], kneeling on his knees, who uttered these words with tears to the Queen of Scots (44), his mistress, "Madam, it will be the sorrowfullest message that ever I carried, when I shall report that my Queen (44) and dear mistress is dead." Then the Queen of Scots, shedding tears, answered him, "You ought to rejoice rather than weep for that the end of Mary Stuart's (44) troubles is now come. Thou knowest, Melvin, that all this world is but vanity, and full of troubles and sorrows; carry this message from me, and tell my friends that I die a true woman to my religion, and like a true Scottish woman and a true Frenchwoman. But God forgive them that have long desired my end; and He that is the true Judge of all secret thoughts knoweth my mind, how that it ever hath been my desire to have Scotland and England united together. Commend me to my son, and tell him that I have not done anything that may prejudice his kingdom of Scotland; and so, good Melvin, farewell;" and kissing him, she bade him pray for her.
Then she (44) turned to the Lords and told them that she had certain requests to make unto them. One was for a sum of money, which she said Sir Amyas Paulet (54) knew of, to be paid to one Curle her servant; next, that all her poor servants might enjoy that quietly which by her Will and Testament she had given unto them; and lastly, that they might be all well entreated, and sent home safely and honestly into their countries. "And this I do conjure you, my Lords, to do."
Answer was made by Sir Amyas Paulet (54), "I do well remember the money your Grace speaketh of, and your Grace need not to make any doubt of the not performance of your requests, for I do surely think they shall be granted."
"I have," said she, "one other request to make unto you, my Lords, that you will suffer my poor servants to be present about me, at my death, that they may report when they come into their countries how I died a true woman to my religion."
Then the Earl of Kent (46), one of the commissioners, answered, "Madam, it cannot well be granted, for that it is feared lest some of them would with speeches both trouble and grieve your Grace, and disquiet the company, of which we have had already some experience, or seek to wipe their napkins in some of your blood, which were not convenient." "My Lord," said the Queen of Scots, "I will give my word and promise for them that they shall not do any such thing as your Lordship has named. Alas! poor souls, it would do them good to bid me farewell. And I hope your Mistress (53), being a maiden Queen, in regard of womanhood, will suffer me to have some of my own people about me at my death. And I know she hath not given you so straight a commission, but that you may grant me more than this, if I were a far meaner woman than I am." And then (seeming to be grieved) with some tears uttered these words: "You know that I am cousin to your Queen (53) [NOTE. They were first-cousin once-Removed], and descended from the blood of Henry the Seventh [NOTE. She was a Great Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509], a married Queen of France [NOTE. She had married Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560], and the anointed Queen of Scotland."
Whereupon, after some consultation, they granted that she (44) might have some of her servants according to her Grace's request, and therefore desired her to make choice of half-a-dozen of her men and women: who presently said that of her men she would have Melvin, her apothecary, her surgeon, and one other old man beside; and of her women, those two that did use to lie in her chamber.
After this, she being supported by Sir Amias's (54) two gentlemen aforesaid, and Melvin carrying up her train, and also accompanied with the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen aforenamed, the Sheriff (46) going before her, she passed out of the entry into the Great Hall, with her countenance careless, importing thereby rather mirth than mournful cheer, and so she willingly stepped up to the scaffold which was prepared for her in the Hall, being two feet high and twelve feet broad, with rails round about, hung and covered with black, with a low stool, long cushion, and block, covered with black also. Then, having the stool brought her, she sat her down; by her, on the right hand, sat the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), and on the left hand stood the Sheriff (46), and before her the two executioners; round about the rails stood Knights, Gentlemen, and others.
Then, silence being made, the Queen's Majesty's Commission for the execution of the Queen of Scots (44) was openly read by Mr. Beale, clerk of the Council (46); and these words pronounced by the Assembly, "God save the Queen." During the reading of which Commission the Queen of Scots (44) was silent, listening unto it with as small regard as if it had not concerned her at all; and with as cheerful a countenance as if it had been a pardon from her Majesty (53) for her life; using as much strangeness in word and deed as if she had never known any of the Assembly, or had been ignorant of the English language.
Then one Doctor Fletcher, Dean of Peterborough (42), standing directly before her, without the rail, bending his body with great reverence, began to utter this exhortation following: "Madam, the Queen's most excellent Majesty," &c, and iterating these words three or four times, she told him, "Mr. Dean (42), I am settled in the ancient Catholic Roman religion, and mind to spend my blood in defence of it." Then Mr. Dean (42) said: "Madam, change your opinion, and repent you of your former wickedness, and settle your faith only in Jesus Christ, by Him to be saved." Then she (44) answered again and again, "Mr. Dean (42), trouble not yourself any more, for I am settled and resolved in this my religion, and am purposed therein to die." Then the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), perceiving her (44) so obstinate, told her that since she would not hear the exhortation begun by Mr. Dean (42), "We will pray for your Grace, that it stand with God's will you may have your heart lightened, even at the last hour, with the true knowledge of God, and so die therein." Then she answered, "If you will pray for me, my Lords, I will thank you; but to join in prayer with you I will not, for that you and I are not of one religion."
Then the Lords called for Mr. Dean (42), who, kneeling on the scaffold stairs, began this prayer, "O most gracious God and merciful Father," &c, all the Assembly, saving the Queen of Scots (44) and her servants, saying after him. During the saying of which prayer, the Queen of Scots (44), sitting upon a stool, having about her neck an Agnus Dei, in her hand a crucifix, at her girdle a pair of beads with a golden cross at the end of them, a Latin book in her hand, began with tears and with loud and fast voice to pray in Latin; and in the midst of her prayers she slided off from her stool, and kneeling, said divers Latin prayers; and after the end of Mr. Dean's (42) prayer, she kneeling, prayed in English to this effect: "For Christ His afflicted Church, and for an end of their troubles; for her son; and for the Queen's Majesty (53), that she might prosper and serve God aright." She conFessed that she hoped to be saved "by and in the blood of Christ, at the foot of whose Crucifix she would shed her blood." Then said the Earl of Kent (46), "Madam, settle Christ Jesus in your heart, and leave those trumperies." Then she little regarding, or nothing at all, his good counsel, went forward with her prayers, desiring that "God would avert His wrath from this Island, and that He would give her grief and forgiveness for her sins." These, with other prayers she made in English, saying she forgave her enemies with all her heart that had long sought her blood, and desired God to convert them to the truth; and in the end of the prayer she desired all saints to make intercession for her to Jesus Christ, and so kissing the crucifix, and crossing of her also, said these words: "Even as Thy arms, O Jesus, were spread here upon the Cross, so receive me into Thy arms of mercy, and forgive me all my sins."
Her (44) prayer being ended, the executioners, kneeling, desired her Grace to forgive them her death; who answered, "I forgive you with all my heart, for now, I hope, you shall make an end of all my troubles." Then they, with her two women, helping of her up, began to disrobe her of her apparel; she never changed her countenance, but with smiling cheer she uttered these words, "that she never had such grooms to make her unready, and that she never put off her clothes before such a company."
Then she (44), being stripped of all her apparel saving her petticoat and kirtle, her two women beholding her made great lamentation, and crying and crossing themselves prayed in Latin; she (44), turning herself to them, embracing them, said these words in French, "Ne criez vous; j'ay promis pour vous;" and so crossing and kissing them, bade them pray for her, and rejoice and not weep, for that now they should see an end of all their mistress's (44) troubles. Then she, with a smiling countenance, turning to her men servants, as Melvin and the rest, standing upon a bench nigh the scaffold, who sometime weeping, sometime crying out aloud, and continually crossing themselves, prayed in Latin, crossing them with her hand bade them farewell; and wishing them to pray for her even until the last hour.
This done, one of the women having a Corpus Christi cloth lapped up three-corner ways, kissing it, put it over the Queen of Scots' (44) face, and pinned it fast to the caul of her head. Then the two women departed from her, and she (44) kneeling down upon the cushion most resolutely, and without any token or fear of death, she spake aloud this Psalm in Latin, "In te, Domine, confido, non confundar in eternum," &c. [Ps. xxv.]. Then, groping for the block, she laid down her head, Putting her chin over the block with both her hands, which holding there, still had been cut off, had they not been espied. Then lying upon the block most quietly, and stretching out her arms, cried, "In manus tuas, Domine," &c, three or four times. Then she (44) lying very still on the block, one of the executioners holding of her slightly with one of his hands, she (44) endured two strokes of the other executioner with an axe, she making very small noise or none at all, and not stirring any part of her from the place where she lay; and so the executioner cut off her head, saving one little grisle, which being cut asunder, he lifted up her head to the view of all the assembly, and bade "God save the Queen." Then her dressing of lawn falling off from her head, it appeared as grey as one of threescore and ten years old, polled very short, her face in a moment being so much altered from the form she had when she was alive, as few could remember her by her dead face. Her lips stirred up and down a quarter of an hour after her head was cut off.
Then Mr. Dean (42) said with a loud voice, "So perish all the Queen's enemies;" and afterwards the Earl of Kent (46) came to the dead body, and standing over it, with a loud voice said, "Such end of all the Queen's and the Gospel's enemies."
Then one of the executioners pulling off her (44) garters, espied her little dog which was crept under her clothes, which could not be gotten forth but by force, yet afterward would not depart from the dead corpse, but came and lay between her head and her shoulders, which being imbrued with her blood, was carried away and washed, as all things else were that had any blood was either burned or clean washed; and the executioners sent away with money for their fees, not having any one thing that belonged unto her. And so, every man being commanded out of the Hall, except the Sheriff (46) and his men, she was carried by them up into a great chamber lying ready for the surgeons to embalm her.

