Biography of Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330

1254 Wedding of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile

1272 Death of Henry III

1297 Marriage of Princess Elizabeth and John of Holland

1299 Edward I and Margaret of France Wedding

1301 Edward II Created Prince of Wales

1307 Death of Edward I

1307 Marriage of Piers Gaveston and Margaret de Clare

1308 Marriage of King Edward II and Isabella of France

1308 de Clare and de Burgh Double Marriage

1314 Battle of Bannockburn

1318 Death of Queen Consort Margaret of France

1322 Battle of Boroughbridge

1327 Abdication of Edward II

1327 Death of Edward II

1328 Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

1328 Marriage of King David II of Scotland and Princess Joan

1330 Execution of Edmund of Woodstock

1348 Black Death Plague Outbreak

Wedding of Edward I and Eleanor of Castile

On 01 Nov 1254 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (15) and Eleanor of Castile (13) were married at Abbey of Santa Maria la Real de Huelgas. They were second cousins once removed. He a son of Henry III King England 1207-1272. She a great x 2 granddaughter of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189.

Death of Henry III

On 16 Nov 1272 [his grandfather] Henry III King England 1207-1272 (65) died at Westminster. His son [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (33) succeeded I King England. Eleanor of Castile (31) by marriage Queen Consort England.

On 30 Apr 1290 Gilbert "Red Earl" Clare 7th Earl Gloucester 6th Earl Hertford 1243-1295 (46) and [his half-sister] Joan of Acre (18) were married at Clerkenwell. He a great x 4 grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England 1068-1135. She a daughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. [his half-sister] She by marriage Countess Gloucester, Earl Hertford 1C 1138.

On 08 Jul 1290 John "Peaceful" Reginar II Duke Brabant 1275-1312 (14) and [his half-sister] Margaret Plantagenet Duchess Brabant 1275-1333 (15) were married. He a great x 4 grandson of Stephen I King England 1094-1154. She a daughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

On 07 Dec 1295 Gilbert "Red Earl" Clare 7th Earl Gloucester 6th Earl Hertford 1243-1295 (52) died at Monmouth Castle. He buried at Tewkesbury Abbey. His son [his nephew] Gilbert Clare 8th Earl Gloucester 7th Earl Hertford -1314 succeeded 8th Earl Gloucester 1C 1121, 7th Earl Hertford 1C 1138, 8th Lord Clare, 4th Lord Glamorgan.

In Jan 1297 Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (27) and [his half-sister] Joan of Acre (24) were married in secret greatly offending her father [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (57). She a daughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (27) was imprisoned; he was released in Aug 1297.

Marriage of Princess Elizabeth and John of Holland

On 08 Jan 1297 John Gerulfing I Count Holland 1284-1299 (13) and [his half-sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Countess Essex Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (14) were married at Ipswich. He a great x 4 grandson of Stephen I King England 1094-1154. She a daughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. [his half-sister] She by marriage Countess Holland. The wedding was attended by her sister [his half-sister] Margaret Plantagenet Duchess Brabant 1275-1333 (21), her father [his father] King Edward I (57), her brother [his half-brother] Edward (12) and her future second husband Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (21).

Edward I and Margaret of France Wedding

On 08 Sep 1299 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (60) and [his mother] Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (20) were married at Canterbury Cathedral. They were first cousins once removed. He a son of Henry III King England 1207-1272. She a great x 3 granddaughter of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189. [his mother] She by marriage Queen Consort England.
Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick 1272-1315 (27) was present.

Edward II Created Prince of Wales

On 07 Feb 1301 [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (16) was created Prince of Wales by his father [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (61); the first English heir to receive the title. He was created Earl Chester 5C 1301 the same day.

On 05 Aug 1301 Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 was born to [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (62) and [his mother] Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (22) at Woodstock Palace.

On 14 Nov 1302 Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (26) and [his half-sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Countess Essex Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (20) were married. They were third cousins. She a daughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. [his half-sister] She by marriage Countess Essex, Earl Hereford 6C 1199. Westminster Abbey.

On 23 Apr 1307 [his half-sister] Joan of Acre (35) died at Clare.

Death of Edward I

On 07 Jul 1307 [his father] Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (68) died at Burgh by Sands whilst on his way north to Scotland. His son [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (23) succeeded II King England.
[his father] Edward (68) had gathered around him Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester 2nd Earl Lancaster 5th Earl Salisbury 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (29), Guy Beauchamp 10th Earl Warwick 1272-1315 (35), Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (32) and Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (33) and charged them with looking after his son in particular ensuring Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (23) didn't return from exile.

