History of Cambridgeshire

673 Synod of Hertford

1551 Sweating Sickness Outbreak

Cambridgeshire is in East Anglia.

Alconbury, Cambridgeshire

Ermine Street 2b Braughing to Durobrivae. From Braughing Ermine Street continues north through Buntingford. 1.6km north of Buntingford the road make a change of alignment before heading to Royston where it again changes aligment before passing through Caxton Gibbet, Durovigutum, Huntingdon, Great Stukeley, Alconbury and Sawtry, Chesterton before reaching Durobrivae.

Abbots Ripton, Cambridgeshire

On 21 Jan 1876 Herbert Noble 1857-1876 (19) was killed at a railway accident at Abbots Ripton. The Special Scotch Express train from Edinburgh to London was involved in a collision, during a blizzard, with a coal train. An express travelling in the other direction then ran into the wreckage.

Barnack, Cambridgeshire

Church of St John the Baptist Barnack, Cambridgeshire

After 1598. Monument to Francis Whitstone in the Church of St John the Baptist Barnack. Jacobean Period.

On 13 Jan 1805 Maria wife of Robert Henson died. Monument in Church of St John the Baptist Barnack. Sculpted by Richard Westmacott 1775-1856 (29).

On 14 Jul 1895 William Alleyne Cecil 3rd Marquess Exeter 1825-1895 (70) died. Brownlow Henry George Cecil 4th Marquess Exeter 1849-1898 (45) succeeded 4th Marquess Exeter 2C 1801, 13th Earl Exeter, 14th Baron Burghley. Monument in the Church of St John the Baptist Barnack.

On 09 Apr 1898 Brownlow Henry George Cecil 4th Marquess Exeter 1849-1898 (48) died. William Cecil 5th Marquess Exeter 1876-1956 (21) succeeded 5th Marquess Exeter 2C 1801, 14th Earl Exeter, 15th Baron Burghley. Monument in the Church of St John the Baptist Barnack.

Barnwell Castle, Cambridgeshire

In Aug 1144 William Saye 1106-1144 (38) was killed at Barnwell Castle.

In Aug 1144 Geoffrey Mandeville 1st Earl Essex -1144 was killed at Barnwell Castle. Geoffrey Mandeville 2nd Earl Essex -1166 succeeded 2nd Earl Essex 1C 1139.

Barrington, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Buckden, Cambridgeshire

Bishop of Lincoln's Palace Buckden, Cambridgeshire

On 14 Jul 1551 Henry Brandon 2nd Duke Suffolk 1535-1551 (15) died of sweating sickness in the Bishop of Lincoln's Palace Buckden. Henry's brother Charles Brandon 3rd Duke Suffolk 1537-1551 (14) succeeded 3rd Duke Suffolk 2C 1514 although he too died an hour later. On 14 Jul 1551 Charles Brandon 3rd Duke Suffolk 1537-1551 (14) died of sweating sickness.

1541 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of Henry Brandon 2nd Duke Suffolk 1535-1551. 1541 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of Charles Brandon 3rd Duke Suffolk 1537-1551.

Diary of Henry Machyn July 1551. 16 Jul 1551. The xvj day of July ded of the swet the ij yonge dukes of Suffoke [Note. Henry Brandon 2nd Duke Suffolk 1535-1551 (15) and Charles Brandon 3rd Duke Suffolk 1537-1551 (14)] of the swet, boyth in one bed in Chambryge-shyre; and [buried] at (blank in MS.); and ther ded from the viij day of July unto the xix ded of the swett in London of all dyssesus, viijc. iijxx. and xij. and no more in alle, and so the chanseller is serteffyd.

Buckden Place Buckden, Cambridgeshire

On 02 Jan 1514 William Smyth Bishop of Lincoln 1460-1514 (54) died at Buckden Place Buckden.

Buckworth, Cambridgeshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 03 May 1668. 03 May 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and to church, where I saw Sir A. Rickard (64), though he be under the Black Rod, by order of the Lords' House, upon the quarrel between the East India Company and Skinner, which is like to come to a very great heat between the two Houses.

At noon comes Mr. Mills and his wife, and Mr. Turner and his wife, by invitation to dinner, and we were mighty merry, and a very pretty dinner, of my Bridget and Nell's dressing, very handsome.

After dinner to church again....

So home and with Sir W. Pen (47) took a Hackney, and he and I to Old Street, to a brew-house there, to see Sir Thomas Teddiman, who is very ill in bed of a fever, got, I believe, by the fright the Parliament have put him into, of late. But he is a good man, a good seaman, and stout.

Thence Pen and I to Islington, and there, at the old house, eat, and drank, and merry, and there by chance giving two pretty fat boys each of them a cake, they proved to be Captain Holland's children, whom therefore I pity. So round by Hackney home, having good discourse, he [Pen] being very open to me in his talk, how the King (37) ought to dissolve this Parliament, when the Bill of Money is passed, they being never likely to give him more; how he [the King (37)] hath great opportunity of making himself popular by stopping this Act against Conventicles; and how my Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (57), if the Parliament continue, will undoubtedly fall, he having managed that place with so much self-seeking, and disorder, and pleasure, and some great men are designing to overthrow (him), as, among the rest, my Lord Orrery (47); and that this will try the King (37) mightily, he being a firm friend to my Lord Lieutenant.

So home; and to supper a little, and then to bed, having stepped, after I come home, to Alderman Backewell's (50) about business, and there talked a while with him and his wife, a fine woman of the country, and how they had bought an estate at Buckeworth, within four mile of Brampton.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II In 1715 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688. Around 1647 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688. Around 1678 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 in his Garter Robes. Before 10 Sep 1687 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688.

Burrough Green, Cambridgeshire

John Evelyn's Diary 19 July 1670. 19 Jul 1670. I accompanied my worthy friend, that excellent man, Sir Robert Murray (62), with Mr. Slingsby (49), Master of the Mint, to see the latter's seat and estate at Burrow-Green in Cambridgeshire, he desiring our advice for placing a new house, which he was resolved to build. We set out in a coach and six horses with him and his lady, dined about midway at one Mr. Turner's, where we found a very noble dinner, venison, music, and a circle of country ladies and their gallants. After dinner, we proceeded, and came to Burrow-Green that night. This had been the ancient seat of the Cheekes (whose daughter Mr. Slingsby (49) married), formerly tutor to King Henry VI [NOTE. Possibly a mistake for Edward VI since John Cheke Tutor 1514-1557 was tutor to Edward VI]. The old house large and ample, and built for ancient hospitality, ready to fall down with age, placed in a dirty hole, a stiff clay, no water, next an adjoining church-yard, and with other inconveniences. We pitched on a spot of rising ground, adorned with venerable woods, a dry and sweet prospect east and west, and fit for a park, but no running water; at a mile distance from the old house.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 July 1670. 23 Jul 1670. We returned from Burrow Green to London, staying some time at Audley End to see that fine palace. It is indeed a cheerful piece of Gothic building, or rather antico moderno, but placed in an obscure bottom. The cellars and galleries are very stately. It has a river by it, a pretty avenue of limes, and in a park.

