History of Northumberland

Alnwick

Battle of Alnwick

On 13 Nov 1093 the Battle of Alnwick was fought at Alnwick between the forces of Malcolm III King Scotland 1031-1093 (62) and Robert de Mobray Earl Northumbria -1125.
Malcolm III King Scotland 1031-1093 (62) and his son Edward Dunkeld -1093 were killed. Duncan II King Scotland 1060-1094 (33) succeeded II King Scotland: Dunkeld. He died a year minus day later.

Battle of Alnwick

On 11 Jul 1174 a small army commanded by Ranulf Glanville 1112-1190 (62) with Hugh de Kevelioc Gernon 5th Earl Chester 1147-1181 (27) surprised William "Lion" I King Scotland 1143-1214 (31) 's army in a dawn raid known as the Battle of Alnwick near Alnwick. William "Lion" I King Scotland 1143-1214 (31) was captured and imprisoned initially in Newcastle on Tyne Castle, Newcastle on Tyne. He was subsequently moved to the more remote, and secure, Falaise Castle, Falaise, Calvados, Basse Normandie.

On 12 Jul 1245 William Percy 6th Baron Percy Topcliffe 1197-1245 (48) died at Alnwick. His son Henry Percy 7th Baron Percy Topcliffe -1272 succeeded 7th Baron Percy Topcliffe (Feudal).

In 1362 Mary Plantagenet Baroness Percy 1320-1362 (42) died at Alnwick.

On 24 Aug 1365 Idonia Clifford Baroness Percy 1303-1365 (62) died at Alnwick.

On 14 Sep 1459 Henry Fenwick 1401-1459 (57) died at Alnwick.

On 11 Feb 1847 Hugh Percy 3rd Duke Northumberland 1785-1847 (61) died at Alnwick. His brother Algernon Percy 4th Duke Northumberland 1792-1865 (54) succeeded 4th Duke Northumberland (3C 1766), 4th Baron Lovain. Eleanor Grosvenor Duchess Northumberland 1820-1911 (26) by marriage Duchess Northumberland (3C 1766).

Alnwick Castle, Alnwick

In 1197 William Percy 6th Baron Percy Topcliffe 1197-1245 was born to Henry Percy 1156-1198 (41) at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

On 10 Nov 1341 Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland 1341-1408 was born to Henry Percy 3rd Baron Percy 1321-1368 (20) and Mary Plantagenet Baroness Percy 1320-1362 (21) at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

On 20 May 1364 Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 was born to Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland 1341-1408 (22) and Margaret Neville Countess Northumberland 1329-1372 (35) at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

On 18 May 1368 Henry Percy 3rd Baron Percy 1321-1368 (47) died at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick. He was buried at Alnwick Abbey, Alnwick. His son Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland 1341-1408 (26) succeeded 4th Baron Percy. Margaret Neville Countess Northumberland 1329-1372 (39) by marriage Baroness Percy.

On 03 Feb 1393 Henry Percy 2nd Earl of Northumberland 1393-1455 was born to Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (28) and Elizabeth Mortimer Baroness Camoys 1371-1417 (21) at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

Around 1395 Elizabeth Percy Countess Westmoreland 1395-1436 was born to Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (30) and Elizabeth Mortimer Baroness Camoys 1371-1417 (23) at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

Around 25 Dec 1401 Henry Fenwick 1401-1459 was born at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

Siege of Alnwick

In Jul 1462 William Douglas 3rd Lord Drumlanrig 1440-1464 (22) fought at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick during the Siege of Alnwick.

Around 1504 Thomas Percy 1504-1537 was born to Henry Percy 5th Earl of Northumberland 1478-1527 (25) and Katherine Spencer Countess Northumberland 1477-1542 (27) at Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

Around 1750. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

Middle Gatehouse, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick

On 30 Nov 1384 Thomas Grey 1384-1415 was born to Thomas Grey 1359-1400 (25) and Joan Mowbray 1363-1402 (21) at Middle Gatehouse, Alnwick Castle, Alnwick.

Alwinton

Around 1390 Richard Redman 1390-1441 was born to Richard Redman Master of the Horse 1350-1426 (40) and Elizabeth Aldeburgh 1362-1417 (28) at Alwinton.

Babington

In 1170 John Babington 1170-1220 was born at Babington.

Around 1220 John Babington 1170-1220 (50) died at Babington.

In 1245 William Babington 1245-1271 was born to Robert Babington 1220-1248 (25) at Babington.

Around 1248 Robert Babington 1220-1248 (28) died at Babington.

Around 1267 Bernard Babington 1267-1303 was born to William Babington 1245-1271 (22) at Babington.

In 1271 William Babington 1245-1271 (26) died at Babington.

In 1303 Bernard Babington 1267-1303 (36) died at Babington.

Bamburgh

Bamburgh Castle, Bamburgh

On Aug 1311 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (27) withdrew at Bamburgh Castle, Bamburgh.

In 1489 Thomas Darcy 1st Baron Darcy Templehurst 1467-1537 (22) was appointed Constable Bamburgh Castle.

Ralph Grey 1432-1464 was appointed Governor of Bamburgh Castle.

Berwick on Tweed

On 25 Oct 1292 Robert Burnell Bishop of Bath and Wells 1239-1292 (53) died at Berwick on Tweed.

1296 Capture of Berwick

On 30 Mar 1296 Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (21) captured Berwick on Tweed from William "Hardy" Douglas 2nd Lord Douglas 1240-1298 (56). Richard Cornwall 1252-1296 (44) was killed during the course of the siege.'When the town had been taken in this way and its citizens had submitted, Edward spared no one, whatever the age or sex, and for two days streams of blood flowed from the bodies of the slain, for in his tyrannous rage he ordered 7,500 souls of both sexes to be massacred. So that mills could be turned by the flow of their blood.' - Account of the Massacre of Berwick, from Bower’s Scotichronicon. . .

On 20 Sep 1305 Nigel Bruce 1276-1305 (29) was hanged at Berwick on Tweed.

Battle of Bannockburn

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter III - Here the matter speaketh of some of the predecessors of king Edward of England. FIRST, the better to enter into the matter of this honourable and pleasant history of the noble Edward king of England (1), who was crowned at London the year of our Lord God MCCCXXVI., on Christmasday, living the king his father and the queen his mother, it is certain that the opinion of Englishmen most commonly was as then, and oftentimes it was seen in England after the time of king Arthur, how that between two valiant kings of England there was most commonly one between them of less sufficiency both of wit and of prowess : and this was right well apparent by the same icing Edward the third (1); for his grandfather, called the good king Edward the first, was right valiant, sage, wise and hardy, adventurous and fortunate jn all feats of war, and had much ado against the Scots, and conquered them three or four times ; for the Scots could never have victory nor endure against him : and after his decease his son of his first wife, who was father to the said good king Edward the third, was crowned king and called Edward the second (30), who resembled nothing to his father in wit nor in prowess, but governed and kept his realm right wildly, and ruled himself by sinister counsel of certain persons, whereby at length he had no profit nor land, as ye shall hear after; for anon after he was crowned, Robert Bruce king of Scotland, who had often before given much ado to the said good king Edward the first, conquered again all Scotland, and brent and wasted a great part of the realm of England, a four or five days' journey within the realm at two times, and discomfited the king and all the barons of England at a place in Scotland called Stirling, by battle arranged the day of Saint John Baptist, in the seventh year of the reign of the same king Edward, in the year of our Lord MCCCXIV. The chase of this discomfiture endured two days and two nights, and the king of England (30) went with a small company to London and on mid-lent Sunday in the year of our Lord MCCCXVI. The Scots won again the city of Berwick by treason ; but because this is no part of our matter, I will leave speaking thereof.

On Jun 1319 Ralph Neville 2nd Baron Neville Raby 1291-1367 (28) was captured at Berwick on Tweed.

In Jun 1319 Robert "Peacock of the North" Neville 1287-1319 (32) was killed by James "Black" Douglas 1286-1330 (33) in single combat at Berwick on Tweed. He was buried at St Brandon's Church, Brancepeth.

Siege of Berwick

On Sep 1319 Goronwy ap Tudur Hen Tudor -1331 fought at Berwick on Tweed during the Siege of Berwick.

Marriage of King David II of Scotland and Princess Joan

On 17 Jul 1328 David II King Scotland 1324-1371 (4) and Joan of the Tower Queen Consort Scotland 1321-1362 (7) were married at Berwick on Tweed.

Battle of Teba

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XX - How king Robert of Scotland died. 25 Aug 1330. Battle of Teba. And within a while after that this knight sir William Douglas (44) was come to the king of Spain (19), on a day the king issued out into the field to approach near to his enemies. And the king of Granade issued out in like wise on his part, so that each king might see other with all their banners displayed. Then they arranged their battles each against other. Then sir William Douglas (44) drew out on the one side with all his company, to the intent to shew his prowess the better. And when he saw these battles thus ranged on both parties, and saw that the battle of the king of Spain (19) began somewhat to advance toward their enemies, he thought then verily that they should soon assemble together to fight at hand strokes; and then he thought rather to be with the foremost than with the hindermost, and strake his horse with the spurs, and all his company also, and dashed into the battle of the king of Granade, crying, 'Douglas! Douglas !' weening to him the king of Spain (19) and his host had followed, but they did not ; wherefore he was deceived, for the Spanish host stood still. And so this gentle knight (44) was enclosed, and all his company, with the Saracens, whereas he did marvels in arms, but finally he could not endure, so that he and all his company were slain. The which was great damage, that the Spaniards would not rescue them. Also in this season there were certain lords that treated for peace between England and Scotland. So that at the last there was a marriage made and solemnised between the young king of Scotland (4) and dame Joan of the Tower (7), sister to king Edward of England (15), at Berwick, as the English chronicle saith, on Mary Maudlin day [Note. the Feast of Mary Magdalen is 22 Jul?], the year 'of our Lord MCCCXXVIII., against the assent of many of the nobles of the realm. But queen Isabel (35) the king's mother and the earl Mortimer (43) made that marriage ; at the which, as mine author saith, there was great feast made on both parties.

