Biography of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503

1460 Battle of Wakefield

1464 Marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville

1470 Earldom of Northumberland returned to the Percy Family

1471 Edward V created Prince of Wales

1478 Marriage of Richard Duke of York and Anne Mowbray

1483 Death of Edward IV

1483 Disappearance of the Princes in the Tower

1483 Buckingham's Rebellion

1485 Richard III publicly denies that he intended to marry his niece Elizabeth

1485 Battle of Bosworth

1486 Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

1487 Coronation of Elizabeth of York

1490 Arthur Tudor created Prince of Wales

1495 Edward IV's Daughter's Marriages

1495 Perkin Warbreck Plot

1501 Marriage of Arthur Tudor and Catherine of Aragon

1502 Death of Prince Arthur

1502 Trial of James Tyrrell

1503 Death of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

1503 Lying in State of Elizabeth of York

1503 Funeral of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

1509 Death of Henry VII

Around 1454 John Grey 1432-1461 (22) and [her mother] Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (17) were married. He a great x 5 grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Battle of Wakefield

On 30 Dec 1460 the Lancastrian army took their revenge for the defeats of the First Battle of St Albans and the Battle of Northampton during the Battle of Wakefield at Sandal Castle. The Lancastrian army was commanded by Henry Holland 3rd Duke Exeter 1430-1475 (30), Henry Beaufort 2nd Duke Somerset 1436-1464 (24) and Henry Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland 1421-1461 (39), and included John Courtenay 15th Earl Devon 1435-1471 (25) and William Gascoigne 1430-1463 (30), both knighted, and James Butler 1st Earl Wiltshire 5th Earl Ormonde 1420-1461 (40), John "Butcher" Clifford 9th Baron Clifford 1435-1461 (25), John Neville 1st Baron Neville Raby 1410-1461 (50), Thomas Ros 9th Baron Ros Helmsley 1427-1464 (33), Henry Roos -1504 and Thomas St Leger 1440-1483 (20).

The Yorkist army was heavily defeated.

[her grandfather] Richard 3rd Duke York (49) was killed. King Edward IV (18) succeeded 4th Duke York 1C 1385, 9th Earl Ulster, 3rd Earl Cambridge 3C 1414.

Thomas Neville 1430-1460 (30), Thomas Harrington 1400-1460 (60), William Bonville 6th Baron Harington 1442-1460 (18) and Edward Bourchier -1460 were killed.

Thomas Parr 1407-1464 (53) fought in the Yorkist army.

Following the battle Richard Neville 5th Earl Salisbury 1400-1460 (60) was beheaded by Thomas "Bastard of Exeter" Holland -1460. William Bonville 1420-1460 (40) was executed.

[her uncle] Edmund York 1st Earl Rutland 1443-1460 (17) was executed on Wakefield Bridge by John "Butcher" Clifford (25) by which he gained his sobriquet "Butcher".

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Marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville

On 01 May 1464 [her father] King Edward IV (22) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (27) were married at Grafton Regis. He a great x 2 grandson of King Edward III England. Jacquetta of Luxemburg Duchess Bedford 1415-1472 (49), Elizabeth's mother, being the only witness. The date not certain.

On 11 Feb 1466 Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 was born to [her father] King Edward IV (23) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (29) at Westminster Palace.

In Oct 1466 [her half-brother] Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (11) and Anne Holland 1461-1474 (5) were married at Greenwich. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

Earldom of Northumberland returned to the Percy Family

On 27 Mar 1470 George Neville 1st Duke Bedford 1461-1483 (9) was created 1st Duke Bedford 3C 1470 by his first cousin once removed [her father] King Edward IV (27) in preparation for his marriage to Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (4) which didn't, in the end, take place. He, George, was nephew to Richard "Kingmaker" Neville 16th Earl Warwick 6th Earl Salisbury 1428-1471 (41) whose defection to the Lancastrian side may have caused the King to change his mind about his daughter's marriage. The attainder of John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471, if it was enacted, would have resulted in the King appropriating the estate of John Neville 1st Marquess Montagu 1431-1471. Eight

Edward V created Prince of Wales

On 26 Jun 1471 [her brother] Edward, the future Edward V was created Prince of Wales. Thomas Vaughan Master 1410-1483 (61) was knighted.

1876. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896.

On 17 Aug 1473 [her brother] Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473- was born to King Edward IV (31) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (36) at Westminster Palace. [her brother] He was created 1st Duke York 2C 1474 by his father on the same day.

1876. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896.

On 05 Sep 1474 [her half-brother] Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (19) and Cecily Bonville Marchioness Dorset 1460-1529 (14) were married. They were half second cousins once removed. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

In 1475 [her half-brother] Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (20) was created 1st Marquess Dorset 3C 1475. Cecily Bonville Marchioness Dorset 1460-1529 (14) by marriage Marchioness Dorset.

On 12 Jun 1476 [her brother] Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473- (2) was created 1st Earl Nottingham 3C 1476 by his father King Edward IV (34).

On 07 Feb 1477 [her brother] Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473- (3) was created 1st Duke Norfolk 2C 1481 by his father King Edward IV (34).

In 1478 [her brother] George York 1st Duke Bedford 1477-1479 was created 1st Duke Bedford 4C 1478 by his father King Edward IV (35).

Marriage of Richard Duke of York and Anne Mowbray

On 15 Jan 1478 Edward IV's youngest son [her brother] Richard of Shrewsbury (4) and Anne Mowbray (5) were married at St Stephen's Chapel in Westminster. They were second cousins once removed. He a son of King Edward IV of England 1442-1483. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England. She had recently inherited the vast Mowbray inheritance when her father John Mowbray 4th Duke Norfolk 1444-1476 (33) died in 1476. The ceremony was attended by Edward's daughters Elizabeth (11), Mary (10) and Cecily (8). The day before Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (35) was knighted. In 1483 Parliament changed the succession so [her brother] Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473- (4) would continue to enjoy her inheritance (she died in 1481) effectively dis-inheriting William Berkeley 1st Marquess Berkeley 1426-1492 (52) (who was subsequently created Earl and Marquess) and John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (53) (who would become an ardent supporter of Richard III following Edward's death).

In 1479 [her half-brother] Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (24) was created 1st Earl Huntingdon 6C 1479. Cecily Bonville Marchioness Dorset 1460-1529 (18) by marriage Countess Huntingdon.

In Mar 1479 [her brother] George York 1st Duke Bedford 1477-1479 (2) died of plague at Windsor Castle. Duke Bedford 4C 1478 extinct.

After 1483 [her nephew] Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset 1477-1530 and Eleanor St John Marchioness Dorset were married. They were half third cousins. He a great x 4 grandson of King Edward III England.

On 23 Jan 1483 Elizabeth Ferrers 6th Baroness Ferrers Groby 1419-1483 (64) died. [her half-brother] Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28) succeeded 7th Baron Ferrers Groby. Cecily Bonville Marchioness Dorset 1460-1529 (22) by marriage Baroness Ferrers Groby.

Death of Edward IV

On 09 Apr 1483 [her father] King Edward IV (40) died at Westminster. Edward V King England 1470- (12) succeeded V King England. Those present included Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (46), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28).

The History of King Richard the Third by Thomas More. [her father] King Edward of that name the Fourth (40), after he had lived fifty and three years, seven months, and six days, and thereof reigned two and twenty years, one month, and eight days, died at Westminster the ninth day of April, the year of our redemption, a thousand four hundred four score and three, leaving much fair issue, that is, Edward the Prince (12), thirteen years of age; Richard Duke of York (9), two years younger; Elizabeth (17), whose fortune and grace was after to be queen, wife unto King Henry the Seventh (26), and mother unto the Eighth; Cecily (14) not so fortunate as fair; Brigette (2), who, representing the virtue of her whose name she bore, professed and observed a religious life in Dertford, a house of cloistered Nuns; Anne (7), who was after honorably married unto Thomas (10), then Lord Howard and after Earl of Surrey; and Katherine (3), who long time tossed in either fortune—sometime in wealth, often in adversity—at the last, if this be the last, for yet she lives, is by the goodness of her nephew, King Henry the Eighth, in very prosperous state, and worthy her birth and virtue.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547.

Disappearance of the Princes in the Tower

Around Aug 1483 [her brother] Edward V King England 1470- (12) and his brother Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473- (9) disappeared, presumably killed, from the Tower of London. Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 (5) reports, sometime after the event, that Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30) requested Robert Brackenbury -1485 undertake the murder of the children. Upon Brackenbury's refusal Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30) instructed Robert Brackenbury -1485 give the keys to the Tower to James Tyrrell 1455-1502 (28) who would then undertake the task.

