History of Cannon Street

Cannon Street is in Castle Baynard.

Diary of Henry Machyn December 1562. 15 Dec 1562. The xv day of Desember was cared by the Clarkes of London from Seypulkurs unto sant Martens orgaynes in Kanwykstrett to be bered be on of ys wyffes the lord justes Browne (40) and knyght, with ij haroldes of armes, master Clarenshux (52) and master Somersett; furst whent a-for xxiiij pore men in mantyll fryse gownes, and after a xx clarkes carehyng ther surples on ther armes, and next the standard borne by a mornar, and then cam the ij chaplens and dyvers mornars, and then cam a harold bayryng the helme and crest, and next cam master Clarenshux beyryng the cott of armes, and then cam the pennone of armes, and then cam the corse with a palle of blake velvett with armes on yt, and then the cheyff mornars and my lord Mordantt (54) with odur, and then came the juges and sergant(s) of the coyffe, and next all the ynes of the cowrt in a-ray, a gret nombur, and thruge Chepesyd; and master Renakur mad the sermon, and after home to a grett dener.... and armes and after ys helmet .... targett and after ys sword, and after ys cott [armour] .... offered, and ys pennon offered, and after alle .... serjantes of the law and servandes offered.

Great Fire of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 02 September 1666. 02 Sep 1666. Lord's Day. Some of our mayds sitting up late last night to get things ready against our feast to-day, Jane called us up about three in the morning, to tell us of a great fire they saw in the City. So I rose and slipped on my nightgowne, and went to her window, and thought it to be on the backside of Marke-lane at the farthest; but, being unused to such fires as followed, I thought it far enough off; and so went to bed again and to sleep. About seven rose again to dress myself, and there looked out at the window, and saw the fire not so much as it was and further off.

So to my closett to set things to rights after yesterday's cleaning.

By and by Jane comes and tells me that she hears that above 300 houses have been burned down to-night by the fire we saw, and that it is now burning down all Fish-street, by London Bridge. So I made myself ready presently, and walked to the Tower, and there got up upon one of the high places, Sir J. Robinson's (51) little son going up with me; and there I did see the houses at that end of the bridge all on fire, and an infinite great fire on this and the other side the end of the bridge; which, among other people, did trouble me for poor little Michell and our Sarah on the bridge. So down, with my heart full of trouble, to the Lieutenant of the Tower (51), who tells me that it begun this morning in the King's baker's' house in Pudding-lane, and that it hath burned St. Magnus's Church and most part of Fish-street already.

So I down to the water-side, and there got a boat and through bridge, and there saw a lamentable fire. Poor Michell's house, as far as the Old Swan, already burned that way, and the fire running further, that in a very little time it got as far as the Steeleyard, while I was there. Everybody endeavouring to remove their goods, and flinging into the river or bringing them into lighters that layoff; poor people staying in their houses as long as till the very fire touched them, and then running into boats, or clambering from one pair of stairs by the water-side to another. And among other things, the poor pigeons, I perceive, were loth to leave their houses, but hovered about the windows and balconys till they were, some of them burned, their wings, and fell down.

Having staid, and in an hour's time seen the fire: rage every way, and nobody, to my sight, endeavouring to quench it, but to remove their goods, and leave all to the fire, and having seen it get as far as the Steele-yard, and the wind mighty high and driving it into the City; and every thing, after so long a drought, proving combustible, even the very stones of churches, and among other things the poor steeple by which pretty Mrs.————lives, and whereof my old school-fellow Elborough is parson, taken fire in the very top, an there burned till it fell down: I to White Hall (with a gentleman with me who desired to go off from the Tower, to see the fire, in my boat); to White Hall, and there up to the Kings closett in the Chappell, where people come about me, and did give them an account dismayed them all, and word was carried in to the King (36).

So I was called for, and did tell the King (36) and Duke of Yorke (32) what I saw, and that unless his Majesty did command houses to be pulled down nothing could stop the fire. They seemed much troubled, and the King (36) commanded me to go to my Lord Mayor (46)1 from him, and command him to spare no houses, but to pull down before the fire every way. The Duke of York (32) bid me tell him that if he would have any more soldiers he shall; and so did my Lord Arlington (48) afterwards, as a great secret2.

Here meeting, with Captain Cocke (49), I in his coach, which he lent me, and Creed with me to Paul's, and there walked along Watlingstreet, as well as I could, every creature coming away loaden with goods to save, and here and there sicke people carried away in beds. Extraordinary good goods carried in carts and on backs. At last met my Lord Mayor (46) in Canningstreet, like a man spent, with a handkercher about his neck. To the King's message he cried, like a fainting woman, "Lord! what can I do? I am spent: people will not obey me. I have been pulling down houses; but the fire overtakes us faster than we can do it". That he needed no more soldiers; and that, for himself, he must go and refresh himself, having been up all night.