This is in Saffron Walden parish, famous for that useful plant, with which all the country is covered.

Dining at Bishop Stortford, we came late to London.

Caldecote, Cambridgeshire

On 22 Dec 1678 William North 6th Baron North 1678-1734 was born to Charles North 1st Baron Grey Rolleston 5th Baron North 1636-1691 (42) and Catherine Grey Baroness North and Grey Rolleston 1631-1694 (47) in Caldecote. The date somewhat suspicious given his mother Catherine Grey Baroness North and Grey Rolleston 1631-1694 (47) was forty-seven at the time and her first and only child.

Cambridge

Chatteris, Cambridgeshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 September 1663. 18 Sep 1663. Up, and got our people together as soon as we could; and after eating a dish of cold cream, which was my supper last night too, we took leave of our beggarly company, though they seem good people, too; and over most sad Fenns, all the way observing the sad life which the people of the place which if they be born there, they do call the Breedlings' of the place, do live, sometimes rowing from one spot to another, and then wadeing, to Wisbeach, a pretty town, and a fine church and library, where sundry very old abbey manuscripts; and a fine house, built on the church ground by Secretary Thurlow (47), and a fine gallery built for him in the church, but now all in the Bishop of Ely's hands.

After visiting the church, &c., we went out of the towne, by the help of a stranger, to find out one Blinkhorne, a miller, of whom we might inquire something of old Day's disposal of his estate, and in whose hands it now is; and by great chance we met him, and brought him to our inn to dinner; and instead of being informed in his estate by this fellow, we find that he is the next heir to the estate, which was matter, of great sport to my cozen Thomas and me, to see such a fellow prevent us in our hopes, he being Day's brother's, daughter's son, whereas we are but his sister's sons and grandsons; so that, after all, we were fain to propose our matter to him, and to get him to give us leave to look after the business, and so he to have one-third part, and we two to have the other two-third parts, of what should be recovered of the estate, which he consented to; and after some discourse and paying the reckoning, we mounted again, and rode, being very merry at our defeat, to Chatteris, my uncle very weary, and after supper, and my telling of three stories, to their good liking, of spirits, we all three in a chamber went to bed.

Chatteris House, Cambridgeshire

In 1804 John Gardner of Chaterris House -1804 died. His daughter Jane Gardner -1839 inherited his estates including Chatteris House at which time her husband William Dunn-Gardner -1831 changed his surname from Dunn to Dunn-Gardner.

Chesterton, Cambridgeshire

Ermine Street 2b Braughing to Durobrivae. From Braughing Ermine Street continues north through Buntingford. 1.6km north of Buntingford the road make a change of alignment before heading to Royston where it again changes aligment before passing through Caxton Gibbet, Durovigutum, Huntingdon, Great Stukeley, Alconbury and Sawtry, Chesterton before reaching Durobrivae.

Rampton Chesterton, Cambridgeshire

In or before 1212 Robert Lisle 1212-1262 was born at Rampton Chesterton.

Cheveley, Cambridgeshire

On 08 Sep 1874 George John Manners 1820-1874 (54) died at Cheveley.

Chippenham, Cambridgeshire

Chippenham, Cambridgeshire

In 1710. John James Baker Painter -1725. Known as "Whig Junto". From www.tate.org ... This is a portrait of a political group named the Whig Junto and a Black servant, whose identity is unknown. It is the only known portrait of the Junto, which was an ideologically close-knit group of political peers who formed the leadership of the Whig party in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The members of the group are shown gathered together on a grand terrace, while a vista onto a garden is revealed by the Black servant, who holds back a heavy velvet curtain. The grand architectural setting is imagined, and is deliberately evocative of power and status. The picture was commissioned by Edward Russell, 1st Earl of Orford (57), who stands on the right, as if welcoming the company. It is not known if Orford (57) had a Black servant in his household or whether the individual was included to emphasise Orford's (57) wealth and social standing. At the time, Britain was profiting heavily from the trade of enslaved people from West Africa. The presence of Black servants, many of whom were enslaved, in both aristocratic and merchant households had come to symbolise property and wealth. This reflected the dehumanising view of enslaved Black people held by the British elite.

The scene conjures one of the Junto's country house meetings where, in between parliamentary sessions, policy and party strategy were formulated. From left to right the sitters round the table can be identified as Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland (34); Thomas Wharton, 1st Marquess of Wharton (61); John Somers, 1st Baron Somers (1C 1697) (58); Charles Montagu, 1st Earl of Halifax (48); and William Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Devonshire (38). The lavish surroundings probably represent Orford's (57) house, Chippenham, where Junto meetings sometimes took place. It was also ideally located for the nearby Newmarket horse races, which the members of the Junto frequently attended when parliament was not sitting.

The portrait is dated 1710, before the crushing electoral defeat of the Whigs in October of that year. It shows the political allies while in power, when Sunderland (34) was Secretary of State, Wharton (61) Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Somers Lord President of the Privy Council, Devonshire (38) Lord Steward and a member of the Privy Council, and Orford (57) First Lord of the Admiralty. On the surface the portrait shows a relaxed gathering of fellow connoisseurs, seated round a table consulting antique medals and books of prints. Fittingly, Somers and Halifax (48) sit at the centre of the company, holding a book and handling a medal respectively. Both were known collectors and antiquarians – Somers was one of the founders of the Whig Kit-Cat Club, a convivial drinking and dining club, but which also had a political propagandist agenda; he had also purchased the Resta collection of drawings from Italy in 1709. Halifax (48) had a celebrated library and a collection of antique medals (sold in 1740), to which those being consulted presumably allude. Behind this exterior of cultural appreciation, however, the portrait advertises Whig policy in 1709–10, which supported the continuation of war against France in opposition to Tory calls for peace. The two visible prints are friezes from Trajan's column showing episodes from the Dacian wars, with the Roman army crossing the Danube. The viewer is invited to make parallels between the valour and victories of the Roman emperors and the current military greatness achieved for Britain by the Duke of Marlborough's campaigns. The globe, showing the Pacific, presumably alludes to Whig foreign policy ambitions beyond Europe. By defeating France in Europe, they aimed to gain commercial access to Spanish American trade routes. It reflects the competitive European colonial pursuit of new markets, including the selling of enslaved West African people to Spanish territories overseas.