Battle of Halidon Hill

On 19 Jul 1333 King Edward III England (20) defeated the Scots army at the Battle of Halidon Hill near Berwick on Tweed. John of Eltham 1st Earl Cornwall 1316-1336 (16) commanded.
English archers, just as at the Battle of Dupplin Moor one year previously, had a significant impact on the massed ranks of Scottish schiltrons. Edward's army included: Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 (33), who commanded the right wing, Hugh Courtenay 9th Earl Devon 1276-1340 (56), Robert Pierrepoint -1334, Hugh Courtenay 10th Earl Devon 1303-1377 (30), Henry Beaumont 4th Earl Buchan 1279-1340 (53) and John Sully 1283-1388 (50). One of the few English casualties was John Neville 1299-1333 (34) who was killed.
The Scottish army included David II King Scotland 1324-1371 (9). Alexander Bruce -1333, Alan Stewart -1333, James Stewart 1276-1333 (57), John Stewart -1333, William Douglas 1st Earl Atholl -1333, Archibald Douglas 1297-1333 (35), Malcolm Lennox 2nd Earl Lennox -1333 and Hugh Ross 4th Earl Ross 1296-1333 (36) who were all killed.
Kenneth de Moravia Sutherland 4th Earl Sutherland -1333 was killed. His son William de Moravia Sutherland 5th Earl Sutherland -1370 succeeded 5th Earl Sutherland. Johanna Menteith Countess Sutherland by marriage Countess Sutherland.

In 1419 William Clifford 1375-1419 (44) died at Berwick on Tweed.

Capture of Berwick

On 24 Aug 1482 Edward Stanley 1st Baron Monteagle 1462-1524 (20) was knighted by Richard III King England 1452-1485 (29) at Berwick on Tweed during the Capture of Berwick.

On 01 Aug 1503 Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (13) crossed the border into Scotland at Berwick on Tweed.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (35).

Around 1514 Mary Hastings Baroness Berkeley 1514-1532 was born to George Hastings 1st Earl Huntingdon 1487-1544 (27) and Anne Stafford Countess Huntingdon 1483-1544 (31) at Berwick on Tweed.

On 07 Nov 1523 Thomas Gerard 1488-1523 (35) was killed during the Battle of Berwick at Berwick on Tweed.

Before 10 Sep 1559 James Hamilton 3rd Earl Arran 1532-1609 travelled to France at Berwick on Tweed.

In 1560 Arthur Grey 14th Baron Grey Wilton 1536-1593 (24) was knighted at Berwick on Tweed.

On 25 Jun 1601 Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1555-1601 (45) died at Berwick on Tweed. His son Robert Bertie 1582-1642 1st Earl Lindsey 1582-1642 (18) succeeded 14th Baron Willoughby Eresby. He was buried at St James' Church, Spilsby.
On 15 Feb 1610 Catherine Bertie 1595-1610 (15) died in childbirth. She was buried at St James' Church, Spilsby.
Monument Elizabethan Recumbent. Tall Sideboard Tomb with reclining hooded figure of Lady Katherine, daughter of Peregrine, with Chrisom Child in the crib at her feet. Above a standing figure of Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby Eresby 1555-1601 (45) in a niche, with Strapwork embellishments, all supported on composite columns with a Dentillated cornice.

In 1638 John Berkeley 1st Baron Berkeley 1602-1678 (36) was knighted at Berwick on Tweed.

On 27 Jul 1639 Vivian Molyneux 1596-1642 (43) was knighted by Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (38) at Berwick on Tweed.

On 23 Jun 1679 James Thynne 1605-1670 was knighted at Berwick on Tweed.

In 1715 John Barrington 1st Viscount Barrington 1678-1734 (37) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1740 William Wildman Barrington 2nd Viscount Barrington 1717-1793 (22) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1740 John Barrington 1717-1764 (22) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1754 John Delaval 1st Baron Delaval 1728-1808 (25) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1751. Arthur Pond Painter 1705-1758 (46). Portrait of Rhoda Delaval 1725-1757 (25) and her siblings Francis Blake Delaval 1727-1771 (23), Edward Hussey Delaval 1729-1814 (22), John Delaval 1st Baron Delaval 1728-1808 (22), Anne Hussey Delaval 1743- and Sarah Delaval Countess Mexborough 1742-1821 (9).

In 1765 John Delaval 1st Baron Delaval 1728-1808 (36) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1780 John Delaval 1st Baron Delaval 1728-1808 (51) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1796 George Carpenter 2nd Earl Tyrconnel 1750-1805 (46) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

In 1820 Charles Augustus Bennet 5th Earl Tankerville 1776-1859 (43) was elected MP Berwick on Tweed.

Berwick Castle, Berwick on Tweed

In 1412 Ralph Eure 1412-1461 was born to William Eure 1396-1465 (16) and Maud Fitzhugh 1391-1467 (21) at Berwick Castle, Berwick on Tweed.

Around 18 Feb 1440 William Eure 1440-1484 was born to Ralph Eure 1412-1461 (28) and Eleanor Greystoke 1416- at Berwick Castle, Berwick on Tweed.

In 1539 William Eure 1st Baron Eure 1483-1548 (56) was appointed Governor of Berwick on Tweed.

On 25 Aug 1568 Henry Carey 1st Baron Hunsdon 1526-1596 (42) was appointed Governor of Berwick on Tweed.

The History of King Richard the Third. In which time of his latter days, this realm was in quiet and prosperous estate: no fear of outward enemies, no war in hand, nor none toward, but such as no man looked for; the people toward the Prince, not in a constrained fear, but in a willing and loving obedience; among themselves, the commons in good peace. The lords whom he knew at variance, he himself in his deathbed appeased. He had left all gathering of money (which is the only thing that withdraws the hearts of Englishmen from the prince), nor anything he intended to take in hand by which he should be driven thereunto, for his tribute out of France he had obtained before, and the year foregoing his death he had obtained Berwick Castle. And although throughout his reign he was with his people so benign, courteous and so familiar that no part of his virtues was more esteemed, yet that condition in the end of his days (in which many princes by a long continued sovereignty decline into a proud port from their debonair behavior at the beginning) marvelously in him grew and increased so far forth that, in the summer, the last that ever he saw, his Highness, being at Windsor hunting, sent for the Mayor and Aldermen of London to him—for no other errand but to have them hunt and be merry with him. Here he treated them not so stately but so friendly and of so familiar cheer, and sent venison from there so freely into the city, that no one thing in many days before got him either more hearts or more hearty favor among the common people, who oftentimes more esteem and take for greater kindness a little courtesy than a great benefit.

John Conyers 3rd Baron Conyers 1524-1557 was appointed Governor of Berwick on Tweed.

Blanchland, Northumberland

Blanchland Abbey, Northumberland

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XVIII - How the king of England made his first journey against the Scots. And thus they continued day by day the space of eight days, abiding every day the returning again of the Scots, who knew no more where the English host lay than they knew where they were; so each of them were ignorant of other. Thus three days and three nights they were in manner without bread, wine, candle or light, fodder or forage, or any manner of purveyance, either for horse or man : and after the space of four days a loaf of bread was sold for sixpence the which was worth but a penny, and a gallon of wine for six groats that was worth but sixpence. And yet for all that, there was such rage of famine that each took victuals out of other's hands, whereby there rose divers battles and strifes between sundry companions ; and yet beside all these mischiefs it never ceased to rain all the whole week, whereby their saddles, panels and countersingles were all rotten and broken, and most part of their horses hurt on their backs : nor they had not wherewith to shoe them that were unshod, nor they had nothing to cover themselves withal from the rain and cold but green bushes and their armour, nor they had nothing to make fire withal but green boughs, the which would not burn because of the rain. In this great mischief they were all the week without hearing of any word of the Scots, upon trust they should repass again into their own countries the same way or near thereabout; whereby great noise and murmur began to rise in the host, for some said and laid it to others' charge that by their counsel the king and all they were brought into that danger, and that they had done it to betray the king and all his host. Wherefore it was ordained by the king and by his council that the next morning they should remove the host and repass again the river about seven mile thence, whereas they might pass more at their ease. Then it was cried throughout the host that every man should be ready apparelled to remove the next day betimes.: also there was a cry made that whosoever could bring to the king certain knowledge where the Scots were, he that brought first tidings thereof should have for his labour a hundred pounds [of] land to him and to his heirs for ever, and to be made a knight of the king's hand.
When this cry was made in the host, divers English knights and squires to the number of fifteen or sixteen, for covetise of winning of this promise, they passed the river in great peril and rode forth through the mountains, and departed each one from other, taking their adventure. The next morning the host dislodged and rode fair and easily all the day, for they were but evil apparelled, and did so much that they day till it was noon, and then they found some villages brent by the Scots, and thereabout was some champaign country with corn and meadows, and so that night the host lodged there. Again the third day they rode forth, so that the most part of the host wist not which way, for they knew not the country nor they could hear no tidings of the Scots. And again the fourth day they rode forth in like manner, till it was about the hour of three, [Note. Translation error. Should 9am] and there came a squire fast riding toward the king and said : 'An it like your grace, I have brought you perfect tidings of the Scots your enemies. Surely they be within three mile of you, lodged on a great mountain, abiding there for you ; and there they have been all this eight days, nor they knew no more tidings of you than ye did of them. Sir, this that I skew you is of truth, for I approached so near to them that I was taken prisoner and brought before the lords of their host ; and there I skewed them tidings of you, and how that ye seek for them to the intent to have battle. And the lords did quit me my ransom and prison, when I had skewed them how your grace had promised a hundred pounds sterling of rent to him that brought first tidings of them to you ; and they made me to promise that I should not rest till I had skewed you this tidings, for they said they had as great desire to fight with you as ye had with them: and there shall ye find them without fault' And as soon as the king had heard this tidings, he assembled all his host in a fair meadow to pasture their horses ; and beside there was a little abbey, the which was all brent, called in the days of king Arthur le Blanche Lande. There the king confessed him, and every man made him ready. The king caused many masses to be sung to housed all such as had devotion thereto ; and incontinent he assigned a hundred pounds sterling of rent to the squire that had brought him tidings of the Scots, according to his promise, and made him knight [with] his own hands' before all the host.