Marriage of Piers Gaveston and Margaret de Clare

On 02 Nov 1307 Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (23) and [his niece] Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 were married. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.. Arranged by [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (23). [his niece] Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 grand-daughter of Edward I through his daughter Joan and, as such, significantly higher than Gaveston in the nobility.

Marriage of King Edward II and Isabella of France

On 25 Jan 1308 [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (23) and Isabella of France Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (13) were married at Boulogne sur Mer. They were second cousins once removed. He a son of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She a great x 4 granddaughter of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189.

de Clare and de Burgh Double Marriage

On 29 Sep 1308 (possibly 30th) in a Double Marriage de Clare siblings married de Burgh siblings at Waltham Abbey in the presence of [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (24).
John Burgh 1286-1313 (22) and [his niece] Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (13) were married. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.
[his nephew] Gilbert Clare 8th Earl Gloucester 7th Earl Hertford -1314 and Matilda Burgh Countess Gloucester Countess Hertford 1288-1320 (20) were married. He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She by marriage Countess Gloucester, Earl Hertford 1C 1138.

In 1311 [his nephew] John Brabant III Duke Brabant 1300-1355 (10) and Marie Évreux Duchess of Brabant 1303-1335 (8) were married. They were second cousins. He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She a great x 2 granddaughter of Henry III King England 1207-1272.

Around 1312 John Comyn 4th Lord Baddenoch 1294-1314 (18) and [his future wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (14) were married. She a great x 3 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

In 1312 [his brother] Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 (11) was created 1st Earl Norfolk 3C 1312.

On 27 Oct 1312 John "Peaceful" Reginar II Duke Brabant 1275-1312 (37) died. His son [his nephew] John Brabant III Duke Brabant 1300-1355 (12) succeeded III Duke Brabant.

Battle of Bannockburn

On 24 Jun 1314 the Scottish army of Robert "The Bruce" I King Scotland 1274-1329 (39) including, James "Black" Douglas 1286-1330 (28), heavily defeated the English army led by [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (30) at the Battle of Bannockburn.
[his nephew] Gilbert Clare 8th Earl Gloucester 7th Earl Hertford -1314, John Comyn 4th Lord Baddenoch 1294-1314 (20), Robert Felton 1st Baron Felton 1270-1314 (44) and William Vesci -1314 were killed.
William Marshal 1st Baron Marshal 1277-1314 (36) was killed. On 24 Jun 1314 His son John Marshal 2nd Baron Marshal 1292-1317 (22) succeeded 2nd Baron Marshal.
Robert Clifford 1st Baron Clifford 1274-1314 (40) was killed. His son Roger Clifford 2nd Baron Clifford 1300-1322 (14) succeeded 2nd Baron Clifford.
John Lovell 2nd Baron Lovel 1289-1314 (25) was killed. His son John Lovell 3rd Baron Lovel 1314-1347 succeeded 3rd Baron Lovel of Titchmarsh.
Henry Bohun -1314 was killed by Robert "The Bruce" I King Scotland 1274-1329 (39).
Walter Fauconberg 2nd Baron Fauconberg 1264-1318 (50) possilby died although his death is also reported as being on 31 Dec 1318.
Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (38), Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (38), Goronwy ap Tudur Hen Tudor -1331, Henry Beaumont 4th Earl Buchan 1279-1340 (35), Aymer Valence 2nd Earl Pembroke 1275-1324 (39) and Robert Umfraville 8th Earl Angus 1277-1325 (37) fought.
Pain Tiptoft 1st Baron Tibetot 1279-1314 (34) was killed. His son John Tiptoft 2nd Baron Tibetot 1313-1367 succeeded 2nd Baron Tibetot.
John Montfort 2nd Baron Montfort 1291-1314 (23) was killed. Peter Montfort 3rd Baron Montfort 1291-1370 (23) succeeded 3rd Baron Montfort.
Thomas Grey 1280-1344 (34) undertook a suicidal charge that contributed to the English defeat and subsequently blemished his career.
William Latimer 2nd Baron Latimer Corby 1276-1327 (38) was captured.
Michael Poynings 1270-1314 (44) was killed.

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On 05 May 1316 [his niece] Isabel Bohun 1316- was born to Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (40) and [his half-sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Countess Essex Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (33). She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. His mother [his half-sister] Princess Elizabeth of Rhuddlan Countess Essex Hereford and Holland 1282-1316 (33) died in childbirth. She was buried at Walden Abbey.

On 28 Apr 1317 Hugh Audley 1st Earl Gloucester 1291-1347 (26) and [his niece] Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 were married. They were half fourth cousins. He a great x 3 grandson of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Death of Queen Consort Margaret of France

On 14 Feb 1318 [his mother] Margaret of France Queen Consort England 1279-1318 (39) died at Marlborough Castle. She was buried at Christ Church Greyfriars. Her tomb was destroyed during the Reformation.