Around 1576 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart I Queen Scotland 1542-1587 (33).

After 1585 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Around 1520 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1560 Francois Clouet Painter 1510-1572 (50). Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560 (15).

On 08 Feb 1587 Mary Queen of Scots (44) was beheaded in the Great Hall in Fotheringhay Castle.
George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury, 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590 (59), Henry Grey 6th Earl Kent 1541-1615 (46), Richard Knightley 1532-1615 (55) and Henry Wriothesley 3rd Earl of Southampton 1573-1624 (13) witnessed her execution.
There are few extant original sources describing Mary's execution. Those that do exist are somewhat contradictory. They include The letter-books of Sir Amias Poulet, Keeper of Mary Queen of Scots, the Calendar of State Papers, Spain (known as the Simancas), Volume 4, 1587-1603 and Beale's sketch of the execution. The most reliable primary source appears to be Jebb's De vita et rebus gestis serenissimæ principis Mariæ Scotorum Reginæ published in Paris in 1589 in French; there doesn't appear to be an extant translation.

St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay

After 25 Oct 1415 Edward York 1st Duke Albemarle aka Aumale, 2nd Duke York 1373-1415 was buried at St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay.

Reburial of Richard and Edmund of York

On 29 Jul 1476 Edward I's paternal grand-father Edward of York, his father Richard of York and and his younger brother Edmund were reburied at St Mary and All Saints in Fotheringhay in a ceremony attended by Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (34), George York 1st Duke Clarence 1449-1478 (26), Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (21), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (45), Anthony Woodville 2nd Earl Rivers 1440-1483 (36).