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 wearing a Lancastrian Esses Collar with Beaufort Portcullis and Tudor Rose Pendant.

On 25 Dec 1483 [her future husband] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (26) promised to marry Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (17) at a ceremony in Rennes Cathedral.

Richard III publicly denies that he intended to marry his niece Elizabeth

On 30 Mar 1485 [her uncle] Richard III King England 1452-1485 (32) publicly rebutted rumours in front of the Mayor and citizens of London that he intended to marry his niece Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (19).

Battle of Bosworth

On 22 Aug 1485 [her uncle] Richard III King England 1452-1485 (32) was killed during the Battle of Bosworth. Henry Tudor (28) succeeded VII King England.

Those supporting Henry Tudor included:

John Blount 3rd Baron Mountjoy 1450-1485 (35).

John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 (43).

Richard Guildford 1450-1506 (35).

Walter Hungerford 1464-1516 (21).

Thomas Stanley 1st Earl Derby 1435-1504 (50).

John Wingfield -1525.

[her uncle] Edward Woodville Lord Scales 1456-1488 (29).

Edward Courtenay 1st Earl Devon 1459-1509 (26).

Rhys ap Thomas Deheubarth 1449-1525 (36).

Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford 1431-1495 (53).

William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (47).

Giles Daubeney 1st Baron Daubeney 1451-1508 (34).

William Stanley Lord Chamberlain 1435-1495 (50).

Roger Kynaston of Myddle and Hordley 1433-1495 (52).

Henry Marney 1st Baron Marney 1447-1523 (38).

William Brandon 1456-1485 (29) was killed.

James Harrington 1430-1485 (55) was killed.

John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (60) was killed. He was buried firstly at Thetford Priory and therafter at Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham. Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (42) succeeded 13th Baron Mowbray 1C 1283, 14th Baron Segrave 2C 1295. Elizabeth Tilney Countess Surrey 1444-1497 (41) by marriage Baroness Mowbray, Baron Segrave 2C 1295.

John Sacheverell 1400-1485 (85) was killed.

Philibert Chandee 1st Earl Bath -1486,.

William Norreys 1441-1507 (44), Gilbert Talbot 1452-1517 (33), John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (42) and John Savage 1444-1492 (41) commanded,.

Robert Poyntz 1450-1520 (35) was knighted.

Those who fought for Richard III included:

John Bourchier 6th Baron Ferrers Groby 1438-1495 (47).

John Conyers Sheriff of Yorkshire 1411-1490 (74).

Thomas Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1467-1525 (17).

William Berkeley 1st Marquess Berkeley 1426-1492 (59).

Richard Fitzhugh 6th Baron Fitzhugh 1457-1487 (28).

John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (48).

Thomas Scrope 6th Baron Scrope Masham 1459-1493 (26).

Henry Grey 4th or 7th Baron Grey Codnor 1435-1496 (50).

Edmund Grey 1st Earl Kent 1416-1490 (68).

Ralph Neville 3rd Earl Westmoreland 1456-1499 (29).

John Pole 1st Earl Lincoln 1462-1487 (23).

Humphrey Stafford 1426-1486 (59).

George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (17).

Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (42) was wounded.

Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (29) fought and escaped.

John Zouche 7th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1459-1526 (26) was captured.

John Babington 1423-1485 (62), William Alington 1420-1485 (65), Robert Mortimer 1442-1485 (43), Robert Brackenbury -1485, Richard Ratclyffe 1430-1485 (55) and Richard Bagot 1412-1485 (73) were killed.

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After 1486 Elizabeth Tilney Countess Surrey 1444-1497 was appointed Lady of the Bedchamber to Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503.

Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

On 18 Jan 1486 [her husband] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (28) and Elizabeth, Edward IV's eldest daughter (19) were married at Westminster Abbey. They were third cousins. He a great x 3 grandson of King Edward III England. She a daughter of King Edward IV of England 1442-1483. She by marriage Queen Consort England.

Vatican Regesta Vol. DCLXXXV Secretarum Tomus IV 2 Innocent VIII. 10 Kal. Aug. Decree, at the petition of [her husband] king Henry (29) and queen Elizabeth (20), that a notarial copy of the process before James, bishop of Imola (7), Apostolic Nuncio with the power of a legate de latere, in regard to the dispensation granted by him to them to contract marriage, notwithstanding the impediment arising from their being related in the double fourth degree of kindred, shall have the same credence as the original letters of the said bishop (7). The Pope (54) exemplifies the said letters and process as follows:

Public instrument, setting forth that in the year of the Incarnation 1486, after the computation of the English church, the 4th indiction, anno 2 Innocent VIII [16 Jan 1486], in the chapel of St. Mary [the Virgin] on the east side of the cathedral church of St. Paul, London, before James, bishop of Imola (7), apostolic legate to England and Scotland, in presence of the below-written notaries public, appointed by the said bishop as scribes in the below-written matter of dispensation, and witnesses below-named, there appeared in person Master Robert Morton (51), Archdeacon of Winchester, and John de Giglis, I.U.D., as proctors of [her husband] king Henry (29), and Richard Hill, dean of the chapel of the household of the said king, and David William, doctor of decrees, dean of St. Mary's Arches, London, as proctors of the lady Elizabeth (20), eldest daughter of the late king [her father] Edward IV (44), who produced their mandates of procuration and presented to the said legate a schedule of petition on behalf of the said king and lady, praying him to dispense them to marry, notwithstanding the impediment of their relationship in the fourth and fourth degrees of kindred, as was specified by the said Master Robert Morton (51).

The said instrument exemplifies the said procurations and schedule, as follows:

(i) A public instrument, setting forth that in the year of the Incarnation, etc., 1486, the 4th indiction, anno 2 Innocent VIII, January 14, in a certain great chamber within the palace royal at Westminster, before Thomas, archbishop of York (62) and legate of the apostolic see, John, bishop of Worcester (56), chancellor of England, and Jasper duke of Bedford (54), and many other nobles and magnates, in the presence of me, Richard Spencer, notary public below-written, the said [her husband] king (29), present in person, appointed Masters John de Giglis, I.U.D., and Robert Morton (51), master or keeper of the rolls of the chancery of the said king, as his proctors to appear before the said bishop and legate (who, as is said, has faculty from the apostolic see to dispense a certain number of persons related in the fourth and fourth degrees of kindred and affinity to contract marriage), and to request him to exhibit, etc., the said letters, and execute them in accordance with the desire of the said king, etc. Of all which things, done on the above date and in the above place, in the presence of the above-named witnesses and of Richard Spencer, clerk, of the diocese of Lincoln, notary public by apostolic and imperial authorities, registrar-principal of the court of Canterbury, and keeper of the registers of the same court, the said notary has made the present public instrument, and, being otherwise engaged, has caused it to be written by another, and has published and drawn it up in this public form, and has signed it with his wonted sign and name;.

(ii) A like public instrument, setting forth that on the same date as in the preceding, and in a certain chamber within the royal palace of Westminster, before John, bishop of Worcester, chancellor of England (56), John lord de Wellys (36), Master William Smyth, dean of the chapel royal of Wymbourn in the diocese of Salisbury, and other witnesses, in the presence of the above notary, Richard Spencer, the above lady Elizabeth (20), present in person, appointed Masters Richard Hill, dean of the chapel of the king's household, and David William, doctor of decrees, dean of St. Mary's Arches, London, and commissary-general of the official of the court of Canterbury and president of the said court, in the absence of the said official, as her proctors to appear, etc., as in the preceding. Of all which things, done on the above date and in the above place, in the presence of the abovenamed witnesses and of … Richard Spencer, clerk, etc., as above, the said notary has made, written, subscribed, published, and drawn up in this public form the present public instrument, and has signed it with his wonted sign and name;.

(iii) The petition to James, bishop of Imola (7), apostolic legate to England and Scotland, on behalf of the most serene prince and lord, the lord [her husband] Henry (29), by the grace of God king of England and France and lord of Ireland, of the one part, and of the most illustrious (clarissime) lady, the lady Elizabeth (20), eldest legitimate and natural daughter of the late Edward, sometime king of England and France and lord of Ireland, of the other part, setting forth that whereas the said king Henry has by God's providence won his realm of England, and is in peaceful possession thereof, and has been asked by all the lords of his realm, both spiritual and temporal, and also by the general council of the said realm, called Parliament, to take the said lady Elizabeth to wife, he, wishing to accede to the just petitions of his subjects, desires to take the said lady to wife, but cannot do so without dispensation, inasmuch as they are related in the fourth and fourth degrees of kindred, wherefore petition is made on their behalf to the said legate to grant them dispensation by his apostolic authority to contract marriage and remain therein, notwithstanding the said impediment of kindred, and to decree the offspring to be born thereof legitimate.