In 1321 Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (19) was created 1st Earl Kent 5C 1321.

Despencer War Executions

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 6 Of the earl Thomas of Lancaster and twenty two other of the great lords and knights of England that were beheaded. 1322. THE foresaid [his half-brother] king Edward the second (37), father to the noble [his nephew] king Edward the third (9), on whom our matter is founded, this said king governed right diversely his realm by the exhortation of sir Hugh Spencer (36), who had been nourished with him sith the beginning of his yongth; the which sir Hugh (36) had so enticed the [his half-brother] king (37), that his father and he were the greatest masters in all the realm, and by envy thought to surmount all other barons of England; whereby after the great discomfiture that the Scots had made at Stirling great murmuring there arose in England between. The noble barons and the king's council, and namely against sir Hugh Spencer (36). They put on him that by his counsel they were discomfited, and that he was favourable to the king of Scots. And on this point the barons had divers times communication together, to be advised what they might do, whereof Thomas earl of Lancaster (44), who was uncle to the king, was chief. And anon when sir Hugh Spencer (36) had espied this, he purveyed for remedy, for he was so great with the [his half-brother] king (37) and so near him, that he was more beloved with the [his half-brother] king (37) than all the world after. So on a day he came to the [his half-brother] king (37) and said, `Sir, certain lords of your realm have made alliance together against you, and without ye take heed thereto betimes, they purpose to put you out of your realm': and so by his malicious means he caused that the king made all the said lords to be taken, and their heads to be stricken off without delay, and without knowledge or answer to any cause. First of all sir Thomas earl of Lancaster (44), who was a noble and a wise, holy knight, and hath done sith many fair miracles in Pomfret, where he was beheaded, for the which deed the said sir Hugh Spencer (36) achieved great hate in all the realm, and specially of the queen (27) and of the earl of Kent (20), brother to the [his half-brother] king (37). And when he perceived the displeasure of the queen (27), by his subtle wit he set great discord between the king and the queen (27), so that the [his half-brother] king (37) would not see the queen nor come in her company, the which discord endured a long space. Then was it skewed to the queen (27) secretly and to the earl of Kent (20), that without they took good heed to themselves, they were likely to be destroyage to Saint Thomas of Canterbury, and so to Winchelsea, and in the night went into a ship that was ready for her, and her young son [his nephew] Edward (9) with her, and the earl of Kent (20) and sir Roger Mortimer (34), and in another ship they had put all their purveyance, and had wind at will, and the next morning they arrived in the haven of Boulogne.

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Battle of Boroughbridge

On 16 Mar 1322 the rebel army led by Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester 2nd Earl Lancaster 5th Earl Salisbury 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (44) attempted to cross the bridge over the River Ure (between Ripon and York) at Boroughbridge. Their path was blocked by forces loyal to the King led by Andrew Harclay 1st Earl Carlisle 1270-1323 (52). Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (46), Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (34), John Botetort 1st Baron Botetort 1265-1324 (57) and John Maltravers 1st Baron Maltravers 1290-1365 (32) fought for the rebels. Roger Clifford 2nd Baron Clifford 1300-1322 (22), Nicholas Longford 1285-1356 (37), Thomas Plantagenet 2nd Earl of Leicester 2nd Earl Lancaster 5th Earl Salisbury 4th Earl Lincoln 1278-1322 (44), John Mowbray 2nd Baron Mowbray 1286-1322 (35) were captured.
Warin Lisle 1271-1322 (51) was hanged after the battle at Pontefract.
Following the battle Hugh Audley 1st Earl Gloucester 1291-1347 (31) and his wife [his niece] Margaret Clare Countess Gloucester -1342 were both imprisoned. He in Nottingham Castle and she in Sempringham Priory.
John Clinton 2nd Baron Clinton 1300-1335 (22), Ralph Greystoke 1st Baron Greystoke 1299-1323 (22), William Latimer 2nd Baron Latimer Corby 1276-1327 (46), Robert Lisle 1st Baron Lisle 1288-1344 (34), Domhnall Mar II Earl Mar 1293- (29) and Peter Saltmarsh 1280-1338 (42) fought for the King.
Adam Everingham 1st Baron Everingham of Laxton 1279-1341 (43) was captured.
Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (46) was killed. His son [his nephew] John Bohun 5th Earl Hereford 4th Earl Essex 1307-1336 (15) succeeded 5th Earl Hereford 6C 1199, 4th Earl Essex 3C 1239.