On 01 Apr 1495 Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (79) made her last will. It was proved 27 Aug 1495.
Source: A Selection From the Wills of Eminent Persons by Camden Society (Great Britain). Published 1838. Transcribed by John Gough Nichols and John Bruce.
IN the name of allmyghty God, the blessed Trinite, fader and son and the holigost, trusting in the meanes and mediacions of oure blessed Lady Moder, of oure most blessed Saviour Jh’u Crist, and by the intercession of holy Saint John Baptist, and all the saintes of heven: I, CECILLE, wife unto the right noble prince Richard late Duke of Yorke, fader unto the most cristen prince my Lord and son King Edward the iiij th , the first day of Aprill the yere of our Lord M.CCCC.lxxxxv. after the computacion of the Church of Englond, of hole mynde and body, loving therfore be it to Jh’u, make and ordeigne my testament in fourme and maner ensuyng.
Furst, I bequeath and surrendour my soule in to the mercifull handes of allmyghty God my maker, and in to protecion of the blessed yrgin our lady Saint Mary, and suffrage of Saint John Baptist, and of all other saintes of heven. Also my body to be buried beside the body of my moost entierly best beloved Lord and housbond, fader unto my said lorde and son, and in his tumbe within the collegiate church of Fodringhay, a if myn executours by the sufferaunce of the King (38) finde goode sufficient therto; and elles at the Kinges (38) pleasure. And I will that after my deceasse all my dettes sufficiently appering and proved be paid, thanking oure Lord at this tyme of making of this my testament to the knolege of my conscience I am not muche in dett; and if it happen, as I trust to God it shalnot, that there be not found sufficient money aswell to pay my dettes as to enture my body, than in advoiding such charges as myght growe for the same, the whiche God defende, I lymytte and assigne all such parcelles of plate as belongith to my chapell, pantry, cellour, ewry, and squillery, to the perfourmyng of the same, as apperith in the inventary, except such plate as I have bequeithed. Also I geve and bequeith to the Kinges noble grace all such money as is owing to me of the customes, and two cuppes of gold.
Also I geve and bequeith to the Quene (29) a crosse croslette of diamantes, a sawter with claspes of silver and guilte enameled covered with grene clothe of golde, and a pix with the fleshe of Saint Cristofer.
Also I bequeith to my lady the Kinges moder (51) a portuos with claspes of gold covered with blacke cloth of golde.
Also I geve to my lord Prince (8) a bedde of arres of the Whele of Fortune and testour of the same, a counterpoint of arras, and a tappett of arres with the pope.
Also I geve to my lord Henry Duke of Yorke (3) b three tappettes of arres, oon of them of the life of Saint John Baptist, another of Mary Maudeleyn, and the thirde of the passion of our Lord and Saint George.
And if my body be buried at Fodringhay in the colege there with my most entierly best beloved lord and housbond, than I geve to the said colege a square canapie of crymeson clothe of gold with iiij. staves, twoo auter clothes of crymeson clothe of gold, twoo copes of crymeson cloth of gold, a chesibull and twoo tenucles of cryinyson clothe of golcrvith iij. abes, c twoo auter clothes of crymeson damaske browdered, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and iij. copes of blewe velwett brodered, with iij. abes, thre masse bokes, thre grayles, and vij. processioners.
Also I geve to the colege of Stoke Clare a chesibull and twoo tenucles of playn crymyson cloth of gold with iij. abes, twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and fyve coopes of white damaske browdered, with iij. abes, twoo awter clothes of crymeson velwett upon the velwete (sic), a vestement of crymeson playne velvet, iiij. antiphoners, iiij. grayles, and sixe processioners.
Also I geve to the house of Sion two of the best coopes of crymyson clothe of gold.
Note. These next four people refer to her grand-daughters, children of Edward IV.
Also I geve to my doughter Brigitte (14) the boke of Legenda Aurea in velem, a boke of the life of Saint Kateryn of Sene, a boke of Saint Matilde.
Also I geve to my doughter Cecill (26) a portuous with claspes silver and gilte covered with purple velvet, and a grete portuous without note.
Also I geve to my doughter Anne (19) the largest bedde of bawdekyn, withe countrepoint of the same, the barge with bailies, tilde, and ores belonging to the same.
Also I geve to my doughter Kateryn (15) a traves of blewe satten.
Also I geve to my doughter of Suffolke (50) a the chare with the coveryng, all the quoshons, horses, and harneys belonging to the same, and all my palfreys.
Note. The next people are her grand-children, children of her daughter Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 (50)
Also I geve to my son of Suffolke (24) b a clothe of estate and iij. quoschons of purpull damaske cloth of gold.
Also I geve to my son Humfrey (21) c two awter clothes of blewe damaske brawdered and a vestyment of crymeson satten for Jh’us masse.
Also I geve to my son William (17) d a traves of white sarcenet, twoo beddes of downe, and twoo bolsters to the same.
Also I geve to my doughter Anne priores of Sion, a boke of Bonaventure and Hilton in the same in Englishe, and a boke of the Revelacions of Saint Burgitte.
Also I woll that all my plate not bequeithed be sold, and the money thereof be putte to the use of my burying, that is to sey, in discharging of suche costes and expensis as shalbe for carying of my body from the castell of Barkehampstede unto the colege of Fodringhey. And if any of the said plate be lefte unexpended I woll the said colege have it.
Also I geve to the colege of saint Antonies in London an antiphoner with the ruelles of musik in the later ynd.
Also I geve unto Master Richard Lessy all suche money as is owing unto me by obligations what soever they be, and also all such money as is owing unto me by the Shirfe of Yorkeshire, to helpe to bere his charges which he has to pay to the Kinges grace, trusting he shall the rather nyghe the said dettes by the help and socour of his said grace.
Also I geve to Master William Croxston a chesibull, stoles, and fanons of blake velwett, with an abe.
Also I geve to Master Eichard Henmershe a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of crymyson damaske, with an abe; and a chesibill, stoles and fanons of crymeson saten, with an abe.
Also I geve to Sir John More a frontell of purpull cloth of gold, a legend boke, and a colett boke.
Also I give to Sir Kandall Brantingham a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymson velvet, with an abe, the better of bothe.
Also I geve to Sir William Grave a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymeson velvett, with an abe; a masse-boke that servith for the closett, a prymour with claspes silver and gilt, covered with blewe velvett, and a sawter that servith for the closett covered with white ledder.
Also I geve to Sir John Blotte a gospell boke, a pistill covered with ledder, and a case for a corporax of grene playne velvett. Also I geve to Sir Thomas Clerk a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, fanons, of rede bawdeken, with iij. abes.
Also I geve to Sir William Tiler twoo coopes of rede bawdekyn.
Also I geve to Robert Claver iij. copes of white damaske brawdered, and a gowne of the Duchie b facion of playne blake velvett furred with ermyns.
Also I geve to John Bury twoo old copes of crymysyn satten cloth of gold, a frontell of white bawdekyn, twoo curteyns of rede sarcenett fringed, twoo curteyns of whit sarcenet fringed, a feder bed, a bolstour to the same, the best of feders, and two whit spervers of lynyn.
Also I geve to John Poule twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of white bawdekyn, with iij. abes; a short gowne of purple playne velvett furred with ermyns, the better of ij. and a kirtill of damaske with andelettes of silver and gilt furred.
Also I geve to John Smyth twoo auter clothes, a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of blew bawdekyn, with iij. abes. Also I geve to John Bury twoo copes of crymysyn clothe of gold that servith for Sondays.
Also I geve to John Walter a case for corporax of purple playne velvett, twoo cases for corporax of blewe bawdekyn, twoo auter clothes, a chesibill of rede and grene bawdekyn, a canapie of white sarcenett, iij. abes for children, and iiij. pair of parrours of white bawdekyn, twoo pair parrours of crymsyn velvett, twoo pair parrours of rede bawdekyn, a housling towell that servith for my selfe, twoo corteyns of blewe sarcenett fringed, a sudory of crymy-syn and white, the egges blak, a crose cloth and a cloth of Saint John Baptist of sarcenett painted, a long lantorn, a dext standing doble, twoo grete stondardes and ij. litill cofers.
Also I geve to John Peit-wynne twoo vestimentes of white damaske, a white bedde of lynnyn, a federbedde and a bolstour, and a short gowne of purple playne velvet furred with sabilles. Also I geve to Thomas Lentall six auter clothes of white sarcenett, with crosses of crymsyn velvet.
Also I geve to John Long iij. peces of bawdekyn of the lengur sorte. Also I geve to Sir [John] Verney knighte and Margarett his wiffe a a crosse [of] silver and guilte and berall, and in the same a pece of the holy crosse and other diverse reliques.
Also I geve to Dame Jane Pesemershe, widue, myne Inne that is called the George in Grauntham, during terme of her life; and after her decesse I woll that the reversion therof be unto the college of Fodringhay for evermore, to find a prest to pray for my Lord my housbond and me.
Also I geve to Nicholas Talbott and Jane his wife a spone of gold with a sharp diamount in the ende, a dymy-sent of gold with a collumbine and a diamont in the same, a guirdill of blewe tissue harnessed with gold, a guirdill of gold with a bokull and a pendaunt and iiij. barres of gold, a hoke of gold with iij. roses, a pomeamber of gold garnesshed with a diamont, sex rubies and sex perles, and the surnap and towell to the same.
Also I geve to Richard Boyvile and Gresild his wife my charrett and the horses with the harnes that belongith therunto, a gowne with a dymy trayn of purpull saten furred with ermyns, a shorte gowne of purple saten furred with jennetes, a kirtill of white damaske with aunde lettes silver and gilte, a spone of gold, a dymysynt of gold with a columbyne garnesshed with a diainant, a saphour, an amatist, and viij. perles, a pomeamber of gold enameled, a litell boxe with a cover of gold and a diamant in the toppe.
Also I geve to Richard Brocas and Jane his wife a long gown of purpull velvett upon velvet furred with ermyns, a greate Agnus of gold with the Trinite, Saint Erasmus, and the Salutacion of our Lady; an Agnus of gold with our Lady and Saint Barbara; a litell goblett with a cover silver and part guild; a pair of bedes of white amber gauded with vj. grete stones of gold, part aneled, with a pair of bedes of x. stones of gold and v. of corall; a cofor with a rounde lidde bonde with iron, which the said Jane hath in her keping, and all other thinges that she hath in charge of keping.
Also I geve to Anne Pinchbeke all other myne Agnus unbequeithed, that is to sey, ten of the Trinite, a litell malmesey pott with a cover silver and parte guilte, a possenett with a cover of silver, a short gowne of playne russett velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of playne blewe velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of purple playn velvet furred with grey, a tester, a siler, and a countrepoint of bawdekyn, the lesser of ij.
Also I geve to Jane Lessy a dymysent of gold with a roos, garnisshed with twoo rubies, a guirdell of purple tissue with a broken bokull, and a broken pendaunt silver and guilte, a guirdill of white riband with twoo claspes of gold with a columbyne, a guirdell of blewe riband with a bokell and a pendaunt of gold, a litell pair of bedes of white amber gaudied with vij. stones of gold, an haliwater stope with a strynkkill silver and gilte, and a laier silver and part guilte.
Also I geve to John Metcalfe and Alice his wife all the ringes that I have, except such as hang by my bedes and Agnus, and also except my signet, a litell boxe of golde with a cover of golde, a pair of bedes of Ixj. rounde stones of golde gaudied with sex square stones of golde enemeled, with a crosse of golde, twoo other stones, and a scalop shele of geete honging by.
Also I geve to Anne Lownde a litell bokull and a litell pendaunt of golde for a guirdill, a litell guirdell of golde and silke with a bokill and a pendaunt of golde, a guirdell of white riband with aggelettes of golde enameled, a hoke of golde playne, a broken hoke of golde enameled, and a litell rounde bottumed basyn of silver.
Also I geve to the house of Asshe-rugge a chesibull and ij. tenucles of crymysyn damaske embrawdered, with thre abes.
Also I geve to the house of Saint Margaretes twoo auter clothes with a crucifix and a vestiment of grete velvet.
Also I geve to the parish church of Stoundon a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.
Also I geve to the parishe church of Much Barkehampstede a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.
Also I geve to the parish church of Compton by sides Guilford a eorporax case of blake cloth of gold and iiij. auter clothes of white sarcenett embrawdered with garters.
Also I geve to Alisaunder Cressener my best bedde of downe and a bolster to the same.
Also I geve to Sir Henry Haidon knyght a tablett and a cristall garnesshed with ix. stones and xxvij. perles, lacking a stone and iij. perles.
Also I geve to Gervase Cressy a long gown of playn blewe velvet furred with sabilles.
Also I geve to Edward Delahay twoo gownes of musterdevilers furred with mynckes, and iiij u of money.
Also I geve to Thomas Manory a short gowne of crymesyn playn velvet lyned, purfilled with blake velvet, and iiij ll in money.
Also I geve to John Broune all such stuf as belongith to the kechyn in his keping at my place at Baynardcastell in London, and iiij u in money.
Also I geve to William Whitington a short gown of russett cloth furred with matrons and calabour wombes, a kirtill of purpull silke chamblett with awndelettes silver and gilte, all such floures of brawdery werke and the cofer that they be kept in, and xls. in money.
Also I geve to all other gentilmen that be daily a waiting in my houshold with Mr. Richard Cressy and Robert Lichingham everich of theime iiij u in money.
Also I geve to every yoman that be daily ad waiting in my houshold with John Otley xls. in money.
Also I geve to every grome of myne xxvj s. viij d. in money. And to every page of myne xiij s. iiij d. in money.
Also I geve to Robert Harison xls. in money and all the gootes.
And if ther be no money founde in my cofers to perfourme this my will and bequest, than I will that myne executours, that is to sey the reverend fader in God Master Olyver King bisshop of Bath (63), Sir Reignolde Bray (55) knight, Sir Thomas Lovell, councellours to the Kinges grace, Master William Pikinham doctour in degrees dean of the colege of Stoke Clare, Master William Felde master of the colege of Fodringhey, and Master Richard Lessy dean of my chapell, havyng God in reverence and drede, unto whome I geve full power and auctorite to execute this my will and testament, make money of such goodes as I have not geven and bequeithed, and with the same to content my dettes and perfourme this my will and testament.
And the foresaid reverend fader in God, Sir Rignold Bray knyght, Sir Thomas Lovell knyght, Master William Pikenham, and Master William Felde, to be rewarded of suche thinges as shalbe delivered unto theme by my commaundement by the hondes of Sir Henry Haidon knyght stieward of my houshold and Master Richard Lessy, humbly beseching the Kinges habundant grace in whome is my singuler trust to name such supervisour as shalbe willing and favorabull diligently to se that this my present testament and will be perfittely executed and perfourmyd, gevyng full power also to my said executours to levey and receyve all my dettes due and owing unto me at the day of my dethe, as well of my receyvours as of all other officers, except such dettes as I have geven and bequeathed unto Master Richard Lessy aforesaid, as is above specified in this present will and testament.
And if that Master Richard Lessy cannot recover such money as I have geven to hym of the Shirffes of Yorkeshire and of my obligacions, than I will he be recompensed of the revenues of my landes to the sume of v c. marcs at the leest.
IN WITTENESSE HEROF I have setto my signet and signemanuell at my castell of Berkehamstede the last day of May the yere of our Lord abovesaid, being present Master Richard Lessy, Sir William Grant my confessour, Richard Brocas clerc of my kechyn, and Gervays Cressy. Proved at “Lamehithe” the 27 th day of August, A.D. 1495, and commission granted to Master Richard Lessy the executor in the said will mentioned to administer, &c. &c.

Around 1520 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1675 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503. From a work of 1500.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1499-1525 (10). Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge, St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535 (40). Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

On 31 May 1495 Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (80) died. She was buried at St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay.

In 1566 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (32) visited St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay.

On 30 Jun 1577 Frances Vere 1517-1577 (60) died at Soham. He was buried at St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay.

On 08 Nov 1586 John Spencer 1524-1586 (62) died. He was buried at St Mary and All Saints, Fotheringhay.