So he left me, and I him, and walked home, seeing people all almost distracted, and no manner of means used to quench the fire. The houses, too, so very thick thereabouts, and full of matter for burning, as pitch and tarr, in Thames-street; and Warehouses of oyle, and wines, and brandy, and other things. Here I saw Mr. Isaake Houblon, the handsome man, prettily dressed and dirty, at his door at Dowgate, receiving some of his brothers' (37) things, whose houses were on fire; and, as he says, have been removed twice already; and he doubts (as it soon proved) that they must be in a little time removed from his house also, which was a sad consideration. And to see the churches all filling with goods by people who themselves should have been quietly there at this time.

By this time it was about twelve o'clock; and so home, and there find my guests, which was Mr. Wood and his wife Barbary Sheldon, and also Mr. Moons: she mighty fine, and her husband; for aught I see, a likely man. But Mr. Moone's design and mine, which was to look over my closett and please him with the sight thereof, which he hath long desired, was wholly disappointed; for we were in great trouble and disturbance at this fire, not knowing what to think of it. However, we had an extraordinary good dinner, and as merry, as at this time we could be. While at dinner Mrs. Batelier come to enquire after Mr. Woolfe and Stanes (who, it seems, are related to them), whose houses in Fish-street are all burned; and they in a sad condition. She would not stay in the fright. Soon as dined, I and Moone away, and walked, through the City, the streets full of nothing but people and horses and carts loaden with goods, ready to run over one another, and, removing goods from one burned house to another.

They now removing out of Canning-streets (which received goods in the morning) into Lumbard-streets, and further; and among others I now saw my little goldsmith, Stokes, receiving some friend's goods, whose house itself was burned the day after. We parted at Paul's; he home, and I to Paul's Wharf, where I had appointed a boat to attend me, and took in Mr. Carcasse and his brother, whom I met in the streets and carried them below and above bridge to and again to see the fire, which was now got further, both below and above and no likelihood of stopping it. Met with the King (36) and Duke of York (32) in their barge, and with them to Queenhith and there called Sir Richard Browne (61) to them. Their order was only to pull down houses apace, and so below bridge the water-side; but little was or could be done, the fire coming upon them so fast. Good hopes there was of stopping it at the Three Cranes above, and at Buttolph's Wharf below bridge, if care be used; but the wind carries it into the City so as we know not by the water-side what it do there. River full of lighters and boats taking in goods, and good goods swimming in the water, and only I observed that hardly one lighter or boat in three that had the goods of a house in, but there was a pair of Virginalls3 in it.

Having seen as much as I could now, I away to White Hall by appointment, and there walked to St. James's Parks, and there met my wife and Creed and Wood and his wife, and walked to my boat; and there upon the water again, and to the fire up and down, it still encreasing, and the wind great. So near the fire as we could for smoke; and all over the Thames, with one's face in the wind, you were almost burned with a shower of firedrops. This is very true; so as houses were burned by these drops and flakes of fire, three or four, nay, five or six houses, one from another. When we could endure no more upon the water; we to a little ale-house on the Bankside, over against the Three Cranes, and there staid till it was dark almost, and saw the fire grow; and, as it grew darker, appeared more and more, and in corners and upon steeples, and between churches and houses, as far as we could see up the hill of the City, in a most horrid malicious bloody flame, not like the fine flame of an ordinary fire. Barbary and her husband away before us.

We staid till, it being darkish, we saw the fire as only one entire arch of fire from this to the other side the bridge, and in a bow up the hill for an arch of above a mile long: it made me weep to see it. The churches, houses, and all on fire and flaming at once; and a horrid noise the flames made, and the cracking of houses at their ruins.

So home with a sad heart, and there find every body discoursing and lamenting the fire; and poor Tom Hater come with some few of his goods saved out of his house, which is burned upon Fish-streets Hill. I invited him to lie at my house, and did receive his goods, but was deceived in his lying there, the newes coming every moment of the growth of the fire; so as we were forced to begin to pack up our owne goods; and prepare for their removal; and did by moonshine (it being brave dry, and moon: shine, and warm weather) carry much of my goods into the garden, and Mr. Hater and I did remove my money and iron chests into my cellar, as thinking that the safest place. And got my bags of gold into my office, ready to carry away, and my chief papers of accounts also there, and my tallys into a box by themselves. So great was our fear, as Sir W. Batten (65) hath carts come out of the country to fetch away his goods this night. We did put Mr. Hater, poor man, to bed a little; but he got but very little rest, so much noise being in my house, taking down of goods.