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On 20 Sep 1486 [her son] Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 was created as Duke Cornwall.

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502.

On 20 Sep 1486 [her son] Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (29) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (20) at Winchester Cathedral Priory.

Coronation of Elizabeth of York

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1487. This yeare the Queene (20) was crowned. Note. See Coronation of Elizabeth of York

The Earle of Lincolne, the Lord Lovell, and one Martin Swarte, a staraunger, slayne all in a feild that they made againste the [her husband] Kinge (29).

On 25 Nov 1487 Elizabeth of York (21) was crowned Queen Consort England at Westminster Abbey.

Giles Daubeney 1st Baron Daubeney 1451-1508 (36), Edward Stafford 2nd Earl Wiltshire 1470-1499 (17), Christopher Willoughby 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1453-1499 (34), Giles Daubeney 1st Baron Daubeney 1451-1508 (36), [her uncle] Richard Woodville 3rd Earl Rivers 1453-1491 (34), William Herbert 2nd Earl Pembroke 1451-1491 (36) and Thomas Fitzalan 17th Earl Arundel 1450-1524 (37), who carried the Rod and Dove, attended as did Cecily York Viscountess Welles 1469-1507 (18).

On 28 Nov 1489 [her daughter] Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541 was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (32) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (23) at Westminster Palace.

Around 1525 Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541.

On 29 Nov 1489 [her son] Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (3) was created as Earl Chester 7C 1489.

Arthur Tudor created Prince of Wales

On 27 Feb 1490 [her son] Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (3) was created Prince of Wales at Westminster Palace.

Thomas West 8th Baron De La Warr 5th Baron West 1457-1525 (33) was appointed Knight of the Bath.

On 28 Jun 1491 [her son] Henry VIII was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (34) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (25) at Palace of Placentia. [her son] He was created as Duke Cornwall.

On 08 Jun 1492 [her mother] Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (55) died at Bermondsey. She was buried at the Altar, St George's Chapel.

On 02 Jul 1492 [her daughter] Elizabeth Tudor 1492-1495 was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (35) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (26).

In 1494 [her son] Henry VIII (2) was created 1st Duke York 3C 1494.

Edward IV's Daughter's Marriages

In 1495 [her husband] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (37) arranged marriages for two of the daughters of King Edward IV (52) his wife's (28) sisters).

On 01 Apr 1495 [her grandmother] Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (79) made her last will. It was proved 27 Aug 1495.

Source: A Selection From the Wills of Eminent Persons by Camden Society (Great Britain). Published 1838. Transcribed by John Gough Nichols and John Bruce.

IN the name of allmyghty God, the blessed Trinite, fader and son and the holigost, trusting in the meanes and mediacions of oure blessed Lady Moder, of oure most blessed Saviour Jh'u Crist, and by the intercession of holy Saint John Baptist, and all the saintes of heven: I, CECILLE, wife unto the right noble prince [her grandfather] Richard late Duke of Yorke (83), fader unto the most cristen prince my Lord and son King Edward the iiij th (52), the first day of Aprill the yere of our Lord M.CCCC.lxxxxv. after the computacion of the Church of Englond, of hole mynde and body, loving therfore be it to Jh'u, make and ordeigne my testament in fourme and maner ensuyng.

Furst, I bequeath and surrendour my soule in to the mercifull handes of allmyghty God my maker, and in to protecion of the blessed yrgin our lady Saint Mary, and suffrage of Saint John Baptist, and of all other saintes of heven. Also my body to be buried beside the body of my moost entierly best beloved Lord and housbond, fader unto my said lorde and son, and in his tumbe within the collegiate church of Fodringhay, a if myn executours by the sufferaunce of the [her husband] King (38) finde goode sufficient therto; and elles at the [her husband] Kinges (38) pleasure. And I will that after my deceasse all my dettes sufficiently appering and proved be paid, thanking oure Lord at this tyme of making of this my testament to the knolege of my conscience I am not muche in dett; and if it happen, as I trust to God it shalnot, that there be not found sufficient money aswell to pay my dettes as to enture my body, than in advoiding such charges as myght growe for the same, the whiche God defende, I lymytte and assigne all such parcelles of plate as belongith to my chapell, pantry, cellour, ewry, and squillery, to the perfourmyng of the same, as apperith in the inventary, except such plate as I have bequeithed. Also I geve and bequeith to the Kinges noble grace all such money as is owing to me of the customes, and two cuppes of gold.

Also I geve and bequeith to the Quene (29) a crosse croslette of diamantes, a sawter with claspes of silver and guilte enameled covered with grene clothe of golde, and a pix with the fleshe of Saint Cristofer.

Also I bequeith to my lady the [her mother-in-law] Kinges moder (51) a portuos with claspes of gold covered with blacke cloth of golde.

Also I geve to my lord [her son] Prince (8) a bedde of arres of the Whele of Fortune and testour of the same, a counterpoint of arras and a tappett of arres with the pope.

Also I geve to my lord [her son] Henry Duke of Yorke (3) b three tappettes of arres, oon of them of the life of Saint John Baptist, another of Mary Maudeleyn, and the thirde of the passion of our Lord and Saint George.

And if my body be buried at Fodringhay in the colege there with my most entierly best beloved [her grandfather] lord and housbond (83), than I geve to the said colege a square canapie of crymeson clothe of gold with iiij. staves, twoo auter clothes of crymeson clothe of gold, twoo copes of crymeson cloth of gold, a chesibull and twoo tenucles of cryinyson clothe of golcrvith iij. abes, c twoo auter clothes of crymeson damaske browdered, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and iij. copes of blewe velwett brodered, with iij. abes, thre masse bokes, thre grayles, and vij. processioners.

Also I geve to the colege of Stoke Clare a chesibull and twoo tenucles of playn crymyson cloth of gold with iij. abes, twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and fyve coopes of white damaske browdered, with iij. abes, twoo awter clothes of crymeson velwett upon the velwete (sic), a vestement of crymeson playne velvet, iiij. antiphoners, iiij. grayles, and sixe processioners.

Also I geve to the house of Sion two of the best coopes of crymyson clothe of gold.

Note. These next four people refer to her grand-daughters, children of Edward IV.

Also I geve to my doughter [her sister] Brigitte (14) the boke of Legenda Aurea in velem, a boke of the life of Saint Kateryn of Sene, a boke of Saint Matilde.

Also I geve to my doughter [her sister] Cecill (26) a portuous with claspes silver and gilte covered with purple velvet, and a grete portuous without note.

Also I geve to my doughter [her sister] Anne (19) the largest bedde of bawdekyn, withe countrepoint of the same, the barge with bailies, tilde, and ores belonging to the same.

Also I geve to my doughter [her sister] Kateryn (15) a traves of blewe satten.

Also I geve to my doughter of [her aunt] Suffolke (50) a the chare with the coveryng, all the quoshons, horses, and harneys belonging to the same, and all my palfreys.

Note. The next people are her grand-children, children of her daughter [her aunt] Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 (50).

Also I geve to my son of Suffolke (24) b a clothe of estate and iij. quoschons of purpull damaske cloth of gold.

Also I geve to my son Humfrey (21) c two awter clothes of blewe damaske brawdered and a vestyment of crymeson satten for Jh'us masse.

Also I geve to my son William (17) d a traves of white sarcenet, twoo beddes of downe, and twoo bolsters to the same.

Also I geve to my doughter Anne priores of Sion (19), a boke of Bonaventure and Hilton in the same in Englishe, and a boke of the Revelacions of Saint Burgitte.

Also I woll that all my plate not bequeithed be sold, and the money thereof be putte to the use of my burying, that is to sey, in discharging of suche costes and expensis as shalbe for carying of my body from the castell of Barkehampstede unto the colege of Fodringhey. And if any of the said plate be lefte unexpended I woll the said colege have it.

Also I geve to the colege of saint Antonies in London an antiphoner with the ruelles of musik in the later ynd.

