History of Chelsea

1557 Death of Anne of Cleves

1557 Battle of St Quentin

1682 Sinking of the Gloucester

Chelsea is in London.

After 14 Jul 1657 Francis Cheyne of Chesham Bois in Buckinghamshire 1568-1644 purchased the manor of Chelsea and its main house, Chelsea Place, financed by the dowry of his wife Lady Jane Cavendish. He paid for the house in instalments beginning in 1657 with £1,900 and made the final payment for whole estate in 1661 at a total cost of £13,626.

John Evelyn's Diary 09 March 1661. 09 Mar 1661. I went with that excellent person and philosopher, Sir Robert Murray (53), to visit Mr. Boyle (34) at Chelsea, and saw divers effects of the eolipile for weighing air.

John Evelyn's Diary 03 February 1662. 03 Feb 1662. I went to Chelsea, to see Sir Arthur Gorges' (93) house.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 May 1663. 04 May 1663. Up betimes and to setting my Brampton papers in order and looking over my wardrobe against summer, and laying things in order to send to my brother to alter.
By and by took boat intending to have gone down to Woolwich, but seeing I could not get back time enough to dinner, I returned and home. Whither by and by the dancing-master came, whom standing by, seeing him instructing my wife, when he had done with her, he would needs have me try the steps of a coranto, and what with his desire and my wife's importunity, I did begin, and then was obliged to give him entry-money 10s., and am become his scholler. The truth is, I think it a thing very useful for a gentleman, and sometimes I may have occasion of using it, and though it cost me what I am heartily sorry it should, besides that I must by my oath give half as much more to the poor, yet I am resolved to get it up some other way, and then it will not be above a month or two in a year. So though it be against my stomach yet I will try it a little while; if I see it comes to any great inconvenience or charge I will fling it off. After I had begun with the steps of half a coranto, which I think I shall learn well enough, he went away, and we to dinner, and by and by out by coach, and set my wife down at my Lord Crew's, going to see my Lady Jem. Montagu, who is lately come to town, and I to St. James's; where Mr. Coventry (35), Sir W. Pen (42) and I staid a good while for the Duke's coming in, but not coming, we walked to White Hall; and meeting the King (32), we followed him into the Park, where Mr. Coventry (35) and he talked of building a new yacht, which the King (32) is resolved to have built out of his privy purse, he having some contrivance of his own.
The talk being done, we fell off to White Hall, leaving the King (32) in the Park, and going back, met the Duke going towards St. James's to meet us. So he turned back again, and to his closett at White Hall; and there, my Lord Sandwich (37) present, we did our weekly errand, and so broke up; and I down into the garden with my Lord Sandwich (37) (after we had sat an hour at the Tangier Committee); and after talking largely of his own businesses, we begun to talk how matters are at Court: and though he did not flatly tell me any such thing, yet I do suspect that all is not kind between the King (32) and the Duke (29), and that the King's fondness to the little Duke (14) do occasion it; and it may be that there is some fear of his being made heir to the Crown. But this my Lord did not tell me, but is my guess only; and that my Chancellor (54) is without doubt falling past hopes.
He being gone to Chelsey by coach I to his lodgings, where my wife staid for me, and she from thence to see Mrs. Pierce and called me at Whitehall stairs (where I went before by land to know whether there was any play at Court to-night) and there being none she and I to Mr. Creed to the Exchange, where she bought something, and from thence by water to White Fryars, and wife to see Mrs. Turner (40), and then came to me at my brother's, where I did give him order about my summer clothes, and so home by coach, and after supper to bed to my wife, with whom I have not lain since I used to lie with my father till to-night.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 May 1663. 27 May 1663. So I waked by 3 o'clock, my mind being troubled, and so took occasion by making water to wake my wife, and after having lain till past 4 o'clock seemed going to rise, though I did it only to see what she would do, and so going out of the bed she took hold of me and would know what ailed me, and after many kind and some cross words I began to tax her discretion in yesterday's business, but she quickly told me my own, knowing well enough that it was my old disease of jealousy, which I denied, but to no purpose. After an hour's discourse, sometimes high and sometimes kind, I found very good reason to think that her freedom with him is very great and more than was convenient, but with no evil intent, and so after awhile I caressed her and parted seeming friends, but she crying in a great discontent.
So I up and by water to the Temple, and thence with Commissioner Pett (52) to St. James's, where an hour with Mr. Coventry (35) talking of Mr. Pett's (52) proceedings lately in the forest of Sherwood, and thence with Pett to my Lord Ashley (41), Chancellor (54) of the Exchequer; where we met the auditors about settling the business of the accounts of persons to whom money is due before the King's time in the Navy, and the clearing of their imprests for what little of their debts they have received. I find my Lord, as he is reported, a very ready, quick, and diligent person.
Thence I to Westminster Hall, where Term and Parliament make the Hall full of people; no further news yet of the King of France (24), whether he be dead or not. Here I met with my cozen Roger Pepys (46), and walked a good while with him, and among other discourse as a secret he hath committed to nobody but myself, and he tells me that his sister Claxton now resolving to give over the keeping of his house at Impington, he thinks it fit to marry again, and would have me, by the help of my uncle Wight or others, to look him out a widow between thirty and forty years old, without children, and with a fortune, which he will answer in any degree with a joynture fit for her fortune. A woman sober, and no high-flyer, as he calls it. I demanded his estate. He tells me, which he says also he hath not done to any, that his estate is not full £800 per annum, but it is £780 per annum, of which £200 is by the death of his last wife, which he will allot for a joynture for a wife, but the rest, which lies in Cambridgeshire, he is resolved to leave entire for his eldest son. I undertook to do what I can in it, and so I shall. He tells me that the King (32) hath sent to them to hasten to make an end by midsummer, because of his going into the country; so they have set upon four bills to dispatch: the first of which is, he says, too devilish a severe act against conventicles; so beyond all moderation, that he is afeard it will ruin all: telling me that it is matter of the greatest grief to him in the world, that he should be put upon this trust of being a Parliament-man, because he says nothing is done, that he can see, out of any truth and sincerity, but mere envy and design.
Thence by water to Chelsey, all the way reading a little book I bought of "Improvement of Trade", a pretty book and many things useful in it. So walked to Little Chelsey, where I found my Lord Sandwich (37) with Mr. Becke, the master of the house, and Mr. Creed at dinner, and I sat down with them, and very merry.
After dinner (Mr. Gibbons (47) being come in also before dinner done) to musique, they played a good Fancy, to which my Lord is fallen again, and says he cannot endure a merry tune, which is a strange turn of his humour, after he has for two or three years flung off the practice of Fancies and played only fidlers' tunes.
Then into the Great Garden up to the Banqueting_House; and there by his glass we drew in the species very pretty. Afterwards to ninepins, where I won a shilling, Creed and I playing against my Lord and Cooke. This day there was great thronging to Banstead Downs, upon a great horse-race and foot-race. I am sorry I could not go thither.
So home back as I came, to London Bridge, and so home, where I find my wife in a musty humour, and tells me before Ashwell that Pembleton had been there, and she would not have him come in unless I was there, which I was ashamed of; but however, I had rather it should be so than the other way.
So to my office, to put things in order there, and by and by comes Pembleton, and word is brought me from my wife thereof that I might come home. So I sent word that I would have her go dance, and I would come presently. So being at a great loss whether I should appear to Pembleton or no, and what would most proclaim my jealousy to him, I at last resolved to go home, and took Tom Hater with me, and staid a good while in my chamber, and there took occasion to tell him how I hear that Parliament is putting an act out against all sorts of conventicles1, and did give him good counsel, not only in his own behalf, but my own, that if he did hear or know anything that could be said to my prejudice, that he would tell me, for in this wicked age (specially Sir W. Batten (62) being so open to my reproaches, and Sir J. Minnes (64), for the neglect of their duty, and so will think themselves obliged to scandalize me all they can to right themselves if there shall be any inquiry into the matters of the Navy, as I doubt there will) a man ought to be prepared to answer for himself in all things that can be inquired concerning him. After much discourse of this nature to him I sent him away, and then went up, and there we danced country dances, and single, my wife and I; and my wife paid him off for this month also, and so he is cleared.
After dancing we took him down to supper, and were very merry, and I made myself so, and kind to him as much as I could, to prevent his discourse, though I perceive to my trouble that he knows all, and may do me the disgrace to publish it as much as he can. Which I take very ill, and if too much provoked shall witness it to her. After supper and he gone we to bed.
Note 1. 16 Car. II, cap. 4, "An Act to prevent and suppresse seditious Conventicles". It was enacted that anyone of the age of sixteen or upwards present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle was to incur fine or imprisonment. A conventicle was defined as an assembly of more than five persons besides the members of a family met together for holding worship not according to the rites of the Church of England. The act was amended 22 Car. II, cap. i (1670), and practically repealed by the Toleration Act of 1689, but the act 22 Car. II, cap. i, was specially repealed 52 Geo. III, cap. 155, s. 1.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 May 1663. 28 May 1663. Up this morning, and my wife, I know not for what cause, being against going to Chelsey to-day, it being a holy day (Ascension Day) and I at leisure, it being the first holy day almost that we have observed ever since we came to the office, we did give Ashwell leave to go by herself, and I out to several places about business. Among others to Dr. Williams, to reckon with him for physique that my wife has had for a year or two, coming to almost £4.
Then to the Exchange, where I hear that the King (32) had letters yesterday from France that the King (24) there is in a [way] of living again, which I am glad to hear. At the coffee-house in Exchange Alley I bought a little book, "Counsell to Builders", by Sir Balth. Gerbier. It is dedicated almost to all the men of any great condition in England, so that the Epistles are more than the book itself, and both it and them not worth a turd, that I am ashamed that I bought it.
Home and there found Creed, who dined with us, and after dinner by water to the Royall Theatre; but that was so full they told us we could have no room.
And so to the Duke's house; and there saw "Hamlett" done, giving us fresh reason never to think enough of Betterton (27). Who should we see come upon the stage but Gosnell, my wife's maid? but neither spoke, danced, nor sung; which I was sorry for. But she becomes the stage very well.
Thence by water home, after we had walked to and fro, backwards and forwards, six or seven times in the Temple walks, disputing whether to go by land or water. By land home, and thence by water to Halfway House, and there eat some supper we carried with us, and so walked home again, it being late we were forced to land at the dock, my wife and they, but I in a humour not willing to daub my shoes went round by the Custom House.
So home, and by and by to bed, Creed lying with me in the red chamber all night.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 June 1663. 30 Jun 1663. Up betimes yesterday and to-day, the sun rising very bright and glorious; and yet yesterday, as it hath been these two months and more, was a foul day the most part of the day.
By and by by water to White Hall, and there to my Lord's lodgings by appointment, whither Mr. Creed comes to me, having been at Chelsey this morning to fetch my Lord to St. James's.
So he and I to the Park, where we understand that the King (33) and Duke (29) are gone out betimes this morning on board the East India ships lately come in, and so our meeting appointed is lost. But he and I walked at the further end of the Park, not to be observed, whither by and by comes my Lord Sandwich (37), and he and we walked two hours and more in the Park and then in White Hall Gallery, and lastly in White Hall garden, discoursing of Mr. Creed's accounts, and how to answer the Treasurer's (56) objections. I find that the business is £500 deep, the advantage of Creed, and why my Lord and I should be concerned to promote his profit with so much dishonour and trouble to us I know not, but however we shall do what we can, though he deserves it not, for there is nothing even to his own advantage that can be got out of him, but by mere force. So full of policy he is in the smallest matters, that I perceive him to be made up of nothing but design.
I left him here, being in my mind vexed at the trouble that this business gets me, and the distance that it makes between Sir G. Carteret (53) and myself, which I ought to avoyd.
Thence by water home and to dinner, and afterwards to the office, and there sat till evening, and then I by water to Deptford to see Sir W. Pen (42), who lies ill at Captain Rooth's, but in a way to be well again this weather, this day being the only fair day we have had these two or three months. Among other discourse I did tell him plainly some of my thoughts concerning Sir W. Batten (62). and the office in general, upon design for him to understand that I do mind things and will not balk to take notice of them, that when he comes to be well again he may know how to look upon me.
Thence homeward walked, and in my way met Creed coming to meet me, and then turned back and walk a while, and so to boat and home by water, I being not very forward to talk of his business, and he by design the same, to see how I would speak of it, but I did not, but in general terms, and so after supper with general discourse to bed and sleep.