Blatherwycke

Humphrey Stafford 1461-1545 and Margaret Fogge were married at Blatherwycke.

Bothal

On 07 Nov 1468 Ralph Ogle 3rd Baron Ogle 1468-1512 was born to Owen Ogle 2nd Baron Ogle 1440-1486 (28) in Bothal.

On 04 Apr 1617 Charles Cavendish 1553-1617 (63) died. On 18 Apr 1629 Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (59) died at Bothal. Monument to Charles Cavendish 1553-1617 (63) and Catherine Ogle 8th Baroness Ogle 1570-1629 (47) in Church of St Mary and St Laurence, Bolsover. Jacobean Period. Bongrace.

St Andrew's Church, Bothal

On 16 Jan 1512 Ralph Ogle 3rd Baron Ogle 1468-1512 (43) died in Morpeth. He was buried in St Andrew's Church, Bothal. His son Robert Ogle 4th Baron Ogle 1490-1530 (22) succeeded 4th Baron Ogle.

Branxton

Carham on Tweed

Cornhill-on-Tweed

On 04 Aug 1804 Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804 (73) died suddenty at an inn Cornhill-on-Tweed on his way to Edinburgh.

1798 John Singleton Copley Painter 1738-1815 (59). Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804 (66).

Before 1804 John Singleton Copley Painter 1738-1815. Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804.

Around 1798 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (39). Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804 (66).

Around 1800 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (41). Portrait of Adam Duncan 1st Viscount Duncan 1731-1804 (68).

Etal

Around 1447 Robert Manners 1447-1495 was born to Robert Manners 1408-1462 (39) at Etal.

Farne Islands

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 1. How Ethelwald, successor to Cuthbert, leading a hermit's life, calmed a tempest by his prayers when the brethren were in danger at sea. [687-699 a.d.]
The venerable Ethelwald succeeded the man of God, Cuthbert, in the exercise of a solitary life, which he spent in the isle of Farne before he became a bishop. After he had received the priesthood, he consecrated his office by deeds worthy of that degree for many years in the monastery which is called Inhrypum. To the end that his merit and manner of life may be the more certainly made known, I will relate one miracle of his, which was told me by one of the brothers for and on whom the same was wrought; to wit, Guthfrid, the venerable servant and priest of Christ, who also, afterwards, as abbot, presided over the brethren of the same church of Lindisfarne, in which he was educated.
"I came," says he, "to the island of Farne, with two others of the brethren, desiring to speak with the most reverend father, Ethelwald. Having been refreshed with his discourse, and asked for his blessing, as we were returning home, behold on a sudden, when we were in the midst of the sea, the fair weather in which we were sailing, was broken, and there arose so great and terrible a tempest, that neither sails nor oars were of any use to us, nor had we anything to expect but death. After long struggling with the wind and waves to no effect, at last we looked back to see whether it was possible by any means at least to return to the island whence we came, but we found that we were on all sides alike cut off by the storm, and that there was no hope of escape by our own efforts. But looking further, we perceived, on the island of Farne, our father Ethelwald, beloved of God, come out of his retreat to watch our course; for, hearing the noise of the tempest and raging sea, he had come forth to see what would become of us. When he beheld us in distress and despair, he bowed his knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in prayer for our life and safety; and as he finished his prayer, he calmed the swelling water, in such sort that the fierceness of the storm ceased on all sides, and fair winds attended us over a smooth sea to the very shore. When we had landed, and had pulled up our small vessel from the waves, the storm, which had ceased a short time for our sake, presently returned, and raged furiously during the whole day; so that it plainly appeared that the brief interval of calm had been granted by Heaven in answer to the prayers of the man of God, to the end that we might escape."
The man of God remained in the isle of Farne twelve years, and died there; but was buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, in the isle of Lindisfarne, beside the bodies of the aforesaid bishops. These things happened in the days of King Aldfrid, who, after his brother Egfrid, ruled the nation of the Northumbrians for nineteen years.

Ford

Ford Castle

In 1338 William Heron was licensed to crenellate Ford Castle.

Battle of Flodden

Before 09 Sep 1513 James IV King Scotland 1473-1513 based himself at Ford Castle before the Battle of Flodden.

In 1549 Ford Castle passed from the Heron family to the Carr family.

Ford Castle is located at a ford across the River Till.

Gilsland

In 1321 Ralph Dacre 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland 1290-1339 (31) was created 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Margaret "Flower of Gillesland" Multon Baroness Dacre Gilsland, 2nd Baroness Multon Gilsland -1361 by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In Apr 1339 Ralph Dacre 1st Baron Dacre Gilsland 1290-1339 (49) died at Naworth Castle, Naworth, Brampton. His son William Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1319-1361 (20) succeeded 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

Before 1357 Hugh Dacre 4th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1335-1383 and Elizabeth Maxwell Countess Atholl 1335-1370 were married. Elizabeth Maxwell Countess Atholl 1335-1370 by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1361 William Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1319-1361 (42) died. His brother Ralph Dacre 3rd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1321-1375 (40) succeeded 3rd Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1375 Ralph Dacre 3rd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1321-1375 (54) was murdered. His brother Hugh Dacre 4th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1335-1383 (40) succeeded 4th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1383 Hugh Dacre 4th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1335-1383 (48) died. He was buried at Lanercost Priory. In 1383 His son William Dacre 5th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1357-1398 (26) succeeded 5th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Joan Douglas Baroness Dacre Gilsland by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1398 William Dacre 5th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1357-1398 (41) died. His son Thomas Dacre 6th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1387-1458 (10) succeeded 6th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

Before 20 Jul 1399 Thomas Dacre 6th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1387-1458 and Philippa Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland were married. Philippa Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1428 Phillipa Dacre 1428- was born to Thomas Dacre 1410-1448 (18) and Elizabeth Bowett at Gilsland.

In 1431 Margaret Dacre 1431- was born to Thomas Dacre 1410-1448 (21) and Elizabeth Bowett at Gilsland.

Around 1433 Joan Dacre 7th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1433-1486 was born to Thomas Dacre 1410-1448 (23) and Elizabeth Bowett at Gilsland.

On Jun 1446 Richard Fiennes 7th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1415-1483 (31) and Joan Dacre 7th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1433-1486 (13) were married. Richard Fiennes 7th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1415-1483 (31) by marriage 7th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 05 Jan 1458 Thomas Dacre 6th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1387-1458 (70) died. On 05 Jan 1458 His granddaughter Joan Dacre 7th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1433-1486 (25) succeeded 7th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 08 Mar 1486 Joan Dacre 7th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1433-1486 (53) died. Her grandson Thomas Fiennes 8th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1472-1534 (14) succeeded 8th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1492 Thomas Fiennes 8th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1472-1534 (20) and Anne Bourchier Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1470-1530 (22) were married. Anne Bourchier Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1470-1530 (22) by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1518 Thomas Neville 1475-1542 (43) and Catherine Dacre 1485-1532 (33) were married (he was her half second-cousin) at Gilsland.

On 09 Sep 1534 Thomas Fiennes 8th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1472-1534 (62) died. He was buried at Herstmonceux, East Sussex. His grandson Thomas Fiennes 9th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1515-1541 (19) succeeded 9th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1536 Thomas Fiennes 9th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1515-1541 (21) and Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 (12) were married. Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 (12) by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1558 Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (18) was restored 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1565 Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (25) and Anne Sackville Baroness Dacre Gilsland -1595 were married. Anne Sackville Baroness Dacre Gilsland -1595 by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 25 Dec 1594 Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (55) died. He was buried at Chelsea Old Church. His sister Margaret Fiennes 11th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1541-1612 (53) succeeded 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Samson Lennard 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1544-1615 (50) by marriage 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 20 Sep 1615 Samson Lennard 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1544-1615 (71) died. His son Henry Lennard 12th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1570-1616 (45) succeeded 12th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Chrysogona Baker Baroness Dacre Gilsland by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 08 Aug 1616 Henry Lennard 12th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1570-1616 (46) died. His son Richard Lennard 13th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1596-1630 (20) succeeded 13th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 14 Jul 1617 Richard Lennard 13th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1596-1630 (21) and Elizabeth Throckmorton Baroness Dacre Gilsland -1622 were married. Elizabeth Throckmorton Baroness Dacre Gilsland -1622 by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 04 Jan 1625 Richard Lennard 13th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1596-1630 (28) and Dorothy North Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1605-1698 (20) were married. Dorothy North Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1605-1698 (20) by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 20 Aug 1630 Richard Lennard 13th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1596-1630 (34) died. He was buried at Herstmonceux, East Sussex. His son Francis Lennard 14th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1619-1662 (11) succeeded 14th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

After 16 Apr 1641 Francis Lennard 14th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1619-1662 and Elizabeth Bayning Baroness Dacre Gilsland were married. Elizabeth Bayning Baroness Dacre Gilsland by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 12 May 1662 Francis Lennard 14th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1619-1662 (43) died. He was buried at Chevening, Sevenoaks. His son Thomas Lennard Earl of Sussex 1654-1715 (7) succeeded 14th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 (1) by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 30 Oct 1715 Thomas Lennard Earl of Sussex 1654-1715 (61) died. Earl of Sussex (4C 1674) extinct. Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321) abeyant.

In 1741 Anne Lennard 16th Baroness Dacre Gilsland, Baroness Teynham 1684-1755 (56) succeeded 16th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 26 Jun 1755 Anne Lennard 16th Baroness Dacre Gilsland, Baroness Teynham 1684-1755 (70) died. Her son Thomas Barrett-Lennard 17th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1717-1786 (38) succeeded 17th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 12 Jan 1786 Thomas Barrett-Lennard 17th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1717-1786 (69) died. His nephew Charles Trevor-Roper 18th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1745-1794 (41) succeeded 18th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

In 1794 Charles Trevor-Roper 18th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1745-1794 (49) died. His sister Gertrude Trevor-Roper 19th Baroness Dacre Gilsland -1819 succeeded 19th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

On 14 Mar 1892 Henry Brand 2nd Viscount Hampden 1841-1906 (50) succeeded 2nd Viscount Hampden (2C 1884), 25th Baron Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321). Susan Henrietta Cavendish Viscountess Hampden 1846-1909 (45) by marriage Viscountess Hampden (2C 1884).

William Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1319-1361 and Catherine Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1330-1361 were married. Catherine Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1330-1361 by marriage Baroness Dacre Gilsland (1C 1321).

Glanton

Hedgeley Moor, Glanton

Battle of Hedgeley Moor

On 25 Apr 1464 a Yorkist army commanded by John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (33) defeated a Lancastrian army commanded by Henry Beaufort 3rd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) at Hedgeley Moor, Glanton during the Battle of Hedgeley Moor.
Of the Lancastrians ...
Thomas Ros 9th Baron Ros Helmsley 1427-1464 (36) was killed. His son Edmund Ros 10th Baron Ros Helmsley 1455-1508 (9) succeeded 10th Baron Ros Helmsley.
Ralph Percy 1425-1464 (39) was killed.

Glendale

On 12 Mar 1344 Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (64) died at Glendale.

Chillingham, Glendale

Around 1225 John Grey 1225-1267 was born to Richard Grey 1202-1271 (22) and Lucy Humez at Chillingham, Glendale.

In 1230 Hugh Grey 1203-1230 (27) died at Chillingham, Glendale.

In 1356 Elizabeth Grey Baroness Darcy Knayth 1356-1412 was born to Thomas Grey 1328-1369 (28) and Margaret Pressene at Chillingham, Glendale.

In 1432 Ralph Grey 1432-1464 was born to Ralph Grey -1442 and Elizabeth Fitzhugh at Chillingham, Glendale.

Around 1436 Jacquetta Stanlow 1436-1469 was born to William Stanlow 1406- at Chillingham, Glendale.

Around 1464 Edward Grey 1464-1533 was born to Ralph Grey 1432-1464 (32) at Chillingham, Glendale.

Around 1529 Ralph Grey 1529-1565 was born to Edward Grey 1464-1533 (65) at Chillingham, Glendale.

Around 1552 Ralph Grey 1552-1623 was born to Ralph Grey 1529-1565 (23) at Chillingham, Glendale.

On 17 Dec 1565 Ralph Grey 1529-1565 (36) died at Chillingham, Glendale. He was buried at Chillingham, Glendale.

On 07 Sep 1623 Ralph Grey 1552-1623 (71) died at Chillingham, Glendale.

On 15 Feb 1922 Olivia Montagu Countess Tankerville 1830-1922 (91) died at Greystones, Tunbridge Wells. She was buried at Chillingham, Glendale.

Chillingham Castle, Chillingham, Glendale

On 09 Jul 1931 George Montagu Bennet 7th Earl Tankerville 1852-1931 (79) died at Chillingham Castle, Chillingham, Glendale.

Greystoke

Collegiate Church, Greystoke

Harbottle

Harbottle Castle, Harbottle

In 1509 George Tailboys 9th Baron Kyme 1467-1538 (42) was keeper of at Harbottle Castle, Harbottle.

On 08 Oct 1515 Margaret Douglas Countess Lennox 1515-1578 was born to Archibald Douglas 6th Earl Angus 1489-1557 (26) and Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (25) at Harbottle Castle, Harbottle.

Around 1525 Unknown Artist. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 (35).

Hexham

Battle of Heavenfield

In 634 Oswald King Northumbria 604-641 (30) won a decisive victory over the army of the Kingdom of Gwynedd at the Battle of Heavenfield which was fought at Heavenfield, Hexham around six miles north of Hexham.
St Oswald's Church, Heavenfield, Hexham is believed to mark the location where Oswald King Northumbria 604-641 (30) raised his standard. The battle re-united Deira and Bernicia to form Northumbria and, according to Bede, restored Christianity to Northumbria.
Cadwallon Gwynedd was killed.

In 1110 Aelred of Reivaulx Chronicler 1110-1167 was born in Hexham.

Battle of Hexham

On 15 May 1464 a Yorkist army commanded by John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (33) defeated a Lancastrian army commanded by Henry Beaufort 3rd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) at Hexham during the Battle of Hexham.
Those fighting for York included John Stafford 1st Earl Wiltshire 1427-1473 (36), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (26) and Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (36).
Of the Lancastrian army William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (49) fought. Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1431-1464 (33) and Philip Wentworth 4th Baron Despencer 1424-1464 (40) were both captured.
Henry Beaufort 3rd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) was beheaded following the battle. His brother Edmund Beaufort 4th Duke Somerset 1439-1471 succeeded 4th Duke Somerset (2C 1448).
On 18 May 1464 Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1431-1464 (33) was executed at Newcastle on Tyne.
Philip Wentworth 4th Baron Despencer 1424-1464 (40) was executed at Middleham. His son Henry Wentworth 5th Baron Despencer 1448-1501 (16) succeeded 5th Baron Despencer (5C 1387).

Hexham Abbey

In 678 Eata Bishop Hexham -686 was appointed Bishop Hexham.

In 678 Eata Prior Melrose -686 was appointed Bishop Hexham.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 2. How Bishop John cured a dumb man by his blessing. [687 a.d.]
In the beginning of Aldfrid's reign, Bishop Eata died, and was succeeded in the bishopric of the church of Hagustald by the holy man John, of whom those that knew him well are wont to tell many miracles, and more particularly Berthun, a man worthy of all reverence and of undoubted truthfulness, and once his deacon, now abbot of the monastery called Inderauuda, that is, "In the wood of the Deiri": some of which miracles we have thought fit to hand on to posterity. There is a certain remote dwelling enclosed by a mound, among scattered trees, not far from the church of Hagustald, being about a mile and a half distant and separated from it by the River Tyne, having an oratory dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, where the man of God used frequently, as occasion offered, and specially in Lent, to abide with a few companions and in quiet give himself to prayer and study. Having come hither once at the beginning of Lent to stay, he bade his followers find out some poor man labouring under any grievous infirmity, or want, whom they might keep with them during those days, to receive alms, for so he was always used to do.
There was in a township not far off, a certain youth who was dumb, known to the bishop, for he often used to come into his presence to receive alms. He had never been able to speak one word; besides, he had so much scurf and scab on his head, that no hair could ever grow on the top of it, but only some rough hairs stood on end round about it. The bishop caused this young man to be brought, and a little hut to be made for him within the enclosure of the dwelling, in which he might abide, and receive alms from him every day. When one week of Lent was over, the next Sunday he bade the poor man come to him, and when he had come, he bade him put his tongue out of his mouth and show it him; then taking him by the chin, he made the sign of the Holy Cross on his tongue, directing him to draw it back so signed into his mouth and to speak. "Pronounce some word," said he; "say ‘gae,’ " which, in the language of the English, is the word of affirming and consenting, that is, yes. The youth's tongue was immediately loosed, and he spoke as he was bidden. The bishop then added the names of the letters: "Say A." He said A. "Say B;" he said B also. When he had repeated all the letters after the bishop, the latter proceeded to put syllables and words to him, and when he had repeated them all rightly he bade him utter whole sentences, and he did it. Nor did he cease all that day and the next night, as long as he could keep awake, as those who were present relate, to say something, and to express his private thoughts and wishes to others, which he could never do before; after the manner of the man long lame, who, when he was healed by the Apostles Peter and John, leaping up, stood and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising the Lord, rejoicing to have the use of his feet, which he had so long lacked. The bishop, rejoicing with him at his cure, caused the physician to take in hand the healing of the sores of his head. He did as he was bidden, and with the help of the bishop's blessing and prayers, a goodly head of hair grew as the skin was healed. Thus the youth became fair of countenance, ready of speech, with hair curling in comely fashion, whereas before he had been ill-favoured, miserable, and dumb. Thus filled with joy at his recovered health, notwithstanding that the bishop offered to keep him in his own household, he chose rather to return home.

In 687 John of Beverley Bishop -721 was consecrated Bishop Hexham.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 3. The same Berthun told another miracle concerning the said bishop. When the most reverend Wilfrid, after a long banishment, was admitted to the bishopric of the church of Hagustald, and the aforesaid John, upon the death of Bosa, a man of great sanctity and humility, was, in his place, appointed bishop of York, he himself came, once upon a time, to the monastery of nuns, at the place called Wetadun, where the Abbess Heriburg then presided. "When we were come thither," said he, "and had been received with great and universal joy, the abbess told us, that one of the nuns, who was her own daughter after the flesh, laboured under a grievous sickness, for she had been lately let blood in the arm, and whilst she was under treatment, was seized with an attack of sudden pain, which speedily increased, while the wounded arm became worse, and so much swollen, that it could scarce be compassed with both hands; and she lay in bed like to die through excess of pain. Wherefore the abbess entreated the bishop that he would vouchsafe to go in and give her his blessing; for she believed that she would soon be better if he blessed her or laid his hands upon her. He asked when the maiden had been let blood, and being told that it was on the fourth day of the moon, said, ‘You did very indiscreetly and unskilfully to let blood on the fourth day of the moon; for I remember that Archbishop Theodore, of blessed memory, said, that blood-letting at that time was very dangerous, when the light of the moon is waxing and the tide of the ocean is rising. And what can I do for the maiden if she is like to die? "
But the abbess still earnestly entreated for her daughter, whom she dearly loved, and designed to make abbess in her stead, and at last prevailed with him to go in and visit the sick maiden. Wherefore he went in, taking me with him to the maid, who lay, as I said, in sore anguish, and her arm swelling so greatly that it could not be bent at all at the elbow; and he stood and said a prayer over her, and having given his blessing, went out. Afterwards, as we were sitting at table, at the usual hour, some one came in and called me out, saying, ‘Quoenburg’ (that was the maid's name) ‘desires that you should immediately go back to her.’ This I did, and entering the chamber, I found her of more cheerful countenance, and like one in good health. And while I was sitting beside her, she said, ‘Shall we call for something to drink?’—‘Yes,’ said I, ‘and right glad am I, if you can.’ When the cup was brought, and we had both drunk, she said, ‘As soon as the bishop had said the prayer for me and given me his blessing and had gone out, I immediately began to mend; and though I have not yet recovered my former strength, yet all the pain is quite gone both from my arm, where it was most burning, and from all my body, as if the bishop had carried it away with him; notwithstanding the swelling of the arm still seems to remain.’ But when we departed thence, the cure of the pain in her limbs was followed by the assuaging of the grievous swelling; and the maiden being thus delivered from pains and death, returned praise to our Lord and Saviour, in company with His other servants who were there.