John James Baker (or Backer, or Bakker) is thought to have been Flemish, from Antwerp. He was Godfrey Kneller's (63) (1646–1723) long-time studio assistant and drapery painter, and this is his largest, most ambitious and complex work. The symbolic programme was presumably devised by Orford in discussion with Baker. The Duke of Devonshire was not a regular member of the Junto, although an increasingly important Whig peer, but his inclusion here is presumably because of his kinship relationship with Orford. The picture is thus a demonstration of Orford's private as well as professional networks, and also his pride and ambition. It would have been displayed at Chippenham in the newly appointed, fashionable interiors, alongside other works that Orford commissioned to advertise his public achievement and the private and professional networks that sustained his power and influence.

Around 1715 Thomas Gibson Painter 1680-1751. Portrait of Edward Russell 1st Earl Orford 1653-1727. Around 1682 Thomas Murray Painter 1663-1735. Portrait of Edward Russell 1st Earl Orford 1653-1727 and Captain John Benbow, and Admiral Ralph Delavall . In 1715 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Thomas Wharton 1st Marquess Wharton 1648-1715. Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of John Somers 1st Baron Somers 1651-1716. In 1714. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Charles Montagu 1st Earl Halifax 1661-1715. Before 04 Jun 1729 Charles Jervas Painter 1675-1739. Portrait of William Cavendish 2nd Duke Devonshire 1672-1729.

Clayhithe, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Cottenham, Cambridgeshire

On 29 Sep 1636 Thomas Tenison Archbishop of Canterbury 1636-1715 was born in Cottenham.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 June 1667. 12 Jun 1667. Up very betimes to our business at the office, there hiring of more fire-ships; and at it close all the morning.

At noon home, and Sir W. Pen (46) dined with us.

By and by, after dinner, my wife out by coach to see her mother; and I in another, being afraid, at this busy time, to be seen with a woman in a coach, as if I were idle, towards The. Turner's (15); but met Sir W. Coventry's (39) boy; and there in his letter find that the Dutch had made no motion since their taking Sheernesse; and the Duke of Albemarle (58) writes that all is safe as to the great ships against any assault, the boom and chaine being so fortified; which put my heart into great joy1. When I come to Sir W: Coventry's (39) chamber, I find him abroad; but his clerk, Powell, do tell me that ill newes is come to Court of the Dutch breaking the Chaine at Chatham; which struck me to the heart.

And to White Hall to hear the truth of it; and there, going up the back-stairs, I did hear some lacquies speaking of sad newes come to Court, saying, that hardly anybody in the Court but do look as if he cried, and would not go into the house for fear of being seen, but slunk out and got into a coach, and to The. Turner's (15) to Sir W. Turner's (51), where I met Roger Pepys (50), newly come out of the country. He and I talked aside a little, he offering a match for Pall (26), one Barnes, of whom we shall talk more the next time. His father married a Pepys; in discourse, he told me further that his grandfather, my great grandfather, had £800 per annum, in Queen Elizabeth's time, in the very town of Cottenham; and that we did certainly come out of Scotland with the Abbot of Crowland. More talk I had, and shall have more with him, but my mind is so sad and head full of this ill news that I cannot now set it down.

A short visit here, my wife coming to me, and took leave of The. (15), and so home, where all our hearts do now ake; for the newes is true, that the Dutch have broke the chaine and burned our ships, and particularly "The Royal Charles",2 other particulars I know not, but most sad to be sure. And, the truth is, I do fear so much that the whole kingdom is undone, that I do this night resolve to study with my father and wife what to do with the little that I have in money by me, for I give [up] all the rest that I have in the King's hands, for Tangier, for lost.

So God help us! and God knows what disorders we may fall into, and whether any violence on this office, or perhaps some severity on our persons, as being reckoned by the silly people, or perhaps may, by policy of State, be thought fit to be condemned by the King (37) and Duke of York (33), and so put to trouble; though, God knows! I have, in my own person, done my full duty, I am sure. So having with much ado finished my business at the office, I home to consider with my father and wife of things, and then to supper and to bed with a heavy heart. The manner of my advising this night with my father was, I took him and my wife up to her chamber, and shut the door; and there told them the sad state of the times how we are like to be all undone; that I do fear some violence will be offered to this office, where all I have in the world is; and resolved upon sending it away—sometimes into the country—sometimes my father to lie in town, and have the gold with him at Sarah Giles's, and with that resolution went to bed full of fear and fright, hardly slept all night.

Note 1. There had been correspondence with Pett respecting this chain in April and May. On the 10th May Pett wrote to the Navy Commissioners, "The chain is promised to be dispatched to-morrow, and all things are ready for fixing it". On the 11th June the Dutch "got twenty or twenty-two ships over the narrow part of the river at Chatham, where ships had been sunk; after two and a half hours' fighting one guard-ship after another was fired and blown up, and the enemy master of the chain" (Calendar of State Papers, 1667, pp. 58, 87, 215).

Note 2. Vandervelde's drawings of the conflagration of the English fleet, made by him on the spot, are in the British Museum. B.

Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686. Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 June 1667. 16 Jun 1667. Lord's Day. Up, and called on by several on business of the office. Then to the office to look out several of my old letters to Sir W. Coventry (39) in order to the preparing for justifying this office in our frequent foretelling the want of money.

By and by comes Roger Pepys (50) and his son Talbot (21), whom he had brought to town to settle at the Temple, but, by reason of our present stirs, will carry him back again with him this week. He seems to be but a silly lad. I sent them to church this morning, I staying at home at the office, busy.

At noon home to dinner, and much good discourse with him, he being mighty sensible of our misery and mal-administration. Talking of these straits we are in, he tells me that my Lord Arlington (49) did the last week take up £12,000 in gold, which is very likely, for all was taken up that could be. Discoursing afterwards with him of our family he told me, that when I come to his house he will show me a decree in Chancery, wherein there was twenty-six men all housekeepers in the town of Cottenham, in Queene Elizabeth's time, of our name. He to church again in the afternoon, I staid at home busy, and did show some dalliance to my maid Nell, speaking to her of her sweetheart which she had, silly girle.

After sermon Roger Pepys (50) comes again. I spent the evening with him much troubled with the thoughts of the evils of our time, whereon we discoursed.

By and by occasion offered for my writing to Sir W. Coventry (39) a plain bold letter touching lack of money; which, when it was gone, I was afeard might give offence: but upon two or three readings over again the copy of it, I was satisfied it was a good letter; only Sir W. Batten (66) signed it with me, which I could wish I had done alone. Roger Pepys (50) gone, I to the garden, and there dallied a while all alone with Mrs. Markham, and then home to my chamber and to read and write, and then to supper and to bed.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 wearing his Garter Robes. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685.