Note 1. Sir Thomas Bludworth (46). See June 30th, 1666.

Note 2. Sir William Coventry wrote to Lord Arlington on the evening of this day, "The Duke of York (32) fears the want of workmen and tools to-morrow morning, and wishes the deputy lieutenants and justices of peace to summon the workmen with tools to be there by break of day. In some churches and chapels are great hooks for pulling down houses, which should be brought ready upon the place to-night against the morning" (Calendar of State Papers, 1666-66, p. 95).

Note 3. The virginal differed from the spinet in being square instead of triangular in form. The word pair was used in the obsolete sense of a set, as we read also of a pair of organs. The instrument is supposed to have obtained its name from young women, playing upon it.

Around 1662 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of John Robinson Lord Mayor of London 1st Baronet 1615-1680. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 wearing his Garter Robes. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 05 May 1667. 05 May 1667. Lord's Day. Up, and going down to the water side, I met Sir John Robinson (52), and so with him by coach to White Hall, still a vain, prating, boasting man as any I know, as if the whole City and Kingdom had all its work done by him. He tells me he hath now got a street ordered to be continued, forty feet broad, from Paul's through Cannon Street to the Tower, which will be very fine.

He and others this day, where I was in the afternoon, do tell me of at least six or eight fires within these few days; and continually stirs of fires, and real fires there have been, in one place or other, almost ever since the late great fire, as if there was a fate sent people for fire. I walked over the Park to Sir W. Coventry's (39). Among other things to tell him what I hear of people being forced to sell their bills before September for 35 and 40 per cent. loss, and what is worst, that there are some courtiers that have made a knot to buy them, in hopes of some ways to get money of the King (36) to pay them, which Sir W. Coventry (39) is amazed at, and says we are a people made up for destruction, and will do what he can to prevent all this by getting the King (36) to provide wherewith to pay them.

We talked of Tangier, of which he is ashamed; also that it should put the King (36) to this charge for no good in the world: and now a man going over that is a good soldier, but a debauched man, which the place need not to have. And so used these words: "That this place was to the King (36) as my Lord Carnarvon (34) says of wood, that it is an excrescence of the earth provided by God for the payment of debts".

Thence away to Sir G. Carteret (57), whom I find taking physic. I staid talking with him but a little, and so home to church, and heard a dull sermon, and most of the best women of our parish gone into the country, or at least not at church.

So home, and find my boy not there, nor was at church, which vexed me, and when he come home I enquired, he tells me he went to see his mother. I send him back to her to send me some token that he was with her. So there come a man with him back of good fashion. He says he saw him with her, which pacified me, but I did soundly threaten him before him, and so to dinner, and then had a little scolding with my wife for not being fine enough to go to the christening to-day, which she excused by being ill, as she was indeed, and cried, but I was in an ill humour and ashamed, indeed, that she should not go dressed. However, friends by and by, and we went by water to Michell's, and there his little house full of his father and mothers and the kindred, hardly any else, and mighty merry in this innocent company, and Betty mighty pretty in bed, but, her head akeing, not very merry, but the company mighty merry, and I with them, and so the child was christened; my wife, his father, and her mother, the witnesses, and the child's name Elizabeth. So we had gloves and wine and wafers, very pretty, and talked and tattled, and so we away by water and up with the tide, she and I and Barker, as high as Barne Elmes, it being a fine evening, and back again to pass the bridges at standing water between 9 and 10 at might, and then home and to supper, and then to bed with much pleasure.

This day Sir W. Coventry (39) tells me the Dutch fleete shot some shot, four or five hundred, into Burnt-Island in the Frith, but without any hurt; and so are gone.

Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686.

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London Stone Cannon Street, Castle Baynard, City of London

Diary of Henry Machyn June 1560. 12 Jun 1560. The xij day of June dyd ryd in (a) care a-bowtt London ij men and iij women; one man was for he was the bowd, and to brynge women unto strangers, and on woman was the wyff of the Bell in Gracyous-strett, and a-nodur the wyff of the Bull-hed be-syd London stone, and boyth wher bawdes and hores, and the thodur man and the woman wher brodur and syster, and wher taken nakyd together.

Diary of Henry Machyn June 1561. 05 Jun 1561. The v day of June dyd hange ym-seylff be-syd London stone (blank) .. lle a harper, the servand of the yerle of Darbe (52).

Around 1532 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Edward Stanley 3rd Earl Derby 1509-1572.