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The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 7 How the queen of England went and complained her to the king of France her brother of sir Hugh Spencer. 1324. WHEN queen Isabel (29) was arrived at Boulogne, and her [his nephew] son (11) with her and the earl of Kent (22), the captains and abbot of the town came against her and joyously received her and her company into the abbey, and there she abode two days: then she departed and rode so long by her journeys that she arrived at Paris. Then king Charles (29) her brother, who was informed of her coming, sent to meet her divers of the greatest lords of his realm, as the lord sir Robert de Artois (37), the lord of Coucy, the lord of Sully, the lord of Roye and divers other, who honourably did receive her and brought her into the city of Paris to the king her brother (29). And when the king (29) saw his sister (29), whom he had not seen long before, as she should have entered into his chamber he met her and took her in his arms and kissed her, and said, ` Ye be welcome, fair sister, with my fair nephew your son,' and took them by the hands and led them forth. The queen, who had no great joy at her heart but that she was so near to the king her brother, she would have kneeled down two or three times at the feet of the king, but the king would not suffer her, but held her still by the right hand, demanding right sweetly of her estate and business. And she answered him right sagely, and lamentably recounted to him all the felonies and injuries done to her by sir Hugh Spencer (38), and required him of his aid and comfort. When the noble King Charles of France (29) had heard his sister's lamentation, who weepingly had shewed him all her need and business, be said to her: ` Fair sister, appease yourself, for by the faith I owe to God and to Saint Denis I shall right well purvey for you some remedy.' The queen then kneeled down, whether the king would or not, and said: 'My right dear lord and fair brother, I pray God reward you.' The king then took her in his arms and led her into another chamber, the which was apparelled for her and for the young Edward her son, and so departed from her, and caused at his costs and charges all things to be delivered that was behoveful for her and for her son. After it was not long, but that for this occasion Charles king of France (29) assembled together many great lords and barons of the realm of France, to have their counsel and good advice how they should ordain for the need and besynes of his sister queen of England. Then it was counselled to the king that he should let the queen his sister to purchase for herself friends, whereas she would, in the realm of France or in any other place, and himself to feign and be not known thereof; for they said, to move war with the [his half-brother] king of England (39), and to bring his own realm into hatred, it were nothing appertinent nor profitable to him nor to his realm. But they concluded that conveniently he might aid her with gold and silver, for that is the metal whereby love is attained both of gentlemen and of poor soldiers. And to this counsel and advice accorded the king, and caused this to be shewed to the queen privily by sir Robert d'Artois (37), who as then was one of the greatest lords of all France.

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In 1325 [his nephew] John Bohun 5th Earl Hereford 4th Earl Essex 1307-1336 (18) and Alice Fitzalan Countess Essex Countess Hereford -1326 were married. They were half third cousins. He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She a great x 5 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216. She by marriage Countess Essex, Earl Hereford 6C 1199.

In 1325 Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (23) and [his wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (27) were married. They were half second cousins twice removed. He a son of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She a great x 3 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216. She by marriage Countess Kent.

After 1325 [his nephew] John Bohun 5th Earl Hereford 4th Earl Essex 1307-1336 and Margaret Basset Countess Essex Countess Hereford -1347 were married. He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She by marriage Countess Essex, Earl Hereford 6C 1199.