Croxton, Cambridgeshire

Croxton Park, Cambridgeshire

My Recollections by Adeline Horsey Countess Cardigan 1824 1915 Chapter X: Newmarket and Melton. My hunting recollections would not be complete without including among them the occasion in '73 when I went to a meet at Belvoir, and met his Majesty King Edward VII (31), then Prince of Wales, who was staying at the Castle. I was riding my famous horse "Dandy", who won the Billesdon Coplow Stakes at Croxton Park, and that morning I was much exercised in my mind about a proposal of marriage I had just received from Disraeli (68). My uncle Admiral Rous (77), had said to me, " My dear, you can't marry that d---d old Jew", but I had known Disraeli (68) all my life, and I liked him very well. He had, however, one drawback so far as I was concerned, and that was his breath — the ill odour of politics perhaps ! In ancient Rome a wife could divorce her husband if his breath were unpleasant, and had Dizzy (68) lived in those days his wife would have been able to divorce him without any difficulty. I was wondering whether I could possibly put up with this unfortunate attribute in a great man, when I met the King, who was graciously pleased to ride with me. In the course of our conver- sation I told him about Disraeli's (68) proposal and asked him whether he would advise me to accept it, but the King (31) said he did not think the marriage would be a very happy one.

I lunched with the Royal party at Belvoir Castle, and as I rode home afterwards I felt well pleased that I had decided not to become the wife of a politician !

1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of King Edward VII. 1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Drawing of King Edward VII on his deathbed. Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Earith, Cambridgeshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Eversden, Cambridgeshire

On 08 May 1427 John_"Butcher_of_England"_Tiptoft was born to John Tiptoft 1st Baron Tiptoft -1443 and Joyce Charleton Baroness Tiptoft 1404-1446 (23) at Eversden.

Exning, Cambridgeshire

In 1075 Ralph de Gael Earl East Anglia 1041-1096 (33) and Emma Fitzosbern Countess East Anglia -1096 were married at Exning.

Fen Ditton, Cambridgeshire

Around 1340 John Henry Cheney 1340-1368 was born to Henry Cheney 1308- (32) at Fen Ditton.

Around 1368 John Henry Cheney 1340-1368 (28) died at Fen Ditton.

Before 1422 John Cheney 1422-1489 was born to Lawrence Cheney 1396-1461 and Elizabeth Cockayne 1394-1422 at Fen Ditton. Date based on his mother's death.

In Apr 1422 Elizabeth Cheney 1422-1473 was born to Lawrence Cheney 1396-1461 (26) and Elizabeth Cockayne 1394-1422 (28) at Fen Ditton.

Around 1448 Thomas Cheney 1448-1513 was born to John Cheney 1422-1489 (26) at Fen Ditton.

In 1455 Thomas Cheney 1455-1513 was born to John Cheney 1422-1489 (33) and Elizabeth Rempston 1418-1478 (37) at Fen Ditton.

On 14 Jul 1489 John Cheney 1422-1489 (67) died at Fen Ditton.

In 1513 Thomas Cheney 1455-1513 (58) died at Fen Ditton.

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Godmanchester, Cambridgeshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 15 September 1663. 15 Sep 1663. Up pretty betimes and rode as far as Godmanchester, Mr. Moore having two falls, once in water and another in dirt, and there 'light and eat and drunk, being all of us very weary, but especially my uncle and wife.

Thence to Brampton to my father's, and there found all well, but not sensible how they ought to treat my uncle and his son, at least till the Court be over, which vexed me, but on my counsel they carried it fair to them; and so my father, cozen Thomas, and I up to Hinchingbroke, where I find my Lord and his company gone to Boughton, which vexed me; but there I find my Lady and the young ladies, and there I alone with my Lady two hours, she carrying me through every part of the house and gardens, which are, and will be, mighty noble indeed. Here I saw Mrs. Betty Pickering (37), who is a very well-bred and comely lady, but very fat.

Thence, without so much as drinking, home with my father and cozen, who staid for me, and to a good supper; after I had had an hour's talk with my father abroad in the fields, wherein he begun to talk very highly of my promises to him of giving him the profits of Sturtlow, as if it were nothing that I give him out of my purse, and that he would have me to give this also from myself to my brothers and sister; I mean Brampton and all, I think: I confess I was angry to hear him talk in that manner, and took him up roundly in it, and advised him if he could not live upon £50 per ann., which was another part of his discourse, that he would think to come and live at Tom's again, where £50 per ann. will be a good addition to Tom's trade, and I think that must be done when all is done. But my father spoke nothing more of it all the time I was in the country, though at the time he seemed to like it well enough. I also spoke with Piggott too this evening before I went in to supper, and doubt that I shall meet with some knots in my business to-morrow before I can do it at the Court, but I shall do my best. After supper my uncle and his son to Stankes's to bed, which troubles me, all our father's beds being lent to Hinchingbroke, and so my wife and I to bed, she very weary.

Ermine Street 2b Braughing to Durobrivae. From Braughing Ermine Street continues north through Buntingford. 1.6km north of Buntingford the road make a change of alignment before heading to Royston where it again changes aligment before passing through Caxton Gibbet, Durovigutum, Huntingdon, Great Stukeley, Alconbury and Sawtry, Chesterton before reaching Durobrivae.

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Grantchester, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 4 Chapter 19. She was succeeded in the office of abbess by her sister Sexberga, who had been wife to Erconbert, king of Kent; who, when her sister had been buried sixteen years, thought fit to take up her bones, and putting them into a new coffin, to translate them into the church. Accordingly she ordered some of the brothers to provide a stone to make a coffin of; they accordingly went on board ship, because the country of Ely is on every side encompassed with the sea or marshes, and has no large stones, and came to a small abandoned city, not far from thence, which, in the language of the English, is called Grantchester, and presently, near the city walls, they found a white marble coffin, most beautifully wrought, and neatly covered with a lid of the same sort of stone. Concluding therefore that God had prospered their journey, they returned thanks to him, and carried it to the monastery.

Great Chesterford, Cambridgeshire

Great Shelford, Cambridgeshire

Around 1615 Bridget Stanhope Countess Desmond 1615-1701 was born to Michael Stanhope 1549-1621 (66) and Elizabeth Read at Great Shelford.

Guilden Morden, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Harston, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Hartford, Cambridgeshire

The 673 Synod of Hertford was convened by Archbishop Theodore of Tarsus 602-690. It was probably held at Hertford, possibly at Hartford.

Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire

In Jun 1541 Thomas Wendy Physician 1500-1560 (41) bought the manor and advowson of Haslingfield where he settled. One of his feoffees was William Paget (35) who became a close friend.