Also I geve unto Master Richard Lessy all suche money as is owing unto me by obligations what soever they be, and also all such money as is owing unto me by the Shirfe of Yorkeshire, to helpe to bere his charges which he has to pay to the Kinges grace, trusting he shall the rather nyghe the said dettes by the help and socour of his said grace.

Also I geve to Master William Croxston a chesibull, stoles, and fanons of blake velwett, with an abe.

Also I geve to Master Eichard Henmershe a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of crymyson damaske, with an abe; and a chesibill, stoles and fanons of crymeson saten, with an abe.

Also I geve to Sir John More a frontell of purpull cloth of gold, a legend boke, and a colett boke.

Also I give to Sir Kandall Brantingham a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymson velvet, with an abe, the better of bothe.

Also I geve to Sir William Grave a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymeson velvett, with an abe; a masse-boke that servith for the closett, a prymour with claspes silver and gilt, covered with blewe velvett, and a sawter that servith for the closett covered with white ledder.

Also I geve to Sir John Blotte a gospell boke, a pistill covered with ledder, and a case for a corporax of grene playne velvett. Also I geve to Sir Thomas Clerk a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, fanons, of rede bawdeken, with iij. abes.

Also I geve to Sir William Tiler twoo coopes of rede bawdekyn.

Also I geve to Robert Claver iij. copes of white damaske brawdered, and a gowne of the Duchie b facion of playne blake velvett furred with ermyns.

Also I geve to John Bury twoo old copes of crymysyn satten cloth of gold, a frontell of white bawdekyn, twoo curteyns of rede sarcenett fringed, twoo curteyns of whit sarcenet fringed, a feder bed, a bolstour to the same, the best of feders, and two whit spervers of lynyn.

Also I geve to John Poule twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of white bawdekyn, with iij. abes; a short gowne of purple playne velvett furred with ermyns, the better of ij. and a kirtill of damaske with andelettes of silver and gilt furred.

Also I geve to John Smyth twoo auter clothes, a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of blew bawdekyn, with iij. abes. Also I geve to John Bury twoo copes of crymysyn clothe of gold that servith for Sondays.

Also I geve to John Walter a case for corporax of purple playne velvett, twoo cases for corporax of blewe bawdekyn, twoo auter clothes, a chesibill of rede and grene bawdekyn, a canapie of white sarcenett, iij. abes for children, and iiij. pair of parrours of white bawdekyn, twoo pair parrours of crymsyn velvett, twoo pair parrours of rede bawdekyn, a housling towell that servith for my selfe, twoo corteyns of blewe sarcenett fringed, a sudory of crymy-syn and white, the egges blak, a crose cloth and a cloth of Saint John Baptist of sarcenett painted, a long lantorn, a dext standing doble, twoo grete stondardes and ij. litill cofers.

Also I geve to John Peit-wynne twoo vestimentes of white damaske, a white bedde of lynnyn, a federbedde and a bolstour, and a short gowne of purple playne velvet furred with sabilles. Also I geve to Thomas Lentall six auter clothes of white sarcenett, with crosses of crymsyn velvet.

Also I geve to John Long iij. peces of bawdekyn of the lengur sorte. Also I geve to Sir [John] Verney knighte and Margarett his wiffe a a crosse [of] silver and guilte and berall, and in the same a pece of the holy crosse and other diverse reliques.

Also I geve to Dame Jane Pesemershe, widue, myne Inne that is called the George in Grauntham, during terme of her life; and after her decesse I woll that the reversion therof be unto the college of Fodringhay for evermore, to find a prest to pray for [her grandfather] my Lord my housbond (83) and me.

Also I geve to Nicholas Talbott and Jane his wife a spone of gold with a sharp diamount in the ende, a dymy-sent of gold with a collumbine and a diamont in the same, a guirdill of blewe tissue harnessed with gold, a guirdill of gold with a bokull and a pendaunt and iiij. barres of gold, a hoke of gold with iij. roses, a pomeamber of gold garnesshed with a diamont, sex rubies and sex perles, and the surnap and towell to the same.

Also I geve to Richard Boyvile and Gresild his wife my charrett and the horses with the harnes that belongith therunto, a gowne with a dymy trayn of purpull saten furred with ermyns, a shorte gowne of purple saten furred with jennetes, a kirtill of white damaske with aunde lettes silver and gilte, a spone of gold, a dymysynt of gold with a columbyne garnesshed with a diainant, a saphour, an amatist, and viij. perles, a pomeamber of gold enameled, a litell boxe with a cover of gold and a diamant in the toppe.

Also I geve to Richard Brocas and Jane his wife a long gown of purpull velvett upon velvet furred with ermyns, a greate Agnus of gold with the Trinite, Saint Erasmus, and the Salutacion of our Lady; an Agnus of gold with our Lady and Saint Barbara; a litell goblett with a cover silver and part guild; a pair of bedes of white amber gauded with vj. grete stones of gold, part aneled, with a pair of bedes of x. stones of gold and v. of corall; a cofor with a rounde lidde bonde with iron, which the said Jane hath in her keping, and all other thinges that she hath in charge of keping.

Also I geve to Anne Pinchbeke all other myne Agnus unbequeithed, that is to sey, ten of the Trinite, a litell malmesey pott with a cover silver and parte guilte, a possenett with a cover of silver, a short gowne of playne russett velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of playne blewe velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of purple playn velvet furred with grey, a tester, a siler, and a countrepoint of bawdekyn, the lesser of ij.

Also I geve to Jane Lessy a dymysent of gold with a roos, garnisshed with twoo rubies, a guirdell of purple tissue with a broken bokull, and a broken pendaunt silver and guilte, a guirdill of white riband with twoo claspes of gold with a columbyne, a guirdell of blewe riband with a bokell and a pendaunt of gold, a litell pair of bedes of white amber gaudied with vij. stones of gold, an haliwater stope with a strynkkill silver and gilte, and a laier silver and part guilte.

Also I geve to John Metcalfe and Alice his wife all the ringes that I have, except such as hang by my bedes and Agnus, and also except my signet, a litell boxe of golde with a cover of golde, a pair of bedes of Ixj. rounde stones of golde gaudied with sex square stones of golde enemeled, with a crosse of golde, twoo other stones, and a scalop shele of geete honging by.

Also I geve to Anne Lownde a litell bokull and a litell pendaunt of golde for a guirdill, a litell guirdell of golde and silke with a bokill and a pendaunt of golde, a guirdell of white riband with aggelettes of golde enameled, a hoke of golde playne, a broken hoke of golde enameled, and a litell rounde bottumed basyn of silver.

Also I geve to the house of Asshe-rugge a chesibull and ij. tenucles of crymysyn damaske embrawdered, with thre abes.

Also I geve to the house of Saint Margaretes twoo auter clothes with a crucifix and a vestiment of grete velvet.

Also I geve to the parish church of Stoundon a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.

Also I geve to the parishe church of Much Barkehampstede a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.

Also I geve to the parish church of Compton by sides Guilford a eorporax case of blake cloth of gold and iiij. auter clothes of white sarcenett embrawdered with garters.

Also I geve to Alisaunder Cressener my best bedde of downe and a bolster to the same.

Also I geve to Sir Henry Haidon knyght a tablett and a cristall garnesshed with ix. stones and xxvij. perles, lacking a stone and iij. perles.

Also I geve to Gervase Cressy a long gown of playn blewe velvet furred with sabilles.

Also I geve to Edward Delahay twoo gownes of musterdevilers furred with mynckes, and iiij u of money.

Also I geve to Thomas Manory a short gowne of crymesyn playn velvet lyned, purfilled with blake velvet, and iiij ll in money.

Also I geve to John Broune all such stuf as belongith to the kechyn in his keping at my place at Baynardcastell in London, and iiij u in money.

Also I geve to William Whitington a short gown of russett cloth furred with matrons and calabour wombes, a kirtill of purpull silke chamblett with awndelettes silver and gilte, all such floures of brawdery werke and the cofer that they be kept in, and xls. in money.

Also I geve to all other gentilmen that be daily a waiting in my houshold with Mr. Richard Cressy and Robert Lichingham everich of theime iiij u in money.

Also I geve to every yoman that be daily ad waiting in my houshold with John Otley xls. in money.

Also I geve to every grome of myne xxvj s. viij d. in money. And to every page of myne xiij s. iiij d. in money.

Also I geve to Robert Harison xls. in money and all the gootes.