Thus, by God's blessing, ends this book of two years; I being in all points in good health and a good way to thrive and do well. Some money I do and can lay up, but not much, being worth now above £700, besides goods of all sorts. My wife in the country with Ashwell, her woman, with my father; myself at home with W. Hewer (21) and my cooke-maid Hannah, my boy Wayneman being lately run away from me. In my office, my repute and understanding good, especially with the Duke (29) and Mr. Coventry (35); only the rest of the officers do rather envy than love me, I standing in most of their lights, specially Sir W. Batten (62), whose cheats I do daily oppose to his great trouble, though he appears mighty kind and willing to keep friendship with me, while Sir J. Minnes (64), like a dotard, is led by the nose by him. My wife and I, by my late jealousy, for which I am truly to be blamed, have not the kindness between us which we used and ought to have, and I fear will be lost hereafter if I do not take course to oblige her and yet preserve my authority. Publique matters are in an ill condition; Parliament sitting and raising four subsidys for the King (33), which is but a little, considering his wants; and yet that parted withal with great hardness. They being offended to see so much money go, and no debts of the publique's paid, but all swallowed by a luxurious Court: which the King (33) it is believed and hoped will retrench in a little time, when he comes to see the utmost of the revenue which shall be settled on him: he expecting to have his £1,200,000 made good to him, which is not yet done by above £150,000, as he himself reports to the House. My differences with my uncle Thomas at a good quiett, blessed be God! and other matters. The town full of the great overthrow lately given to the Spaniards by the Portugalls, they being advanced into the very middle of Portugall. The weather wet for two or three months together beyond belief, almost not one fair day coming between till this day, which has been a very pleasant day and the first pleasant day this summer. The charge of the Navy intended to be limited to £200,000 per annum, the ordinary charge of it, and that to be settled upon the Customs. The King (33) yet greatly taken up with Madam Castlemaine (22) and Mrs. Stewart (15), which God of Heaven put an end to! Myself very studious to learn what I can of all things necessary for my place as an officer of the Navy, reading lately what concerns measuring of timber and knowledge of the tides. I have of late spent much time with Creed, being led to it by his business of his accounts, but I find him a fellow of those designs and tricks, that there is no degree of true friendship to be made with him, and therefore I must cast him off, though he be a very understanding man, and one that much may be learned of as to cunning and judging of other men. Besides, too, I do perceive more and more that my time of pleasure and idleness of any sort must be flung off to attend to getting of some money and the keeping of my family in order, which I fear by my wife's liberty may be otherwise lost.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 August 1663. 17 Aug 1663. Up, and then fell into discourse, my wife and I to Ashwell, and much against my will I am fain to express a willingness to Ashwell that she should go from us, and yet in my mind I am glad of it, to ease me of the charge. So she is to go to her father this day.
And leaving my wife and her talking highly, I went away by coach with Sir J. Minnes (64) and Sir W. Batten (62) to St. James's, and there attended of course the Duke (29).
And so to White Hall, where I met Mr. Moore, and he tells me with great sorrow of my lord's being debauched he fears by this woman at Chelsey, which I am troubled at, and resolve to speak to him of it if I can seasonably.
Thence home, where I dined, and after dinner comes our old mayde Susan to look for a gorgett that she says she has lost by leaving it here, and by many circumstances it being clear to me that Hannah, our present cook-mayde, not only has it, but had it on upon her necke when Susan came in, and shifted it off presently upon her coming in, I did charge her so home with it (having a mind to have her gone from us), that in a huff she told us she would be gone to-night if I would pay her her wages, which I was glad and my wife of, and so fetched her her wages, and though I am doubtful that she may convey some things away with her clothes, my wife searching them, yet we are glad of her being so gone, and so she went away in a quarter of an hour's time. Being much amused at this to have never a maid but Ashwell, that we do not intend to keep, nor a boy, and my wife and I being left for an hour, till my brother came in, alone in the house, I grew very melancholy, and so my brother being come in I went forth to Mrs. Holden's, to whom I formerly spoke about a girle to come to me instead of a boy, and the like I did to Mrs. Standing and also to my brother Tom (29), whom I found at an alehouse in Popinjay ally drinking, and I standing with him at the gate of the ally, Ashwell came by, and so I left Tom and went almost home with her, talking of her going away. I find that she is willing to go, and told her (though behind my back my wife has told her that it was more my desire than hers that she should go, which was not well), that seeing my wife and she could not agree I did choose rather (was she my sister) have her gone, it would be better for us and for her too. To which she willing agreed, and will not tell me anything but that she do believe that my wife would have some body there that might not be so liable to give me information of things as she takes her to be. But, however, I must later to prevent all that. I parted with her near home, agreeing to take no notice of my coming along with her, and so by and by came home after her. Where I find a sad distracted house, which troubles me. However, to supper and prayers and to bed. And while we were getting to bed my wife began to discourse to her, and plainly asked whether she had got a place or no. And the other answered that she could go if we would to one of our own office, to which we agreed if she would. She thereupon said no; she would not go to any but where she might teach children, because of keeping herself in use of what things she had earnt, which she do not here nor will there, but only dressing. By which I perceive the wench is cunning, but one very fit for such a place, and accomplished to be woman to any lady in the land. So quietly to sleep, it being a cold night. But till my house is settled, I do not see that I can mind my business of the office, which grieves me to the heart. But I hope all will over in a little time, and I hope to the best. This day at Mrs. Holden's I found my new low crowned beaver according to the present fashion made, and will be sent home to-morrow.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 August 1663. 19 Aug 1663. Up betimes, and my wife up and about the house, Susan beginning to have her drunken tricks, and put us in mind of her old faults and folly and distractednesse, which we had forgot, so that I became mightily troubled with her. This morning came my joyners to new lay the floors, and begun with the dining room. I out and see my viall again, and it is very well, and to Mr. Hollyard (54), and took some pills of him and a note under his hand to drink wine with my beere, without which I was obliged, by my private vowe, to drink none a good while, and have strictly observed it, and by my drinking of small beere and not eating, I am so mightily troubled with wind, that I know not what to do almost.
Thence to White Hall, and there met Mr. Moore, and fell a-talking about my Lord's folly at Chelsey, and it was our discourse by water to London and to the great coffee house against the Exchange, where we sat a good while talking; and I find that my lord is wholly given up to this wench, who it seems has been reputed a common strumpett. I have little encouragement from Mr. Moore to meddle with it to tell my Lord, for fear it may do him no good, but me hurt.
Thence homewards, taking leave of him, and met Tom Marsh, my old acquaintance at Westminster, who talks mightily of the honour of his place, being Clerke Assistant to the Clerke of the House of Commons, and I take him to be a coxcombe, and so did give him half a pint of wine, but drink none myself, and so got shut of him.
So home, and there found my wife almost mad with Susan's tricks, so as she is forced to let her go and leave the house all in dirt and the clothes all wet, and gets Goody Taylour to do the business for her till another comes. Here came Will Howe, and he and I alone in my chamber talking of my Lord, who drives me out of love to my Lord to tell my Lord of the matter we discoursed of, which tend so much to the ruin of his state, and so I resolved to take a good heart and do whatever comes of it. He gone, we sat down and eat a bit of dinner fetched from the cooke's, and so up again and to my joyners, who will make my floors very handsome.
By and by comes in Pembleton, which begun to make me sweat, but I did give him so little countenance, and declared at one word against dancing any more, and bid him a short (God be with you) myself, and so he took as short a leave of my wife and so went away, and I think without any time of receiving any great satisfaction from my wife or invitation to come again.
To my office till it was dark doing business, and so home by candle light to make up my accounts for my Lord and Mr. Moore. By and by comes Mr. Moore to me, and staid a good while with me making up his accounts and mine, and we did not come to any end therein for want of his papers, and so put it off to another time. He supped with me in all my dirt and disorder, and so went away and we to bed. I discoursed with him a great while about my speaking to my Lord of his business, and I apprehend from him that it is likely to prove perhaps of bad effect to me and no good to him, and therefore I shall even let it alone and let God do his will, at least till my Lord is in the country, and then we shall see whether he resolves to come to Chelsey again or no, and so order the stopping of him therein if we can.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 September 1663. 07 Sep 1663. Up pretty betimes, and awhile to my vyall, and then abroad to several places, to buy things for the furnishing my house and my wife's closet, and then met my uncle Thomas (68), by appointment, and he and I to the Prerogative Office in Paternoster Row, and there searched and found my uncle Day's will, end read it over and advised upon it, and his wife's after him, and though my aunt Perkins testimony is very good, yet I fear the estate being great, and the rest that are able to inform us in the matter are all possessed of more or less of the estate, it will be hard for us ever to do anything, nor will I adventure anything till I see what part will be given to us by my uncle Thomas (68) of all that is gained. But I had another end of putting my uncle into some doubt, that so I might keep him: yet from going into the country that he may be there against the Court at his own charge, and so I left him and his son at a loss what to do till I see them again.
And so I to my Lord Crew's, thinking to have dined there, but it was too late, and so back and called at my brother's and Mr. Holden's about several businesses, and went all alone to the Black Spread Eagle in Bride Lane, and there had a chopp of veale and some bread, cheese, and beer, cost me a shilling to my dinner, and so through Fleet Ally, God forgive me, out of an itch to look upon the sluts there, against which when I saw them my stomach turned, and so to Bartholomew Fayre, where I met with Mr. Pickering, and he and I to see the Monkeys at the Dutch house, which is far beyond the other that my wife and I saw the other day; and thence to see the dancing on the ropes, which was very poor and tedious. But he and I fell in discourse about my Lord Sandwich (38). He tells me how he is sorry for my Lord at his being at Chelsey, and that his but seeming so to my Lord without speaking one word, had put him clear out of my Lord's favour, so as that he was fain to leave him before he went into the country, for that he was put to eat with his servants; but I could not fish from him, though I knew it, what was the matter; but am very sorry to see that my Lord hath thus much forgot his honour, but am resolved not to meddle with it. The play being done, I stole from him and hied home, buying several things at the ironmonger's—dogs, tongs, and shovels—for my wife's closett and the rest of my house, and so home, and thence to my office awhile, and so home to supper and to bed.
By my letters from Tangier today I hear that it grows very strong by land, and the Mole goes on. They have lately killed two hundred of the Moores, and lost about forty or fifty. I am mightily afeard of laying out too much money in goods upon my house, but it is not money flung away, though I reckon nothing money but when it is in the bank, till I have a good sum beforehand in the world.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 09 September 1663. 09 Sep 1663. Up by break of day, and then to my vials a while, and so to Sir W. Warren's by agreement, and after talking and eating something with him, he and I down by water to Woolwich, and there I did several businesses, and had good discourse, and thence walked to Greenwich; in my way a little boy overtook us with a fine cupp turned out of Lignum Vitae, which the poor child confessed was made in the King's yard by his father, a turner there, and that he do often do it, and that I might have one, and God knows what, which I shall examine.
Thence to Sir W. Warren's again, and there drew up a contract for masts which he is to sell us, and so home to dinner, finding my poor wife busy. I, after dinner, to the office, and then to White Hall, to Sir G. Carteret's (53), but did not speak with him, and so to Westminster Hall, God forgive me, thinking to meet Mrs. Lane, but she was not there, but here I met with Ned Pickering (45), with whom I walked 3 or 4 hours till evening, he telling me the whole business of my Lord's folly with this Mrs. Becke, at Chelsey, of all which I am ashamed to see my Lord so grossly play the beast and fool, to the flinging off of all honour, friends, servants, and every thing and person that is good, and only will have his private lust undisturbed with this common.... his sitting up night after night alone, suffering nobody to come to them, and all the day too, casting off Pickering, basely reproaching him with his small estate, which yet is a good one, and other poor courses to obtain privacy beneath his honour, and with his carrying her abroad and playing on his lute under her window, and forty other poor sordid things, which I am grieved to hear; but believe it to no purpose for me to meddle with it, but let him go on till God Almighty and his own conscience and thoughts of his lady and family do it. So after long discourse, to my full satisfaction but great trouble, I home by water and at my office late, and so to supper to my poor wife, and so to bed, being troubled to think that I shall be forced to go to Brampton the next Court, next week.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 September 1663. 11 Sep 1663. This morning, about two or three o'clock, knocked up in our back yard, and rising to the window, being moonshine, I found it was the constable and his watch, who had found our back yard door open, and so came in to see what the matter was. So I desired them to shut the door, and bid them good night, and so to bed again, and at 6 o'clock up and a while to my vyall, and then to the office, where all the morning upon the victualler's accounts, and then with him to dinner at the Dolphin, where I eat well but drank no wine neither; which keeps me in such good order that I am mightily pleased with myself for it.