Church of St Swithin London Stone Cannon Street, Castle Baynard, City of London

In 1413 Catrin Mathrafal was buried at Church of St Swithin London Stone Cannon Street.

Martin Lane, Cannon Street, Castle Baynard, City of London

Church of St Martin Orgar, Martin Lane, Cannon Street, Castle Baynard, City of London

Diary of Henry Machyn December 1562. 15 Dec 1562. The xv day of Desember was cared by the Clarkes of London from Seypulkurs unto sant Martens orgaynes in Kanwykstrett to be bered be on of ys wyffes the lord justes Browne (40) and knyght, with ij haroldes of armes, master Clarenshux (52) and master Somersett; furst whent a-for xxiiij pore men in mantyll fryse gownes, and after a xx clarkes carehyng ther surples on ther armes, and next the standard borne by a mornar, and then cam the ij chaplens and dyvers mornars, and then cam a harold bayryng the helme and crest, and next cam master Clarenshux beyryng the cott of armes, and then cam the pennone of armes, and then cam the corse with a palle of blake velvett with armes on yt, and then the cheyff mornars and my lord Mordantt (54) with odur, and then came the juges and sergant(s) of the coyffe, and next all the ynes of the cowrt in a-ray, a gret nombur, and thruge Chepesyd; and master Renakur mad the sermon, and after home to a grett dener.... and armes and after ys helmet .... targett and after ys sword, and after ys cott [armour] .... offered, and ys pennon offered, and after alle .... serjantes of the law and servandes offered.

On 14 Jul 1585 Anne Hewett 1544-1585 (41) died. She was buried at the Church of St Martin Orgar.

In 1735 Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762 (32) and Caroline Magdalene Hélot -1751 were married at Church of St Martin Orgar.

In 1751 Andrea Soldi Painter 1703-1771. Portrait of Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762. In 1762 Adrien Carpentiers Painter 1713-1778. Portrait of Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762.

St Swithin's Lane, Cannon Street, Castle Baynard, City of London

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII August 1527. 30 Jun 1528. R. O. 4442. Sir William Compton (46).

Will of Sir William Compton, made on 8 March 1522, 14 Hen. VIII. Desires to be buried at Compton Wynyates in Warwickshire, beside his ancestors:—That if his wife die before he return home from his journey, she be afterwards brought to Compton and buried there. Bequeaths to his wife (31) movables at Bettyschorne, and at the great park of Windsor, and the plate which belonged to Francis Cheyny, "my predecessor." If his wife be delivered of a son, bequeaths to him all his household stuff at Compton, with the plate which was given him by the French king in a schedule. His wife to have the control of it till the child be of age. If he have a son, bequeaths to each of his daughters 1,000 marks for their marriages, and 100 marks in plate. Wills that 40 pair of vestments be made of one suit, to be distributed to the parish churches in the counties of Warwick and Worcester, adjoining to Compton. All his apparel to be used in making vestments and other works of charity. Bequeaths to the abbey of Winchcomb his wedding gown of tynsen satin, to make a vestment that they may pray for the souls of his ancestors. Wills his executors to release to the monastery of Denny all the debts they owe him, and bequeaths to them 10l. for an obit. Bequeaths goods to the value of 200 marks to be distributed to poor householders, and to the marriages of poor maids in the counties of Warwick and Worcester. Wills that a tomb of alabaster be prepared for his father, with his arms graven upon it. Bequeaths to the King (37) his little chest of ivory with gilt lock, "and a chest bourde under the same, and a pair of tables upon it," with all the jewels and treasure enclosed, now in his wife's custody; also "certain specialties to the sum of 1,000 marks, which I have of Sir Thos. Bullen (51), knight," for money lent to him. Wills that his children have their plate on coming to their full ages; i.e., on the males coming to the age of twenty-one, and the females to the age of eighteen.