Heavenfield, Hexham

Battle of Heavenfield

In 634 Oswald King Northumbria 604-641 (30) won a decisive victory over the army of the Kingdom of Gwynedd at the Battle of Heavenfield which was fought at Heavenfield, Hexham around six miles north of Hexham.
St Oswald's Church, Heavenfield, Hexham is believed to mark the location where Oswald King Northumbria 604-641 (30) raised his standard. The battle re-united Deira and Bernicia to form Northumbria and, according to Bede, restored Christianity to Northumbria.
Cadwallon Gwynedd was killed.

St Oswald's Church, Heavenfield, Hexham

Battle of Heavenfield

In 634 Oswald King Northumbria 604-641 (30) won a decisive victory over the army of the Kingdom of Gwynedd at the Battle of Heavenfield which was fought at Heavenfield, Hexham around six miles north of Hexham.
St Oswald's Church, Heavenfield, Hexham is believed to mark the location where Oswald King Northumbria 604-641 (30) raised his standard. The battle re-united Deira and Bernicia to form Northumbria and, according to Bede, restored Christianity to Northumbria.
Cadwallon Gwynedd was killed.

St John's Lea, Hexham

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 2. How Bishop John cured a dumb man by his blessing. [687 a.d.]
In the beginning of Aldfrid's reign, Bishop Eata died, and was succeeded in the bishopric of the church of Hagustald by the holy man John, of whom those that knew him well are wont to tell many miracles, and more particularly Berthun, a man worthy of all reverence and of undoubted truthfulness, and once his deacon, now abbot of the monastery called Inderauuda, that is, "In the wood of the Deiri": some of which miracles we have thought fit to hand on to posterity. There is a certain remote dwelling enclosed by a mound, among scattered trees, not far from the church of Hagustald, being about a mile and a half distant and separated from it by the River Tyne, having an oratory dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, where the man of God used frequently, as occasion offered, and specially in Lent, to abide with a few companions and in quiet give himself to prayer and study. Having come hither once at the beginning of Lent to stay, he bade his followers find out some poor man labouring under any grievous infirmity, or want, whom they might keep with them during those days, to receive alms, for so he was always used to do.
There was in a township not far off, a certain youth who was dumb, known to the bishop, for he often used to come into his presence to receive alms. He had never been able to speak one word; besides, he had so much scurf and scab on his head, that no hair could ever grow on the top of it, but only some rough hairs stood on end round about it. The bishop caused this young man to be brought, and a little hut to be made for him within the enclosure of the dwelling, in which he might abide, and receive alms from him every day. When one week of Lent was over, the next Sunday he bade the poor man come to him, and when he had come, he bade him put his tongue out of his mouth and show it him; then taking him by the chin, he made the sign of the Holy Cross on his tongue, directing him to draw it back so signed into his mouth and to speak. "Pronounce some word," said he; "say ‘gae,’ " which, in the language of the English, is the word of affirming and consenting, that is, yes. The youth's tongue was immediately loosed, and he spoke as he was bidden. The bishop then added the names of the letters: "Say A." He said A. "Say B;" he said B also. When he had repeated all the letters after the bishop, the latter proceeded to put syllables and words to him, and when he had repeated them all rightly he bade him utter whole sentences, and he did it. Nor did he cease all that day and the next night, as long as he could keep awake, as those who were present relate, to say something, and to express his private thoughts and wishes to others, which he could never do before; after the manner of the man long lame, who, when he was healed by the Apostles Peter and John, leaping up, stood and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising the Lord, rejoicing to have the use of his feet, which he had so long lacked. The bishop, rejoicing with him at his cure, caused the physician to take in hand the healing of the sores of his head. He did as he was bidden, and with the help of the bishop's blessing and prayers, a goodly head of hair grew as the skin was healed. Thus the youth became fair of countenance, ready of speech, with hair curling in comely fashion, whereas before he had been ill-favoured, miserable, and dumb. Thus filled with joy at his recovered health, notwithstanding that the bishop offered to keep him in his own household, he chose rather to return home.

Homildon Hill

Battle of Homildon Hill

On 14 Sep 1402 Henry Percy 1st Earl of Northumberland 1341-1408 (60) and his son Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (38) lay in wait at at Homildon Hill for the Scots to return from their laying waste to Northumberland. The Battle of Homildon Hill was a victory for the English forces whose longbowmen decimated the Scottish schiltrons. Henry Fitzhugh 3rd Baron Fitzhugh 1358-1425 (44) fought for the English.
John Swinton -1402 was killed.
Thomas Dunbar 5th Earl Moray 1371-1422 (31) and Henry Sinclair 2nd Earl Orkney 1375-1420 (27) were captured.
Archibald Douglas 1st Duke Touraine 1372-1424 (30) was wounded. Henry IV King England 1367-1413 (35) forbade the ransoming of Scottish prisoners so that he could concentrate on the Welsh. By doing so he created a rift with the Percy family who subsequently defected to Owain ap Gruffudd Glyndŵr (43).
William Stewart -1402 was executed by Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (38) having been captured.
John Stewart -1420 fought at the Battle of Homildon Hill.

Howick

On 09 Dec 1816 John "Radical Jack" Lambton 1st Earl Durham 1792-1840 (24) and Louisa Elizabeth Grey Countess Durham 1797-1841 (19) were married at Howick.

Howick Hall, Howick

Kirkley

On 22 Feb 1368 John Eure 1303-1368 (65) died in Kirkley.

Kyme

Lindisfarne

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 19. In the fourth year of the reign of Osred (12), Coenred, who had for some time nobly governed the kingdom of the Mercians, much more nobly quitted the sceptre of his kingdom. For he went to Rome, and there receiving the tonsure and becoming a monk, when Constantine (45) was pope, he continued to his last hour in prayer and fasting and alms-deeds at the threshold of the Apostles. He was succeeded in the throne by Ceolred, the son of Ethelred, who had governed the kingdom before Coenred. With him went the son of Sighere, the king of the East Saxons whom we mentioned before, by name Offa, a youth of a most pleasing age and comeliness, and greatly desired by all his nation to have and to hold the sceptre of the kingdom. He, with like devotion, quitted wife, and lands, and kindred and country, for Christ and for the Gospel, that he might "receive an hundred-fold in this life, and in the world to come life everlasting." He also, when they came to the holy places at Rome, received the tonsure, and ending his life in the monastic habit, attained to the vision of the blessed Apostles in Heaven, as he had long desired.
The same year that they departed from Britain, the great bishop, Wilfrid, ended his days in the province called Inundalum, after he had been bishop forty-five years. His body, being laid in a coffin, was carried to his monastery, which is called Inhrypum, and buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, with the honour due to so great a prelate. Concerning whose manner of life, let us now turn back, and briefly make mention of the things which were done. Being a boy of a good disposition, and virtuous beyond his years, he conducted himself so modestly and discreetly in all points, that he was deservedly beloved, respected, and cherished by his elders as one of themselves. At fourteen years of age he chose rather the monastic than the secular life; which, when he had signified to his father, for his mother was dead, he readily consented to his godly wishes and desires, and advised him to persist in that wholesome purpose. Wherefore he came to the isle of Lindisfarne, and there giving himself to the service of the monks, he strove diligently to learn and to practise those things which belong to monastic purity and piety; and being of a ready wit, he speedily learned the psalms and some other books, having not yet received the tonsure, but being in no small measure marked by those virtues of humility and obedience which are more important than the tonsure; for which reason he was justly loved by his elders and his equals. Having served God some years in that monastery, and being a youth of a good understanding, he perceived that the way of virtue delivered by the Scots was in no wise perfect, and he resolved to go to Rome, to see what ecclesiastical or monastic rites were in use at the Apostolic see. When he told the brethren, they commended his design, and advised him to carry out that which he purposed. He forthwith went to Queen Eanfled, for he was known to her, and it was by her counsel and support that he had been admitted into the aforesaid monastery, and he told her of his desire to visit the threshold of the blessed Apostles. She, being pleased with the youth's good purpose, sent him into Kent, to King Earconbert,8 who was her uncle's son, requesting that he would send him to Rome in an honourable manner. At that time, Honorius, one of the disciples of the blessed Pope Gregory, a man very highly instructed in ecclesiastical learning, was archbishop there. When he had tarried there for a space, and, being a youth of an active spirit, was diligently applying himself to learn those things which came under his notice, another youth, called Biscop, surnamed Benedict, of the English nobility, arrived there, being likewise desirous to go to Rome, of whom we have before made mention.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 1. How Ethelwald, successor to Cuthbert, leading a hermit's life, calmed a tempest by his prayers when the brethren were in danger at sea. [687-699 a.d.]
The venerable Ethelwald succeeded the man of God, Cuthbert, in the exercise of a solitary life, which he spent in the isle of Farne before he became a bishop. After he had received the priesthood, he consecrated his office by deeds worthy of that degree for many years in the monastery which is called Inhrypum. To the end that his merit and manner of life may be the more certainly made known, I will relate one miracle of his, which was told me by one of the brothers for and on whom the same was wrought; to wit, Guthfrid, the venerable servant and priest of Christ, who also, afterwards, as abbot, presided over the brethren of the same church of Lindisfarne, in which he was educated.
"I came," says he, "to the island of Farne, with two others of the brethren, desiring to speak with the most reverend father, Ethelwald. Having been refreshed with his discourse, and asked for his blessing, as we were returning home, behold on a sudden, when we were in the midst of the sea, the fair weather in which we were sailing, was broken, and there arose so great and terrible a tempest, that neither sails nor oars were of any use to us, nor had we anything to expect but death. After long struggling with the wind and waves to no effect, at last we looked back to see whether it was possible by any means at least to return to the island whence we came, but we found that we were on all sides alike cut off by the storm, and that there was no hope of escape by our own efforts. But looking further, we perceived, on the island of Farne, our father Ethelwald, beloved of God, come out of his retreat to watch our course; for, hearing the noise of the tempest and raging sea, he had come forth to see what would become of us. When he beheld us in distress and despair, he bowed his knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in prayer for our life and safety; and as he finished his prayer, he calmed the swelling water, in such sort that the fierceness of the storm ceased on all sides, and fair winds attended us over a smooth sea to the very shore. When we had landed, and had pulled up our small vessel from the waves, the storm, which had ceased a short time for our sake, presently returned, and raged furiously during the whole day; so that it plainly appeared that the brief interval of calm had been granted by Heaven in answer to the prayers of the man of God, to the end that we might escape."
The man of God remained in the isle of Farne twelve years, and died there; but was buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, in the isle of Lindisfarne, beside the bodies of the aforesaid bishops. These things happened in the days of King Aldfrid, who, after his brother Egfrid, ruled the nation of the Northumbrians for nineteen years.