Foxley

On 16 Nov 1608 Newdigate Poyntz 1608-1643 was born to John Poyntz 1577-1617 (30) at Foxley.

Geddington

Eleanor Crosses

After 28 Nov 1290 Eleanor of Castile's body was taken from Harby to Westminster Abbey. At each of the locations at which her body rested overnight Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 commissioned the building of an Eleanor Cross. Three remain. The best example being at Geddington.

On 05 Dec 1290 Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 body rested at Geddington.

Grafton Regis

Around 1341 John Woodville 1341-1403 was born at Grafton Regis.

In 1390 Joan Bittelsgate 1390-1448 was born to Thomas Bittelsgate 1350- and Joan Beauchamp 1370- at Grafton Regis.

In 1396 Thomas Bittelsgate 1350- and Joan Beauchamp 1370- were married at Grafton Regis.

Around 1400 Humphrey Stafford 1400-1467 was born in Grafton Regis.

After 08 Sep 1403 John Woodville 1341-1403 died at Grafton Regis.

Around 1437 Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 was born to Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 (32) and Jacquetta of Luxembourg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472 (22) at Grafton Regis.

In 1441 Anne Stafford 1441-1502 was born to Humphrey Stafford 1400-1467 (41) in Grafton Regis.

On 29 Nov 1441 Richard Woodville 1385-1441 (56) died at Grafton Regis.

In 1447 Lionel Woodville Bishop of Salisbury 1447-1484 was born to Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 (42) and Jacquetta of Luxembourg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472 (32) in Grafton Regis.

Marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville

Around May 1464 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (22) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (27) were married at Grafton Regis. Jacquetta of Luxembourg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472 (49), Elizabeth's mother, being the only witness. .

On 27 Jul 1558 Frances Giffard 1520-1558 (38) died at Grafton Regis.

Anne Woodville was born to Richard Woodville 1st Earl Rivers 1405-1469 and Jacquetta of Luxembourg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472 at Grafton Regis.

Grafton Underwood

See St James the Apostle Church, Grafton Underwood

Great Brington

Great Creaton

In 1555 William Dickens 1555-1585 was born at Great Creaton.

In 1582 Anne Dickens 1582-1637 was born to William Dickens 1555-1585 (27) at Great Creaton.

In 1585 William Dickens 1555-1585 (30) died at Great Creaton.

Great Harrowden

Before 1616 Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 and Catherine Vaux Baroness Bergavenny 1592-1649 were married at Great Harrowden.

Greatworth

Greatworth Church, Greatworth

On 25 Jul 1696 Eleanor Pargiter -1696 died. She was buried at Greatworth Church, Greatworth.

On 17 Feb 1742 Charles Howe 1661-1742 (81) died. He was buried at Greatworth Church, Greatworth.

Greens Norton

In 1345 Thomas Green 1345-1391 was born to Henry Green -1369 and Katherine Drayton 1319-1387 at Greens Norton.

On 10 Feb 1369 Thomas Green 1369-1417 was born to Thomas Green 1345-1391 (24) at Greens Norton.

On 14 Dec 1417 Thomas Green 1369-1417 (48) died at Greens Norton.

On 13 Apr 1433 Mary Talbot 1383-1433 (49) died at Greens Norton.

On 18 Jan 1462 Thomas Green 1400-1462 (61) died at Greens Norton.

St Bartholomew's Church, Greens Norton

On 09 Sep 1462 Thomas Green 1421-1462 (41) died. He was buried at St Bartholomew's Church, Greens Norton.

Gretton

In 1610 Robert Abbott Scrivener 1610-1653 was born to Thomas Abbott -1652 in Gretton.

Kirby Hall, Gretton

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. 25 Aug 1654. To see Kirby, a very noble house of my Lord Hatton's (49), in Northamptonshire, built à la moderne; the garden and stables agreeable, but the avenue ungraceful, and the seat naked: returned that evening.

On 19 May 1791 George Finch-Hatton 5th Earl Nottingham, 10th Earl Winchilsea 1791-1858 was born to George Finch-Hatton 1747-1823 (43) at Kirby Hall, Gretton.

Grimsbury

In 1450 William Cope 1450-1513 was born at Grimsbury.

Hardingstone

Eleanor Crosses

On 06 Dec 1290 Eleanor of Castile Queen Consort England 1241-1290 body rested at Hardingstone.

Harleston

On 20 Jan 1861 Assheton Edward Harbord 1861-1929 was born to Charles Harbord 5th Baron Suffield 1830-1914 (31) and Cecilia Annetta Baring Baroness Suffield at Harleston.

Harringworth

In 1273 Eleanor Zouche 1273-1300 was born to Eudo Zouche 1238-1279 (35) and Millicent Cantilupe -1299 at Harringworth.

On 18 Dec 1276 William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 was born to Eudo Zouche 1238-1279 (38) and Millicent Cantilupe -1299 at Harringworth.

Around 1279 Lucy Zouche 1279- was born to Eudo Zouche 1238-1279 (41) and Millicent Cantilupe -1299 at Harringworth.

Around 1281 Eva Zouche 1281-1314 was born to Eudo Zouche 1238-1279 and Millicent Cantilupe -1299 at Harringworth.

Around 1300 Joan Zouche 1300-1337 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (23) and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 (20) at Harringworth.

Around 1301 John Zouche 1301-1326 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (24) and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 (21) at Harringworth.

Around 1303 Roger Zouche 1303-1326 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (26) and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 (23) at Harringworth.

Around 1305 Thomas Zouche 1305-1326 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (28) and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 (25) at Harringworth.

Around 1309 Edmund Zouche 1309-1326 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (32) and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 (29) at Harringworth.

On 27 Oct 1351 William Zouche 3rd Baron Zouche Harringworth 1351-1396 was born to William Zouche 2nd Baron Zouche Harringworth 1321-1382 (29) and Elizabeth Ros Baroness Zouche Harringworth at Harringworth.

On 11 Mar 1352 William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (75) died at Harringworth. His grandson William Zouche 2nd Baron Zouche Harringworth 1321-1382 (30) succeeded 2nd Baron Zouche Harringworth. Elizabeth Ros Baroness Zouche Harringworth by marriage Baroness Zouche Harringworth.

Around 1373 William Zouche 4th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1373-1415 was born to William Zouche 3rd Baron Zouche Harringworth 1351-1396 (21) and Agnes Greene Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1341-1391 at Harringworth.

Around 1383 John Zouche 1383-1445 was born to William Zouche 3rd Baron Zouche Harringworth 1351-1396 (31) and Agnes Greene Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1341-1391 at Harringworth.

In 1402 William Zouche 5th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1402-1462 was born to William Zouche 4th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1373-1415 (29) at Harringworth.

Around 1430 Elizabeth Zouche 1430- was born to William Zouche 5th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1402-1462 (28) and Alice St Maur Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1409-1450 (20) at Harringworth.

Around 1430 John Zouche 1430-1513 was born to John Zouche and Elizabeth Grey at Harringworth.

Around 1486 John Zouche 8th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1486-1550 was born to John Zouche 7th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1459-1526 (27) and Joan Dinham Baroness Zouche Harringworth at Harringworth.

Around 1515 John Zouche 1515- was born to John Zouche 8th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1486-1550 (29) and Dorothy Capell Baroness Zouche Harringworth at Harringworth.

On 10 Aug 1550 John Zouche 8th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1486-1550 (64) died at Harringworth. His son Richard Zouche 9th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1510-1552 (40) succeeded 9th Baron Zouche Harringworth. Margaret Cheney Baroness Zouche Harringworth by marriage Baroness Zouche Harringworth.

On 19 Jun 1569 George Zouche 10th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1526-1569 (43) died at Harringworth. His son Edward Zouche 11th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1556-1625 (13) succeeded 11th Baron Zouche Harringworth.

On Aug 1625 Margaret Poley Baronetess Palmer 1542-1625 (83) died at Harringworth.

John Zouche was born to William Zouche 5th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1402-1462 at Harringworth.

Elizabeth Zouche Countess Kildare -1517 was born to John Zouche and Elizabeth Grey at Harringworth.

Millicent Zouche Baroness Deincourt -1379 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 at Harringworth.

Harrowden

Around 1473 Florence Hastings Baroness Grey Wilton 1473-1536 was born to Ralph Hastings -1495 and Anne Tattershall 1439-1499 (34) at Harrowden.

Holdenby

Horton

On 10 Sep 1547 William Parr 1st Baron Parr Horton 1483-1547 (64) died. He was buried at Horton.

On 16 Apr 1661 Christopher Montagu 1661- was born to George Montagu 1622-1681 (38) at Horton.

On 16 Apr 1661 Charles Montagu 1st Earl Halifax 1661-1715 was born to George Montagu 1622-1681 (38) at Horton.

Hothorpe

In 1620 Dr Ralph Bathurst 1620-1704 was born in Hothorpe.

Isham

In 1508 Cecilia Durance 1508-1538 was born to John Durance -1539 at Isham.

Lamport

Church of All Saints, Lamport

On 02 Mar 1675 Justinian Isham 2nd Baronet Isham 1610-1675 (65) died of smallpox at Oxford. He was buried at Church of All Saints, Lamport. His son Thomas Isham 3rd Baronet Isham 1657-1681 (17) succeeded 3rd Baronet Isham of Lamport in Northamptonshire.