On 11 Aug 1325 Hugh Courtenay 10th Earl Devon 1303-1377 (22) and [his niece] Margaret Bohun Countess Devon 1311-1391 (14) were married. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 9 How that queen Isabel departed from France and entered into the Empire. 1326. WHEN the Queen (31) heard this tidings, she knew not what to say nor what advice to take; for as then the barons of the realm of France were withdrawn from her by the commandment of the king of France, and so she had no comfort nor succour, but all only of her dear cousin Sir Robert de Artois (39); for he secretly did counsel and comfort her as much as he might, for otherwise he durst not, for the king had defended him. But he knew well that the Queen (31) was chased out of England and also out of France for evil will and by envy, which grieved him greatly. Thus was Sir Robert de Artois (39) at the queen's commandment; but be durst not speak nor be known thereof, for he had heard the king and the Earl of Kent (24) and Sir Roger Mortimer (38), and to put them all in the hands of the king and of Sir Hugh Spencer (40). Wherefore he came on a night and declared all this to the queen (31), and advised her of the peril that she was in. Then the queen (31) was greatly abashed, and required biro all weeping of his good counsel. Then he said: 'Madam, I counsel you that ye depart and go into the Empire, whereas there be many great lords, who may right well aid you, and specially the earl Guilliam of Hainault (40) and sir John of Hainault (38) his brother. These two are great lords and wise men, true, drad and redoubted of their enemies.' Then the queen (31) caused to be made ready all her purveyance, and paid for everything as secretly as she might, and so she and [his nephew] her son (13), the Earl of Kent (24) and all her company departed from Paris and rode toward Hainault, and so long she rode that she came to Cambresis; and when she knew she was in the Empire, she was better assured than she was before, and so passed through Cambresis and entered into Ostrevant in Hainault, and lodged at Bugnicourt, in a knight's house who was called sir d'Aubrecicourt, who received her right joyously in the best manner to his power, insomuch that afterward the queen of England (31) and [his nephew] her son (13) had with them into England for ever the knight and his wife and all his children, and advanced them in divers manners. The coming thus of the queen of England (31) and of her son and heir into the country of Hainault was anon well known in the house of the good earl of Hainault, who as then was at Valenciennes; and sir John of Hainault (38) was certified of the time when the queen arrived at the place of sir d'Aubrecicourt, the which sir John (38) was brother to the said earl Guilliam (40), and as he that was young and lusty, desiring all honour, mounted on his horse and departed with a small company from Valenciennes, and came the same night to Bugnicourt, and did to the queen all honour and reverence that he could devise. The queen, who was right sorrowful, began to declare (complaining to him right piteously) her dolours; whereof the said sir John (38) had great pity, so that the water dashed in his eyen, and said, ' Certainly, fair lady, behold me here your own knight, who shall you into your estates in England, by the grace of God and with the help of your friends in that parts: and I and such other as I can desire shall put our lives and goods in adventure for your sake, and shall get men of war sufficient, if God be pleased, without the danger of the king of France your brother.' Then the queen would have kneeled down for great joy that she had, and for the good-will he offered her, but this noble knight took her up quickly in his arms and said: 'By the grace of God the noble queen of England shall not kneel to me; but, madam, recomfort yourself and all your company, for I shall keep you faithful promise; and ye shall go see the earl my brother (40) and the countess his wife (32) and all their fair children, who shall receive you with great joy, for so I heard them report they would do.' Then the queen said: 'Sir, I find in you more love and comfort than in all the world, and for this that ye say and affirm me I thank you a thousand times; and if ye will do this ye have promised in all courtesy and honour, I and my son shall be to you for ever bound, and will put all the realm of England in your abandon; for it is right that it so should be.' And after these words, when they were thus accorded, sir John of Hainault (38) took leave of the queen (31) for that night, and went to Denaing and lay in the abbey; and in the morning after mass he leapt on his horse and came again to the queen (31), who received him with great joy. By that time she had dined and was ready to mount on her horse to, depart with him; and so the queen departed from the castle of Bugnicourt, and took leave of the knight and of the lady, and thanked them for their good cheer that they bad made her, and said that she trusted once to see the time that she or her son should well remember their courtesy. Thus departed the queen in the company of the said sir John to the countess his wife, and feasted her right nobly. And as then this earl (40) had four fair daughters, Margaret (14), Philippa (11), Jane (11) and Isabel (3), among whom the young [his nephew] Edward (13) yet most his love and company on Philippa (11), and also the young lady in all honour was more conversant with him than any of her sisters. Thus the queen Isabel (31) abode at Valenciennes by the space of eight days with the good earl (40) and with the countess Jane de Valois. In the meantime the queen apparelled for her needs and business, and the said sir John wrote letters right affectuously unto knights and such companions as he trusted best in all Hainault, in Brabant and in Bohemia, and prayed them for all amities that was between them, that they would go with him in this enterprise into England; and so there were great plenty, what of one country and other, that were content to go with him for his love. But this said sir John of Hainault (38) was greatly reproved and counselled the contrary both of the earl his brother (40) and of the chief of the council of the country, because it seemed to them that the enterprise was right high and perilous, seeing the great discords and great hates that as then was between the barons of England among themselves, and also considering that these Englishmen most commonly have ever great envy at strangers. Therefore they doubted that the said sir John of Hainault and his company should not return again' with honour. But howsoever they blamed or counselled him, the gentle knight would never change his purpose, but said he had but one death to die, the which was in the will of God; and also said that all knights ought to aid to their powers all ladies and damosels chased out of their own countries, being without counsel or comfort.

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In 1326 [his son] Edmund Plantagenet 2nd Earl Kent 1326-1331 was born to Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (24) and [his wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (28). He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Before 12 Oct 1326 [his brother] Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300-1338 and Alice Hales Countess Norfolk -1330 were married. He a son of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She by marriage Countess Norfolk.

In 1327 James Butler 1st Earl Ormonde 1305-1338 (22) and [his niece] Eleanor Bohun Countess Ormonde 1304-1363 (22) were married. They were fourth cousins. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

In 1327 [his daughter] Margaret Plantagenet 1327-1352 was born to Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (25) and [his wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (29). She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Abdication of Edward II

On 25 Jan 1327 [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (42) abdicated II King England. His son [his nephew] King Edward III England (14) succeeded III King England.