Hither Mr. Moore came to me, and he and I home and advised about business, and so after an hour's examining the state of the Navy debts lately cast up, I took coach to Sir Philip Warwick's (53), but finding Sir G. Carteret (53) there I did not go in, but directly home, again, it raining hard, having first of all been with Creed and Mrs. Harper about a cook maid, and am like to have one from Creed's lodging.
In my way home visited my Lord Crew and Sir Thomas, thinking they might have enquired by the by of me touching my Lord's matters at Chelsey, but they said nothing, and so after some slight common talk I bid them good night. At home to my office, and after a while doing business home to supper and bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 September 1663. 19 Sep 1663. Up pretty betimes, and after eating something, we set out and I (being willing thereto) went by a mistake with them to St. Ives, and there, it being known that it was their nearer way to London, I took leave of them there, they going straight to London and I to Brampton, where I find my father ill in bed still, and Madam Norbery (whom and her fair daughter and sister I was ashamed to kiss, but did, my lip being sore with riding in the wind and bit with the gnatts), lately come to town, come to see my father and mother, and they after a little stay being gone, I told my father my success.
And after dinner my wife and I took horse, and rode with marvellous, and the first and only hour of, pleasure, that ever I had in this estate since I had to do with it, to Brampton woods; and through the wood rode, and gathered nuts in my way, and then at Graffam to an old woman's house to drink, where my wife used to go; and being in all circumstances highly pleased, and in my wife's riding and good company at this time, I rode, and she showed me the river behind my father's house, which is very pleasant, and so saw her home, and I straight to Huntingdon, and there met Mr. Shepley and to the Crown (having sent home my horse by Stankes), and there a barber came and trimmed me, and thence walked to Hinchingbroke, where my Lord and ladies all are just alighted. And so I in among them, and my Lord glad to see me, and the whole company. Here I staid and supped with them, and after a good stay talking, but yet observing my Lord not to be so mightily ingulphed in his pleasure in the country as I expected and hoped, I took leave of them, and after a walk in the courtyard in the dark with Mr. Howe, who tells me that my Lord do not enjoy himself and please himself as he used to do, but will hasten up to London, and that he is resolved to go to Chelsey again, which we are heartily grieved for and studious how to prevent if it be possible, I took horse, there being one appointed for me, and a groom to attend me, and so home, where my wife: staid up and sister for me, and so to bed, troubled for what I hear of my Lord.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 September 1663. 23 Sep 1663. Up betimes and to my office, where setting down my journall while I was in the country to this day, and at noon by water to my Lord Crew's, and there dined with him and Sir Thomas, thinking to have them inquire something about my Lord's lodgings at Chelsey, or any thing of that sort, but they did not, nor seem to take the least notice of it, which is their discretion, though it might be better for my Lord and them too if they did, that so we might advise together for the best, which cannot be while we seem ignorant one to another, and it is not fit for me to begin the discourse.
Thence walked to several places about business and to Westminster Hall, thinking to meet Mrs. Lane, which is my great vanity upon me at present, but I must correct it. She was not in the way.
So by water home and to my office, whither by and by came my brother John (22), who is to go to Cambridge to-morrow, and I did give him a most severe reprimand for his bad account he gives me of his studies. This I did with great passion and sharp words, which I was sorry to be forced to say, but that I think it for his good, forswearing doing anything for him, and that which I have yet, and now do give him, is against my heart, and will also be hereafter, till I do see him give me a better account of his studies. I was sorry to see him give me no answer, but, for aught I see, to hear me without great resentment, and such as I should have had: in his condition. But I have done my duty, let him do his, for I am resolved to be as good as my word. After two hours walking in the garden, till after it was dark, I ended with him and to my office, and there set some papers in order, and so to supper, and my poor wife, who is mighty busy at home; fitting her closet. So to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 November 1663. 12 Nov 1663. Lay long in bed, indeed too long, divers people and the officers staying for me. My cozen Thomas Pepys (52) the executor being below, and I went to him and stated reckonings about our debt, for his payments of money to my uncle Thomas heretofore by the Captain's orders. I did not pay him but will soon do it if I can.
To the office and there all the morning, where Sir W. Pen (42), like a coxcomb, was so ready to cross me in a motion I made unawares for the entering a man at Chatham into the works, wherein I was vexed to see his spleene, but glad to understand it, and that it was in no greater a matter, I being not at all concerned here.
To the 'Change and did several businesses there and so home with Mr. Moore to dinner, my wife having dined, with Mr. Hollyard (54) with her to-day, he being come to advise her about her hollow sore place.
After dinner Mr. Moore and I discoursing of my Lord's negligence in attendance at Court, and the discourse the world makes of it, with the too great reason that I believe there is for it; I resolved and took coach to his lodgings, thinking to speak with my Lord about it without more ado. Here I met Mr. Howe, and he and I largely about it, and he very soberly acquainted me how things are with my Lord, that my Lord do not do anything like himself, but follows his folly, and spends his time either at cards at Court with the ladies, when he is there at all, or else at Chelsy with the slut to his great disgrace, and indeed I do see and believe that my Lord do apprehend that he do grow less too at Court.
Anon my Lord do come in, and I begun to fall in discourse with him, but my heart did misgive me that my Lord would not take it well, and then found him not in a humour to talk, and so after a few ordinary words, my Lord not talking in the manner as he uses to do; I took leave, and spent some time with W. Howe again, and told him how I could not do what I had so great a mind and resolution to do, but that I thought it would be as well to do it in writing, which he approves of, and so I took leave of him, and by coach home, my mind being full of it, and in pain concerning it.
So to my office busy very late, the nights running on faster than one thinks, and so to supper and to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 22 November 1663. 22 Nov 1663. Lord's Day. Up pretty early, and having last night bespoke a coach, which failed me this morning, I walked as far as the Temple, and there took coach, and to my Lord's lodgings, whom I found ready to go to chappell; but I coming, he begun, with a very serious countenance, to tell me that he had received my late letter, wherein first he took notice of my care of him and his honour, and did give me thanks for that part of it where I say that from my heart I believe the contrary of what I do there relate to be the discourse of others; but since I intended it not a reproach, but matter of information, and for him to make a judgment of it for his practice, it was necessary for me to tell him the persons of whom I have gathered the several particulars which I there insist on. I would have made excuses in it; but, seeing him so earnest in it, I found myself forced to it, and so did tell him Mr. Pierce; the chyrurgeon, in that of his Lordship's living being discoursed of at Court; a mayd servant that-I kept, that lived at Chelsy school; and also Mr. Pickering, about the report touching the young woman; and also Mr. Hunt, in Axe Yard, near whom she lodged. I told him the whole city do discourse concerning his neglect of business; and so I many times asserting my dutifull intention in all this, and he owning his accepting of it as such. That that troubled me most in particular is, that he did there assert the civility of the people of the house, and the young gentlewoman, for whose reproach he was sorry. His saying that he was resolved how to live, and that though he was taking a house, meaning to live in another manner, yet it was not to please any people, or to stop report, but to please himself, though this I do believe he might say that he might not seem to me to be so much wrought upon by what I have writ; and lastly, and most of all, when I spoke of the tenderness that I have used in declaring this to him, there being nobody privy to it, he told me that I must give him leave to except one. I told him that possibly somebody might know of some thoughts of mine, I having borrowed some intelligence in this matter from them, but nobody could say they knew of the thing itself what I writ. This, I confess, however, do trouble me, for that he seemed to speak it as a quick retort, and it must sure be Will Howe, who did not see anything of what I writ, though I told him indeed that I would write; but in this, I think, there is no great hurt. I find him, though he cannot but owne his opinion of my good intentions, and so, he did again and again profess it, that he is troubled in his mind at it; and I confess, I think I may have done myself an injury for his good, which, were it to do again, and that I believed he would take it no better, I think I should sit quietly without taking any notice of it, for I doubt there is no medium between his taking it very well or very ill. I could not forbear weeping before him at the latter end, which, since, I am ashamed of, though I cannot see what he can take it to proceed from but my tenderness and good will to him.
After this discourse was ended, he began to talk very, cheerfully of other things, and I walked with him to White Hall, and we discoursed of the pictures in the gallery, which, it may be, he might do out of policy, that the boy might not see any, strangeness in him; but I rather think that his mind was somewhat eased, and hope that he will be to me as he was before. But, however, I doubt not when he sees that I follow my business, and become an honour to him, and not to be like to need him, or to be a burden to him, and rather able to serve him than to need him, and if he do continue to follow business, and so come to his right witts again, I do not doubt but he will then consider my faithfulnesse to him, and esteem me as he ought.
At chappell I had room in the Privy Seale pew with other gentlemen, and there heard Dr. Killigrew (50), preach, but my mind was so, I know not whether troubled, or only full of thoughts of what had passed between my Lord and me that I could not mind it, nor can at this hour remember three words. The anthem was good after sermon, being the fifty-first psalme, made for five voices by one of Captain Cooke's (47) boys, a pretty boy. And they say there are four or five of them that can do as much. And here I first perceived that the King (33) is a little musicall, and kept good time with his hand all along the anthem.
Up into the gallery after sermon and there I met Creed. We saluted one another and spoke but not one word of what had passed yesterday between us, but told me he was forced to such a place to dinner and so we parted. Here I met Mr. Povy (49), who tells me how Tangier had like to have been betrayed, and that one of the King's officers is come, to whom 8,000 pieces of eight were offered for his part.
Hence I to the King's Head ordinary, and there dined, good and much company, and a good dinner: most of their discourse was about hunting, in a dialect I understand very little.
Thence by coach to our own church, and there my mind being yet unsettled I could mind nothing, and after sermon home and there told my wife what had passed, and thence to my office, where doing business only to keep my mind employed till late; and so home to supper, to prayers, and to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 November 1663. 28 Nov 1663. Up and at the office sat all the morning, and at noon by Mr. Coventry's (35) coach to the 'Change, and after a little while there where I met with Mr. Pierce, the chyrurgeon, who tells me for good newes that my Lord Sandwich (38) is resolved to go no more to Chelsy, and told me he believed that I had been giving my Lord some counsel, which I neither denied nor affirmed, but seemed glad with him that he went thither no more, and so I home to dinner, and thence abroad to Paul's Church Yard, and there looked upon the second part of Hudibras, which I buy not, but borrow to read, to see if it be as good as the first, which the world cry so mightily up, though it hath not a good liking in me, though I had tried by twice or three times reading to bring myself to think it witty.
Back again home and to my office, and there late doing business and so home to supper and to bed. I have been told two or three times, but to-day for certain I am told how in Holland publickly they have pictured our King with reproach. One way is with his pockets turned the wrong side outward, hanging out empty; another with two courtiers picking of his pockets; and a third, leading of two ladies, while others abuse him; which amounts to great contempt.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 November 1663. 30 Nov 1663. Was called up by a messenger from Sir W. Pen (42) to go with him by coach to White Hall. So I got up and went with him, and by the way he began to observe to me some unkind dealing of mine to him a weeke or two since at the table, like a coxcomb, when I answered him pretty freely that I would not think myself to owe any man the service to do this or that because they would have it so (it was about taking of a mulct upon a purser for not keeping guard at Chatham when I was there), so he talked and I talked and let fall the discourse without giving or receiving any great satisfaction, and so to other discourse, but I shall know him still for a false knave.