Laxton

Laxton Hall, Laxton

On 23 May 1732 George Evans 2nd Baron Carbery 1703-1759 (29) and Frances Fitzwilliam Baroness Carbery -1789 were married. He was given the Laxton Hall, Laxton estate by his mother, worth £1100 per year, and an annuity on the family's Irish estates worth £1,400 per year.

Little Creston

In 1570 John Twigden 1570-1611 was born at Little Creston.

In 1611 John Twigden 1570-1611 (41) died at Little Creston.

Lowick

On 18 Jun 1626 John Mordaunt 1st Viscount Mordaunt 1626-1675 was born to John Mordaunt 1st Earl Peterborough -1642 and Elizabeth Howard Countess Peterborough 1603-1671 (23) at Lowick.

Melton

Around 1520 Ellen Helena Fitzwilliam 1520-1575 was born to William Fitzwilliam Sheriff of London 1460-1534 (60) at Melton.

Milton

Around 16 Sep 1526 William Fitzwilliam 1526-1599 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1490-1552 (36) in Milton.

Around 1544 Philippa Fitzwilliam 1544-1596 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1526-1599 (17) in Milton.

Around 1555 William Fitzwilliam 1555-1618 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1526-1599 (28) in Milton.

In 1578 William Fitzwilliam 1st Baron Fitzwilliam 1578-1643 was born to William Fitzwilliam 1555-1618 (23) in Milton.

Naseby

Battle of Naseby

On 14 Jun 1645 Maurice Palatinate-Simmern 1621-1652 (24) fought at Naseby during the Battle of Naseby for the Royalist army.
John Lucas 1st Baron Lucas Shenfield 1606-1671 (38) fought for the King.
Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (25) was wounded.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646 (30). Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate-Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (22), Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 (22) and Colonel William Murray.

Nether Boddington

In 1619 Robert Washington 1544-1619 (75) died at Nether Boddington. He was buried at Church of St James the Less, Sulgrave.

Northampton

Trial of Thomas a Becket

In Oct 1164 Thomas Becket Archbishop of Canterbury 1119-1170 (44) was put on trial in Northampton by Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (31) on a charge of contempt. After a week of discussion Becket fled to Flanders with John of Salisbury Bishop Chartres 1118-1180 (46).

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 22 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. Robert Terry, of Whytefield, imprisoned at Northampton for the death of Galianus de Bek, has letters to the Sheriff of Nottingham to bail him until the first assize. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XX - How king Robert of Scotland died. Mar 1328. Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton. AND when that the Scots were departed by night from the mountain, whereas the king of England (15) had besieged them, as ye have heard herebefore, they went twentytwo mile through that savage country without resting, and passed the river of Tyne right near to Carlisle ; and the next day they went into their own land, and so departed every man to his own mansion. And within a space after there was a peace purchased between the kings of England and Scotland ; and as the English chronicle saith,' it was done by the special counsel of the old queen (33) and sir Roger Mortimer (40) ; for by their means there was a parliament holden at Northampton, at the which the king (15) being within age granted to the Scots to release all the fealties and homages that they ought to have done to the crown of England, by his charter ensealed, and also there was delivered to the Scots an indenture, the which was called the Ragman, wherein was contained all the homages and fealties that the king of Scots and all the prelates, earls and barons of Scotland ought to have done to the crown of England, sealed with all their seals, with all other rights that sundry barons and knights ought to have had in the realm of Scotland. And also they delivered to them again the black cross of Scotland, the which the good king Edward conquered and brought it out of the abbey of Scone, the which was a precious relic ; and all rights and interests that every baron had in Scotland was then clean forgiven. And many other things were done at that parliament to the great hurt and prejudice of the realm of England, and in manner against the wills of all the nobles of the realm, save only of Isabel (33) the old queen and the bishop of Ely and the lord Mortimer (40) : they ruled the realm in such wise, that every man was miscontent. So that the earl Henry of Lancaster (47) and sir Thomas Brotherton (27), earl marshal, and sir Edmund of Woodstock (26), the king's uncle, and divers other lords and commons were agreed together to amend these faults, if they might. And in that meantime the queen Isabel (33) and sir Roger Mortimer (40) caused another parliament to be holden at Salisbury, at the which parliament sir Roger Mortimer (40) was made earl of March against all the barons' wills of England, in prejudice of king and his realm, and sir John of Eltham (11) the king's brother was made earl of Cornwall. To the which parliament the earl Henry of Lancaster (47) would not come, wherefore the king was brought in belief that he would have destroyed his person; for the which they assembled a great host and went toward Bedford, whereas the earl Henry (47) was with his company. Then the earl marshal (27) and the earl of Kent (26), the king's uncle, made a peace between the king (15) and the earl of Lancaster (47), on whose part was sir Henry lord Beaumont (48), sir Fulke Fitz-Warin (43), sir Thomas Rocelin, sir William Trussel, sir Thomas Wither and about a hundred knights, who were all expelled out of England by the counsel of queen Isabel and the earl Mortimer : for he was so covetous, that he thought to have the most part of all their lands into his own hands, as it is more plainly shewed in the English chronicle, the which I pass over and follow mine author.

On 17 Mar 1328 Robert the Bruce (53) signed the Treaty of Edinburgh-Northampton bringing to an end the First Scottish War of Independence. The English Parliament signed at Northampton on 03 May 1328. The terms of the Treaty included:
Scotland to pay England £100,000 sterling,
The Kingdom of Scotland as fully independent,
Robert the Bruce (53), and his heirs and successors, as the rightful rulers of Scotland, and
The border between Scotland and England as that recognised under the reign of Alexander III (1249–1286).
The Treaty lasted four years only being regarded by the English nobility as humiliating; the work of Edward's (15) mother Isabella Capet Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (33) and Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (40) rather than King Edward (15). Two years after King Edward (15) commenced his personal reign he commenced the Second War of Scottish Independence in Aug 1332.

Battle of Northampton 1460

On 10 Jul 1460 the Yorkist army led by the future Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (18) and including Richard "Kingmaker" Neville 16th Earl Warwick, 6th Earl Salisbury 1428-1471 (32), George Neville Archbishop of York 1432-1476 (28), William Neville 1st Earl Kent 1405-1463 (55), Edmund Grey 1st Earl Kent 1416-1490 (43), Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (45) and John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (22) defeated the Lancastrian army at the Battle of Northampton 1460.
Henry VI King England, II King France 1421-1471 (38) was captured.
Humphrey Stafford 1st Duke of Buckingham 1402-1460 (57) was killed. His grandson Henry Stafford 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1454-1483 (5) succeeded 2nd Duke of Buckingham (1C 1444), 7th Earl Stafford (1C 1351), 8th Baron Stafford (1C 1299).
John Talbot 2nd Earl Shrewsbury, 2nd Earl Waterford 1417-1460 (42) was killed. His son John Talbot 3rd Earl Shrewsbury, 3rd Earl Waterford 1448-1473 (11) succeeded 3rd Earl Shrewsbury (2C 1442), 3rd Earl Waterford, 8th Baron Furnivall (1C 1295), 12th Baron Strange Blackmere (1C 1309), 9th Baron Talbot (1C 1331)
Thomas Percy 1st Baron Egremont 1422-1460 (37) was killed.
John Beaumont 1st Viscount Beaumont 1409-1460 (50) was killed. His son William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (22) succeeded 2nd Viscount Beaumont.
Thomas Tresham 1420-1471 fought.
William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (22) and William Norreys 1441-1507 (19) were knighted.
Thomas "Bastard of Exeter" Holland -1460 was executed following the battle. .

Arrest of the Woodville Affinity

The History of King Richard the Third. 01 May 1483. And as soon as they came in his presence, they alighted down with all their company about them. To whom the Duke of Buckingham (28) said, "Go before, gentlemen and yeomen, keep your rooms." And thus in a goodly array, they came to the King (12) and, on their knees in very humble fashion, assuaged his Grace, who received them in very joyous and amiable manner, nothing earthly knowing nor mistrusting as yet. But even by and by, in his presence, they picked a quarrel with the Lord Richard Grey (26), the King’s other brother by his mother, saying that he, with the Lord Marquis (28) his brother and the Lord Rivers (43) his uncle, had planned to rule the King and the realm, and to set variance among the lords, and to subdue and destroy the noble blood of the realm. Toward the accomplishing whereof, they said that the Lord Marquis (28) had entered into the Tower of London, and thence taken out the King’s treasure, and sent men to the sea. All of which things, these dukes knew well, were done for good purposes and necessary ones by the whole council at London, except that they must say something.
Unto which words, the King (12) answered, "What my brother marquis (28) has done I cannot say. But in good faith I dare well answer for mine uncle Rivers (43) and my brother (26) here, that they be innocent of any such matters."
"Yea, my Liege," said the Duke of Buckingham (28), "they have kept their dealing in these matters far from the knowledge of your good Grace."
And forthwith they arrested the Lord Richard (26) and Sir Thomas Vaughan (73), knight, in the King’s (12) presence, and brought the King (12) and all back unto Northampton, where they took again further counsel. And there they sent away from the King (12) whomever it pleased them, and set new servants about him, such as liked them better than him. At which dealing he wept and was nothing content, but it remedied not. And at dinner the Duke of Gloucester (30) sent a dish from his own table to the Lord Rivers (43), praying him to be of good cheer, all should be well enough. And he thanked the Duke (30), and prayed the messenger to bear it to his nephew, the Lord Richard (26), with the same message for his comfort, who he thought had more need of comfort, as one to whom such adversity was foreign. But for himself, he had been all his days used to a life therewith, and therefore could bear it the better. But for all this comfortable courtesy of the Duke of Gloucester (30), he sent the Lord Rivers (43) and the Lord Richard (26) with Sir Thomas Vaughan (73) into the north country to different places to prison and, afterwards, all to Pomfrait, where they were, in conclusion, beheaded..