Bequests to his sister [Elizabeth] Rudney, and his cousin John Rudney, her son. Wills that his mother's body be taken up and buried at Compton Wynyates. Bequest to the daughter of his aunt Appulby. 20l. to be put in a box at the abbey of Winchecombe, to make defence for all such actions as may be wrongfully taken against his wife or his executors. Two chantries to be founded in his name at Compton Wynyates, to do daily service for the souls of the King, the Queen, my lady Anne Hastings (45), himself, his wife and ancestors. The priests to be appointed by the abbot of Winchecombe, or, failing him, the abbot of Evesham. 5 marks a year to be paid to the parson of Compton to keep a free grammar school. 100l. a year to be paid to his wife during her life, for her jointure, besides her inheritance in Barkeley's lands. Bequests to the monasteries of Evesham, Hayles, Winchecombe, Worcester, Croxton, the charterhouses of Henton and Coventry, for obits; to Sir William Tyler, Sir Thos. Lynne, Thos. Baskett and George Lynde; to his servants who happen to be with him this journey; to John Draper, his servant, and Robt. Bencare, his solicitor; to Griffin Gynne, now with Humphrey Brown, serjeant-at-law, for his learning; and to lady Anne Hastings (45). Executors appointed: Dame Warburgh my wife (31), the bishop of Exeter (66), Sir Henry Marney, lord privy-seal (81), Sir Henry Guildford (39), Sir Ric. Broke, Sir John Dantsy, Dr. Chomber, Humphrey Brown, serjeant-at-law, Thos. Leson, clk., Jas. Clarell and Thos. Unton. Appoints my lord bishop of Canterbury (78) supervisor of his will. Gifts to the executors.

3. Bargain and sale by Sir Henry Guildford (39), Humphrey Brown, Thos. Hunton and Thos. Leeson, as executors of Sir William Compton, to Sir Thomas Arundell, of certain tenements in St Swithin's Lane, [London,] lately in the possession of Lewis... and Humphrey... as executors of Sir Richard Wingfield (59).

4. Inventory of the goods of Sir Wm. Compton in his house in London.

Ready money, gold and silver, 1,338l. 7s. 0½d. Jewels of gold and silver, 898l. 6s. 2d. Gilt plate, 85l. 5s. 3d. Parcel gilt plate, 31l. 12s. 2d. White plate, 90l. 0s. 3½d. Silks, 210l. 13s. 6d.=2,654l. 4s. 5d.

5. Names of the officers upon the lands late Sir Wm. Compton's.

[Note. Lots of names of Steward and Bailiffs and values.].

6. Inquisition taken in Middlesex on the death of Sir Will. Compton, 20 Hen. VIII.

Found that Ric. Broke, serjeant-at-law, [Walter Rodney] [Names in brackets crossed out], Will. Dyngley and John Dyngley, now surviving, with [Sir Rob. Throgmerton and Will. Tracy,]* deceased, were seized of the manors of Totenham, Pembrokes, Bruses, Daubeneys and Mokkyngs, with lands in Tottenham, Edelmeton and Enfeld, to Compton's use; and that Geo. earl of Shrewsbury (60), Henry earl of Essex, John Bourchier lord Bernes (61), [Sir Rob. Ratclyf,]* Rob. Brudenell (67), justice of the King's Bench, Ric. Sacheverell (61) [and Thos. Brokesby],* now surviving, with [Sir Ralph Shyrley,]* deceased, were seized of the manor of Fyncheley and lands in Fyncheley and Hendon to his use. His son, Peter Compton (5), is his heir, and is six years old and over.

7. Citation by Wolsey (55), as legate, of Sir Wm. Compton, for having lived in adultery with the wife (45) of Lord Hastings (41), while his own wife, dame Anne Stafford Countess Huntingdon 1483-1544 (45), was alive, and for having taken the sacrament to disprove it.

4443. SIR WILL. COMPTON.

Inventory of the goods of Sir Will. Compton at his places in London, Compton, Bittisthorne, the Great Park of Windsor, Sir Walter Stoner's place. Total of moveables, 4,485l. 2s. 3½d. "Sperat dettes," estimated at 3,511l. 13s. 4d. "Chatell Royall," 666l. 13s. 4d.

Wards.—One ward that cost 466l. 13s. 4d.; another of 500 marks land; the third, "Sir Geo. Salynger's son and his heir." There is at Windsor Great Park plate embezzled to the value of 579l. 2s. 6d., as appears by a bill found in Sir William's place at London. Desperate debts estimated at 1,908l. 6s. 8d. Debts owing by him estimated at 1,000l.

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Before 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539. 1535. Ambrosius Benson Painter 1495-1550. Portrait of Anne Stafford Countess Huntingdon 1483-1544. In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 wearing the Garter and Inter twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford's arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter's dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office. In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 when she was twenty-seven commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Baroness Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety. Before 1532 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1450-1532. Around 1620 based on a work of 1526.Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1450-1532. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of John Bourchier 2nd Baron Berners 1467-1533. Around 1590 based on a work of around 1520.Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey 1473-1530.

New Court, St Swithin's Lane, Cannon Street, Castle Baynard, City of London

On 29 May 1810 Anthony Rothschild 1st Baronet 1810-1876 was born to Nathan Mayer Rothschild 1777–1836 (32) at New Court.