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 15 How that king Robert de Bruce of Scotland defied king Edward. AFTER that sir John of Hainault (39) was departed from [his nephew] king Edward (14), he and the queen (32) his mother governed the realm by the counsel of the earl of Kent (25), uncle to the king, and by the counsel of sir Roger Mortimer (39), who had great lands in England to the sum of seven hundred pounds of rent yearly. And they both were banished and chased out of England with the queen (32), as ye have heard before. Also they used much after the counsel of sir Thomas Wake (30), and by the advice of other who were reputed for the most sagest of the realm. Howbeit there were some had envy thereat, the which never died in England, and also it reigneth and will reign in divers other countries. Thus passed forth the winter and the Lent season till Easter, and then the [his nephew] king (14) and the queen (32) and all the realm was in good peace all this season. Then so it fortuned that king Robert of Scotland (52), who had been right hardy and had suffered much travail against Englishmen, and oftentimes he had been chased and discomfited in the time of king Edward the first, grandfather to this young [his nephew] king Edward the third (14), he was as then become very old and ancient, and sick (as it was said) of the great evil and malady. When he knew the adventures that was fallen in England, how that the old [his half-brother] king Edward the second (42) was taken and deposed down from his regaly and his crown, and certain of his counsellors beheaded and put to destruction, as ye have heard herebefore, then he bethought him that he would defy the young [his nephew] king Edward the third (14), because he was young and that the barons of the realm were not all of one accord, as it was said: therefore he [thought] the better to speed in his purpose to conquer part of England. And so about Easter in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. he sent his defiance to the young king Edward the third and to all the realm, sending them word how that he would enter into the realm of England and bren before him as he had done beforetime at such season as the discomfiture was at the castle of Stirling, whereas the Englishmen received great damage. When the [his nephew] king of England (14) and his council perceived that they were defied, they caused it to be known over all the realm, and commanded that all the nobles and all other should be ready apparelled every man after his estate, and that they should be by Ascension-day next after at the town of York, standing northward. The king sent much people before to keep the frontiers against Scotland, and sent a great ambassade to sir John of Hainault (39), praying him right affectuously that he would help to succour and to keep company with him in his voyage against the Scots, and that he world be with him at the Ascensionday next after at York, with such company as he might get of men of war in those parts. When sir John of Hainault lord of Beaumont (39) heard the [his nephew] king's (14) desire, he sent straight his letters and his messengers in every place whereas he thought to recover or attain to have any company of men of war, in Flanders, in Hainault, in Brabant, and in other places, desiring them that in their best apparel for the war they would meet him at Wissant, for to go over the sea with him into England. And all such as he sent unto came to him with a glad cheer, and divers other that heard thereof, in trust to attain to as much honour as they had that were with him in England before at the other voyage. So that by that time the said lord Beaumont (39) was come to Wissant, there was ready ships for him and his company, brought out of England. And so they took shipping and passed over the sea and arrived at Dover, and so then ceased not to ride till: they came within three days of Pentecost to the town of York, whereas the [his nephew] king (14) and the queen (32) his mother and all his lords were with great host tarrying the coming of sir John of Hainault (39), and had sent many before of their men of arms, archers and common people of the good towns and villages; and as people resorted, they were caused to be lodged two or three leagues off, all about in the country. And on a day thither came sir John of Hainault (39) and his company, who were right welcome and well received both of the [his nephew] king (14), of the queen his mother, and of all other barons, and to them was delivered the suburbs of the city to lodge in. And to sir John of Hainault was delivered an abbey of white monks for him and his household. There came with him out of Hainault the lord of Enghien, who was called sir Gaultier, and sir Henry lord d'Antoing, and the lord of Fagnolle, and sir Fastres du Roeulx, sir Robert de Bailleul, and sir Guilliam de Bailleul his brother, and the lord of Havreth, chatelain of Mons, sir Allard de Briffeuil, sir Michael de Ligne, sir John de Montigny the younger and his brother, sir Sanses de Boussoit, the lord of Gommegnies, sir Perceval de Semeries, the lord of Beaurieu and the lord of Floyon. Also of the country of Flanders there was sir Hector of Vilain, sir John de Rhodes, sir Wu there was sir John le Belt and sir Henry his brother, sir Godfrey de la Chapelle, sir Hugh d'Ohey, sir John de Libyne, sir Lambert d'Oupey, and sir Gilbert de Herck: and out of Cambresis and Artois there were come certain knights of their own good wills to advance their bodies: so that sir John of Hainault had well in his company five hundred men of arms, well apparelled and richly mounted. And after the feast of Pentecost came thither sir Guilliam de Juliers (28), who was after duke of Juliers after the decease of his father, and sir Thierry of Heinsberg, who was after earl of Loos, and with them a right fair rout, and all to keep company with the gentle knight sir John of Hainault lord Beaumont.

