History of Gloucestershire

577 Battle of Dyrham

946 Death of King Edmund

1051 Banishment of the Godwins

1495 Death of Jasper Tudor Duke Bedford

1643 Battle of Lansdowne

Gloucestershire is in Welsh March.

After 1603 Colonel Nathaniel Pope 1603-1660 was born to William Pope 1st Earl Downe 1573-1631 and Anne Hopton Baroness Wentworth 1561-1625 at Gloucestershire.

Before 1619 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of William Pope 1st Earl Downe 1573-1631.Around 1590 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. Portrait of Anne Hopton Baroness Wentworth 1561-1625.

Around 1630 Leonard Hoar 1630- was born to Charles Hoar in Gloucestershire.

Three Shires Stone is three blocks of limestone, each dated 1736 and with the initial of one of the three counties, with a large cap, mark where the historical counties of Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset meet. Each stone is approximately 9–12 feet in height and weighs four to five tons, with the cap being of a similar size and weight.

Acton Turville, Gloucestershire

The Gloucester River Avon rises near Acton Turville after which it flows past Luckington, Sherston, Easton Grey, Malmesbury, Great Somerford, Christian Malford, Chippenham, Melksham, Bradford on Avon, under the Dundas Aquaduct, through Bath, past Keynsham, through Bristol under the Clifton Suspension Bridge to Avonmouth where it joins the Severn Estuary.

Adlestrop, Gloucestershire

St Mary Magdalene's Church Adlestrop, Gloucestershire

On 14 Apr 1905 Henry Pitt Cholmondeley 1820-1905 (84) died. He was buried at St Mary Magdalene's Church Adlestrop.

On 24 Aug 1906 Mary Leigh 1828-1906 (78) died. She was buried at St Mary Magdalene's Church Adlestrop.

Alveston, Gloucestershire

Around 1220 Fulk IV Fitzwarin 1220-1264 was born to Fulk Fitzwarin 1160-1258 (60) and Maud Vavasour 1176-1225 (43) at Alveston.

Avonmouth, Gloucestershire

The Gloucester River Avon rises near Acton Turville after which it flows past Luckington, Sherston, Easton Grey, Malmesbury, Great Somerford, Christian Malford, Chippenham, Melksham, Bradford on Avon, under the Dundas Aquaduct, through Bath, past Keynsham, through Bristol under the Clifton Suspension Bridge to Avonmouth where it joins the Severn Estuary.

Badminton

Berkeley

Bibury, Gloucestershire

Bibury is on the River Coln.

On 28 May 1840 Frederick Dutton 5th Baron Sherborne 1840-1920 was born to James Henry Legge Dutton 3rd Baron Sherborne 1804-1883 (35) and Elizabeth Howard Baroness Sherborne 1803-1845 (37) at Bibury.

Bisley, Gloucestershire

In 1251 Margery Bohun Lady Verdun 1251-1309 was born to Humphrey Bohun 1225-1265 (26) and Eleanor Braose 1228-1251 (23) at Bisley.

Blockley, Gloucestershire

On 15 Jan 1750 Elizabeth Rushout Countess Northampton -1750 died. She was buried in Blockley.

Northwick Park Blockley, Gloucestershire

In 1683 James Rushout 1st Baronet Rushout Northwick Park 1644-1698 (38) bought Northwick Park Blockley.

Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street, aka Ryknild Street, is a Roman Road from Bourton-on-the-Water to Templeborough. Icknield Street is road RM18 in Ivan Margary's book 'Roman Roads in Britain'.

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

The River Windrush is a tributary of the River Thames. Its is near Taddington in Gloucestershire. It travels broadly south-west through Bourton-on-the-Water, Burford, Minster Lovell, Witney joining the River Thames at Nebridge.