At White Hall we met the Duke (30) in the Matted Gallery, and there he discoursed with us; and by and by my Lord Sandwich (38) came and stood by, and talked; but it being St. Andrew's, and a collar-day, he went to the Chappell, and we parted.
From him and Sir W. Pen (42) and I back again and 'light at the 'Change, and to the Coffee-house, where I heard the best story of a cheate intended by a Master of a ship, who had borrowed twice his money upon the bottomary, and as much more insured upon his ship and goods as they were worth, and then would have cast her away upon the coast of France, and there left her, refusing any pilott which was offered him; and so the Governor of the place took her and sent her over hither to find an owner, and so the ship is come safe, and goods and all; they all worth £500, and he had one way or other taken £3000. The cause is to be tried to-morrow at Guildhall, where I intend to be.
Thence home to dinner, and then with my wife to her arithmetique.
In the evening came W. Howe to see me, who tells me that my Lord hath been angry three or four days with him, would not speak to him; at last did, and charged him with having spoken to me about what he had observed concerning his Lordship, which W. Howe denying stoutly, he was well at ease; and continues very quiett, and is removing from Chelsy as fast as he can, but, methinks, both by my Lord's looks upon me to-day, or it may be it is only my doubtfulness, and by W. Howe's discourse, my Lord is not very well pleased, nor, it may be, will be a good while, which vexes me; but I hope all will over in time, or else I am but ill rewarded for my good service.
Anon he and I to the Temple and there parted, and I to my cozen Roger Pepys (46), whom I met going to his chamber; he was in haste, and to go out of town tomorrow. He tells me of a letter from my father which he will keep to read to me at his coming to town again. I perceive it is about my father's jealousys concerning my wife's doing ill offices with me against him only from the differences they had when she was there, which he very unwisely continues to have and troubles himself and friends about to speak to me in, as my Lord Sandwich (38), Mr. Moore, and my cozen Roger (46), which vexes me, but I must impute it to his age and care for my mother and Pall and so let it go.
After little discourse with him I took coach and home, calling upon my bookseller's for two books, Rushworth's and Scobell's Collections. I shall make the King (33) pay for them. The first I spent some time at the office to read and it is an excellent book.
So home and spent the evening with my wife in arithmetique, and so to supper and to bed. I end this month with my mind in good condition for any thing else, but my unhappy adventuring to disoblige my Lord by doing him service in representing to him the discourse of the world concerning him and his affairs.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 December 1663. 14 Dec 1663. Up by candlelight, which I do not use to do, though it be very late, that is to say almost 8 o'clock, and out by coach to White Hall, where we all met and to the Duke (30), where I heard a large discourse between one that goes over an agent from the King (33) to Legorne and thereabouts, to remove the inconveniences his ships are put to by denial of pratique; which is a thing that is now-a-days made use of only as a cheat, for a man may buy a bill of health for a piece of eight, and my enemy may agree with the Intendent of the Sante for ten pieces of eight or so; that he shall not give me a bill of health, and so spoil me in my design, whatever it be. This the King (33) will not endure, and so resolves either to have it removed, or to keep all ships from coming in, or going out there, so long as his ships are stayed for want hereof.
Then, my Lord Sandwich (38) being there, we all went into the Duke's closet and did our business. But among other things, Lord! what an account did Sir J. Minnes (64) and Sir W. Batten (62) make of the pulling down and burning of the head of the Charles, where Cromwell was placed with people under his horse, and Peter, as the Duke called him, is praying to him; and Sir J. Minnes (64) would needs infer the temper of the people from their joy at the doing of this and their building a gibbet for the hanging of his head up, when God knows, it is even the flinging away of £100 out of the King's purse, to the building of another, which it seems must be a Neptune.
Thence I through White Hall only to see what was doing, but meeting none that I knew I went through the garden to my Lord Sandwich's (38) lodging, where I found my Lord got before me (which I did not intend or expect) and was there trying some musique, which he intends for an anthem of three parts, I know not whether for the King's chapel or no, but he seems mighty intent upon it. But it did trouble me to hear him swear before God and other oathes, as he did now and then without any occasion, which methinks did so ill become him, and I hope will be a caution for me, it being so ill a thing in him. The musique being done, without showing me any good or ill countenance, he did give me his hat and so adieu, and went down to his coach without saying anything to me.
He being gone I and Mr. Howe talked a good while. He tells me that my Lord, it is true, for a while after my letter, was displeased, and did shew many slightings of me when he had occasion of mentioning me to his Lordship, but that now my Lord is in good temper and he do believe will shew me as much respect as ever, and would have me not to refrain to come to him. This news I confess did much trouble me, but when I did hear how he is come to himself, and hath wholly left Chelsy, and the slut, and that I see he do follow his business, and becomes in better repute than before, I am rejoiced to see it, though it do cost me some disfavour for a time, for if not his good nature and ingenuity, yet I believe his memory will not bear it always in his mind. But it is my comfort that this is the thing that after so many years good service that has made him my enemy.
Thence to the King's Head ordinary, and there dined among a company of fine gentlemen; some of them discoursed of the King of France's (25) greatness, and how he is come to make the Princes of the Blood to take place of all foreign Embassadors, which it seems is granted by them of Venice and other States, and expected from my Lord Hollis (64), our King's Embassador there; and that either upon that score or something else he hath not had his entry yet in Paris, but hath received several affronts, and among others his harnesse cut, and his gentlemen of his horse killed, which will breed bad blood if true. They say also that the King of France (25) hath hired threescore ships of Holland, and forty of the Swede, but nobody knows what to do; but some great designs he hath on foot against the next year.
Thence by coach home and to my office, where I spent all the evening till night with Captain Taylor discoursing about keeping of masts, and when he was gone, with Sir W. Warren, who did give me excellent discourse about the same thing, which I have committed to paper, and then fell to other talk of his being at Chatham lately and there discoursing of his masts. Commissioner Pett (53) did let fall several scurvy words concerning my pretending to know masts as well as any body, which I know proceeds ever since I told him I could measure a piece of timber as well as anybody employed by the King (33). But, however, I shall remember him for a black sheep again a good while, with all his fair words to me, and perhaps may let him know that my ignorance does the King (33) as much good as all his knowledge, which would do more it is true if it were well used.
Then we fell to talk of Sir J. Minnes's (64) and Sir W. Batten's (62) burning of Oliver's head, while he was there; which was done with so much insulting and folly as I never heard of, and had the Trayned Band of Rochester to come to the solemnity, which when all comes to all, Commissioner Pett (53) says it never was made for him; but it troubles me the King (33) should suffer £100 losse in his purse, to make a new one after it was forgot whose it was, or any words spoke of it.
He being gone I mightily pleased with his discourse, by which I always learn something, I to read a little in Rushworth, and so home to supper to my wife, it having been washing day, and so to bed, my mind I confess a little troubled for my Lord Sandwich's (38) displeasure. But God will give me patience to bear since it rises from so good an occasion.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 08 June 1664. 08 Jun 1664. All day before dinner with Creed, talking of many things, among others, of my Lord's going so often to Chelsy, and he, without my speaking much, do tell me that his daughters do perceive all, and do hate the place, and the young woman there, Mrs. Betty Becke; for my Lord, who sent them thither only for a disguise for his going thither, will come under pretence to see them, and pack them out of doors to the Parke, and stay behind with her; but now the young ladies are gone to their mother to Kensington.
To dinner, and after dinner till 10 at night in my study writing of my old broken office notes in shorthand all in one book, till my eyes did ake ready to drop out. So home to supper and to bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 June 1664. 14 Jun 1664. Up and to the office, where we sat all the morning, and had great conflict about the flags again, and am vexed methought to see my Lord Berkeley (62) not satisfied with what I said, but however I stop the King's being abused by the flag makers for the present. I do not know how it may end, but I will do my best to preserve it.
So home to dinner, and after dinner by coach to Kensington. In the way overtaking Mr. Laxton, the apothecary, with his wife and daughters, very fine young lasses, in a coach; and so both of us to my Lady Sandwich (39), who hath lain this fortnight here at Deane Hodges's. Much company came hither to-day, my Baroness Carteret (62), &c., Sir William Wheeler (53) and his lady, and, above all, Mr. Becke, of Chelsy, and wife and daughter, my Lord's mistress, and one that hath not one good feature in her face, and yet is a fine lady, of a fine taille, and very well carriaged, and mighty discreet. I took all the occasion I could to discourse with the young ladies in her company to give occasion to her to talk, which now and then she did, and that mighty finely, and is, I perceive, a woman of such an ayre, as I wonder the less at my Lord's favour to her, and I dare warrant him she hath brains enough to entangle him. Two or three houres we were in her company, going into Sir H. Finche's (42) garden, and seeing the fountayne, and singing there with the ladies, and a mighty fine cool place it is, with a great laver of water in the middle and the bravest place for musique I ever heard. After much mirthe, discoursing to the ladies in defence of the city against the country or court, and giving them occasion to invite themselves to-morrow to me to dinner, to my venison pasty, I got their mother's leave, and so good night, very well pleased with my day's work, and, above all, that I have seen my Lord's mistresse.
So home to supper, and a little at my office, and to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 April 1665. 18 Apr 1665. Up and to Sir Philip Warwicke (55), and walked with him an houre with great delight in the Parke about Sir G. Carteret's (55) accounts, and the endeavours that he hath made to bring Sir G. Carteret (55) to show his accounts and let the world see what he receives and what he pays.
Thence home to the office, where I find Sir J. Minnes (66) come home from Chatham, and Sir W. Batten (64) both this morning from Harwich, where they have been these 7 or 8 days.
At noon with my wife and Mr. Moore by water to Chelsey about my Privy Seale (59) for Tangier, but my Lord Privy Seale (59) was gone abroad, and so we, without going out of the boat, forced to return, and found him not at White Hall. So I to Sir Philip Warwicke (55) and with him to my Lord Treasurer (58), who signed my commission for Tangier-Treasurer and the docquet of my Privy Seale, for the monies to be paid to me.
Thence to White Hall to Mr. Moore again, and not finding my Lord I home, taking my wife and woman up at Unthanke's. Late at my office, then to supper and to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 April 1665. 19 Apr 1665. Up by five o'clock, and by water to White Hall; and there took coach, and with Mr. Moore to Chelsy; where, after all my fears what doubts and difficulties my Lord Privy Seale (59) would make at my Tangier Privy Seale, he did pass it at first reading, without my speaking with him. And then called me in, and was very civil to me. I passed my time in contemplating (before I was called in) the picture of my Lord's son's lady, a most beautiful woman, and most like to Mrs. Butler.
Thence very much joyed to London back again, and found out Mr. Povy (51); told him this; and then went and left my Privy Seale at my Lord Treasurer's (58); and so to the 'Change, and thence to Trinity-House; where a great dinner of Captain Crisp, who is made an Elder Brother.
And so, being very pleasant at dinner, away home, Creed with me; and there met Povy (51); and we to Gresham College, where we saw some experiments upon a hen, a dogg, and a cat, of the Florence poyson1. The first it made for a time drunk, but it come to itself again quickly; the second it made vomitt mightily, but no other hurt.
The third I did not stay to see the effect of it, being taken out by Povy (51). He and I walked below together, he giving me most exceeding discouragements in the getting of money (whether by design or no I know not, for I am now come to think him a most cunning fellow in most things he do, but his accounts), and made it plain to me that money will be hard to get, and that it is to be feared Backewell hath a design in it to get the thing forced upon himself. This put me into a cruel melancholy to think I may lose what I have had so near my hand; but yet something may be hoped for which to-morrow will shew. He gone, Creed and I together a great while consulting what to do in this case, and after all I left him to do what he thought fit in his discourse to-morrow with my Lord Ashly (43).
So home, and in my way met with Mr. Warren, from whom my hopes I fear will fail of what I hoped for, by my getting him a protection. But all these troubles will if not be over, yet we shall see the worst of there in a day or two.
So to my office, and thence to supper, and my head akeing, betimes, that is by 10 or 11 o'clock, to bed.
Note 1. "Sir Robert Moray (57) presented the Society from the King (34) with a phial of Florentine poison sent for by his Majesty from Florence, on purpose to have those experiments related of the efficacy thereof, tried by the Society". The poison had little effect upon the kitten (Birch's "History"; vol. ii., p. 31).