And if ther be no money founde in my cofers to perfourme this my will and bequest, than I will that myne executours, that is to sey the reverend fader in God Master Olyver King bisshop of Bath (63), Sir Reignolde Bray (55) knight, Sir Thomas Lovell, councellours to the Kinges grace, Master William Pikinham doctour in degrees dean of the colege of Stoke Clare, Master William Felde master of the colege of Fodringhey, and Master Richard Lessy dean of my chapell, havyng God in reverence and drede, unto whome I geve full power and auctorite to execute this my will and testament, make money of such goodes as I have not geven and bequeithed, and with the same to content my dettes and perfourme this my will and testament.

And the foresaid reverend fader in God, Sir Rignold Bray knyght, Sir Thomas Lovell knyght, Master William Pikenham, and Master William Felde, to be rewarded of suche thinges as shalbe delivered unto theme by my commaundement by the hondes of Sir Henry Haidon knyght stieward of my houshold and Master Richard Lessy, humbly beseching the Kinges habundant grace in whome is my singuler trust to name such supervisour as shalbe willing and favorabull diligently to se that this my present testament and will be perfittely executed and perfourmyd, gevyng full power also to my said executours to levey and receyve all my dettes due and owing unto me at the day of my dethe, as well of my receyvours as of all other officers, except such dettes as I have geven and bequeathed unto Master Richard Lessy aforesaid, as is above specified in this present will and testament.

And if that Master Richard Lessy cannot recover such money as I have geven to hym of the Shirffes of Yorkeshire and of my obligacions, than I will he be recompensed of the revenues of my landes to the sume of v c. marcs at the leest.

IN WITTENESSE HEROF I have setto my signet and signemanuell at my castell of Berkehamstede the last day of May the yere of our Lord abovesaid, being present Master Richard Lessy, Sir William Grant my confessour, Richard Brocas clerc of my kechyn, and Gervays Cressy. Proved at "Lamehithe" the 27 th day of August, A.D. 1495, and commission granted to Master Richard Lessy the executor in the said will mentioned to administer, &c. &c.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525. Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535. Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

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Edward IV's Daughter's Marriages

In Oct 1495 William Courtenay 1st Earl Devon 1475-1511 (20) and [her sister] Catherine York Countess Devon 1479-1527 (16) were married. He a great x 5 grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She a daughter of King Edward IV of England 1442-1483.

On 18 Mar 1496 [her daughter] Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533 was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (39) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (30).

In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Mary Tudor Queen Consort France 1496-1533.

On 09 Feb 1498 John Welles 1st Viscount Welles 1450-1498 (48) died in London. His will reads ...

In the name of oure Lorde Jeshu, Amen. I, John, Viscounte lorde Wellis (48), uncle to the [her husband] Kynge (41), oure soveraigne lorde, and brodre to the right noble prynces, Margaret, countes of Richemond (54), naturall and dere modre to oure said soveregne lord, beyng of goode and hole memory, ye viij daie of February, the yere of oure Lorde God 1498, and in the xiiij yere of the regne of our saide soverayne lorde, make this my testament. My bodie to be buried in suche place as [to] the [her husband] kynge (41), the quene (31), my lady, his moder (54), and my lady, my wife (28), shalbe thought, most convenyent, and the costis and charge of the same burying, the obsequyes, masses, funeralles and all oder thynges therto convenyent and necessarie. And also I remyt the makyng of my tumbe to the ordre and discrecionn of my saide soverayne lady the quene (31), my lady his modre, and my wife (28). And after these charges and costis aforesaid had and done, I will that all the dettis nowe by me dewe or to be dewe be treuly contented and paied. And I will that to the honour of Almighty God in the aulter afore which my bodie shall next lie my executors shall delyver a pair of candelstickes of silver, a masse booke covered with clothe of goolde, a chales of silver and gilte, a vestament of blewe velvet enbrodered with my armes, a pair of litle cruettes of silver and parcellis gilte, and a crosse of silver p[arcell] gilt, which 1 will do remayne there to serve Almyghty God with for ever and in noo oder place. Also I geve and bequethe to my dere beloved lady and wife Cecille (28), for terme of her life, all my castelles, manors, landes and tenements, aswell suche as I have purchased as all odre duryng only her life, whome I trust above all oder, that if my goodes and catallis wilnot suffice for the performance of this my laste will, that she will thenne of the revenues of the profittes of my inheritance perform this my laste will. Also I will that a preste be founde for ever after my said wifes decease to sey masse daily for my sowle and all Cristen sowles at the said aulter of the yerely revenues of my purchased landes, and over which my saide lady hath promysed me faithfully to purchase to the same entent if my saide purchased landes suffice not therto. And I will yt suche residue as shall fortune to be of my goodes that my saide dere beloved lady aud wife have theym to her owne use. And I make executors the saide Cecill (28), my dere beloved wife, and Sr Raynold Bray (58), knyght, and in my mooste humble wise beseche my said soverayne lorde the kyng and the quenes grace, my lady the kynges modre, to be supervisours.

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On 21 Feb 1499 [her son] Edmund Tudor 1st Duke Somerset 1499-1500 was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (42) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (33) at the Palace of Placentia being their sixth child. On 24 Feb 1499 he was christened at the Church of the Observant Friars. His godparents were Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 (55), Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (21) and Richard Foxe Bishop 1448-1528 (51), then Bishop of Durham. [her son] He is believed to have been created 1st Duke Somerset 3C 1499 on the same day although there is no documentation. On 19 Jun 1500 [her son] he died at the Royal Palace, Hatfield; possibly of plague of which an outbreak was occuring. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

On 20 Sep 1501 [her half-brother] Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (46) died. On 20 Sep 1501 Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset 1477-1530 (24) succeeded 2nd Marquess Dorset 3C 1475, 2nd Earl Huntingdon 6C 1479, 8th Baron Ferrers Groby. Eleanor St John Marchioness Dorset by marriage Marchioness Dorset.

Marriage of Arthur Tudor and Catherine of Aragon

On 14 Nov 1501 [her son] Arthur Prince of Wales (15) and [her daughter-in-law] Catherine of Aragon (15) were married at St Paul's Cathedral by Henry Deane Archbishop of Canterbury -1503 assisted by William Warham Bishop of London (51) and a further eighteen bishops They were half third cousins once removed. He a son of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

[her sister] Cecily York Viscountess Welles 1469-1507 (32) bore the train, Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset 1477-1530 (24) was Chief Answerer. Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (18) and Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (23) attended.

Thomas Englefield Speaker of the House of Commons 1453-1514 was appointed Knight of the Bath.

Immediately after their marriage [her son] Arthur Prince of Wales (15) and [her daughter-in-law] Catherine of Aragon (15) resided at Tickenhill Manor Bewdley for a month.

Thereafter they travelled to Ludlow.

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon or Joanna Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon. Before 1532 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1450-1532. Around 1620 based on a work of 1526.Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1450-1532. Around 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of the wife of Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542. He had three wives. The sitter is believed to his third wife.

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Death of Prince Arthur

On 02 Apr 1502 [her son] Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (15) died at Ludlow Castle. See Death of Prince Arthur. The cause of death unknown other than being reported as "a malign vapour which proceeded from the air". Catherine of Aragon (16) had recovered.

Trial of James Tyrrell

On 02 May 1502 James Tyrrell 1455-1502 (47) confessd to the murder of the Princes in the Tower at Guildhall during the Trial of James Tyrrell attended by [her husband] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (45) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (36).

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1503. This yeare, in Februarie, died Queene Elizabeth (36) at the Towre of London, lyeinge in childebedd of a daughter named [her daughter] Katherine (the 8th day after her birth), and was buried at Westminster; and on Passion Sundaye a peace made betwene the Emperoure (43) and the Kinge (45) duringe their lyves, solemnized upon a great oathe at the highe aulter in Paules queere.

Death of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

On 02 Feb 1503 [her daughter] Katherine Tudor 1503-1503 was born to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (46) and Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (36) at the Tower of London. She died eight days later on 10 Feb 1503.

On 11 Feb 1503 (her birthday) Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (36) died from childbirth.

Lying in State of Elizabeth of York

The Antiquarian Repertory Volume 4 Funeral Ceremonies of Queen Elizabeth. And after that the corps (37) was could the Serjeant of the Chandry with such officers that belong to that Office had the Charge of baumeing with other serimonies theirto belonging and were allowed xl. Ells of lynning holland Cloth of Ell bredth with there gomes baumes Spices sweet wines and other as thereto belongeth and was thereto according.