Bourton-on-the-Water Fosse Way, Gloucestershire

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester and Lichfield. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Moreton-in-Marsh, Halford, past Fosse Way Compton Verney, Princethorpe, then Bretford where it crosses the River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Slaughter Pike, Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

Brimpsfield

Bristol

Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

On 03 Dec 1817 Gwendoline Catherine Talbot 1817-1840 was born to John "Good Earl" Talbot 16th Earl Shrewsbury 16th Earl Waterford 1791-1852 (26) and Maria Theresa Talbot Countess Shrewsbury Countess Waterford -1856 at Cheltenham.

On 25 Jul 1821 Frances Twysden 1753-1821 (68) died in Cheltenham. She was buried in the Villiers Vault All Saints' Church Middleton Stoney.

On 17 Nov 1845 Salusbury Pryce Davenport 1778-1845 (66) died at Cheltenham. He was buried at Leckhampton Cheltenham.

Imperial Square Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

6 Imperial Square Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

On 25 Apr 1879 Charles Tennyson Turner 1808-1879 (70) died at 6 Imperial Square Cheltenham.

Leckhampton Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

On 17 Nov 1845 Salusbury Pryce Davenport 1778-1845 (66) died at Cheltenham. He was buried at Leckhampton Cheltenham.

Chipping Campden

Cirencester

Clearwell, Gloucestershire

Clearwell Court Clearwell, Gloucestershire

In 1727 Thomas Wyndham 1686-1752 (41) commissioned the building of Clearwell Court Clearwell.

Coberley, Gloucestershire

In 1427 Thomas Brugge 5th Baron Chandos 1427-1493 was born to Giles Brugge 4th Baron Chandos 1396-1466 (30) at Coberley.

Around 1462 Giles Brugge 6th Baron Chandos 1462-1511 was born to Thomas Brugge 5th Baron Chandos 1427-1493 (35) and Florence Darell Baroness Chandos 1425-1506 (37) at Coberley.

On 13 Apr 1466 Giles Brugge 4th Baron Chandos 1396-1466 (69) died at Coberley. His son Thomas Brugge 5th Baron Chandos 1427-1493 (39) succeeded 5th Baron Chandos 1C 1337. Florence Darell Baroness Chandos 1425-1506 (41) by marriage Baroness Chandos.

On 09 Mar 1492 John Brydges 1st Baron Chandos 1492-1557 was born to Giles Brugge 6th Baron Chandos 1462-1511 (30) and Isabel Baynham Baroness Chandos 1475-1511 (17) at Coberley.

Cold Ashton, Gloucestershire

Battle of Lansdowne

On 05 Jul 1643 the Battle of Lansdowne was an inconclusive battle between a Royalist army commanded by Ralph Hopton 1st Baron Hopton 1596-1652 (47) and a Parliamentary Army commanded by William Waller 1597-1668 (46) at Lansdown Hill Bath. The two commanders being old friends.
Edward Leke -1643 was killed.
Bevil Granville 1595-1643 (48) was killed at the at the head of the Cornish infantry as it reached the top of Lansdown Hill. He received a blow to the head with a pole-axe and was taken to the rectory at nearby Cold Ashton where he died.

Condicote, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

Cotswold Airport, Gloucestershire

Fosse Way 5c Bath to Cirencester. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road where it curves around Solsbury Hill to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone, Fosse Gate, crossing the River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey before reaching the Cotswold Airport after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester.

Deerhurst, Gloucestershire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1053. About this time was the great wind, on the mass-night of St. Thomas; which did much harm everywhere. And all the midwinter also was much wind. It was this year resolved to slay Rees, the Welsh king's brother, because he did harm; and they brought his head to Gloucester on the eve of Twelfth-day. In this same year, before Allhallowmas, died Wulfsy, Bishop of Lichfield; and Godwin, Abbot of Winchcomb; and Aylward, Abbot of Glastonbury; all within one month. And Leofwine, Abbot of Coventry, took to the bishopric at Lichfield; Bishop Aldred to the abbacy at Winchcomb; and Aylnoth took to the abbacy at Glastonbury. The same year died Elfric, brother of Odda (60), at Deerhurst; and his body resteth at Pershore.