In 1549 Unknown Painter. Flemish. Portrait of William Paget 1st Baron Paget Beaudasert 1506-1563.

All Saints Church Haslingfield, Cambridgeshire

On 11 May 1560 Thomas Wendy Physician 1500-1560 (60) died. He was buried at All Saints Church Haslingfield.

In his will he left his Thomas Percy (32), nephew of his former employer, in his will a silver ewer and basin "in remembrance of such benefits which I have received at the hands of my very good lord and late master the late earl of Northumberland (58) his uncle".

He left Anne Preston Baroness Geneville Beaudasert and Parr Kendal -1587 his lands at Coton and Whitwell, Cambridgeshire ‘as a poor token of the good will which I have ever borne to her ladyship and in remembrance that in that place she had her first acquaintance with my lord her husband (54)’.

He also remembered Judge Anthony Browne 1509-1567 (51), Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585 (28), Humphrey Radclyffe 1509-1566 (51) and Richard Weston 1527-1572 (33).

In 1549 Unknown Painter. Flemish. Portrait of William Paget 1st Baron Paget Beaudasert 1506-1563. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585.

Hauxton, Cambridgeshire

Hinxton, Cambridgeshire

Horningsea, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Horseheath Chilford, Cambridgeshire

On 03 Aug 1641 Hildebrand Alington 5th Baron Alington 1641-1723 was born to William Alington 1st Baron Alington 1611-1648 (30) and Elizabeth Tollemache Baroness Alington -1671 at Horseheath Chilford.

Horseheath Hall, Horseheath Chilford, Cambridgeshire

John Evelyn's Diary 20 July 1670. 20 Jul 1670. We went to dine at Lord Allington's (30), who had newly built a house of great cost, I believe a little less than £20,000. His architect was Mr. Pratt (50). It is seated in a park, with a sweet prospect and stately avenue; but water still defective; the house has also its infirmities. Went back to Mr. Slingsby's (49).

Impington

Isleham, Cambridgeshire

The River Lark rises near Stonecross Green from where it flows past Pinford End, Sicklesmere, through Bury St Edmunds, past Fornham All Saints, Flempton, Icklingham, Barton Mills, Mildenhall, Isleham and Prickwillow after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Kennett, Cambridgeshire

Around 1420 John Cheney 1420-1459 was born to Thomas Cheney of Chesham Blois 1394-1468 (26) at Kennett.

On 06 May 1459 John Cheney 1420-1459 (39) died at Kennett.

Kirtling, Cambridgeshire

Around 1551 John North 1551-1597 was born to Edward North 1st Baron North 1496-1564 (55) and Alice Squier Baroness North -1560 in Kirtling.

Landwade, Cambridgeshire

In 1389 Walter Cotton of Langwade 1389-1445 was born at Landwade.

On 14 May 1445 Walter Cotton of Langwade 1389-1445 (56) died at Landwade.

Linton, Cambridgeshire

St Mary the Virgin Linton, Cambridgeshire

Diary of Henry Machyn March 1558. 06 Mar 1558. The vj day (of) Marche was cared in a hersse [to] be bered in Cambrygshyre ser Phylype Pares knyght, at a [place] callyd Lyntun, wher sergant Heth ded, and was ....

Little Abington, Cambridgeshire

On 16 Apr 1981 George Cambridge 2nd Marquess Cambridge 1895-1981 (85) died at Little Abington. He was buried at Royal Burial Ground Frogmore Estate Home Park Windsor.

Little Thetford, Cambridgeshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Littleport, Cambridgeshire

The River Great Ouse rises near Syresham from where it flows past Biddlesden, Brackley, Westbury, Radclive, through the centre of Buckingham, Buckingham after which it is joined by Padbury Brook.

The River Great Ouse continues past Thornton, Passenham, Stony Straford, around Newport Pagnell, past Gayhurst, Olney, Newton Blossomville, crossing into Bedfordshirem, past Harrold, Sharnbrook, Milton Ernest, through the centre of Bedford, under Great Barford Bridge, past Tempsford, Eaton Socon, through St Neots, past Offord D'Arcy and Offord Cluny, through Godmanchester and Huntingdon, under St Ives Bridge, Earith after which it is separates into two.

Thereafter one section is canalised heading north-east to Downham Market.

The other natural section flows past Little Thetford, through Ely, Littleport, past to Downham Market where it joins the canalised section.

Thereafter to King's Lynn after which it joins the The Wash.

Peakirk, Cambridgeshire

Peterborough

Prickwillow, Cambridgeshire

The River Lark rises near Stonecross Green from where it flows past Pinford End, Sicklesmere, through Bury St Edmunds, past Fornham All Saints, Flempton, Icklingham, Barton Mills, Mildenhall, Isleham and Prickwillow after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Rings End, Cambridgeshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Sawston, Cambridgeshire

In 1466 William Huddlestone 1466-1509 was born to John Huddlestone 7th Lord Millom 1425-1494 (41) and Mary Fenwick Lady Millom -1513 at Sawston.

In 1481 Richard Huddlestone 1481-1557 was born to William Huddlestone 1466-1509 (15) and Isabel Neville 1457-1516 (23) at Sawston.

In 1491 John Huddlestone 1491-1530 was born to William Huddlestone 1466-1509 (25) and Isabel Neville 1457-1516 (33) in Sawston.

In 1509 William Huddlestone 1466-1509 (43) died at Sawston.

Around 1510 Anne Huddlestone 1510-1562 was born to Richard Huddlestone 1481-1557 (29) and Margery Smythe at Sawston. Coefficient of inbreeding 12.62%.

In Jul 1517 John Huddlestone 1517-1557 was born to John Huddlestone 1491-1530 (26) in Sawston.

Elizabeth Huddlestone was born to Richard Huddlestone 1481-1557 at Sawston.

Lucy Huddlestone was born to Richard Huddlestone 1481-1557 and Margery Smythe at Sawston. Coefficient of inbreeding 12.62%.

Sawtry, Cambridgeshire

Ermine Street 2b Braughing to Durobrivae. From Braughing Ermine Street continues north through Buntingford. 1.6km north of Buntingford the road make a change of alignment before heading to Royston where it again changes aligment before passing through Caxton Gibbet, Durovigutum, Huntingdon, Great Stukeley, Alconbury and Sawtry, Chesterton before reaching Durobrivae.