Item after that she was sered by the Kings Plumer Closed her in lead with an Epitaph of lead what she was and then all that was Chested in borcle sufficiently Coverd for bearing of the same which was covered with white and black velvet with a Crosse of white damaske.

Item in the quire of the Chappell of the Tower was ordeyned a hearse of fine prncipills with Renninge lights about the Church and all the windowes rayled about a good heighte furnish'd with burninge tapers and also hanged with black Cloth furnish'd with scochins of her Armes.

The Sunday next following the corps (37) was removed from her Chamber to the Chappcll in manner that followeth.

First there was The Abbott of Westminster (39) in pontificalibus with the Dean of the kings Chappell (63) and the whole company of the same fowr knights bearing the Canapye with great Number of Gentlemen which went two and two together on every syde of the prossion great Number of torches brening borne by the Kings and the Queens servants after them the Officers of Armes and the Greatest estates and other Lords their present layd their hands to the Corps the Lady Elizabeth Stafford (24) was that day principall Mourner and all the other Laides followed her two and two together in such most sadd and simplest Clothing that they had on their heads thredden kierchiefs hanging on their shoulders and close under their Chins and this daily until their slopps mantells hoodes and paris were made and Ordyned. And when the Corps was sett under the hearse in the Chapell Coverd with a rich Cloth of black velvet with a Crosse of Cloth of Gold. And an Officer of Armes in an high voice said for Queen EHzebeth soule and all Xtn souls Pater noster and every ...... and atoremus before the Collect Aminabus inlykewise.

That night and every Night following was ordyned a goodly watch both of men and Gentlewomen at the lest iiij gentlewomen ij officers of Armes and vij yeomen and grooms. The gentlewomen were relieved with vj ladies which continually did knele about the Corps.

Then the kings Chaplin began and Redd the sawter that done to the laudes and Commendations.

After that the Deane of the kings Chappell (63) all the nobles officers of Armes other gentle and honest persons went to the great chamber for the Ladys to the Masse of Requiem.

Then was the [her sister] Lady Catherin (23) sister of the noble Queene (37) Cheif mourner led by the Earle of Surry (60) and Earle of Essex her train borne by the Lady Elizabeth Stafford (24) accompanied also with all the other Laidies and Gentlewomen of the Court And when they were comen to the quier the foresaid vj Laides gave roome to there betters in tyme masse was done after which they continued their watch.

The [her sister] Cheif Mourner (23) kneled at the heade alone then an officer of Arms began for the Queene &c And so began the masse songen by the Abbot of Westminster (39) at the Offringe the Lady was led by ij of the greatest Estates there present and the lest gave her the offring having before her the Chamberlain and the Officers of Arms passing always by the Corps did their obeysance as before.

Then offered the other six Laides before any Estate ij and ij together then the greatest estates and all the Laides and Gentlewomen then all the other Laides and knights and squires with other Gentlemen So this order as before was dayly kept as long as she was in the Tower every day in pontificalibus by a Bishop or an Abbott at the least as the next day by the Abbott of Barmsey The iij11 by the Abbott Albones The iiijth by the Abbott of Winchcomb The vth by the Abbott of Towerhill The vj'h by the Abbott of Stratford The vij"1 day there was iij solempne masses The first of our lady sungen by the Abbott of Redyng att that masse offered a piece of Gold of xld for the masse pennye the principle Mourner and no other person The second masse songen by the bishop Landaffe and Likewise at the masse none offered but she and then offered a piece of Gold of 5s. The iijd Masse songen by the bishop of Norwigge and att that Masse she offered a Noble Then offered the Laides and the Nobles as before The viijth day the service was done by the Bishop of Bangor The ixth day by the Bishop of Exeter the xll> day by the Bishop of Lincolne.

That Masse done the Lords and Laides went to breakfast and in meane tyme the Corps was conveyd into the Chaire which was eniparralled as followeth:

First all the bayles sydes and Coffers were covered with black velvett and over all along of a prety depnes a Cloth of black velvett with a Crosse of White Cloth of gould well frindged drawn with vi horses traped with black velvett and all the draught of the same.

And when the Corps was in the Chest there was Ordeyned an Image or a personage like a Queene Clothed in the very Roabes of Estate of the Queene having her very rich Crowne on her Head her heire about her shoulders her septer in her right Hand and her fingers well garnished with Gould and precious Stones.

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Funeral of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

On 24 Feb 1503 Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (37) was buried in the Henry VII Chapel Westminster Abbey. Her sister [her sister] Catherine York Countess Devon 1479-1527 (23) chief mourner.

Death of Henry VII

On 21 Apr 1509 [her husband] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (52) died of tuberculosis at Richmond Palace. Henry VIII (17) succeeded VIII King England.

Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII August 1527. After 28 Jun 1529. Vit. B. XII. 70. B. M. 5774. KATHARINE OF ARRAGON.

A set of depositions as to Katharine's marriage with prince Arthur.

1. Of George earl of Shrewsbury (61), seneschal of the King's household, at the Coldherbar, on Monday, 28 June 1529. Is 59 years of age. Was present at the marriage of [her former husband] Henry VII (72). at Westminster, and at the creation of Arthur prince of Wales and Henry Duke of York. They were always considered as brothers, and he never heard it contradicted. Was present at the marriage of prince Arthur with Katharine, now Queen, at St. Paul's, in Nov. 17 Hen. VII. 1521 (sic). Believes that Arthur was then 14 or more. Saw the queen Elizabeth (63) and him a month after his birth, at Winchester, in 2 Hen. VII. Believes that Catharine was more than 14. Thinks that Arthur must have been nearer 15 than 14. At night, with the lord of Oxford and others, conducted prince Arthur to the lady Catharine's (43) bedchamber, and left him there. Supposes that the Prince consummated the marriage,as he did so, being only 15 years when he was married. They were always considered lawfully married during the life of prince Arthur. Saw the funeral of prince Arthur at Worcester, and the marriage of the King and Queen at Greenwich. Cannot answer the 6th and 7th articles, but leaves them to the laws. Never heard what is contained in the 8th article. As to the 9th, knows that the King and Queen cohabited and treated each other as husband and wife, but cannot say whether lawfully or not. Can say nothing from his own knowledge as to the 10th, 11th, and 12th articles. Has made this deposition without being instructed or corrupted in any way, only for the sake of truth.

Vit. B. XII. 80. B. M.

2. Of [her nephew] Thomas marquis of Dorset (52). Is 52 years of age. The 1st and 2nd articles contain the truth. Was present at the baptism of Arthur and Henry, the former at Winchester, and the latter at Greenwich. Was present at the marriage of prince Arthur with Catharine, now Queen, at St Paul's, on a Sunday in Nov. 1501, 17 Hen. VII. Believes Arthur was about 15, for he has seen in the book in which are written the births of the King's children that he was born 20 Sept. 1486. Was present when prince Arthur went to bed after his marriage, where the lady Catharine (43) lay under the coverlet, "as the manner is of queens in that behalf." Thinks that he used the princess as his wife, for he was of a good and sanguine complexion, and they were commonly reputed as man and wife during prince Arthur's life. As to the 5th article, he can depose nothing to the first part, as he was then prisoner at Calais; but the remainder, touching cohabitation and reputation, is true. Can say nothing to the 6th, 7th, and 8th. The 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th contain the truth, as he believes.

Vit. B. XII. 85. B. M.

3. Of Sir Antony Willoughby. Has lived 15 years in Hampshire, for 12 years previously in Wiltshire. Was five years in the service of prince Arthur, for five years before that in the service of the bishop of Durham, and before that time in his father's household. Believes the 1st and 2nd articles to be true. To the 3rd and 4th, was present at the marriage of prince Arthur and lady Catharine. By favor of his father, lord Broke (57), steward of the King's household, was present when prince Arthur went to bed on his marriage night in the palace of the bishop of London. In the morning the prince, in the presence of Mores St. John, Mr. Cromer, Mr. William Woddall, Mr. Griffith Rice, and others, said to him, "Willoughby, bring me a cup of ale, for I have been this night in the midst of Spain;" and afterward said openly, "Masters, it is good pastime to have a wife." He, therefore, supposes that the marriage was consummated; and he heard that they lay together the Shrovetide following at Ludlow.

Knows that they lived together as man and wife during the remainder of the Prince's life.