On Oct 1509 Richard Empson 1450-1510 (59) convicted at Northampton.

On 18 Jul 1553 Thomas Tresham -1559 proclaimed as queen Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558 (37) and accompanied her to London at Northampton.

In 1634 Thomas Cartwright Bishop of Chester 1634-1689 was born in Northampton.

Before 1680 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of Thomas Cartwright Bishop of Chester 1634-1689.

In 1640 Samuel Parker Bishop of Oxford 1640-1688 was born in Northampton.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 July. 11 Jul 1675. We heard the speeches, and saw the ceremony of creating doctors in Divinity, Law and Physic. I had, early in the morning, heard Dr. Morison, Botanic Professor, read on divers plants in the Physic Garden; and saw that rare collection of natural curiosities of Dr. Plot's, of Magdalen Hall, author of "The Natural History of Oxfordshire," all of them collected in that shire, and indeed extraordinary, that in one county there should be found such variety of plants, shells, stones, minerals, marcasites, fowls, insects, models of works, crystals, agates, and marbles. He was now intending to visit Staffordshire, and, as he had of Oxfordshire, to give us the natural, topical, political, and mechanical history. Pity it is that more of this industrious man's genius were not employed so to describe every county of England; it would be one of the most useful and illustrious works that was ever produced in any age or nation.
I visited also the Bodleian Library and my old friend, the learned Obadiah Walker (59), head of University College, which he had now almost rebuilt, or repaired. We then proceeded to Northampton, where we arrived the next day.
In this journey, went part of the way Mr. James Graham (26) (since Privy Purse to the Duke (41)), a young gentleman exceedingly in love with Mrs. Dorothy Howard (24), one of the maids of honor in our company. I could not but pity them both, the mother not much favoring it. This lady was not only a great beauty, but a most virtuous and excellent creature, and worthy to have been wife to the best of men. My advice was required, and I spoke to the advantage of the young gentleman, more out of pity than that she deserved no better match; for, though he was a gentleman of good family, yet there was great inequality.

John Evelyn's Diary 1675 July. 14 Jul 1675. I went to see my Lord Sunderland's (33) Seat at Althorpe, four miles from the ragged town of Northampton (since burned, and well rebuilt). It is placed in a pretty open bottom, very finely watered and flanked with stately woods and groves in a park, with a canal, but the water is not running, which is a defect. The house, a kind of modern building, of freestone, within most nobly furnished; the apartments very commodious, a gallery and noble hall; but the kitchen being in the body of the house, and chapel too small, were defects. There is an old yet honorable gatehouse standing awry, and out-housing mean, but designed to be taken away. It was moated round, after the old manner, but it is now dry, and turfed with a beautiful carpet. Above all, are admirable and magnificent the several ample gardens furnished with the choicest fruit, and exquisitely kept. Great plenty of oranges, and other curiosities. The park full of fowl, especially herons, and from it a prospect to Holmby House, which being demolished in the late civil wars, shows like a Roman ruin shaded by the trees about it, a stately, solemn, and pleasing view.

Around 1680 Francis Brudenell 1680-1736 was born to Francis Brudenell 1654-1698 (26) at Northampton and Frances Savile 1658-1695 (22).

After 1685 Mary Brudenell 1683-1766 was born to Francis Brudenell 1654-1698 at Northampton and Frances Savile 1658-1695.

The History of King Richard the Third. Now when the King on his way to London had gone from Northampton, then these Dukes of Gloucester and Buckingham came thither. But the Lord Rivers, the King’s uncle, remained behind, intending on the morrow to follow the King, and be with him at Stony Stratford, eleven miles thence, early before he departed. So was there made that night much friendly cheer between these dukes and the Lord Rivers a great while. But immediately after that, they openly and with great courtesy departed; and while the Lord Rivers lodged, the dukes secretly, with a few of their most private friends, set themselves down in council, wherein they spent a great part of the night. And at their rising in the dawning of the day, they sent about secretly to their servants, who were in their inns and lodgings about, giving the commandment to make themselves shortly ready, for their lords were ready to ride. Upon which messages, many of their folk were attendant when many of the Lord Rivers’ servants were unready. Now had these dukes taken also into their custody the keys of the inn so that none should pass forth without their approval. And besides this, on the highway toward Stony Stratford, where the King lay, they had ordered certain of their folk that they should send back again and compel to return any man who were gotten out of Northampton toward Stony Stratford, till they should give permission, because the dukes themselves intended, for the show of their diligence, to be the first that should that day attend upon the King’s Highness out of that town; thus did they deceive the folk at hand.
But when the Lord Rivers understood the gates closed and the ways on every side beset, neither his servants nor himself allowed to go out, perceiving well so great a thing without his knowledge was not begun for nothing, comparing this manner present with this last night’s cheer, in so few hours so great a change he marvelously disliked. However, since he could not get away—and keep himself close, he would not do so lest he should seem to hide himself for some secret fear of his own fault, whereof he saw no such fault in himself—he determined, upon the surety of his own conscience, to go boldly to them and inquire what this matter might mean. Whom, as soon as they saw, they began to quarrel with him and say that he intended to set distance between the King and them and to bring them to confusion, but this plan would not lie in his power. And when he began (as he was a very well-spoken man) in goodly manner to excuse himself, they tarried not the end of his answer, but shortly took him and put him under guard, and that done, forthwith went to horseback and took the way to Stony Stratford, where they found the King with his company ready to leap on horseback and depart forward, to leave that lodging for them because it was too small for both companies.

Northampton Castle, Northampton

Battle of Northampton

On 06 Apr 1264 the future Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (24), Philip Marmion 5th Baron Marmion 1233-1291 (30) and Roger Leybourne 1215-1271 (49) fought for the King at Northampton Castle, Northampton during the Battle of Northampton. Simon Montfort 6th Earl of Leicester 1208-1265 (56) fought for the rebels with his son Simon "Younger" Montfort 1240-1271 (24) who was captured.

St Andrew's Priory, Northampton

Around 1095 Simon Senlis 1st Earl of Northampton -1111 founded St Andrew's Priory, Northampton.

Yardley Hastings, Northampton

Norton

On 03 Feb 1271 William Zouche 1215-1271 (61) died at Norton.

On Jun 1602 Dudley Knightley 1583-1602 (19) died in Norton. He had been shot in the neck whilst in the defense of Ostend. Having returned home he "fell down wherwith a fever took him whereof he died.".

On 01 Sep 1615 Richard Knightley 1532-1615 (83) died in Norton. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Fawsley.

See All Saints Church, Norton

Overstone

Pottersbury

Wakefield Lodge, Pottersbury

On 04 Dec 1918 Augustus Charles Lennox Fitzroy 7th Duke Grafton 1821-1918 (97) died in Wakefield Lodge, Pottersbury. His son Alfred Fitzroy 8th Duke Grafton 1850-1930 (68) succeeded 8th Duke Grafton (1C 1675), 8th Earl Euston, 8th Viscount Ipswich, 8th Baron Sudbury. Susanna Mary Mctaggart-Stewart Duchess Grafton by marriage Duchess Grafton (1C 1675).

Rushton

On 11 Aug 1604 Anne Cockayne 1604-1668 was born to William Cockayne 1561-1626 (43) and Mary Morris Countess Dover -1648 in Rushton.

On 25 May 1668 Anne Cockayne 1604-1668 (63) died in Rushton.

All Saints Church, Rushton

On 16 Mar 1559 Thomas Tresham -1559 was buried at All Saints Church, Rushton.

Rushton Hall, Rushton

In 1439 William Tresham -1450 bought at Rushton Hall, Rushton.

Salcey Lawn

On 22 Aug 1839 Blanche Adeliza Fitzroy 1839-1933 was born to Henry Fitzroy 1806-1877 (33) in Salcey Lawn and Jane Elizabeth Beauclerk.

Selcey Forest

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 12 Dec 1461. Westminster. Grant for life to Richard Wydevill (56), lord of Ryvers, of the office of chief rider of the king's forest of Saucy. co Northampton, with all trees and profits, viz dry trees, dead trees, blown down, old hedges or copice-hedges, boughs fallen without date, cahettels, waifs, strays, pannage of swine, 'derefall wode', 'draenes' brushwood and brambles, prerquisites of courts, swainmote and other issues within the forest, from the time when he had he same by letters patent of Henry VI.

Sibbertoft

After 1544 Mary Ferrers 1487-1544 died at Sibbertoft.