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 09 April 1666. 09 Apr 1666. Up betimes, and with my Joyner begun the making of the window in my boy's chamber bigger, purposing it shall be a roome to eat and for having musique in.
To the office, where a meeting upon extraordinary business, at noon to the 'Change about more, and then home with Creed and dined, and then with him to the Committee of Tangier, where I got two or three things done I had a mind to of convenience to me.
Thence by coach to Mrs. Pierce's, and with her and Knipp and Mrs. Pierce's boy and girle abroad, thinking to have been merry at Chelsey; but being come almost to the house by coach near the waterside, a house alone, I think the Swan, a gentleman walking by called to us to tell us that the house was shut up of the sicknesse. So we with great affright turned back, being holden to the gentleman; and went away (I for my part in great disorder) for Kensington, and there I spent about 30s. upon the jades with great pleasure, and we sang finely and staid till about eight at night, the night coming on apace and so set them down at Pierce's, and so away home, where awhile with Sir W. Warren about business, and then to bed,

Diary of Samuel Pepys 08 August 1666. 08 Aug 1666. Up, and with Reeves walk as far as the Temple, doing some business in my way at my bookseller's and elsewhere, and there parted, and I took coach, having first discoursed with Mr. Hooke (31) a little, whom we met in the streete, about the nature of sounds, and he did make me understand the nature of musicall sounds made by strings, mighty prettily; and told me that having come to a certain number of vibrations proper to make any tone, he is able to tell how many strokes a fly makes with her wings (those flies that hum in their flying) by the note that it answers to in musique during their flying. That, I suppose, is a little too much refined; but his discourse in general of sound was mighty fine.
There I left them, and myself by coach to St. James's, where we attended with the rest of my fellows on the Duke (32), whom I found with two or three patches upon his nose and about his right eye, which come from his being struck with the bough of a tree the other day in his hunting; and it is a wonder it did not strike out his eye. After we had done our business with him, which is now but little, the want of money being such as leaves us little to do but to answer complaints of the want thereof, and nothing to offer to the Duke (32), the representing of our want of money being now become uselesse, I into the Park, and there I met with Mrs. Burroughs by appointment, and did agree (after discoursing of some business of her's) for her to meet me at New Exchange, while I by coach to my Lord Treasurer's (59), and then called at the New Exchange, and thence carried her by water to Parliament stayres, and I to the Exchequer about my Tangier quarter tallys, and that done I took coach and to the west door of the Abby, where she come to me, and I with her by coach to Lissen-greene where we were last, and staid an hour or two before dinner could be got for us, I in the meantime having much pleasure with her, but all honest.
And by and by dinner come up, and then to my sport again, but still honest; and then took coach and up and down in the country toward Acton, and then toward Chelsy, and so to Westminster, and there set her down where I took her up, with mighty pleasure in her company, and so I by coach home, and thence to Bow, with all the haste I could, to my Lady Pooly's, where my wife was with Mr. Batelier and his sisters, and there I found a noble supper, and every thing exceeding pleasant, and their mother, Mrs. Batelier, a fine woman, but mighty passionate upon sudden news brought her of the loss of a dog borrowed of the Duke of Albemarle's (57) son to line a bitch of hers that is very pretty, but the dog was by and by found, and so all well again, their company mighty innocent and pleasant, we having never been here before.
About ten o'clock we rose from table, and sang a song, and so home in two coaches (Mr. Batelier and his sister Mary and my wife and I in one, and Mercer alone in the other); and after being examined at Allgate, whether we were husbands and wives, home, and being there come, and sent away Mr. Batelier and his sister, I find Reeves there, it being a mighty fine bright night, and so upon my leads, though very sleepy, till one in the morning, looking on the moon and Jupiter, with this twelve-foote glasse and another of six foote, that he hath brought with him to-night, and the sights mighty pleasant, and one of the glasses I will buy, it being very usefull.
So to bed mighty sleepy, but with much pleasure. Reeves lying at my house again; and mighty proud I am (and ought to be thankfull to God Almighty) that I am able to have a spare bed for my friends.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 01 August 1667. 01 Aug 1667. Up, and all the morning at the office.
At noon my wife and I dined at Sir W. Pen's (46), only with Mrs. Turner (44) and her husband (54), on a damned venison pasty, that stunk like a devil. However, I did not know it till dinner was done. We had nothing but only this, and a leg of mutton, and a pullet or two. Mrs. Markham was here, with her great belly. I was very merry, and after dinner, upon a motion of the women, I was got to go to the play with them-the first I have seen since before the Dutch coming upon our coast, and so to the King's house, to see "The Custome of the Country". The house mighty empty—more than ever I saw it—and an ill play. After the play, we into the house, and spoke with Knipp, who went abroad with us by coach to the Neat Houses in the way to Chelsy; and there, in a box in a tree, we sat and sang, and talked and eat; my wife out of humour, as she always is, when this woman is by. So, after it was dark, we home. Set Knepp down at home, who told us the story how Nell is gone from the King's house, and is kept by my Lord Buckhurst (24).
Then we home, the gates of the City shut, it being so late: and at Newgate we find them in trouble, some thieves having this night broke open prison. So we through, and home; and our coachman was fain to drive hard from two or three fellows, which he said were rogues, that he met at the end of Blow-bladder Street, next Cheapside. So set Mrs. Turner (44) home, and then we home, and I to the Office a little; and so home and to bed, my wife in an ill humour still.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 November 1667. 18 Nov 1667. Up, and all the morning at my office till 3 after noon with Mr. Hater about perfecting my little pocket market book of the office, till my eyes were ready to fall out of my head, and then home to dinner, glad that I had done so much, and so abroad to White Hall, to the Commissioners of the Treasury, and there did a little business with them, and so home, leaving multitudes of solicitors at their door, of one sort or other, complaining for want of such despatch as they had in my Lord Treasurer's time, when I believe more business was despatched, but it was in his manner to the King's wrong. Among others here was Gresham College coming about getting a grant of Chelsey College for their Society, which the King (37), it seems, hath given them his right in; but they met with some other pretences, I think; to it, besides the King's.
Thence took up my wife, whom I had left at her tailor's, and home, and there, to save my eyes, got my wife at home to read again, as last night, in the same book, till W. Batelier come and spent the evening talking with us, and supped with us, and so to bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 10 May 1668. 10 May 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and to the office, there to do, business till church time, when Mr. Shepley, newly come to town, come to see me, and we had some discourse of all matters, and particularly of my Lord Sandwich's (42) concernments, and here did by the by as he would seem tell me that my Lady [Lady Sandwich (43).] had it in her thoughts, if she had occasion, to, borrow £100 of me, which I did not declare any opposition to, though I doubt it will be so much lost. But, however, I will not deny my Lady, if she ask it, whatever comes of it, though it be lost; but shall be glad that it is no bigger sum. And yet it vexes me though, and the more because it brings into my head some apprehensions what trouble I may here after be brought to when my Lord comes home, if he should ask me to come into bonds with him, as I fear he will have occasions to make money, but I hope I shall have the wit to deny it. He being gone, I to church, and so home, and there comes W. Hewer (26) and Balty (28), and by and by I sent for Mercer to come and dine with me, and pretty merry, and after dinner I fell to teach her "Canite Jehovae", which she did a great part presently, and so she away, and I to church, and from church home with my Lady Pen (44); and, after being there an hour or so talking, I took her, and Mrs. Lowther, and old Mrs. Whistler, her mother-in-law, by water with great pleasure as far as Chelsy, and so back to Spring Garden, at Fox-Hall, and there walked, and eat, and drank, and so to water again, and set down the old woman at home at Durham Yard:' and it raining all the way, it troubled us; but, however, my cloak kept us all dry, and so home, and at the Tower Wharfe there we did send for a pair of old shoes for Mrs. Lowther, and there I did pull the others off and put them on, elle being peu shy, but do speak con mighty kindness to me that she would desire me pour su mari if it were to be done.... Here staid a little at Sir W. Pen's (47), who was gone to bed, it being about eleven at night, and so I home to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 21 February 1669. 21 Feb 1669. Lord's Day. Up, and with my wife and two girls to church, they very fine; and so home, where comes my cozen Roger (51) and his wife, I having sent for them, to dine with us, and there comes in by chance also Mr. Shepley, who is come to town with my Lady Paulina (20), who is desperately sick, and is gone to Chelsey, to the old house where my Lord himself was once sick, where I doubt my Lord means to visit hers more for young Mrs. Beck's sake than for hers. Here we dined with W. Batelier, and W. Hewer (27) with us, these two, girls making it necessary that they be always with us, for I am not company light enough to be always merry with them and so sat talking all the afternoon, and then Shepley went: away first, and then my cozen Roger (51) and his wife. And so I, to my Office, to write down my Journall, and so home to my chamber and to do a little business there, my papers being in mighty disorder, and likely so to continue while these girls are with us.
In the evening comes W. Batelier and his sisters and supped and talked with us, and so spent the evening, myself being somewhat out of order because of my eyes, which have never been well since last Sunday's reading at Sir W. Coventry's (41) chamber, and so after supper to bed.