Believes the 5th article to be true. Can depose nothing to the 6th, 7th and 8th. Believes the 9th, 10th and 11th to be true. The 12th contains law; to which he is not bound to reply. To the second additional interrogatory he replies, that it contains the truth, for he has been present twenty times at the solemnization of marriage, and the said form of words is always used.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

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1667. Remigius van Leemput Painter 1607-1675 (59). Copy (for which he received £150) of Hans Holbein's "Whitehall Mural" of [her son] King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547, Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509, Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 and Jane Seymour Queen Consort England 1509-1537. The original was destroyed in a fire in 1698.

Around 1675 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503. From a work of 1500.

Buckingham's Rebellion

The History of King Richard the Third by Thomas More. For hereupon, soon after, began the conspiracy, or rather good confederation, between the Duke of Buckingham and many other gentlemen against [her uncle] him. The occasion whereupon the King and the Duke fell out is by different folk, different ways presented. This duke, as I have for certain been informed, as soon as the [her uncle] Duke of Gloucester, upon the death of King Edward, came to York and there had solemn funeral service for King Edward, sent thither, in the most secret way he could, one Percival, his trusty servant, who came to John Ward, a chamber-man of like secret trust with the [her uncle] Duke of Gloucester, desiring that in the most close and covert manner he might be admitted to the presence and speech of his master. And the [her uncle] Duke of Gloucester, informed of his desire, caused him in the dead of the night, after all other folk left, to be brought unto him in his secret chamber, where Percival, after his master's recommendation, showed him what his master had secretly sent him to show him that in this new world he could take such part as he would, and Buckingham would wait upon him with a thousand good fellows if need were. The messenger, sent back with thanks and some secret instruction of the [her uncle] Protector's mind, yet he met him again with further message from the Duke, his master, within a few days after at Nottingham, to where the [her uncle] Protector from York with many gentlemen of the north country, up to the number of six hundred horse, was coming on his way to London. And after secret meeting and communication had, at once departed. Whereupon at Northampton the Duke met with the [her uncle] Protector himself, with three hundred horse, and from there still continued with him, partner of all his devices, such that after his coronation they departed, as it seemed, very great friends at Gloucester.

From whence, as soon as the Duke came home, he so lightly turned from him and so highly conspired against him that a man would marvel whereof the change grew.

And surely the occasion of their variance is of different men differently reported. Some I have heard say that the Duke—a little before the coronation, among other things—required of the [her uncle] Protector the Duke of Hereford's lands, to which he pretended himself just inheritor. And forasmuch as the title that he claimed by inheritance was somewhat interlaced with the title to the crown by the line of King Henry VI, before deprived, the [her uncle] Protector conceived such indignation that he rejected the Duke's request with many spiteful and threatening words, which so wounded his heart with hatred and mistrust that he never after could endure to look aright on [her uncle] King Richard, but ever feared his own life, so far forth that when the [her uncle] Protector rode through London toward his coronation, he feigned himself sick because he would not ride with him. And the other, taking it in evil part, sent him word to rise and come ride, or he would make him be carried. Whereupon he rode on with evil will and, that notwithstanding, on the morrow rose from the feast feigning himself sick, and [her uncle] King Richard said it was done in hatred and contempt of him. And they say that ever after, continually, each of them lived in such hatred and distrust of other that the Duke verily looked to have been murdered at Gloucester, from which, nevertheless, he in fair manner departed.

But surely some right from those days' secrets deny this; and many right wise men think it unlikely (the deep dissimulating nature of both those men considered, and what need in that green world the [her uncle] Protector had of the Duke, and in what peril the Duke stood if he fell once in suspicion of the tyrant) that either the [her uncle] Protector would give the Duke occasion of displeasure, or the Duke the [her uncle] Protector occasion of mistrust. And men in fact think that, if King Richard had any such opinion conceived of the Duke, he would never have suffered him to escape his hands.

Very truth it is, the Duke was a high-minded man and could ill bear the glory of another, so that I have heard of some who said they saw it that the Duke, at such time as the crown was first set upon the [her uncle] Protector's head, his eye could not abide the sight thereof, but turned his head another way. But men say that he was, of truth, not well at ease, and that to King Richard was both well known and not ill taken, nor any demand of the Duke's discourteously rejected, but he with great gifts and high promises both, in most loving trusty manner departed at Gloucester. But soon after his coming home to Brecknock, having there in his custody by the commandment of King Richard, Doctor Morton, Bishop of Ely, who as you heard before was taken in the Council at the Tower, growing familiar with him, whose wisdom deceived his pride—to his own deliverance and the Duke's destruction.

The Bishop was a man of great natural wit, very well learned, and honorable in behavior, lacking no wise ways to win favor. He had been loyal to the part of King Henry while that part was in wealth, and nevertheless left it not, nor forsook it in woe, but fled the realm with the Queen and the Prince, and while King Edward had the King in prison, he never came home but to the battlefield. After this loss, and that part was utterly subdued, King Edward, for Morton's steadfast faith and wisdom, not only was content to receive him, but also wooed him to come and had him from thence forth both in secret trust and very special favor, in which he nothing deceived. For he was, as you have heard, after King Edward's death, first taken by the tyrant for his loyalty to the King, but found the means to turn this Duke to his plans, joining gentlemen together in the aid of King Henry, devising first the marriage between him and King Edward's daughter, by which he declared his faith and good service to both his masters at once, with infinite benefit to the realm, by the conjunction of those two bloods in one, whose several titles had long left the land without quiet. Afterwards, he fled the realm, went to Rome, never minding more to meddle with the world till the noble prince, King Henry the Seventh, got him home again, made him Archbishop of Canterbury and Chancellor of England, whereunto the Pope joined the honor of Cardinal. Thus living many days in as much honor as one man might well wish, ended them so godly that his death, with God's mercy, well changed his life.

This man, therefore, as I was about to tell you, by long and often alternate proof, as well from prosperity as adverse fortune, had gotten by great experience, the very mother and mistress of wisdom, a deep insight in political, worldly drifts.

Whereby, perceiving now this Duke glad to come with him, he fed him with fair words and many pleasant praises. And perceiving by the process of their communications the Duke's pride now and then to let slip a little outburst of envy toward the glory of the King, and thereby feeling him easy to fall out if the matter were well handled, he craftily sought the ways to prick him forward, taking always the occasion of his coming, and so keeping himself close within his bonds that he rather seemed to follow him than to lead him.

For when the Duke first began to praise and boast of the King and show how much profit the realm should take by his reign, my Lord Morton answered, "Surely, my Lord, folly it were for me to lie, for if I would swear the contrary, your Lordship would not, I know, believe it, but that, if the world would have gone as I would have wished, King Henry's son had had the crown and not King Edward. But after God had ordered him to lose it, and King Edward to reign, I was never so mad that I would with a dead man strive against the living. So was I to King Edward faithful chaplain, and glad would have been that his child had succeeded him. However, if the secret judgment of God has otherwise provided, I propose not to spurn against a spur, nor labor to set up what God pulls down. And as for the late [her uncle] Protector and now King...." And even there he left off, saying that he had already meddled too much with the world and would from that day meddle with his book and his beads alone, and no further.

Then longed the Duke sore to hear what he would have said because he ended with the King and there so suddenly stopped, and so exhorted him familiarly between them to be so bold to say whatsoever he thought, whereof he faithfully promised there should never come hurt and perchance more good than he would know, and that he himself intended to use his faithful, secret advice and counsel; this counsel, he said, was the only cause for which he procured of the King to have him in his custody, where he might reckon himself at home, or else had he been put in the hands of them with whom he should not have found the like favor.

The Bishop right humbly thanked him and said, "In good faith, my Lord, I love not much to talk much of princes, as things not all out of peril even though the word be without fault—forasmuch as it shall not be taken as the party meant it, but as it pleases the prince to construe it. And ever I think on Aesop's tale, that one in which the lion had proclaimed on pain of death that no horned beast should abide in that wood. Then one who had on his forehead a lump of flesh fled away at great pace. The fox who saw him run so fast asked him why he made all that haste. And he answered: 'In faith, I neither know nor care, so I were once hence because of this proclamation made about horned beasts.'

"'What, fool!' said the fox. 'Thou may abide well enough; the lion meant not thee, for it is no horn that is on your head.'

"'No, marry,' said he. 'That know I well enough. But what if he call it a horn? Where am I then?'"

The Duke laughed merrily at the tale, and said, "My Lord, I warrant you, neither the lion nor the boar shall find any problem with anything here spoken, for it shall never come near their ear."

"In good faith, Sir," said the Bishop, "if it did, the thing that I was about to say, taken as well as before God as I meant it, could deserve but thanks. And yet taken as I know it would, might happen to turn me to little good and you to less."