Lindisfarne Abbey

In 688 Bishop Eadberht of Lindisfarne -698 was appointed Bishop Lindisfarne.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 18. How the South Saxons received Eadbert and Eolla, and the West Saxons, Daniel and Aldhelm, for their bishops; and of the writings of the same Aldhelm. [705 a.d.]
705. In the year of our Lord 705, Aldfrid, king of the Northumbrians, died before the end of the twentieth year of his reign. His son Osred (7), a boy about eight years of age, succeeding him in the throne, reigned eleven years. In the beginning of his reign, Haedde, bishop of the West Saxons, departed to the heavenly life; for he was a good man and a just, and his life and doctrine as a bishop were guided rather by his innate love of virtue, than by what he had gained from books. The most reverend bishop, Pechthelm, of whom we shall speak hereafter in the proper place, and who while still deacon or monk was for a long time with his successor Aldhelm, was wont to relate that many miracles of healing have been wrought in the place where he died, through the merit of his sanctity; and that the men of that province used to carry the dust thence for the sick, and put it into water, and the drinking thereof, or sprinkling with it, brought health to many sick men and beasts; so that the holy dust being frequently carried away, a great hole was made there.
Upon his death, the bishopric of that province was divided into two dioceses. One of them was given to Daniel, which he governs to this day; the other to Aldhelm, wherein he presided most vigorously four years; both of them were fully instructed, as well in matters touching the Church as in the knowledge of the Scriptures. Aldhelm, when he was as yet only a priest and abbot of the monastery which is called the city of Maildufus, by order of a synod of his own nation, wrote a notable book against the error of the Britons, in not celebrating Easter at the due time, and in doing divers other things contrary to the purity of doctrine and the peace of the church; and through the reading of this book many of the Britons, who were subject to the West Saxons, were led by him to adopt the Catholic celebration of our Lord's Paschal Feast. He likewise wrote a famous book on Virginity, which, after the example of Sedulius, he composed in twofold form, in hexameters and in prose. He wrote some other books, being a man most instructed in all respects, for he had a polished style, and was, as I have said, of marvellous learning both in liberal and ecclesiastical studies. On his death, Forthere was made bishop in his stead, and is living at this time, being likewise a man very learned in the Holy Scriptures.
Whilst they administered the bishopric, it was detErmined by a synodal decree, that the province of the South Saxons, which till that time belonged to the diocese of the city of Winchester, where Daniel then presided, should itself have an episcopal see, and a bishop of its own. Eadbert, at that time abbot of the monastery of Bishop Wilfrid, of blessed memory, called Selaeseu, was consecrated their first bishop. On his death, Eolla succeeded to the office of bishop. He also died some years ago, and the bishopric has been vacant to this day.

In 721 Æthelwold Bishop Lindisfarne -740 was appointed Bishop Lindisfarne.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 1. How Ethelwald, successor to Cuthbert, leading a hermit's life, calmed a tempest by his prayers when the brethren were in danger at sea. [687-699 a.d.]
The venerable Ethelwald succeeded the man of God, Cuthbert, in the exercise of a solitary life, which he spent in the isle of Farne before he became a bishop. After he had received the priesthood, he consecrated his office by deeds worthy of that degree for many years in the monastery which is called Inhrypum. To the end that his merit and manner of life may be the more certainly made known, I will relate one miracle of his, which was told me by one of the brothers for and on whom the same was wrought; to wit, Guthfrid, the venerable servant and priest of Christ, who also, afterwards, as abbot, presided over the brethren of the same church of Lindisfarne, in which he was educated.
"I came," says he, "to the island of Farne, with two others of the brethren, desiring to speak with the most reverend father, Ethelwald. Having been refreshed with his discourse, and asked for his blessing, as we were returning home, behold on a sudden, when we were in the midst of the sea, the fair weather in which we were sailing, was broken, and there arose so great and terrible a tempest, that neither sails nor oars were of any use to us, nor had we anything to expect but death. After long struggling with the wind and waves to no effect, at last we looked back to see whether it was possible by any means at least to return to the island whence we came, but we found that we were on all sides alike cut off by the storm, and that there was no hope of escape by our own efforts. But looking further, we perceived, on the island of Farne, our father Ethelwald, beloved of God, come out of his retreat to watch our course; for, hearing the noise of the tempest and raging sea, he had come forth to see what would become of us. When he beheld us in distress and despair, he bowed his knees to the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, in prayer for our life and safety; and as he finished his prayer, he calmed the swelling water, in such sort that the fierceness of the storm ceased on all sides, and fair winds attended us over a smooth sea to the very shore. When we had landed, and had pulled up our small vessel from the waves, the storm, which had ceased a short time for our sake, presently returned, and raged furiously during the whole day; so that it plainly appeared that the brief interval of calm had been granted by Heaven in answer to the prayers of the man of God, to the end that we might escape."
The man of God remained in the isle of Farne twelve years, and died there; but was buried in the church of the blessed Apostle Peter, in the isle of Lindisfarne, beside the bodies of the aforesaid bishops. These things happened in the days of King Aldfrid, who, after his brother Egfrid, ruled the nation of the Northumbrians for nineteen years.

Aldun Northumbria Bishop Lindisfarne, Bishop of Durham -1019 was appointed Bishop Lindisfarne.

Mitford

Mitford Castle, Mitford

In 1334 Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (54) granted at Mitford Castle, Mitford.

Morpeth

On 16 Jan 1512 Ralph Ogle 3rd Baron Ogle 1468-1512 (43) died in Morpeth. He was buried in St Andrew's Church, Bothal. His son Robert Ogle 4th Baron Ogle 1490-1530 (22) succeeded 4th Baron Ogle.

Newburn

Battle of Newburn

On 28 Aug 1640 the Battle of Newburn was fought at the Newburn ford over the River Tyne between the Scottish army of 20,000 men commanded by Alexander Leslie 1st Earl Leven 1580-1661 (60) and the English army of 5000 commanded by Edward Conway 2nd Viscount Conway 1594-1655 (46). The Scottish army was successful.

Newcastle on Tyne

On 04 Aug 1306 John Seton 1278-1306 (28) was hanged at Newcastle on Tyne following his capture by English forces after the fall of Tibbers Castle, Carronbridge.

Around 1314 Margaret Grey 1314-1378 was born to Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (34) and Agnes Bayles in Newcastle on Tyne.

On 27 May 1378 Margaret Grey 1314-1378 (64) died in Newcastle on Tyne.

Around 1419 Matthew Redman 1395-1419 (24) died at Newcastle on Tyne.

Battle of Towton

On 01 May 1461 James Butler 1st Earl Wiltshire, 5th Earl Ormonde 1420-1461 (40) was beheaded at Newcastle on Tyne having been captured at, or after, the Battle of Towton. His brother John Butler 6th Earl Ormonde 1422-1476 (39) succeeded 6th Earl Ormonde (1C 1328).

Battle of Hexham

On 15 May 1464 a Yorkist army commanded by John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471 (33) defeated a Lancastrian army commanded by Henry Beaufort 3rd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) at Hexham during the Battle of Hexham.
Those fighting for York included John Stafford 1st Earl Wiltshire 1427-1473 (36), John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (26) and Richard Welles 7th Baron Willoughby Eresby, 7th Baron Welles 1428-1470 (36).
Of the Lancastrian army William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (49) fought. Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1431-1464 (33) and Philip Wentworth 4th Baron Despencer 1424-1464 (40) were both captured.
Henry Beaufort 3rd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (28) was beheaded following the battle. His brother Edmund Beaufort 4th Duke Somerset 1439-1471 succeeded 4th Duke Somerset (2C 1448).
On 18 May 1464 Robert Hungerford 3rd Baron Hungerford 1431-1464 (33) was executed at Newcastle on Tyne.
Philip Wentworth 4th Baron Despencer 1424-1464 (40) was executed at Middleham. His son Henry Wentworth 5th Baron Despencer 1448-1501 (16) succeeded 5th Baron Despencer (5C 1387).

Around 20 May 1464 William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (49) was captured carrying 3000 marks of Lancastrian army funds at Newcastle on Tyne.

On 15 Oct 1542 William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton 1490-1542 (52) died at Newcastle on Tyne. Anthony Browne 1500-1548 (42) inherited Cowdray House, Cowdray, Midhurst.