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Death of Edward II

On 21 Sep 1327 [his half-brother] King Edward II of England (43) was murdered at Berkeley Castle. There is speculation as to the manner of his death, and as to whether he died at all. Some believe he may have lived the rest of his life in Europe.

Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

On 24 Jan 1328 [his nephew] King Edward III England (15) and Philippa of Hainault (13) were married at York Minster. They were second cousins. He a son of King Edward II of England. She a great x 5 granddaughter of Stephen I King England 1094-1154. She by marriage Queen Consort England.

Roger Mortimer created Earl of March

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 20 How king Robert of Scotland died. Mar 1328. And also they delivered to them again the black cross of Scotland, the which the good king Edward conquered and brought it out of the abbey of Scone, the which was a precious relic; and all rights and interests that every baron had in Scotland was then clean forgiven. And many other things were done at that parliament to the great hurt and prejudice of the realm of England, and in manner against the wills of all the nobles of the realm, save only of Isabel (33) the old queen and the bishop of Ely and the lord Mortimer (40): they ruled the realm in such wise, that every man was miscontent. So that the earl Henry of Lancaster (47) and sir [his brother] Thomas Brotherton (27), earl marshal, and sir Edmund of Woodstock (26), the king's uncle, and divers other lords and commons were agreed together to amend these faults, if they might. And in that meantime the queen Isabel (33) and sir Roger Mortimer (40) caused another parliament to be holden at Salisbury, at the which parliament sir Roger Mortimer (40) was made earl of March against all the barons' wills of England, in prejudice of king and his realm, and sir [his nephew] John of Eltham (11) the king's brother was made earl of Cornwall. To the which parliament the earl Henry of Lancaster (47) would not come, wherefore the king was brought in belief that he would have destroyed his person; for the which they assembled a great host and went toward Bedford, whereas the earl Henry (47) was with his company.

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The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 20 How king Robert of Scotland died. Mar 1328. Then the [his brother] earl marshal (27) and the earl of Kent (26), the king's uncle, made a peace between the [his nephew] king (15) and the earl of Lancaster (47), on whose part was sir Henry lord Beaumont (49), sir Fulke Fitz-Warin (43), sir Thomas Rocelin, sir William Trussel (48), sir Thomas Wither and about a hundred knights, who were all expelled out of England by the counsel of queen Isabel and the earl Mortimer: for he was so covetous, that he thought to have the most part of all their lands into his own hands, as it is more plainly shewed in the English chronicle, the which I pass over and follow mine author.

Marriage of King Edward III and Philippa of Hainault

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 19 How king Edward was married to my lady Philippa of Hainault. Jun 1328.It was not long after but that the [his nephew] king (15) and the queen (33) his mother, the earl of Kent (26) his uncle, the earl of Lancaster (47), sir Roger Mortimer (41) and all the barons of England, and by the advice of the king's council, they sent a bishop1 and two knights bannerets, with two notable clerks, to sir John of Hainault (40), praying him to be a mean that their lord the young king of England might have in marriage one of the earl's (42) daughters of Hainault, his brother (42), named Philippa (13); for the king and all the nobles of the realm had rather have her than any other lady, for the love of him. Sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont feasted and honoured greatly these ambassadors, and brought them to Valenciennes to the earl his brother, who honourably received them and made them such cheer, that it were over long here to rehearse. And when they had skewed the content of their message, the earl (42) said, 'Sirs, I thank greatly the [his nephew] king (15) your prince and the queen (33) his mother and all other lords of England, sith they have sent such sufficient personages as ye be to do me such honour as to treat for the marriage; to the which request I am well agreed, if our holy father the pope (84) will consent thereto'-. with the which answer these ambassadors were right well content. Then they sent two knights and two clerks incontinent to the pope, to Avignon, to purchase a dispensation for this marriage to be had; for without the pope's licence they might not marry, for [by] the lineage of France they were so near of kin as at the third degree, for the two mothers [Note. Isabella of France Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (33) and Joan Valois Countess Zeeland Holland Avesnes and Hainault 1294-1342 (34)] were cousin-germans issued of two brethren2. And when these ambassadors were come to the pope (84), and their requests and considerations well heard, our holy father the pope (84) with all the whole college consented to this marriage, and so feasted them. And then they departed and came again to Valenciennes with their bulls. Then this marriage was concluded and affirmed on both parties. Then was there devised and purveyed for their apparel and for all things honourable that belonged to such a lady, who should be queen of England: and there this princess was married by a sufficient procuration brought from the king of England; and after all feasts and triumphs done, then this young queen entered into the sea at Wissant, and arrived with all her company at Dover. And sir John of Hainault (40) lord Beaumont, her uncle, did conduct her to the city of London, where there was made great feast, and many nobles of England, ... queen was crowned. And there was also great jousts, tourneys, dancing, carolling and great feasts every day, the which endured the, space of three weeks. The English chronicle saith this marriage and coronation of the queen was done at York with much honour, the Sunday in the even of the Conversion of Saint Paul, in the year of our Lord MCCCXXVII. In the which chronicle is shewed many other things of the ruling of the realm, and of the death of [his half-brother] king Edward of Caernarvon (44), and divers other debates that were within the realm, as in the same chronicle more plainly it appeareth: the which the author of this book speaketh no word of, because peradventure he knew it not; for it was hard for a stranger to know all things. But according to his writing this young queen Philippa (13) abode still in England with a small company of any persons of her own country, saving one who was named Watelet of Manny (18), who abode still with the queen and was, her carver, and after did so many great prowesses in divers places, that it were hard to make mention of them all.
Note 1. This should be: 'And the other barons of England who had continued to be of the council of the king sent a bishop,' etc. Or according to a better text, ' took advice to marry him. So they sent a bishop,' etc.
Note 2. The meaning is that the kinship came by the relationship of both to the house of France. The mother of Edward was daughter of Philip the Fair and the mother of Philippa was daughter of Charles I of Valois [who were brothers; Edward and Philippa were second cousins].