Then longed the Duke yet much more to know what it was. Whereupon the Bishop said: "In good faith, my Lord, as for the late [her uncle] Protector, since he is now King in possession, I propose not to dispute his title. But for the welfare of this realm, whereof his Grace has now the governance and whereof I am myself one poor member, I was about to wish that to those good abilities, whereof he has already right many, little needing my praise, it might yet have pleased God for the better store to have given him some of such other excellent virtues suitable for the rule of a realm, as our Lord has planted in the person of your Grace."

Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Villiers 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1628-1687 wearing his Garter Collar.

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Grafton's Chronicle Henry VII. After the death of this noble Princes, which for her great vertue was commonly called good Queene Elizabeth, departed Sir Reignolde Bray knight of the Garter, a very father of his Countrie, a sage and a graue person, and a feruent louer of iustice. In so muche that if any thing had beene done agaynst good lawe or equitie, he would after an humble fashion plainly reprehende the king, and geue him good aduertisement how to reforme that offence, & to be more circumspect in another lyke case.

Death of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

Grafton's Chronicle Henry VII. The next yere after Queene Elizabeth, liyng within the Tower of London, was brought abed of a fayre daughter on Candlemasse day, which was there christened and named [her daughter] Katheryn, and the xj. day of the same moneth, the sayde most vertuous Princes and gracious Queene there deceassed, and was with all funerall pompe caryed through the Citie of London to Westminster, and there buried, whose [her daughter] daughter also taryed but a small season after her mother.

Perkin Warbreck Plot

History of England by Polydore Vergil Book 26 Henry VII Chapter 39. Learning that Peter had decamped, Henry sent out horsemen in every direction to follow him and seek his capture, but he, having covered most of the distance, was not seen before he reached the asylum. But not so his captains, who were taken in mid-flight and brought to the king. And the mob, when they could not see Peter nor his captains’ standards, having no idea where he was, whether he had been killed by some trick or had fled, were unsure of what counsel to take or what was best to do. In the end, learning of his shameful flight, everybody, immediately unhinged by their common evil, their common fear, their common danger, cast aside their weapons and began to hold up their hands, and out of his kindness the king readily forgave them. Being a victor without having had a fight, he went to Exeter, where he praised the citizenry for having done its duty and extended his thanks, and while there he presided over the execution of some of the Cornishmen responsible for the recent rising. Meanwhile the king’s horsemen rode as far as St. Michael’s Mount, and there they found Peter’s wife Catherine and brought her captive to the king. Henry, marveling at the woman’s beauty, thought she was not plunder for soldiers, but worthy of an emperor, and forthwith sent her to the queen at London with an escort of honorable matrons, as a sure harbinger of the victory he had won.

Death of Edward IV

Mémoires de Philippe de Commynes Chapter 6 Section 8. Dès l'heure que le roy Edouard fut mort, le Roy nostre maistre en fut adverty, et n'en feit nulle joye quant il le sceut:

From the hour that [her father] King Edward IV died, the King our master was made aware, and took no joy in it [Note. Not clear what il le sceut means!]

et peu de jours après receut lettres du duc de Clocestre, qui s'estoit faict roy d'Angleterre1, et se signoit Richard, lequel avoit faict mourir les deux filz du roy Edouard son frère.

And few days after he received letters from the [her uncle] Duke of Gloucester, who had become the King of England, and signed Richard, who had caused the death of the two sons [Note. The Princes in the Tower Edward V King England 1470- and Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473-] of [her father] King Edward his brother.

Lequel roy Richard requeroit l'amytié du Roy, et croy qu'il eust bien voulu ravoir reste pension;

[her uncle] King Richard wanted the friendship of the King, and belived he would continue to receive the pension;

mais le Roy ne voulut respondre à ses lettres, ne ouyr le messagier, et l'estima très cruel et mauvais:

but the King didn't want to respond to the letters, nor hear the messanger, and considered [her uncle] him very cruel and bad:

car, après le trespas dudict roy Edouard, ledict duc de Clocestre avoit faict hommaige à son nepveu, comme à son roy et souverain seigneur, et incontinent après commit ce cas.

since, after the [Note. didict? Possibly dudit ie said] crime against King Edward, the [her uncle] Duke of Gloucester gave homage to his nephew, as his King and sovereign lord, and [Note. incontinent?] after commited this case.

Et, en plain parlement d'Angleterre, feit desgrader deux filles dudict roy Edouard et desclarer bastardes, soubz couleur3 qu'il prouva par ung evesque de Bas4 en Angleterre

And, in the parliament of England, had degraded the two daughters of the said [her father] King of England and declared them bastards, on the pretext of the evidence of a Bishop of Bath in England

(qui aultresfois avoit eu grant credit avec ledict roy Edouard, et puis le desappoincta, et le tint en prison, et puis le ranconna d'une somme d'argent):

(who formerley had great credit with the King Edward then disappointed him, and held him in prison, and then ransomed himself with a sum of money)

lequel evesque disoit que ledict roy Edouard avoit promis foy de mariaige à une dame d'Angleterre (qu'il nommoit)5 pour ce qu'il en estoit amoureux, pour en avoir son plaisir;

which Bishop said that [her father] King Edward had promised [Note. foy? ] marriage to an English lady [who he named] who he was in love with, to have his pleasure; [See Edward IV marries Eleanor Talbot possibly].

et en avoit faict la promesse en la main dudict evesque, et, sur ceste promesse, coucha avec elle: et ne le faisoit que pour la tromper.

and had made this promise in the presence of the Bishop, and, on this promise, slept with her: and did this to deceive her. See The Princes of the Tower described as Illegitimate.

Toutesfois telz jeux sont bien dangereux, tesmoing ces enseignes. J'ay veu beaucoup de gens de court qui, une bonne adventure qui leur eust pleu en tel cas, ilz ne l'eussent point perdue par faulte de promettre.

Nevertheless such games are very dangerous, [Note. tesmoing?] these signs. I saw alot of courtiers who, having the opportunity of such an adventure, would not have lost it for the sake of a promise.

Et ce mauvais evesque garda ceste vengeance en son cueur, par adventure vingt ans; mais il luy en meschut:

And this bad Bishop guarded revenge in his heart, for twenty years; but he is in [Note. meshut?]:

car il avoit ung filz, qu'il aymoit fort, à qui ledict roy [her uncle] Richard vouloit faire de grans biens et luy faire espouser l'une de ces deux filles, desgradees de leur dignité, laquelle de présent est royne d'Angleterre et a deux beaux enfans.

because he had a son, who he loved very much, whom [her uncle] King Richard wished to do great things and to marry one of the two daughters, beneath their dignity, one of whom is now the present Queen of England and has two beautiful children [Note. [her son] Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 and Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541].

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Death of Elizabeth of York Queen Consort

The Antiquarian Repertory Volume 4 Funeral Ceremonies of Queen Elizabeth. REMEMBRANCE for the enterment of the right high right excelent and most Christen Princese Elizabeth Queene of England and of France Lady of Ireland and the Eldest daughter of [her father] king Edward the fourth wife to the most hygh most puyssant and most victorious king Henry the viith our most dread Souveraigne Lord the which deceased in childbed in The Tower of London the xith day of Februarye which was upon Saturday and the xviiith yeare of the reigne of our said Soveraigne Lord the king her most dearest husband whose departing was as heveye and dolorous to the kings hcighuess as hath been sene or heard of. And also in likeyse to all the Estates of this Realme as well Citizens as Comnyns for she was one of the most gracious and best, beloved princesses in the world in her tyme beinge.

Then the king of his wisdom ordeyned certaine of his Counsell for the ordering of her buryall to be at Westminster. That is to say The Erle of Surry Treasurer of England and Sr Richard Guilford Comptrowler of his noble household And himselfe tooke with him certain of his secretest and prevely departed to a solitary place to passe his sorrows and would no man should resort to him but such his grace appointed untill such tyme it should please him to showe his pleasure and over yt every Officer to give their Attendance upon the said Councellours And over yt in his Departing ordeyned Incontinent the next day following for vi Hundredth and xxxvi hole masses said in London and by Sr Charles Somerset and Sr Richard Guilford sent the best comfort to all the Queens servants that hath bene sene of a soveraigne Lord with as good words.

Also then were ronngen the bells of London everye one and after that through out the Realme with solomne Dyrgies and Masses of Requiems and everye Religious place collegs and Churches.

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