Sawtry Abbey, Cambridgeshire

Vienna Archives 1536. On Thursday, after mass, which was no less solemn than the vigils of the day before, the body was carried from the chapel and put on a waggon, to be conveyed not to one of the convents of the Observant Friars, as the Queen had desired before her death, but at the pleasure of the King, her husband, to the Benedictine Abbey of Peterborough, and they departed in the following order:—First, 16 priests or clergymen in surplices went on horseback, without saying a word, having a gilded laten cross borne before them; after them several gentlemen, of whom there were only two of the house, "et le demeurant estoient tous emprouvez," and after them followed the maître d'hotel and chamberlain, with their rods of office in their hands; and, to keep them in order, went by their sides 9 or 10 heralds, with mourning hoods and wearing their coats of arms; after them followed 50 servants of the aforesaid gentlemen, bearing torches and "bâtons allumés," which lasted but a short time, and in the middle of them was drawn a waggon, upon which the body was drawn by six horses all covered with black cloth to the ground. The said waggon was covered with black velvet, in the midst of which was a great silver cross; and within, as one looked upon the corpse, was stretched a cloth of gold frieze with a cross of crimson velvet, and before and behind the said waggon stood two gentlemen ushers with mourning hoods looking into the waggon, round which the said four banners were carried by four heralds and the standards with the representations by four gentlemen. Then followed seven ladies, as chief mourners, upon hackneys, that of the first being harnessed with black velvet and the others with black cloth. After which ladies followed the waggon of the Queen's gentlemen; and after them, on hackneys, came nine ladies, wives of knights. Then followed the waggon of the Queen's chambermaids; then her maids to the number of 36, and in their wake followed certain servants on horseback. In this order the royal corpse was conducted for nine miles of the country, i.e., three French leagues, as far as the abbey of Sautry, where the abbot and his monks received it and placed it under a canopy in the choir of the church, under an "estalage" prepared for it, which contained 408 candles, which burned during the vigils that day and next day at mass.

Vienna Archives 1536. Next day a solemn mass was chanted in the said abbey of Sautry, by the bishop of Ely, during which in the middle of the church 48 torches of rosin were carried by as many poor men, with mourning hoods and garments. After mass the body was borne in the same order to the abbey of Peterborough, where at the door of the church it was honorably received by the bishops of Lincoln, Ely, and Rochester, the abbot of the place, and the abbots of Ramsey, Crolain (Crowland), Tournan (66) (Thorney), Walden and Thame, who, wearing their mitres and hoods, accompanied it in procession till it was placed under the chapelle ardente which was prepared for it there, upon eight pillars of beautiful fashion and roundness, upon which were placed about 1,000 candles, both little and middle-sized, and round about the said chapel 18 banners waved, of which one bore the arms of the Emperor, a second those of England, with those of the King's mother, prince Arthur, the queen of Portugal, sister of the deceased, Spain, Arragon, and Sicily, and those of Spain and England with three "lambeaulx," those of John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, who married the daughter of Peter the Cruel, viz., "le joux des beufz," the bundle of arrows, the pomegranate (granade), the lion and the greyhound. Likewise there were a great number of little pennons, in which were portrayed the devices of king Ferdinand, father of the deceased, and of herself; and round about the said chapel, in great gold letters was written, as the device of the said good lady, "Humble et loyale." Solemn vigils were said that day.

Sketchworth, Cambridgeshire

In 1632 Reverend Arthur Hildersham 1553-1632 was born to Thomas Hildersham and Ann Pole 1540- (92) at Sketchworth into a devoutly Roman Catholic family.

Soham, Cambridgeshire

In 1456 William Brandon 1456-1485 was born to William Brandon 1425-1491 (31) and Elizabeth Wingfield -1497 at Soham.

On 30 Jun 1577 Frances Vere Countess Surrey 1517-1577 (60) died at Soham. She was buried at St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay.

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Frances Vere Countess Surrey 1517-1577.

Staine, Cambridgeshire

Bottisham Staine, Cambridgeshire

In 1460 John Middleton Merchant of Calais 1460-1509 was born in Bottisham Staine.

In 1501 Alice Middleton 1501-1563 was born to John Middleton Merchant of Calais 1460-1509 (41) in Bottisham Staine.

Before 1509 John Middleton Merchant of Calais 1460-1509 died in Bottisham Staine.

On 16 Sep 1635 Eizabeth Alington 2nd Baroness Seymour Trowbridge 1635-1691 was baptised at Bottisham Staine.

Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Eizabeth Alington 2nd Baroness Seymour Trowbridge 1635-1691.

Stapleford, Cambridgeshire

On 05 Feb 1808 Sidney Godolphin Osborne 1808-1889 was born to Francis Osborne 1st Baron Godolphin 1777-1850 (30) and Elizabeth Charlotte Eden Baroness Godolphin 1780-1847 (28) at Stapleford.

Before 1839. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839. Portrait of Elizabeth Charlotte Eden Baroness Godolphin 1780-1847.

Stoneley, Cambridgeshire

Sturtlow

Sutton Bridge, Cambridgeshire

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Swaffham Prior, Cambridgeshire

Before 1753 John Peter Allix 1679-1758 was appointed Vicar of Swaffham Prior.

Swaffham Prior House, Cambridgeshire

In 1794 Charles Allix 1716-1794 (78) died. Reverend Charles Wager Allix 1748-1795 (46) inherited Willoughby Hall. John Peter Allix 1749-1817 (45) inherited Swaffham Prior House.

In 1817 John Peter Allix 1749-1817 (68) died. John Peter Allix 1785-1848 (32) inherited Swaffham Prior House.

In 1848 John Peter Allix 1785-1848 (63) died. Unamed Allix -1862 inherited Swaffham Prior House.

In 1862 Unamed Allix -1862 died. Charles Peter Allix 1842-1921 (20) inherited Swaffham Prior House.

Thoney Abbey, Cambridgeshire

On 16 Apr 1520 Bishop Robert Blyth 1470-1547 (50) was appointed Abbot of Thorney Abbey.

Ufford, Cambridgeshire

St Andrew's Church Ufford, Cambridgeshire

On 18 Apr 1621 Bridget Chaworth 1542-1621 (79) died. Monument in St Andrew's Church Ufford. Marble with Corinthian Columns and reclining effigy. Corinthian Columns. Jacobean Hooded Monument.

The inscription reads "Dame Bridget, Lady Carr, widow, daughter of Sir John Chaworth of Wiverton, Nottingham, late wife to Sir William Carr of Old Sleaford in the county of Lincoln, who served the late Queen Elizabeth (87) of most famous memory, being one of the gentlewomen of her Majesty's Privy Chamber for the space of five and twenty years, and afterwards served the most renowned Queen Anne (46), wife to our most gracious sovereign, King James, for the space of 14 years, being the residue of her life, and died the 18th day of April being of the age of 79 years, the which said Lady Carr, out of her love to her dear sister Katherine, the wife of George Quarles of this town of Ufford, esquire, hath caused her body to be here interred 1612". The date a mistake given she died in 1621.

Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1605 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of Anne of Denmark. 1595. Circle of Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of Anne of Denmark.

After 1624. Monument to John Bourne and his wife in St Andrew's Church Ufford.

After 17 Jun 1705. Monument to Richard Bourne in St Andrew's Church Ufford.

On 01 Nov 1790 James Manners 1720-1790 (70) died. Monument in St Andrew's Church Ufford.

Upware, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

Water Newton, Cambridgeshire

Durobrivae was a Roman fortified garrison town at Water Newton where Ermine Street crossed the River Nene in the territory of the Corieltauvi.

Ermine Street 2b Braughing to Durobrivae. From Braughing Ermine Street continues north through Buntingford. 1.6km north of Buntingford the road make a change of alignment before heading to Royston where it again changes aligment before passing through Caxton Gibbet, Durovigutum, Huntingdon, Great Stukeley, Alconbury and Sawtry, Chesterton before reaching Durobrivae.

Ermine Street 2c Durobrivae to Lincoln. From Durobrivae Ermine Street crosses the River Welland at Stamford then continues through Great Casterton, Colsterworth, Ancaster. Continuing on a new alignment Ermine Street passes east of Navenby meeting the Fosse Way at Bracebridge with both roads continuing together to Lindum Colonia aka Lincoln.

Wendy, Cambridgeshire

The River Cam rises at Ashwell from where it flows past Guilden Morden, Wendy, Barrington and Harston after which it is joined by the River Granta aka Cam.

Thereafter it flows past Grantchester, through Cambridge, past Fen Ditton, Horningsea, Clayhithe, Upware after which it joins the River Great Ouse.

West Wicken, Cambridgeshire

Source of the River Stour, West Wicken, Cambridgeshire

Weston Green, Cambridgeshire

Wicken, Cambridgeshire

In Apr 1657 Edward Peyton 2nd Baronet -1657 (77) died at Wicken. He was buried at St Clement Danes. John Peyton 3rd Baronet 1607-1665 (49) succeeded 3nd Baronet Peyton of Isleham.

Wicken Church Wicken, Cambridgeshire

On 23 Mar 1674 Henry Cromwell 1628-1674 (46) died. He was buried at Wicken Church Wicken.

Wimpole, Cambridgeshire

Wimpole Hall Wimpole, Cambridgeshire

Before 1693 Wimpole Hall Wimpole bought Wimpole Hall Wimpole from Thomas Chicheley of Wimpole Politician 1614-1699.

In 1739 Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764 (48) purchased Wimpole Hall Wimpole.

1763. William Hoare 1707-1792. Portrait of Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764 wearing the Robes of Lord Keeper of the Great Seal and holding the Great Seal. In 1756 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764.

Wisbech, Cambridgeshire

Around 1580 Mary Day 1580-1625 was born at Wisbech.

In 1596 Thomas "The Black" Pepys 1563-1630 (33) and Mary Day 1580-1625 (16) were married at Wisbech.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 July 1663. 14 Jul 1663. Up a little late, last night recovering my sleepiness for the night before, which was lost, and so to my office to put papers and things to right, and making up my journal from Wednesday last to this day. All the morning at my office doing of business; at noon Mr. Hunt came to me, and he and I to the Exchange, and a Coffee House, and drank there, and thence to my house to dinner, whither my uncle Thomas (68) came, and he tells me that he is going down to Wisbech, there to try what he can recover of my uncle Day's estate, and seems to have good arguments for what he do go about, in which I wish him good speed. I made him almost foxed, the poor man having but a bad head, and not used I believe nowadays to drink much wine.

So after dinner, they being gone, I to my office, and so home to bed. This day I hear the judges, according to order yesterday, did bring into the Lords' House their reasons of their judgment in the business between my Lord Bristoll (50) and the Chancellor (54); and the Lords do concur with the Judges that the articles are not treason, nor regularly brought into the House, and so voted that a Committee should be chosen to examine them; but nothing to be done therein till the next sitting of this Parliament (which is like to be adjourned in a day or two), and in the mean time the two Lords to, remain without prejudice done to either of them.

Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677 and William Russell 1st Duke Bedford 1616-1700. Around 1638 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of George Digby 2nd Earl Bristol 1612-1677. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 September 1663. 17 Sep 1663. Up, and my father being gone to bed ill last night and continuing so this morning, I was forced to come to a new consideration, whether it was fit for to let my uncle and his son go to Wisbeach about my uncle Day's estate alone or no, and concluded it unfit; and so resolved to go with them myself, leaving my wife there, I begun a journey with them, and with much ado, through the fens, along dikes, where sometimes we were ready to have our horses sink to the belly, we got by night, with great deal of stir and hard riding, to Parson's Drove, a heathen place, where I found my uncle and aunt Perkins, and their daughters, poor wretches! in a sad, poor thatched cottage, like a poor barn, or stable, peeling of hemp, in which I did give myself good content to see their manner of preparing of hemp; and in a poor condition of habitt took them to our miserable inn, and there, after long stay, and hearing of Frank, their son, the miller, play, upon his treble, as he calls it, with which he earns part of his living, and singing of a country bawdy song, we sat down to supper; the whole crew, and Frank's wife and child, a sad company, of which I was ashamed, supped with us.

And after supper I, talking with my aunt about her report concerning my uncle Day's will and surrender, I found her in such different reports from what she writes and says to the people, and short of what I expected, that I fear little will be done of good in it.

By and by newes is brought to us that one of our horses is stole out of the stable, which proves my uncle's, at which I am inwardly glad—I mean, that it was not mine; and at this we were at a great loss; and they doubting a person that lay at next door, a Londoner, some lawyer's clerk, we caused him to be secured in his bed, and other care to be taken to seize the horse; and so about twelve at night or more, to bed in a sad, cold, nasty chamber, only the mayde was indifferent handsome, and so I had a kiss or two of her, and I to bed, and a little after I was asleep they waked me to tell me that the horse was found, which was good newes, and so to sleep till the morning, but was bit cruelly, and nobody else of our company, which I wonder at, by the gnatts.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 September 1663. 18 Sep 1663. Up, and got our people together as soon as we could; and after eating a dish of cold cream, which was my supper last night too, we took leave of our beggarly company, though they seem good people, too; and over most sad Fenns, all the way observing the sad life which the people of the place which if they be born there, they do call the Breedlings' of the place, do live, sometimes rowing from one spot to another, and then wadeing, to Wisbeach, a pretty town, and a fine church and library, where sundry very old abbey manuscripts; and a fine house, built on the church ground by Secretary Thurlow (47), and a fine gallery built for him in the church, but now all in the Bishop of Ely's hands.