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Marriage of King David II of Scotland and Princess Joan

On 17 Jul 1328 David II King Scotland 1324-1371 (4) and [his niece] Joan of the Tower Queen Consort Scotland 1321-1362 (7) were married at Berwick on Tweed. She a daughter of King Edward II of England.

On 29 Sep 1328 [his daughter] Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales 1328-1385 was born to Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (27) and [his wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (31) at Woodstock Palace. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

In 1330 [his nephew] John of Eltham 1st Earl Cornwall 1316-1336 (13) was created 1st Earl Cornwall 6C 1330.

Execution of Edmund of Woodstock

On 19 Mar 1330 the King's uncle Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (28) was beheaded at Winchester Castle. His son [his son] Edmund Plantagenet 2nd Earl Kent 1326-1331 (4) succeeded 2nd Earl Kent 5C 1321. The executioner was a convicted latrine cleaner who was also facing the death penalty; no-one else would undertake the task. Edmund had been convicted of plotting against the court believing his brother Edward II was still alive. It later emerged the plot had been created by Roger Mortimer 1st Earl March 1287-1330 (42) to entrap Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (28). [his nephew] King Edward III England (17) was unable to show leniency risking complicity in the plot.

After 19 Mar 1330 Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 was buried at Westminster Abbey.

On 07 Apr 1330 [his son] John Plantagenet 3rd Earl Kent 1330-1352 was born to Edmund Plantagenet 1st Earl Kent 1301-1330 (28) and [his wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (33) at Arundel Castle. He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

1348 Black Death Plague Outbreak

On 29 Sep 1349 [his wife] Margaret Wake Countess Kent 1297-1349 (52) died of plague. [his son] John Plantagenet 3rd Earl Kent 1330-1352 (19) inherited her dower lands and the estates she had inherited from her brother [his brother-in-law] Thomas Wake 2nd Baron Wake Liddell 1297-1349 (52).

[his half-brother] Louis Chatillon II Count Blois I Count Chatillon -1346 succeeded I Count Chatillon.

[his nephew] Guy Chatillon II Count Blois -1397 and Marie Dampierre Countess Blois were married. They were second cousins once removed. He a great x 5 grandson of Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189. She a great x 3 granddaughter of Henry III King England 1207-1272. She by marriage Countess Blois.

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 4 Here mine author maketh mention of the parent of this good king Edward the third. THIS [his half-brother] king Edward the second, father to the noble [his nephew] king Edward the third, had two brethren, the one called [the earl] [his brother] marshal, who was right wild and diverse of conditions, the other called sir Edmund earl of Kent, right wise, amiable, gentle and well beloved with all people. This [his half-brother] king Edward the second was married to Isabel, the daughter of [his uncle] Philip le Beau king of France, who was one of the fairest ladies of the world. The [his half-brother] king had by her two sons and two daughters. The first son was the noble and hardy [his nephew] king Edward the third, of whom this history is begun. The second was named [his nephew] John, and died young. The first of the daughters was called [his niece] Isabel, married to the young king David of Scotland, son to king Robert de Bruce, married in her tender youth by the accord of both realms of England and Scotland for to make perfect peace. The other [his niece] daughter was married to the earl Raynold, who after was called duke of Gueldres, and he had by her two sons, Raynold and Edward, who after reigned in great puissance.

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