On 17 Jul 1685 John Robartes 1st Earl Radnor 1606-1685 (79) died at Chelsea. His grandson Charles Robartes 2nd Earl Radnor 1660-1723 (25) succeeded 2nd Earl Radnor 1C 1679, 2nd Viscount Bodmin, 3rd Baron Robartes of Truro in Cornwall, 3rd Baronet Robartes.

On 22 Jul 1700 Thomas Newport 1st Baron Torrington 1655-1719 (45) and Penelope Bridgeman were married at Chelsea.

On 05 Jul 1718 Francis Seymour Conway 1st Marquess Hertford 1718-1794 was born to Francis Seymour Conway 1679-1732 (39) and Charlotte Shorter at Chelsea.

1785. Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788. Portrait of Francis Seymour Conway 1st Marquess Hertford 1718-1794.

On 10 Apr 1778 Thomas Grey 4th Baron Walsingham 1778-1839 was born to Thomas Grey 2nd Baron Walsingham -1818 at Chelsea.

On 06 Jul 1804 Thomas Grey 5th Baron Walsingham 1804-1870 was born to Thomas Grey 4th Baron Walsingham 1778-1839 (26) and Elizabeth North Baroness Walsingham 1776-1845 (27) at Chelsea.

On 15 Mar 1851 Augustus Frederick Keppel 5th Earl Albermarle 1794-1851 (56) died at Chelsea. His brother George Thomas Keppel 6th Earl Albermarle 1799-1891 (51) succeeded 6th Earl Albermarle 1C 1697, 6th Viscount Bury in Lancashire, 6th Baron Ashford of Ashford in Kent.

On 25 Jun 1863 Charles William Cavendish 1822-1890 (40) and Louisa Cockburn 1839-1869 (24) were married at Chelsea.

On 21 Apr 1922 Lieutenant David Hugh Joicey 1922-1943 was born to Hugh Edward Joicey 3rd Baron 1881-1966 (41) and Joan Katherine Lambton Baroness Joicey 1893-1967 (28) at Chelsea. He ws educated at Eton College and Christ Church College for one year.

On 14 Apr 1925 John Singer Sargent Painter 1856-1925 (69) died suddenly at his home in Chelsea.

Beaufort House, Chelsea

Survey London Volume 4 Chelsea Part II. The Site of Beaufort House.
In the whole history of Chelsea, a history which is indeed famous, so many notable men and women has this little village known—the chief interest has centred about Beaufort House. From those early days in the 16th century, when it was the well-loved home of Sir Thomas More, until the 18th, when it was the seat of the Duke of Beaufort, it yielded to no other house in importance, not to King Henry VIII's manor house in Cheyne Walk, nor to the Earl of Shrewsbury's mansion, nor to the old manor house with which it shared the dignity of a proprietary chapel in the old Church. It did not carry with it the lordship of the manor, but its property was extensive, including practically the frontage of the Thames between Milman Street and Church Street, and its gardens stretched northwards as far as the King's Road.

1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 wearing a Lancastrian Esses Collar with Beaufort Portcullis and Tudor Rose Pendant.

Banqueting House, Beaufort House, Chelsea

Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 May 1663. 27 May 1663. So I waked by 3 o'clock, my mind being troubled, and so took occasion by making water to wake my wife, and after having lain till past 4 o'clock seemed going to rise, though I did it only to see what she would do, and so going out of the bed she took hold of me and would know what ailed me, and after many kind and some cross words I began to tax her discretion in yesterday's business, but she quickly told me my own, knowing well enough that it was my old disease of jealousy, which I denied, but to no purpose. After an hour's discourse, sometimes high and sometimes kind, I found very good reason to think that her freedom with him is very great and more than was convenient, but with no evil intent, and so after awhile I caressed her and parted seeming friends, but she crying in a great discontent.
So I up and by water to the Temple, and thence with Commissioner Pett (52) to St. James's, where an hour with Mr. Coventry (35) talking of Mr. Pett's (52) proceedings lately in the forest of Sherwood, and thence with Pett to my Lord Ashley (41), Chancellor (54) of the Exchequer; where we met the auditors about settling the business of the accounts of persons to whom money is due before the King's time in the Navy, and the clearing of their imprests for what little of their debts they have received. I find my Lord, as he is reported, a very ready, quick, and diligent person.
Thence I to Westminster Hall, where Term and Parliament make the Hall full of people; no further news yet of the King of France (24), whether he be dead or not. Here I met with my cozen Roger Pepys (46), and walked a good while with him, and among other discourse as a secret he hath committed to nobody but myself, and he tells me that his sister Claxton now resolving to give over the keeping of his house at Impington, he thinks it fit to marry again, and would have me, by the help of my uncle Wight or others, to look him out a widow between thirty and forty years old, without children, and with a fortune, which he will answer in any degree with a joynture fit for her fortune. A woman sober, and no high-flyer, as he calls it. I demanded his estate. He tells me, which he says also he hath not done to any, that his estate is not full £800 per annum, but it is £780 per annum, of which £200 is by the death of his last wife, which he will allot for a joynture for a wife, but the rest, which lies in Cambridgeshire, he is resolved to leave entire for his eldest son. I undertook to do what I can in it, and so I shall. He tells me that the King (32) hath sent to them to hasten to make an end by midsummer, because of his going into the country; so they have set upon four bills to dispatch: the first of which is, he says, too devilish a severe act against conventicles; so beyond all moderation, that he is afeard it will ruin all: telling me that it is matter of the greatest grief to him in the world, that he should be put upon this trust of being a Parliament-man, because he says nothing is done, that he can see, out of any truth and sincerity, but mere envy and design.
Thence by water to Chelsey, all the way reading a little book I bought of "Improvement of Trade", a pretty book and many things useful in it. So walked to Little Chelsey, where I found my Lord Sandwich (37) with Mr. Becke, the master of the house, and Mr. Creed at dinner, and I sat down with them, and very merry.
After dinner (Mr. Gibbons (47) being come in also before dinner done) to musique, they played a good Fancy, to which my Lord is fallen again, and says he cannot endure a merry tune, which is a strange turn of his humour, after he has for two or three years flung off the practice of Fancies and played only fidlers' tunes.
Then into the Great Garden up to the Banqueting_House; and there by his glass we drew in the species very pretty. Afterwards to ninepins, where I won a shilling, Creed and I playing against my Lord and Cooke. This day there was great thronging to Banstead Downs, upon a great horse-race and foot-race. I am sorry I could not go thither.
So home back as I came, to London Bridge, and so home, where I find my wife in a musty humour, and tells me before Ashwell that Pembleton had been there, and she would not have him come in unless I was there, which I was ashamed of; but however, I had rather it should be so than the other way.
So to my office, to put things in order there, and by and by comes Pembleton, and word is brought me from my wife thereof that I might come home. So I sent word that I would have her go dance, and I would come presently. So being at a great loss whether I should appear to Pembleton or no, and what would most proclaim my jealousy to him, I at last resolved to go home, and took Tom Hater with me, and staid a good while in my chamber, and there took occasion to tell him how I hear that Parliament is putting an act out against all sorts of conventicles1, and did give him good counsel, not only in his own behalf, but my own, that if he did hear or know anything that could be said to my prejudice, that he would tell me, for in this wicked age (specially Sir W. Batten (62) being so open to my reproaches, and Sir J. Minnes (64), for the neglect of their duty, and so will think themselves obliged to scandalize me all they can to right themselves if there shall be any inquiry into the matters of the Navy, as I doubt there will) a man ought to be prepared to answer for himself in all things that can be inquired concerning him. After much discourse of this nature to him I sent him away, and then went up, and there we danced country dances, and single, my wife and I; and my wife paid him off for this month also, and so he is cleared.
After dancing we took him down to supper, and were very merry, and I made myself so, and kind to him as much as I could, to prevent his discourse, though I perceive to my trouble that he knows all, and may do me the disgrace to publish it as much as he can. Which I take very ill, and if too much provoked shall witness it to her. After supper and he gone we to bed.
Note 1. 16 Car. II, cap. 4, "An Act to prevent and suppresse seditious Conventicles". It was enacted that anyone of the age of sixteen or upwards present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle was to incur fine or imprisonment. A conventicle was defined as an assembly of more than five persons besides the members of a family met together for holding worship not according to the rites of the Church of England. The act was amended 22 Car. II, cap. i (1670), and practically repealed by the Toleration Act of 1689, but the act 22 Car. II, cap. i, was specially repealed 52 Geo. III, cap. 155, s. 1.

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Beaufort House Gardens, Chelsea

Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 May 1663. 27 May 1663. So I waked by 3 o'clock, my mind being troubled, and so took occasion by making water to wake my wife, and after having lain till past 4 o'clock seemed going to rise, though I did it only to see what she would do, and so going out of the bed she took hold of me and would know what ailed me, and after many kind and some cross words I began to tax her discretion in yesterday's business, but she quickly told me my own, knowing well enough that it was my old disease of jealousy, which I denied, but to no purpose. After an hour's discourse, sometimes high and sometimes kind, I found very good reason to think that her freedom with him is very great and more than was convenient, but with no evil intent, and so after awhile I caressed her and parted seeming friends, but she crying in a great discontent.
So I up and by water to the Temple, and thence with Commissioner Pett (52) to St. James's, where an hour with Mr. Coventry (35) talking of Mr. Pett's (52) proceedings lately in the forest of Sherwood, and thence with Pett to my Lord Ashley (41), Chancellor (54) of the Exchequer; where we met the auditors about settling the business of the accounts of persons to whom money is due before the King's time in the Navy, and the clearing of their imprests for what little of their debts they have received. I find my Lord, as he is reported, a very ready, quick, and diligent person.
Thence I to Westminster Hall, where Term and Parliament make the Hall full of people; no further news yet of the King of France (24), whether he be dead or not. Here I met with my cozen Roger Pepys (46), and walked a good while with him, and among other discourse as a secret he hath committed to nobody but myself, and he tells me that his sister Claxton now resolving to give over the keeping of his house at Impington, he thinks it fit to marry again, and would have me, by the help of my uncle Wight or others, to look him out a widow between thirty and forty years old, without children, and with a fortune, which he will answer in any degree with a joynture fit for her fortune. A woman sober, and no high-flyer, as he calls it. I demanded his estate. He tells me, which he says also he hath not done to any, that his estate is not full £800 per annum, but it is £780 per annum, of which £200 is by the death of his last wife, which he will allot for a joynture for a wife, but the rest, which lies in Cambridgeshire, he is resolved to leave entire for his eldest son. I undertook to do what I can in it, and so I shall. He tells me that the King (32) hath sent to them to hasten to make an end by midsummer, because of his going into the country; so they have set upon four bills to dispatch: the first of which is, he says, too devilish a severe act against conventicles; so beyond all moderation, that he is afeard it will ruin all: telling me that it is matter of the greatest grief to him in the world, that he should be put upon this trust of being a Parliament-man, because he says nothing is done, that he can see, out of any truth and sincerity, but mere envy and design.
Thence by water to Chelsey, all the way reading a little book I bought of "Improvement of Trade", a pretty book and many things useful in it. So walked to Little Chelsey, where I found my Lord Sandwich (37) with Mr. Becke, the master of the house, and Mr. Creed at dinner, and I sat down with them, and very merry.
After dinner (Mr. Gibbons (47) being come in also before dinner done) to musique, they played a good Fancy, to which my Lord is fallen again, and says he cannot endure a merry tune, which is a strange turn of his humour, after he has for two or three years flung off the practice of Fancies and played only fidlers' tunes.
Then into the Great Garden up to the Banqueting_House; and there by his glass we drew in the species very pretty. Afterwards to ninepins, where I won a shilling, Creed and I playing against my Lord and Cooke. This day there was great thronging to Banstead Downs, upon a great horse-race and foot-race. I am sorry I could not go thither.
So home back as I came, to London Bridge, and so home, where I find my wife in a musty humour, and tells me before Ashwell that Pembleton had been there, and she would not have him come in unless I was there, which I was ashamed of; but however, I had rather it should be so than the other way.
So to my office, to put things in order there, and by and by comes Pembleton, and word is brought me from my wife thereof that I might come home. So I sent word that I would have her go dance, and I would come presently. So being at a great loss whether I should appear to Pembleton or no, and what would most proclaim my jealousy to him, I at last resolved to go home, and took Tom Hater with me, and staid a good while in my chamber, and there took occasion to tell him how I hear that Parliament is putting an act out against all sorts of conventicles1, and did give him good counsel, not only in his own behalf, but my own, that if he did hear or know anything that could be said to my prejudice, that he would tell me, for in this wicked age (specially Sir W. Batten (62) being so open to my reproaches, and Sir J. Minnes (64), for the neglect of their duty, and so will think themselves obliged to scandalize me all they can to right themselves if there shall be any inquiry into the matters of the Navy, as I doubt there will) a man ought to be prepared to answer for himself in all things that can be inquired concerning him. After much discourse of this nature to him I sent him away, and then went up, and there we danced country dances, and single, my wife and I; and my wife paid him off for this month also, and so he is cleared.
After dancing we took him down to supper, and were very merry, and I made myself so, and kind to him as much as I could, to prevent his discourse, though I perceive to my trouble that he knows all, and may do me the disgrace to publish it as much as he can. Which I take very ill, and if too much provoked shall witness it to her. After supper and he gone we to bed.
Note 1. 16 Car. II, cap. 4, "An Act to prevent and suppresse seditious Conventicles". It was enacted that anyone of the age of sixteen or upwards present at an unlawful assembly or conventicle was to incur fine or imprisonment. A conventicle was defined as an assembly of more than five persons besides the members of a family met together for holding worship not according to the rites of the Church of England. The act was amended 22 Car. II, cap. i (1670), and practically repealed by the Toleration Act of 1689, but the act 22 Car. II, cap. i, was specially repealed 52 Geo. III, cap. 155, s. 1.