Second Bishop's War

Between Jun 1640 and Oct 1640 the Second Bishop's War was an attack by the Scottish Covenanters into England against Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (39). The Scots crossed into Northumberland reaching Newcastle on Tyne. In Oct 1640 Charles I King England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (39) sued for peace.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 10th September 1677. To divert me, my Lord (59) would needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with one Mr. Mann by the way, who was Recorder of the town. There were in our company my Lord Huntingtower (28), son to the Duchess of Lauderdale (50), Sir Edward Bacon, a learned gentleman of the family of the great Chancellor Verulam, and Sir John Felton, with some other knights and gentlemen. After dinner came the bailiff and magistrates in their formalities with their maces to compliment my Lord (59), and invite him to the town-house, where they presented us a collation of dried sweetmeats and wine, the bells ringing, etc. Then, we went to see the town, and first, the Lord Viscount Hereford's (3) house, which stands in a park near the town, like that at Brussels, in Flanders; the house not great, yet pretty, especially the hall. The stews for fish succeeded one another, and feed one the other, all paved at bottom. There is a good picture of the blessed virgin in one of the parlors, seeming to be of Holbein, or some good master. Then we saw the Haven, seven miles from Harwich. The tide runs out every day, but the bedding being soft mud, it is safe for shipping and a station. The trade of Ipswich is for the most part Newcastle on Tyne coals, with which they supply London; but it was formerly a clothing town. There is not any beggar asks alms in the whole place, a thing very extraordinary, so ordered by the prudence of the magistrates. It has in it fourteen or fifteen beautiful churches: in a word, it is for building, cleanness, and good order, one of the best towns in England. Cardinal Wolsey was a butcher's son of Ipswich, but there is little of that magnificent Prelate's foundation here, besides a school and I think a library, which I did not see. His intentions were to build some great thing. We returned late to Euston, having traveled about fifty miles this day.
Since first I was at this place, I found things exceedingly improved. It is seated in a bottom between two graceful swellings, the main building being now in the figure of a Greek II with four pavilions, two at each corner, and a break in the front, railed and balustered at the top, where I caused huge jars to be placed full of earth to keep them steady upon their pedestals between the statues, which make as good a show as if they were of stone, and, though the building be of brick, and but two stories besides cellars and garrets covered with blue slate, yet there is room enough for a full court, the offices and outhouses being so ample and well disposed. the King (47)'s apartment is painted à fresco, and magnificently furnished. There are many excellent pictures of the great masters. The gallery is a pleasant, noble room; in the break, or middle, is a billiard table, but the wainscot, being of fir, and painted, does not please me so well as Spanish oak without paint. The chapel is pretty, the porch descending to the gardens. The orange garden is very fine, and leads into the greenhouse, at the end of which is a hall to eat in, and the conservatory some hundred feet long, adorned with maps, as the other side is with the heads of the Cæsars, ill cut in alabaster; above are several apartments for my Lord, Lady, and Duchess, with kitchens and other offices below, in a lesser form; lodgings for servants, all distinct for them to retire to when they please and would be in private, and have no communication with the palace, which he tells me he will wholly resign to his son-in-law and daughter, that charming young creature.
The canal running under my Lady's (43) dressing room chamber window, is full of carps and fowl, which come and are fed there. The cascade at the end of the canal turns a cornmill that provides the family, and raises water for the fountains and offices. To pass this canal into the opposite meadows, Sir Samuel Morland (52) has invented a screw bridge, which, being turned with a key, lands you fifty feet distant at the entrance of an ascending walk of trees, a mile in length,—as it is also on the front into the park,—of four rows of ash trees, and reaches to the park pale, which is nine miles in compass, and the best for riding and meeting the game that I ever saw. There were now of red and fallow deer almost a thousand, with good covert, but the soil barren and flying sand, in which nothing will grow kindly. The tufts of fir, and much of the other wood, were planted by my direction some years before. This seat is admirably placed for field sports, hawking, hunting, or racing. The mutton is small, but sweet. The stables hold thirty horses and four coaches. The out-offices make two large quadrangles, so as servants never lived with more ease and convenience; never master more civil. Strangers are attended and accommodated as at their home, in pretty apartments furnished with all manner of conveniences and privacy.
There is a library full of excellent books; bathing rooms, elaboratory, dispensary, a decoy, and places to keep and fat fowl in. He had now in his new church (near the garden) built a dormitory, or vault, with several repositories, in which to bury his family.
In the expense of this pious structure, the church is most laudable, most of the houses of God in this country resembling rather stables and thatched cottages than temples in which to serve the Most High. He has built a lodge in the park for the keeper, which is a neat dwelling, and might become any gentleman. The same has he done for the parson, little deserving it for murmuring that my Lord put him some time out of his wretched hovel, while it was building. He has also erected a fair inn at some distance from his palace, with a bridge of stone over a river near it, and repaired all the tenants' houses, so as there is nothing but neatness and accommodations about his estate, which I yet think is not above £1,500 a year. I believe he had now in his family one hundred domestic servants.
His lady (43) (being one of the Brederode's daughters, grandchild to a natural son of Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange) [Note. Evelyn confused here. Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (43) was the daughter of Louis Nassau-Beverweert 1602-1665 who was the illegitimate son of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625. Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 was the younger brother of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.] is a good-natured and obliging woman. They love fine things, and to live easily, pompously, and hospitably; but, with so vast expense, as plunges my Lord (59) into debts exceedingly. My Lord (59) himself is given into no expensive vice but building, and to have all things rich, polite, and princely. He never plays, but reads much, having the Latin, French, and Spanish tongues in perfection. He has traveled much, and is the best bred and courtly person his Majesty (47) has about him, so as the public Ministers more frequent him than any of the rest of the nobility. While he was Secretary of State and Prime Minister, he had gotten vastly, but spent it as hastily, even before he had established a fund to maintain his greatness; and now beginning to decline in favor (the Duke being no great friend of his), he knows not how to retrench. He was son of a Doctor of Laws, whom I have seen, and, being sent from Westminster School to Oxford, with intention to be a divine, and parson of Arlington, a village near Brentford, when Master of Arts the Rebellion falling out, he followed the King (47)'s Army, and receiving an HONORABLE WOUND IN THE FACE, grew into favor, and was advanced from a mean fortune, at his Majesty's (47) Restoration, to be an Earl and Knight of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and first favorite for a long time, during which the King (47) married his natural son, the Duke of Grafton (13), to his only daughter (22) and heiress, as before mentioned, worthy for her beauty and virtue of the greatest prince in Christendom. My Lord is, besides this, a prudent and understanding person in business, and speaks well; unfortunate yet in those he has advanced, most of them proving ungrateful. The many obligations and civilities I have received from this noble gentleman, extracts from me this character, and I am sorry he is in no better circumstances.
Having now passed near three weeks at Euston, to my great satisfaction, with much difficulty he suffered me to look homeward, being very earnest with me to stay longer; and, to engage me, would himself have carried me to Lynn-Regis, a town of important traffic, about twenty miles beyond, which I had never seen; as also the Traveling Sands, about ten miles wide of Euston, that have so damaged the country, rolling from place to place, and, like the Sands in the Deserts of Lybia, quite overwhelmed some gentlemen's whole estates, as the relation extant in print, and brought to our Society, describes at large.

In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641 (56). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (38).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.

On 03 Jul 1795 Denis Le Marchant 1st Baronet Le Marchant 1795-1874 was born at Newcastle on Tyne.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XVII - Here the history speaketh of the manner of the Scots and how they can war. AND when they had sojourned three weeks after this said fray, then they had knowledge from the king by the marshals of the host, that the next week every man should provide for carts and charettes, tents and pavilions, to lie in the field, and for all other necessaries thereto belonging, to the intent to draw toward Scotland. And when every man was ready apparelled, the king and all his barons went out of the city, and the first night they lodged six mile forward. And sir John of Hainault and his company were lodged always as per the king as might be, to do him the more honour, and also to the intent that the archers should have no advantage of him nor of his company. And there the king abode two days and two nights, tarrying for all them that were behind, and to be well advised that they lacked nothing. And on the third day they dislodged and went forward till they came to the full of flint and great stones, called the water of Tyne. And on this river standeth the town and castle of Carlisle, [Note. Carlisle is on the River Eden rather than the River Tyne] the which sometime was king Arthur's, and held his court there oftentimes. Also on that river is assised the town of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, in the which town was ready the marshal of England with a great company of men of arms, to keep the country against the Scots : and at Carlisle was the lord Hereford and the lord Mowbray, who were governours there, to defend the Scots the passage ; for the Scots could not enter into England, but they must pass this said river in one place or other. The Englishmen could hear no tidings of the Scots till they were come to the entry of the said country. The Scots were passed this river so privily, that they of Carlisle nor yet of Newcastle knew nothing thereof, for between the said towns it was twenty-four English mile. [Note. Geographical error. Fifty miles] These Scottish men are right hardy and sore travailing in harness and in wars. For when they will enter into England, within a day and a night they will drive their whole host twenty-four mile, for they are all a-horseback, without it be the trandals and laggers of the host, who follow after afoot. The knights and squires are well horsed, and the common people and other on little hackneys and geldings ; and they carry with them no carts nor chariots, for the diversities of the mountains that they must pass through in the country of Northumberland. They take with them no purveyance of bread nor wine, for their usage and soberness is such in time of war, that they will pass in the journey a great long time with flesh half sodden, without bread, and drink of the river water without wine, and they neither care for pots nor pans, for they seethe beasts in their own skins. They are ever sure to find plenty of beasts in the country that they will pass through : therefore they carry with them none other purveyance, but on their horse between the saddle and the panel they truss a broad plate of metal, and behind the saddle they will have a little sack full of oatmeal, to the intent that when they have eaten of the sodden flesh,' then they lay this plate on the fire and temper a little of the oatmeal ; and when the plate is hot, they cast of the thin paste thereon, and so make a little cake in manner of a cracknell or biscuit, and that they eat to comfort withal their stomachs. Wherefore it is no great marvel though they make greater journeys than other people do. And in this manner were the Scots entered into the said country, and wasted and brent all about as they went, and took great number of beasts. They were to the number of four thousand men of arms, knights and squires, mounted on good horses, and other ten thousand men of war were armed after their guise, right hardy and fierce, mounted on little hackneys, the which were never tied nor kept at hard meat, but let go to pasture in the fields and bushes. They had two good captains, for king Robert of Scotland, who in his days had been hardy and prudent, was as then of great age and sore grieved with the great sickness ; but he had made one of his captains a gentle prince and a valiant in arms called the earl of Moray, bearing in his arms silver, three oreillers gules; and the other was the lord William Douglas, who was reputed for the most hardy knight and greatest adventurer in all the realm of Scotland, and he bare azure, a chief silver. These two lords were renowned as chief in all deeds of arms and great prowess in all Scotland.