After visiting the church, &c., we went out of the towne, by the help of a stranger, to find out one Blinkhorne, a miller, of whom we might inquire something of old Day's disposal of his estate, and in whose hands it now is; and by great chance we met him, and brought him to our inn to dinner; and instead of being informed in his estate by this fellow, we find that he is the next heir to the estate, which was matter, of great sport to my cozen Thomas and me, to see such a fellow prevent us in our hopes, he being Day's brother's, daughter's son, whereas we are but his sister's sons and grandsons; so that, after all, we were fain to propose our matter to him, and to get him to give us leave to look after the business, and so he to have one-third part, and we two to have the other two-third parts, of what should be recovered of the estate, which he consented to; and after some discourse and paying the reckoning, we mounted again, and rode, being very merry at our defeat, to Chatteris, my uncle very weary, and after supper, and my telling of three stories, to their good liking, of spirits, we all three in a chamber went to bed.

On or before 21 Mar 1841 Keomi aka Keytumas Gray Model 1841-1914 was born to Osery Gray at Wisbech. She was baptised on 21 Mar 1841 at Wisbech.

The River Nene rises near Badby from where it flows past Newnham, Weedon, Nether Heyford, Kinslingbury, Hunsbury Meadows, Northampton, Billing, Great Doddinton, Rushden, Thrapston, around Oundle, past St Mary and All Saints Fotheringhay and the remains of Fotheringay Castle, Wansford, through the centre of Peterborough after which it is canalised to Rings End. After Rings End it continues through Wisbech, under Sutton Bridge after which it reaches The Wash at Guys Head.

Wisbech Castle, Cambridgeshire

On 27 Sep 1584 or 15 Oct 1584 Bishop Thomas Watson 1515-1584 (69) died at Wisbech Castle having been confined for the previous twenty-five years.

Wothorpe, Cambridgeshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 03 March 1667. 03 Mar 1667. Lord's Day. Lay long, merrily talking with my wife, and then up and to church, where a dull sermon of Mr. Mills touching Original Sin, and then home, and there find little Michell and his wife, whom I love mightily. Mightily contented I was in their company, for I love her much; and so after dinner I left them and by water from the Old Swan to White Hall, where, walking in the galleries, I in the first place met Mr. Pierce, who tells me the story of Tom Woodall, the surgeon, killed in a drunken quarrel, and how the Duke of York (33) hath a mind to get him [Pierce] one of his places in St. Thomas's Hospitall. Then comes Mr. Hayward, the Duke of York's (33) servant, and tells us that the Swede's Embassador hath been here to-day with news that it is believed that the Dutch will yield to have the treaty at London or Dover, neither of which will get our King any credit, we having already consented to have it at The Hague; which, it seems, De Witt opposed, as a thing wherein the King (36) of England must needs have some profound design, which in my conscience he hath not. They do also tell me that newes is this day come to the King (36), that the King of France (28) is come with his army to the frontiers of Flanders, demanding leave to pass through their country towards Poland, but is denied, and thereupon that he is gone into the country. How true this is I dare not believe till I hear more.

From them I walked into the Parke, it being a fine but very cold day; and there took two or three turns the length of the Pell Mell: and there I met Serjeant Bearcroft, who was sent for the Duke of Buckingham (39), to have brought him prisoner to the Tower. He come to towne this day, and brings word that, being overtaken and outrid by the Duchesse of Buckingham (28) within a few miles of the Duke's house of Westhorp, he believes she got thither about a quarter of an hour before him, and so had time to consider; so that, when he come, the doors were kept shut against him. The next day, coming with officers of the neighbour market-town to force open the doors, they were open for him, but the Duke (39) gone; so he took horse presently, and heard upon the road that the Duke of Buckingham (39) was gone before him for London: so that he believes he is this day also come to towne before him; but no newes is yet heard of him. This is all he brings.

Thence to my Chancellor's (58), and there, meeting Sir H. Cholmly (34), he and I walked in my Lord's garden, and talked; among other things, of the treaty: and he says there will certainly be a peace, but I cannot believe it. He tells me that the Duke of Buckingham (39) his crimes, as far as he knows, are his being of a caball with some discontented persons of the late House of Commons, and opposing the desires of the King (36) in all his matters in that House; and endeavouring to become popular, and advising how the Commons' House should proceed, and how he would order the House of Lords. And that he hath been endeavouring to have the King's nativity calculated; which was done, and the fellow now in the Tower about it; which itself hath heretofore, as he says, been held treason, and people died for it; but by the Statute of Treasons, in Queen Mary's times and since, it hath been left out. He tells me that this silly Lord hath provoked, by his ill-carriage, the Duke of York (33), my Chancellor (58), and all the great persons; and therefore, most likely, will die. He tells me, too, many practices of treachery against this King; as betraying him in Scotland, and giving Oliver an account of the King's private councils; which the King (36) knows very well, and hath yet pardoned him1.

Here I passed away a little time more talking with him and Creed, whom I met there, and so away, Creed walking with me to White Hall, and there I took water and stayed at Michell's to drink. I home, and there to read very good things in Fuller's "Church History", and "Worthies", and so to supper, and after supper had much good discourse with W. Hewer (25), who supped with us, about the ticket office and the knaveries and extortions every day used there, and particularly of the business of Mr. Carcasse, whom I fear I shall find a very rogue. So parted with him, and then to bed.

Note 1. Two of our greatest poets have drawn the character of the Duke of Buckingham (39) in brilliant verse, and both have condemned him to infamy. There is enough in Pepys's reports to corroborate the main features of Dryden's (35) magnificent portrait of Zimri in "Absolom and Achitophel": "In the first rank of these did Zimri stand; A man so various that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome; Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong; Was everything by starts, and nothing long, But, in the course of one revolving moon, Was chymist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking, * * * * * * * He laughed himself from Court, then sought relief By forming parties, but could ne'er be chief". Pope's facts are not correct, and hence the effect of his picture is impaired. In spite of the duke's constant visits to the Tower, Charles II still continued his friend; but on the death of the King (36), expecting little from James, he retired to his estate at Helmsley, in Yorkshire, to nurse his property and to restore his constitution. He died on April 16th, 1687, at Kirkby Moorside, after a few days' illness, caused by sitting on the damp grass when heated from a fox chase. The scene of his death was the house of a tenant, not "the worst inn's worst room" ("Moral Essays", epist. iii.). He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Villiers 2nd Duke of Buckingham 1628-1687 wearing his Garter Collar. After 1659. After John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Mary Fairfax Duchess Buckingham 1638-1720. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Around 1554 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558. Around 1556 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of John Dryden 1631-1700. Around 1693. Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of John Dryden 1631-1700. Around 1697. Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of John Dryden 1631-1700. Around 1665 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of John Dryden 1631-1700.