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Cadogan Street, Chelsea

Pont Street, Cadogan Street, Chelsea

Farm House Pont Street, Cadogan Street, Chelsea

Times Newspaper Marriages. 17 Jan 1918. THE EARL OF CARLISLE (23) AND MISS RUTHVEN (21).
The Marriage of Lieutenant the Earl of Carlisle (23) and Miss Bridget Helen Ruthven (21) eldest daughter of the Master of Ruthven (47) and the Hon. Mrs. Ruthven took place yesterday at St. Paul's Church, Knightsbridge. The ceremony was performed by the Bishop of Oxford (Dr. Charles Gore) (64), cousin of the bride. assisted bv the Rev. Canon Sheppard, D.D. Sub-Dean of the Chapel Royal (37).
The bride, who was given away by her father (47) wore a gown of cloth of silver, covered with Old Brussels lace. and lace sleeves, and as tulle veil vith wreath of real orange blossom. and carried a bouquet of myrtle. She was attended by three little pages and one bridesmaid. The pages were Master Patrick Hore-Ruthven, son of Lieutenant-Colonel the Hon. Alexander and Mrs. Hore-Ruthvcn, couson of the bride Master Michael Henley son or the Hon. Francis and Lady Dorothy Henley; and Master Anthony Toynbee son of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Toynbee, cousins of the bridegroom. They wore Kate Greenaway costumes of pale pink satin, with lawn collars and cuffs. The bridesmaid, Miss Jean Ruthven, sister of the bride, also wore pale pink satin, with a ruby-coloured velvet waistband embroidered in silver, a pale pink veil, with wreath of green leaves. She carried a small bouquet of myrtle. Lioutetant Henry Bovell, R.N.. was best man.
Among those present were:-.
The Hon. Mrs. Ruthven and the Misses Ruthven, Mrs. Jampson grandmother of the bride. Lord Ruthven, the Hon. Mrs. Alexander Hore-Ruthin. the Hon. Geoffrey Howard. M.P.. Professor Gilbert Murray and Lady Mary Murray. Lady Cecelia Roberts. Lady Dorothy Hanley, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Toynbee. the Duchess of Buccleuch and lady Sybil Scott, Winifred Countess of Arran, Lady Winifred Gore and Mrs. Dougal Malcolm, Mr. and Lady Mary Ehart, Viscountess Hambleden and the Hon. Edith Smith, Lord Sheffield, Viscount and Viscountess Dunluce. the Countess of Selkirk, Lord and Lady Stuart-Wortley, Grace Countess of Weymss, the Dowager Countems of Airlie. Lady Helen Mitford, Mrs. L'Estrange. Mrs. L'Estrange Malone, Lady Alwyne Compton. Lady Victoria Russell and the Misses Russell. Lady Jane Combe and the Misses Combe. Lady Blanche Conyngham, Lady (Francis) Howard, Lady Gore, Baroness Geneville aind Miss Winifred Paget.....
Men from nthe ship on which the Earl of Carlislc served at the Battle of Jutlaud formed a Guard of honour as the brlde and bridegroom left the church. There was no reception after the ceremony, but relatives went on to Farm House, Pont-street. Later the Earl (23) and Countess of Carlisle (21) left to spend the honeymoon at Muncaster Castle, the brlde vearing a dress of mole-coloured chiffon velvet with a fur coat aud a mole velvet toque.

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St Mary's Church Cadogan Street, Chelsea

On 18 Aug 1828 Henry Pelham 3rd Earl Chichester 1804-1886 (23) and Mary Brudenell Countess Chichester 1806-1867 (22) were married at St Mary's Church Cadogan Street. She by marriage Countess Chichester.

Chelsea Manor

Death of Anne of Cleves

On 16 Jul 1557 Anne of Cleves (41) died at Chelsea Manor. She was buried at Westminster Abbey on 03 Aug 1557. She was the last of Henry VIII's six wives to die having outlived him by ten years.

Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Anne of Cleves.

Chelsea Old Church

Battle of St Quentin

On 19 Nov 1557 John Braye 2nd Baron Braye -1557 died from wounds received at the Battle of St Quentin without issue. He was buried at Chelsea Old Church. Baron Braye abeyant between his six sisters inherited. The abeyance would be terminated in 1839 in favour of Sarah Otway-Cave 3rd Baroness Braye 1768-1862 a descendant of his sister Elizabeth Braye 1501-1573 (56).

Diary of Henry Machyn November 1557. 23 Nov 1557. The xxiij day of November was cared from Blake-freres to Temes syd, and ther wher rede to grett barges covered with blake and armes hangyng for my lord Bray, and so by water to Chelsey, to be bereyd by ys father, with iiij haroldes of armes, and a standard and a baner of armes, and ij baners of emages borne by ij haroldes of armes in ther cott armurs, and so mony nobull men morners in blake, and xvj porre men had new gownes, and a xvj grett torchys, ij whytt branchys, and iiij grett tapurs, and a cott armur, elmett, target, sword, and mantylles, and a viij dosen of skochyons; and after messe, and ther wher mony prestes and clarkes, and the dener at ys plase at Blake-frers, and so they cam bake from Cheshey to dener.

Around 1565 Elizabeth Fiennes 1565-1565 died. She was buried at Chelsea Old Church.

On 25 Dec 1594 Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594 (55) died. He was buried at Chelsea Old Church. His sister Margaret Fiennes 11th Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1541-1612 (53) succeeded 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1C 1321. Samson Lennard 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1544-1615 (50) by marriage 11th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1C 1321.

In 1559 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 and her son Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594.

On 25 Feb 1603 Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 (53) died at Arundel House. She was buried in Chelsea Old Church on 25 Apr 1603.

In 1590 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603.

On 30 Jun 1698 Charles Cheyne 1st Viscount Newhaven 1625-1698 (72) died. He was buried at Chelsea Old Church. His son William Cheyne 2nd Viscount Newhaven 1657-1728 (40) succeeded 2nd Viscount Newhaven.

Cheyne Walk

Eaton Gardens, Chelsea

26 Eaton Gardens, Chelsea

On 26 Apr 1923 Dorothea Hay Countess Chesterfield 1828-1923 (95) died at 26 Eaton Gardens. She was buried at St Cuthbert's Church Holme Lacy.

Eaton Mansions, Chelsea

12a Eaton Mansions, Chelsea

On 07 May 1959 Samuel Hoare 1st Viscount Templewood 1880-1959 (79) died at his home 12a Eaton Mansions. Viscount Templewood of Chelsea in Middlesex and Baronet Hoare of Sidestrand Hall extinct.

King's Road, Chelsea

Survey London Volume 4 Chelsea Part II. The house stood across the line of the present Beaufort Street and rather nearer King's Road than the river. Between it and the way along the waterside were two large courtyards, and opposite was a quay. The remainder of the estate, south of the present King's Road, was laid out in gardens and orchards, with the exception of the stable buildings, where now is the Moravian Burial Ground, and the farmhouse and barns on the site of Lindsey House. The situation, attractive as it is now, was far lovelier then, when across the Surrey bank was a view of undisturbed wood and pasture.

211 King's Road King's Road, Chelsea

Argyll House 211 King's Road King's Road, Chelsea

On 20 Dec 1790 Elizabeth Gunning Duchess Hamilton and Argyll 1733-1790 (57) died in Argyll House 211 King's Road King's Road. Her son Douglas Hamilton 8th Duke Hamilton 5th Duke Brandon 1756-1799 (34) succeeded 2nd Baron Hamilton of Hamilton in Leicestershire. Elizabeth Anne Burrell Duchess Hamilton Duchess Brandon 1757-1837 (33) by marriage Baroness Hamilton of Hamilton in Leicestershire.

Around 1754 Gavin Hamilton Painter 1723-1798. Portrait of Elizabeth Gunning Duchess Hamilton and Argyll 1733-1790.

Chelsea Town Hall King's Road, King's Road

Lindsey Row, Chelsea

7 Lindsey Row, Chelsea

Letters of James McNeill Whistler 16 Mar 1863 to James Anderson Rose. 16 Mar 1863 or 23 Mar 1863. 7a Queens Road West, Chelsea. Monday - / March
Dear Rose (43) -
Any news about "my house" - . Is it all right? am I wanted to take any step? or will it all be settled without me? Are you going to make him do anything at all to the house and can I go in shortly when the agreement is made
I have been knocked up for a couple of days with rheumatism but hope to get to work again tomorrow - I was very sorry not to see you the other day at Rosetti's (34) -
Will you drop me a line about the house.
With many thanks
Ever Yours
J Whistler (28)

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1862. Frederick Sandys Painter 1829-1904. Portrait of Susanna Rose nee Anderson 1795-1870. Mother of collector James Anderson Rose 1819-1890. Sandys exhibited this portrait at the Royal Academy in 1863.1902. Frederick Sandys Painter 1829-1904. Portrait of Emily Winter Rose nee Chadwick 1825-1907, wife of collector James Anderson Rose 1819-1890.

Letters of James McNeill Whistler 13 May 1863 to Dante Gabriel Rossetti. 13 May 1863. 7 Lindsey Row Battersea Bridge Old Chelsea. Wednesday
Dear Rossetti (35) -
Do come and breakfast with me on Sunday next at half past eleven - to meet Gambart (48) and perhaps Steevens (40) -
Ever yours
J Whistler (28)

Letters of James McNeill Whistler 31 May 1863 to Frederick Sandys. 31 May 1863. 7 Lindsey Row Old Chelsea. Sunday
Dear Sandys (34) -
You have done the proper thing thoroughly and I only wish I could accept your jolly invitation and do the yachting and eat the dinner which I have no doubt will be stunning -
but it's of no use - I must stick to a couple of pictures, commissions! for I am just about cleaned out - and tin will be forked over on their completion -
Your "Vivien" is splendid in tone and colour especially the head - of course it is badly hung -
One of my pictures [is] refused and one put on the floor - You will perhaps be pleased to hear that the "White Girl" is a real success in Paris - and already I have had a letter to know if it may be possessed for gold! -
Adieu mon cher - Remember me to Tom Geckyl (35) -
Jo (20) says many things aimables - and if ever I lent her to anyone to paint, it should certainly be to you mon ami -
Adieu again - and success to the trip -
Ever yours,
J. Whistler

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1865 to 1866. Gustave Courbet Painter 1819-1877. "La Bella Irlandaise" aka "Portrait of Jo. Model Joanna Hiffernan Model 1843-1903.