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter XVIII - How the king of England made his first journey against the Scots. Thus rode forth all that day the young king of England by mountains and deserts without finding any highway, town or village. And when it was against night they came to the river of Tyne, to the same place whereas the Scots had passed over into England, wtening to them that they must needs repass again the same way. Then the king of England and his host passed over the same river with such guides as he had, with much pain and travail, for the passage was full of great stones. And when they were over, they lodged them that night by the river side, and by that time the sun was gone to rest, and there was but few among them that had either axe or hook, or any instrument to cut down any wood to make their lodgings withal; and there were many that had lost their own company and wist not where they were. Some of the footmen were far behind and wist not well what way to take ; but such as knew best the country said plainly they had ridden the same day twenty-four English miles, for they rode as fast as they might without any rest, but at such passages as they could not choose. All this night they lay by this river side, still in their harness, holding their horses by their reins in their hands, for they wist not whereunto to tie them. Thus their horses did eat no meat of all that night nor day before: they had neither oats for forage for them, nor the people of the host had no sustenance of all that day nor night, but every man his loaf that he had carried behind him, the which was sore wet with the sweat of the horses ; nor they drank none other drink but the water of the river, without it were some of the lords that had carried bottles with them ; nor they had no fire nor light, for they had nothing to make light withal, without it were some of the lords that had torches brought with them.
In this great trouble and danger they passed all that night, their armour still on their backs, their horses ready saddled. And when the day began to appear, the which was greatly desired of all the whole host, they trusted then to find some redress for themselves and for their horses, or else to fight with their enemies, the which they greatly desired to the intent to be delivered out of tantes ; but so all that night they were fain to fast, nor their horses had nothing but leaves of trees and herbs : they cut down boughs of trees with their swords to tie withal their horses and to make themselves lodges. And about noon some poor folks of the country were found, and they said how they were as then fourteen mile from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and eleven mile from Carlisle, and that there was no town nearer to them wherein they might find anything to do them ease withal. And when this was shewed to the king and to the lords of his council, incontinent were sent thither horses and sumpters to fetch thence some purveyance ; and there was a cry in the king's name made in the town of Newcastle, that whosoever would bring bread or wine or any other victual should be paid therefore incontinent at a good price, and that they should be conducted to the host in safe-guard ; for it was published openly that the king nor his host would not depart from the place that they were in, till they had some tidings where their enemies were become. And the next day by noon such as had been sent for victual returned again to the host with such purveyances as they could get, and that was not over much, and with them came other folks of the country with little nags charged with bread evil baken in panniers, and small poor wine in barrels, and other victual to sell in the host, whereby great part of the host were well refreshed and eased.

Greyfriar's Church, Newcastle on Tyne

On 26 May 1464 William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (49) was beheaded at Sandhills, Newcastle on Tyne. He was buried at Greyfriar's Church, Newcastle on Tyne. Robert Tailboys 8th Baron Kyme 1450-1495 (14) de jure 8th Baron Kyme. Elizabeth Heron Baroness Kyme 1453-1495 (11) by marriage Baroness Kyme.

Newcastle on Tyne Castle, Newcastle on Tyne

Battle of Alnwick

On 11 Jul 1174 a small army commanded by Ranulf Glanville 1112-1190 (62) with Hugh de Kevelioc Gernon 5th Earl Chester 1147-1181 (27) surprised William "Lion" I King Scotland 1143-1214 (31) 's army in a dawn raid known as the Battle of Alnwick near Alnwick. William "Lion" I King Scotland 1143-1214 (31) was captured and imprisoned initially in Newcastle on Tyne Castle, Newcastle on Tyne. He was subsequently moved to the more remote, and secure, Falaise Castle, Falaise, Calvados, Basse Normandie.

Gaveston's Escape from Newcastle

On 04 May 1312 King Edward II of England (28) and Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) were at Newcastle on Tyne Castle, Newcastle on Tyne where they barely escaped a force led by Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester, 2nd Earl Lancaster, 5th Earl Salisbury, 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (34), Henry Percy 1st Baron Percy 1273-1314 (39) and Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (38). Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (28) escaped to Scarborough, North Yorkshire, King Edward II of England (28) to York.

Sandhills, Newcastle on Tyne

On 26 May 1464 William Tailboys 7th Baron Kyme 1415-1464 (49) was beheaded at Sandhills, Newcastle on Tyne. He was buried at Greyfriar's Church, Newcastle on Tyne. Robert Tailboys 8th Baron Kyme 1450-1495 (14) de jure 8th Baron Kyme. Elizabeth Heron Baroness Kyme 1453-1495 (11) by marriage Baroness Kyme.

Marston Moor, Newcastle on Tyne

Battle of Marston Moor

On 02 Jul 1644 at the Battle of Marston Moor Alexander Montgomerie 6th Earl Eglinton 1588-1661 (56) fought at for the Royal army. Lionel Carey 1622-1644 (22) was killed. John Hay 1st Marquess Teviotdale 1625-1697 (18) fought for the Parliamentary army.
At the Battle of Marston Moor Lucas swept Fairfax's Yorkshire horse before him, but later in the day he was taken prisoner, in a battle won decisively by Parliament.
John Dolben (19) fought for the Royalists.
William Eure -1644 was killed.
Philip Musgrave 2nd Baronet Musgrave of Eden Hall 1607-1678 (37) fought for the Royalists.

St Nicholas' Church, Newcastle on Tyne

On 22 Jan 1685 William Blackett 1st Baronet Newcastle-upon Tyne 1657-1705 (27) and Julia Conyers 1669-1722 (16) were married at St Nicholas' Church, Newcastle on Tyne.

Around 1715 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman Painter 1694-1744 (21) (attributed). Portrait of William Blackett 1st Baronet Newcastle-upon Tyne 1657-1705.

Around 1715 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman Painter 1694-1744 (21). Portrait of Julia Conyers 1669-1722 (46).

On 25 Sep 1728 William Blackett 2nd Baronet Newcastle-upon Tyne1690-1728 (38) died without issue. He was buried in St Nicholas' Church, Newcastle on Tyne.

Newminster Abbey

On 16 Jul 1350 Joan Willoughby -1350 died. He was buried at Newminster Abbey.

In 1437 Robert Umfraville 1363-1437 (74) died. He was buried at Newminster Abbey.

William Greystoke was reburied at Newminster Abbey.

Newsham on Tyne

In 1249 Constance Gille 1249- was born to Thomas Gille at Newsham on Tyne.

Norham

Heaton, Norham

On 18 Aug 1266 Thomas Grey 1266-1310 was born to John Grey 1230-1267 (36) at Heaton, Norham.

Castle Heaton, Heaton, Norham

Around 1280 Thomas Grey 1280-1344 was born to Thomas Grey 1266-1310 (13) at Castle Heaton, Heaton, Norham.

Around 1328 Thomas Grey 1328-1369 was born to Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (48) and Agnes Bayles at Castle Heaton, Heaton, Norham.

Ogle

Ogle Castle, Ogle

In 1566 John Ogle 1477-1566 (89) died at Ogle Castle, Ogle.

Otterburn

Battle of Otterburn

On 05 Aug 1388 a Scottish army commanded by John Swinton -1402 defeated an English army commanded by Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (24) during the Battle of Otterburn at Otterburn. Henry "Hotspur" Percy 1364-1403 (24) and his brother Ralph Percy were captured as was Matthew Redman 1328-1389 (59). On the Scottish side James Douglas 2nd Earl Douglas 1358-1388 (30) was killed, John Dunbar 4th Earl Moray -1391 fought. The English suffered 1000 killed, 2000 captured. The Scottish 100 killed, 200 captured.

Redesdale

Seaton Delaval

Tynemouth

Wark on Tweed

Warkworth

In 1329 Euphemia Clavering Baroness Neville Raby 1267-1329 (62) died at Warkworth. She was buried at St Mary's Church, Staindrop.

On 10 Jul 1555 Mary Salisbury 1473-1555 (82) died in Warkworth.

Acklington Park, Warkworth

Around 1612 John Rushworth 1612-1690 was born to Lawrence Rushworth at Acklington Park, Warkworth.

Werke

Around Aug 1593 William Grey 1st Baron Grey Werke 1593-1674 was born to Ralph Grey 1552-1623 (41) in Werke.

Wilton

Around 1396 William Eure 1396-1465 was born to Ralph Eure 1350-13422 (46) and Katherine Aton at Wilton.

Wooler

Fenton, Wooler

Times Newspaper Funerals. 05 Feb 1929. The funeral of the Earl of Durham took place yesterday at Burnmoor. The Countess of Durham who was unable to attend owing to illness, received the following telegram from the Queen (61):- " I send you and your family my sincere sympathy in your great sorrow."
The cortege left Fenton at 11.30, and, as followed by 25 coaches, three of which conveyed wreaths. The chief mourners included Viscount Lambton (44) and Captain the Hon. Claud Lambton (45) (sons). Captain the Hon. D'Arcv Lambton (62), the Hon. George Lambton (68), and the Hon. Charles Lambton (71) (brothers). Viscount Cecil (brother-in-law), the Earl (56) and Countess of Ellesmnere (48) (son-in-law and daughter), the Earl of Home (son-in-law). The officiating clergy were the Rev. Ralph Watson. the Rev. A. J. Gadd, the rector. and the Rev, G. F. Eolme. Tenants from Lord Durham's Fenton Estate were the bearers. A memorial eervice for Lord Durham was held vesterday at St. Peter's. Eaton-square, the Rev. Austin Thompson officiating. Among those present were:- The Hen. Mrs. Charles rsmbton. the Bon. Mrs. Claud Lambtor, Air. D'Arcy Iarnb9o0. the Earl and Countr of Pemlroke. Co'onel the on. George lerhert lalso represeettna the Dowager Coun!tess of Pembrke). Mr artlrr Lambton. the Duke and Duchess of Abereorn the Dowager Marchioness of Lansdowne Alberthn Marehioness of Blaamdord.

1923. William Bruce Ellis-Rankin Painter 1881-1941 (42). Portrait of Victoria Mary Teck Queen Consort England 1867-1953 (55).