Southwick

See Church of St Mary, Southwick

Spatton

Around 1609 Amphilis Twigden 1609-1654 was born to John Twigden 1570-1611 (39) and Anne Dickens 1582-1637 (27) at Spatton.

Stoke Albany

Around 1370 William Ros 6th Baron Ros Helmsley 1370-1414 was born to Thomas Ros 4th Baron Ros Helmsley 1335-1384 (34) and Beatrice Stafford Countess Desmond 1341-1415 (29) at Stoke Albany.

Stoke Brunerne

Around 1252 Eva Chaworth 1252-1300 was born at Stoke Brunerne.

Stowe

On 09 Jun 1360 Gerard Lisle 1st Baron Lisle 1304-1360 (56) died at Stowe. On 09 Jun 1360 His son Warin Lisle 2nd Baron Lisle 1330-1382 (30) succeeded 2nd Baron Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Oxfordshire (3C 1357).

Sulby

In 1398 Ralph Hastings 1340-1398 (58) died at York Castle, York. He was buried at Sulby.

Sulgrave

On 31 Jul 1621 Mary Washington 1555-1621 (66) died at Sulgrave.

Church of St James the Less, Sulgrave

In 1619 Robert Washington 1544-1619 (75) died at Nether Boddington. He was buried at Church of St James the Less, Sulgrave.

Sutton

On 23 Jan 1260 Stephen Longespée 1216-1260 (44) died at Sutton.

Thenford

Around 1372 Katherine Pavenham 1372-1436 was born to Laurence Pavenham 1335-1399 (37) at Thenford.

On 10 Jul 1399 Laurence Pavenham 1335-1399 (64) died at Thenford.

The Rectory, Aldwincle, Thrapston

On or before 19 Jun 1608 Thomas Fuller Author 1608-1661 was born at The Rectory, Aldwincle, Thrapston. He was baptised 19 Jun 1608.

On 19 Aug 1631 John Dryden Poet 1631-1700 was born in The Rectory, Aldwincle, Thrapston.

Titchmarsh

Around 1230 Maud Sydenham 1230-1288 was born to William Sydenham 1200-1233 (30) at Titchmarsh.

In 1289 John Lovell 2nd Baron Lovel 1289-1314 was born to John Lovell 1st Baron Lovel 1254-1311 (35) and Joan Ros Baroness Lovel 1260-1348 (29) at Titchmarsh.

Around 1310 Isabel Lovell 1310-1338 was born to John Lovell 2nd Baron Lovel 1289-1314 (21) and Maud Burnell Baroness Lovel 1290-1341 (20) at Titchmarsh.

In 1397 William Lovell 7th Baron Lovel 4th Baron Holand 1397-1455 was born to John Lovell 6th Baron Lovel 1375-1414 (22) at Titchmarsh.

On 01 Sep 1429 Eleanor Zouche Baroness Lovel 1365-1429 (64) died at Titchmarsh.

On 05 Aug 1466 Joan Beaumont Baroness Lovel 1435-1466 (31) died at Titchmarsh.

On 10 Feb 1474 Alice Deincourt Baroness Lovel, Baroness Sudeley 1404-1474 (69) died at Titchmarsh. Her grandson Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (18) succeeded 7th Baron Deincourt (2C 1322), Baron Grey Rotherfield and the feudal baorny of Bedale.

Thrapston, Titchmarsh

Before 27 Sep 1287 John Lovell 1222-1287 died at Thrapston, Titchmarsh.

Towcester

In 1414 Peter Empson 1414-1473 was born at Towcester to Francis Empson 1390-1495 (24).

On 05 Dec 1510 Joan Empson 1480-1510 (30) died at Towcester.

Easton Neston

In 1682 Thomas Chamberlayne 2nd Baronet Chamberlayne 1635-1682 (47) died at Easton Neston. His brother James Chamberlayne 3rd Baronet Chamberlayne 1635-1699 (46) succeeded 3rd Baronet Chamberlayne of Wickham in Oxfordshire.

Wakerley

On 04 Sep 1633 Richard Cecil 1570-1633 (62) died. He was buried at Wakerley.

Walton

On 31 Jan 1785 Henry Pelham-Clinton 4th Duke Newcastle-under-Lyne 1785-1851 was born to Thomas Pelham-Clinton 3rd Duke Newcastle-under-Lyne 1752-1795 (32) and Anna Maria Stanhope Countess Lincoln -1834 in Walton.

Warkton

See St Edmund's Church, Warkton

Weekley

On 21 Sep 1585 Edward Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1563-1644 (22) and Elizabeth Jeffrey 1568-1611 (17) were married at Weekley.

On 24 Feb 1612 Edward Montagu 1st Baron Montagu 1563-1644 (49) and Frances Cotton 1578-1620 (34) were married at Weekley.

In 1616 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619 (65). Portrait of (possibly) Frances Cotton 1578-1620 (38).

Weldon

In 1135 Osmund Basset 1104-1135 (31) died at Weldon.

Welford

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Welford

On 10 Nov 1709 Richard Hastings 1645-1714 (64) and Goodith Smith 1659-1731 (50) were married at Church of St Mary the Virgin, Welford.

Around Oct 1714 Richard Hastings 1645-1714 (69) was buried at Church of St Mary the Virgin, Welford.

Whiston

Around 1376 William Catesby 1376- was born to John Catesby 1352-1405 (24) at Whiston.

Around 1402 John Catesby 1402-1479 was born to John Catesby 1378-1437 (24) at Whiston.

Around 1406 Edmund Catesby 1406-1474 was born to John Catesby 1378-1437 (28) at Whiston.

Around 1433 John Catesby 1433-1486 was born to Edmund Catesby 1406-1474 (27) at Whiston.

Around 1458 Humphrey Catesby 1458-1504 was born to John Catesby 1433-1486 (25) at Whiston.

Around 1527 Dorothy Catesby 1527-1613 was born to Anthony Catesby 1500-1544 (27) at Whiston.

In 1528 Wilburga Catesby 1528-1558 was born to Anthony Catesby 1500-1544 (28) in Whiston.

Wigsthorpe

On 21 May 1559 Edmund Quincy 1559-1628 was born to John Quincy 1528-1597 (31) in Wigsthorpe.

In 1602 Edmund "The Puritan" Quincy 1602-1636 was born to Edmund Quincy 1559-1628 (42) at Wigsthorpe.

Winwick Manor

In 1541 Thomas Andrew of Winwick Manor Sheriff of 1541-1594 was born.

Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

Original Letters Illustrative of English History Second Series Volume III. Ellis notes that "the present narrative is from the Lansdowne MS. 51. art. 46. It is indorsed in Lord Burghley's hand, "8 Feb. 1586. The Manner of the Q. of Scotts death at Fodrynghay, wr. by Ro. Wy.
A Reporte of the manner of the execution of the Sc. Q. performed the viijth. of February, Anno 1586 [modern dating 1587] in the great hall of Fotheringhay, with relacion of speeches uttered and accions happening in the said execution, from the delivery of the said Sc. Q. to Mr Thomas Androwes Esquire Sherife of the County of Northampton unto the end of said execution.
THE READER shall now be presented with the Execution of the Queen of Scots (44) which was to the Court or three Statements of this Transaction were There was a Short one copies of which are Manuscripts Jul F vi foll 246 266 b and b Another a Copy of the Account of the Earl to the Lords of the Council dated on the day is MS Calig C ix fol 163 And there is a Office somewhat longer said to have been drawn evidently one of her servants present Narrative is from the Lansdowne MS in Lord Burghley s hand 8 Feb 1586 of Scotts death at Fodrynghay wr by Ro Wy Queen s death have been dressed up from writers but it is here given accurate and entire.
First, the said Scottish Queen, being carried by two of Sir Amias Paulett's (54) gentlemen, and the Sheriff (46) going before her, came most willingly out of her chamber into an entry next the Hall, at which place the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), commissioners for the execution, with the two governors of her person, and divers knights and gentlemen did meet her, where they found one of the Scottish Queen's servants, named Melvin [NOTE. Possibly Andrew Melville of Garvock Steward], kneeling on his knees, who uttered these words with tears to the Queen of Scots (44), his mistress, "Madam, it will be the sorrowfullest message that ever I carried, when I shall report that my Queen (44) and dear mistress is dead." Then the Queen of Scots, shedding tears, answered him, "You ought to rejoice rather than weep for that the end of Mary Stuart's (44) troubles is now come. Thou knowest, Melvin, that all this world is but vanity, and full of troubles and sorrows; carry this message from me, and tell my friends that I die a true woman to my religion, and like a true Scottish woman and a true Frenchwoman. But God forgive them that have long desired my end; and He that is the true Judge of all secret thoughts knoweth my mind, how that it ever hath been my desire to have Scotland and England united together. Commend me to my son, and tell him that I have not done anything that may prejudice his kingdom of Scotland; and so, good Melvin, farewell;" and kissing him, she bade him pray for her.
Then she (44) turned to the Lords and told them that she had certain requests to make unto them. One was for a sum of money, which she said Sir Amyas Paulet (54) knew of, to be paid to one Curle her servant; next, that all her poor servants might enjoy that quietly which by her Will and Testament she had given unto them; and lastly, that they might be all well entreated, and sent home safely and honestly into their countries. "And this I do conjure you, my Lords, to do."
Answer was made by Sir Amyas Paulet (54), "I do well remember the money your Grace speaketh of, and your Grace need not to make any doubt of the not performance of your requests, for I do surely think they shall be granted."
"I have," said she, "one other request to make unto you, my Lords, that you will suffer my poor servants to be present about me, at my death, that they may report when they come into their countries how I died a true woman to my religion."
Then the Earl of Kent (46), one of the commissioners, answered, "Madam, it cannot well be granted, for that it is feared lest some of them would with speeches both trouble and grieve your Grace, and disquiet the company, of which we have had already some experience, or seek to wipe their napkins in some of your blood, which were not convenient." "My Lord," said the Queen of Scots, "I will give my word and promise for them that they shall not do any such thing as your Lordship has named. Alas! poor souls, it would do them good to bid me farewell. And I hope your Mistress (53), being a maiden Queen, in regard of womanhood, will suffer me to have some of my own people about me at my death. And I know she hath not given you so straight a commission, but that you may grant me more than this, if I were a far meaner woman than I am." And then (seeming to be grieved) with some tears uttered these words: "You know that I am cousin to your Queen (53) [NOTE. They were first-cousin once-Removed], and descended from the blood of Henry the Seventh [NOTE. She was a Great Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509], a married Queen of France [NOTE. She had married Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560], and the anointed Queen of Scotland."
Whereupon, after some consultation, they granted that she (44) might have some of her servants according to her Grace's request, and therefore desired her to make choice of half-a-dozen of her men and women: who presently said that of her men she would have Melvin, her apothecary, her surgeon, and one other old man beside; and of her women, those two that did use to lie in her chamber.
After this, she being supported by Sir Amias's (54) two gentlemen aforesaid, and Melvin carrying up her train, and also accompanied with the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen aforenamed, the Sheriff (46) going before her, she passed out of the entry into the Great Hall, with her countenance careless, importing thereby rather mirth than mournful cheer, and so she willingly stepped up to the scaffold which was prepared for her in the Hall, being two feet high and twelve feet broad, with rails round about, hung and covered with black, with a low stool, long cushion, and block, covered with black also. Then, having the stool brought her, she sat her down; by her, on the right hand, sat the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), and on the left hand stood the Sheriff (46), and before her the two executioners; round about the rails stood Knights, Gentlemen, and others.
Then, silence being made, the Queen's Majesty's Commission for the execution of the Queen of Scots (44) was openly read by Mr. Beale, clerk of the Council (46); and these words pronounced by the Assembly, "God save the Queen." During the reading of which Commission the Queen of Scots (44) was silent, listening unto it with as small regard as if it had not concerned her at all; and with as cheerful a countenance as if it had been a pardon from her Majesty (53) for her life; using as much strangeness in word and deed as if she had never known any of the Assembly, or had been ignorant of the English language.
Then one Doctor Fletcher, Dean of Peterborough (42), standing directly before her, without the rail, bending his body with great reverence, began to utter this exhortation following: "Madam, the Queen's most excellent Majesty," &c, and iterating these words three or four times, she told him, "Mr. Dean (42), I am settled in the ancient Catholic Roman religion, and mind to spend my blood in defence of it." Then Mr. Dean (42) said: "Madam, change your opinion, and repent you of your former wickedness, and settle your faith only in Jesus Christ, by Him to be saved." Then she (44) answered again and again, "Mr. Dean (42), trouble not yourself any more, for I am settled and resolved in this my religion, and am purposed therein to die." Then the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), perceiving her (44) so obstinate, told her that since she would not hear the exhortation begun by Mr. Dean (42), "We will pray for your Grace, that it stand with God's will you may have your heart lightened, even at the last hour, with the true knowledge of God, and so die therein." Then she answered, "If you will pray for me, my Lords, I will thank you; but to join in prayer with you I will not, for that you and I are not of one religion."
Then the Lords called for Mr. Dean (42), who, kneeling on the scaffold stairs, began this prayer, "O most gracious God and merciful Father," &c, all the Assembly, saving the Queen of Scots (44) and her servants, saying after him. During the saying of which prayer, the Queen of Scots (44), sitting upon a stool, having about her neck an Agnus Dei, in her hand a crucifix, at her girdle a pair of beads with a golden cross at the end of them, a Latin book in her hand, began with tears and with loud and fast voice to pray in Latin; and in the midst of her prayers she slided off from her stool, and kneeling, said divers Latin prayers; and after the end of Mr. Dean's (42) prayer, she kneeling, prayed in English to this effect: "For Christ His afflicted Church, and for an end of their troubles; for her son; and for the Queen's Majesty (53), that she might prosper and serve God aright." She conFessed that she hoped to be saved "by and in the blood of Christ, at the foot of whose Crucifix she would shed her blood." Then said the Earl of Kent (46), "Madam, settle Christ Jesus in your heart, and leave those trumperies." Then she little regarding, or nothing at all, his good counsel, went forward with her prayers, desiring that "God would avert His wrath from this Island, and that He would give her grief and forgiveness for her sins." These, with other prayers she made in English, saying she forgave her enemies with all her heart that had long sought her blood, and desired God to convert them to the truth; and in the end of the prayer she desired all saints to make intercession for her to Jesus Christ, and so kissing the crucifix, and crossing of her also, said these words: "Even as Thy arms, O Jesus, were spread here upon the Cross, so receive me into Thy arms of mercy, and forgive me all my sins."
Her (44) prayer being ended, the executioners, kneeling, desired her Grace to forgive them her death; who answered, "I forgive you with all my heart, for now, I hope, you shall make an end of all my troubles." Then they, with her two women, helping of her up, began to disrobe her of her apparel; she never changed her countenance, but with smiling cheer she uttered these words, "that she never had such grooms to make her unready, and that she never put off her clothes before such a company."
Then she (44), being stripped of all her apparel saving her petticoat and kirtle, her two women beholding her made great lamentation, and crying and crossing themselves prayed in Latin; she (44), turning herself to them, embracing them, said these words in French, "Ne criez vous; j'ay promis pour vous;" and so crossing and kissing them, bade them pray for her, and rejoice and not weep, for that now they should see an end of all their mistress's (44) troubles. Then she, with a smiling countenance, turning to her men servants, as Melvin and the rest, standing upon a bench nigh the scaffold, who sometime weeping, sometime crying out aloud, and continually crossing themselves, prayed in Latin, crossing them with her hand bade them farewell; and wishing them to pray for her even until the last hour.
This done, one of the women having a Corpus Christi cloth lapped up three-corner ways, kissing it, put it over the Queen of Scots' (44) face, and pinned it fast to the caul of her head. Then the two women departed from her, and she (44) kneeling down upon the cushion most resolutely, and without any token or fear of death, she spake aloud this Psalm in Latin, "In te, Domine, confido, non confundar in eternum," &c. [Ps. xxv.]. Then, groping for the block, she laid down her head, Putting her chin over the block with both her hands, which holding there, still had been cut off, had they not been espied. Then lying upon the block most quietly, and stretching out her arms, cried, "In manus tuas, Domine," &c, three or four times. Then she (44) lying very still on the block, one of the executioners holding of her slightly with one of his hands, she (44) endured two strokes of the other executioner with an axe, she making very small noise or none at all, and not stirring any part of her from the place where she lay; and so the executioner cut off her head, saving one little grisle, which being cut asunder, he lifted up her head to the view of all the assembly, and bade "God save the Queen." Then her dressing of lawn falling off from her head, it appeared as grey as one of threescore and ten years old, polled very short, her face in a moment being so much altered from the form she had when she was alive, as few could remember her by her dead face. Her lips stirred up and down a quarter of an hour after her head was cut off.
Then Mr. Dean (42) said with a loud voice, "So perish all the Queen's enemies;" and afterwards the Earl of Kent (46) came to the dead body, and standing over it, with a loud voice said, "Such end of all the Queen's and the Gospel's enemies."
Then one of the executioners pulling off her (44) garters, espied her little dog which was crept under her clothes, which could not be gotten forth but by force, yet afterward would not depart from the dead corpse, but came and lay between her head and her shoulders, which being imbrued with her blood, was carried away and washed, as all things else were that had any blood was either burned or clean washed; and the executioners sent away with money for their fees, not having any one thing that belonged unto her. And so, every man being commanded out of the Hall, except the Sheriff (46) and his men, she was carried by them up into a great chamber lying ready for the surgeons to embalm her.

Around 1576 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Mary "Queen of Scots" Stewart I Queen Scotland 1542-1587 (33).

After 1585 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Around 1520 Unknown Artist. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1560 Francois Clouet Painter 1510-1572 (50). Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560 (15).

On 23 May 1594 Thomas Andrew of Winwick Manor Sheriff of 1541-1594 (53) died at Winwick Manor.

Wollaston

In 1426 Benedicta Babington 1368-1426 (58) died at Wollaston.

Woodford

On 22 Aug 1759 Andrew St John 14th Baron St John Bletso 1759-1817 was born to John St John 12th Baron St John Bletso 1725-1767 (33) at Woodford.