Lowndes Square, Chelsea

14 William Street Lowndes Square, Chelsea

On 08 Aug 1871 Olga de Meyer 1871-1931 was born at 14 William Street Lowndes Square. Possibly a daughter of the Prince of Wales (29).

1907. John Singer Sargent Painter 1856-1925 Portrait of Olga de Meyer 1871-1931.1907. William Bruce Ellis Ranken Painter 1881-1941. Portrait of Olga de Meyer 1871-1931.1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910.Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales.

Neat Houses, Chelsea

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 September 1664. 12 Sep 1664. Up, and to my cozen Anthony_Joyce_1668's, and there took leave of my aunt James, and both cozens, their wives, who are this day going down to my father's by coach. I did give my Aunt 20s., to carry as a token to my mother, and 10s. to Pall.
Thence by coach to St. James's, and there did our business as usual with the Duke; and saw him with great pleasure play with his little girle, [Afterwards Queen (25) Mary II] like an ordinary private father of a child.
Thence walked to Jervas's, where I took Jane in the shop alone, and there heard of her, her master and mistress were going out. So I went away and came again half an hour after. In the meantime went to the Abbey, and there went in to see the tombs with great pleasure. Back again to Jane, and there upstairs and drank with her, and staid two hours with her kissing her, but nothing more.
Anon took boat and by water to the Neat Houses over against Fox Hall to have seen Greatorex (39) dive, which Jervas and his wife were gone to see, and there I found them (and did it the rather for a pretence for my having been so long at their house), but being disappointed of some necessaries to do it I staid not, but back to Jane, but she would not go out with me.
So I to Mr. Creed's lodgings, and with him walked up and down in the New Exchange, talking mightily of the convenience and necessity of a man's wearing good clothes, and so after eating a messe of creame I took leave of him, he walking with me as far as Fleete Conduit, he offering me upon my request to put out some money for me into Backewell's hands at 6 per cent. interest, which he seldom gives, which I will consider of, being doubtful of trusting any of these great dealers because of their mortality, but then the convenience of having one's money, at an houre's call is very great.
Thence to my uncle Wight's (62), and there supped with my wife, having given them a brave barrel of oysters of Povy's (50) giving me.
So home and to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 05 August 1666. 05 Aug 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and down to the Old Swan, and there called Betty Michell and her husband, and had two or three a long salutes from her out of sight of 'su mari' [Note. her husband], which pleased me mightily, and so carried them by water to West minster, and I to St. James's, and there had a meeting before the Duke of Yorke (32), complaining of want of money, but nothing done to any purpose, for want we shall, so that now our advices to him signify nothing. Here Sir W. Coventry (38) did acquaint the Duke of Yorke (32) how the world do discourse of the ill method of our books, and that we would consider how to answer any enquiry which shall be made after our practice therein, which will I think concern the Controller most, but I shall make it a memento to myself.
Thence walked to the Parish Church to have one look upon Betty Michell, and so away homeward by water, and landed to go to the church, where, I believe, Mrs. Horsely goes, by Merchant-tailors' Hall, and there I find in the pulpit Elborough, my old schoolfellow and a simple rogue, and yet I find him preaching a very good sermon, and in as right a parson-like manner, and in good manner too, as I have heard any body; and the church very full, which is a surprising consideration; but I did not see her.
So home, and had a good dinner, and after dinner with my wife, and Mercer, and Jane by water, all the afternoon up as high as Morclaeke with great pleasure, and a fine day, reading over the second part of "The Siege of Rhodes", with great delight. We landed and walked at Barne-elmes, and then at the Neat Houses I landed and bought a millon, [melon] and we did also land and eat and drink at Wandsworth, and so to the Old Swan, and thence walked home. It being a mighty fine cool evening, and there being come, my wife and I spent an houre in the garden, talking of our living in the country, when I shall be turned out of the office, as I fear the Parliament may find faults enough with the office to remove us all, and I am joyed to think in how good a condition I am to retire thither, and have wherewith very well to subsist. Nan, at Sir W. Pen's (45), lately married to one Markeham, a kinsman of Sir W. Pen's (45), a pretty wench she is.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 01 August 1667. 01 Aug 1667. Up, and all the morning at the office.
At noon my wife and I dined at Sir W. Pen's (46), only with Mrs. Turner (44) and her husband (54), on a damned venison pasty, that stunk like a devil. However, I did not know it till dinner was done. We had nothing but only this, and a leg of mutton, and a pullet or two. Mrs. Markham was here, with her great belly. I was very merry, and after dinner, upon a motion of the women, I was got to go to the play with them-the first I have seen since before the Dutch coming upon our coast, and so to the King's house, to see "The Custome of the Country". The house mighty empty—more than ever I saw it—and an ill play. After the play, we into the house, and spoke with Knipp, who went abroad with us by coach to the Neat Houses in the way to Chelsy; and there, in a box in a tree, we sat and sang, and talked and eat; my wife out of humour, as she always is, when this woman is by. So, after it was dark, we home. Set Knepp down at home, who told us the story how Nell is gone from the King's house, and is kept by my Lord Buckhurst (24).
Then we home, the gates of the City shut, it being so late: and at Newgate we find them in trouble, some thieves having this night broke open prison. So we through, and home; and our coachman was fain to drive hard from two or three fellows, which he said were rogues, that he met at the end of Blow-bladder Street, next Cheapside. So set Mrs. Turner (44) home, and then we home, and I to the Office a little; and so home and to bed, my wife in an ill humour still.

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Old Manor, Chelsea

After 31 Jan 1547 Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548 resided at Old Manor.

In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548.Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548.

Propsect Place, Chelsea

5 Propsect Place, Chelsea

30 Mar 1851. Census. 5 Propsect Place.
William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910 (23). 22. Historical Painter.

Queens Road West, Chelsea

7A Queens Road West, Chelsea

Letters of James McNeill Whistler 16 Mar 1863 to James Anderson Rose. 16 Mar 1863 or 23 Mar 1863. 7a Queens Road West, Chelsea. Monday - / March
Dear Rose (43) -
Any news about "my house" - . Is it all right? am I wanted to take any step? or will it all be settled without me? Are you going to make him do anything at all to the house and can I go in shortly when the agreement is made
I have been knocked up for a couple of days with rheumatism but hope to get to work again tomorrow - I was very sorry not to see you the other day at Rosetti's (34) -
Will you drop me a line about the house.
With many thanks
Ever Yours
J Whistler (28)

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Letters of James McNeill Whistler 20 Mar 1863 to James Anderson Rose. 7A Queens Road West - Chelsea - Friday
Dear Rose -
Many thanks for all that [you] have done and are so kindly doing for me - I shall only be too glad to see about what etchings I may have for exhibition by Thursday next - Tomorrow though I can't have the pleasure of dining with you, as I am finishing The White Girl for the Salon in Paris and it ought to go off on Monday - so that I should be painting at it until late in the evening - I would very much like you to see it before I send it - If you were by any chance in Rosetti's neighborhood tomorrow morning and could drop in and have a peep -
Shall I send the Brittany Sea piece to the 'Artists & Amateurs' or would it be too large?
Ever Yours
J Whistler

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Ranelagh House, Chelsea

On 05 Jan 1712 Richard Jones 1st Earl Ranelagh 1641-1712 (70) died. Catherine Jones 1672-1740 (40) inherited Ranelagh House.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Richard Jones 1st Earl Ranelagh 1641-1712.In 1687 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Frances Jones Countess Coningsbury 1673-1716 and Catherine Jones 1672-1740.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768 (53). Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea

In 1742 Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea were opened to the public as a more fashionable, and more expensive, competitor to Vauxhall Gardens. The Rotunda was 37m across. It was closed in 1803 and demonlished in 1805.

Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea

In 1742 Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea were opened to the public as a more fashionable, and more expensive, competitor to Vauxhall Gardens. The Rotunda was 37m across. It was closed in 1803 and demonlished in 1805.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768 (53). Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768 (56). View of the interior of the Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea.

Around 1754. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. View of the interior of the Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea.

Royal Hospital Chelsea

John Evelyn's Diary 27 January 1682. 27 Jan 1682. This evening, Sir Stephen Fox (54) acquainted me again with his Majesty's (51) resolution of proceeding in the erection of a Royal Hospital for emerited soldiers on that spot of ground which the Royal Society had sold to his Majesty (51) for £1,300, and that he would settle £5,000 per annum on it, and build to the value of £20,000 for the relief and reception of four companies, namely, 400 men, to be as in a college, or monastery. I was therefore desired by Sir Stephen (54) (who had not only the whole managing of this, but was, as I perceived, himself to be a grand benefactor, as well it became him who had gotten so vast an estate by the soldiers) to assist him, and consult what method to cast it in, as to the government. So, in his study we arranged the governor, chaplain, steward, housekeeper, chirurgeon, cook, butler, gardener, porter, and other officers, with their several salaries and entertainments. I would needs have a library, and mentioned several books, since some soldiers might possibly be studious, when they were at leisure to recollect. Thus we made the first calculations, and set down our thoughts to be considered and digested better, to show his Majesty (51) and the Archbishop. He also engaged me to consider of what laws and orders were fit for the government, which was to be in every respect as strict as in any religious convent.
After supper, came in the famous treble, Mr. Abel, newly returned from Italy; I never heard a more excellent voice; one would have sworn it had been a woman's, it was so high, and so well and skillfully managed, being accompanied by Signor Francesco on the harpsichord.

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Sinking of the Gloucester

John Evelyn's Diary 25 May 1682. 25 May 1682. I was desired by Sir Stephen Fox (55) and Sir Christopher Wren (58) to accompany them to Lambeth, with the plot and design of the college to be built at Chelsea, to have the Archbishop's approbation. It was a quadrangle of 200 feet square, after the dimensions of the larger quadrangle at Christ church, Oxford, for the accommodation of 440 persons, with Governor of and officers. This was agreed on.
The Duke (48) and James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (48) and Duchess of York (23) were just now come to London, after his escape and shipwreck, as he went by sea for Scotland. See Sinking of the Gloucester.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 August 1682. 04 Aug 1682. With Sir Stephen Fox (55), to survey the foundations of the Royal Hospital begun at Chelsea.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768 (53). Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

Around 1751. Canaletto Painter 1697-1768. Royal Hospital Chelsea, Rotunda Ranelagh Gardens Chelsea and Ranelagh House.

On 13 Oct 1791 Elizabeth Beckford Countess Effingham 1725-1791 (66) died at Royal Hospital Chelsea.

Sloane Street, Chelsea

91 Sloane Street, Chelsea

On 01 Apr 1861 Charlotte Susan Maria Campbell 1775-1861 (86) died at 91 Sloane Street.

1789. Johann Heinrich Tischbein Painter 1722-1789. Portrait of Charlotte Susan Maria Campbell 1775-1861 as Artemisia.

The Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity with Saint Jude Sloane Street, Chelsea

On 30 Apr 1892 Henry Arthur Cadogan 1868-1908 (23) and Mildred Cecilia Sturt 1869-1942 (23) were married at The Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity with Saint Jude Sloane Street.

On 28 Jul 1910 Herbert Dixon Asquith 1881-1947 (29) and Cynthia Mary Evelyn Charteris 1887-1960 (23) were married at The Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity with Saint Jude Sloane Street.