Dodington Park, Gloucestershire

The River Frome rises in Dodington Park after which it flows past Westerleigh, Iron Acton, Frampton Coterrel then into Bristol where is covered for a long stretch emerging into Bristol Floating Harbour before joining the River Avon.

Down Ampney

Dyrham, Gloucestershire

Hinton Hill Dyrham, Gloucestershire

Battle of Dyrham

In 577 Ceawlin King Wessex -592 and his son Cuthwine 565- (12) won a major victory over the Britons at the Battle of Dyrham Hinton Hill Dyrham. The victory of resulted in the capture of Gloucester, Cirencester and Bath.
Coinmail Briton -577, Condidan Briton -577 and Farinmail Briton -577 were killed.

Elmore, Gloucestershire

Church of St John the Baptist Elmore, Gloucestershire

In Nov 1695 John Guise 2nd Baronet Guise 1654-1695 (41) died of smallpox. He was buried in Church of St John the Baptist Elmore.

Fairford, Gloucestershire

Fairford is on the River Coln.

On 30 May 1718 Wills Hill 1st Marquess Downshire 1718-1793 was born to Trevor Hill 1st Viscount Hillsborough 1693-1742 (25) at Fairford.

On 19 May 1793 John Chetwynd-Talbot 1st Earl Talbot 1749-1793 (44) died at Fairford. His son Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot 1777-1849 (16) succeeded 2nd Earl Talbot 2C 1784.

In 1773 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of John Chetwynd-Talbot 1st Earl Talbot 1749-1793.In 1798 Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun Painter 1755-1842. Portrait of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot 1777-1849.1807. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of the children of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot 1777-1849 and Frances Thomasine Lambart Countess Talbot 1772-1819.1811. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of the children of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot 2nd Earl Talbot 1777-1849 and Frances Thomasine Lambart Countess Talbot 1772-1819.

Forest of Dean

Fossbridge, Gloucestershire

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester and Lichfield. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Moreton-in-Marsh, Halford, past Fosse Way Compton Verney, Princethorpe, then Bretford where it crosses the River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Frampton on Severn, Gloucestershire

In 1353 James Boteville 1353-1419 was born to John Clifford 1310-1376 (43) at Frampton on Severn.

Around 1401 Katherine Boteville Baroness Chandos 1401-1466 was born to James Boteville 1353-1419 (48) at Frampton on Severn.

Around 1419 James Boteville 1353-1419 (66) died at Frampton on Severn.

Frampton Coterrel, Gloucestershire

In 1458 Thomas Poyntz 1381-1458 (77) died at Frampton Coterrel.

The River Frome rises in Dodington Park after which it flows past Westerleigh, Iron Acton, Frampton Coterrel then into Bristol where is covered for a long stretch emerging into Bristol Floating Harbour before joining the River Avon.

Gloucester

Goodrich, Gloucestershire

Goodrich Castle, Gloucestershire

On 27 Nov 1245 Walter Marshal 5th Earl Pembroke 1199-1245 (46) died at Goodrich Castle. He was buried at Tintern Abbey next to his mother Isabel Clare 4th Countess Pembroke 1172-1220 (73) His brother Anselm Marshal 6th Earl Pembroke 1208-1245 (37) succeeded 6th Earl Pembroke 2C 1199 although he only enjoyed the title for one month dying on 23 Dec 1245.

In 1332 Gilbert Talbot 3rd Baron Talbot 1332-1386 was born to Richard Talbot 2nd Baron Talbot 1305-1356 (27) and Elizabeth Comyn Baroness Talbot at Goodrich Castle.

The River Wye rises on Plynlimon after which it travels through, under, or near, Rhayader, Newbridge-on-Wye, Builth Wells, Llanstephan Suspension Bridge, Glasbury, Hay-on-Wye, Clifford Castle, Bredwardine, Byford, Wye Bridge Hereford, Holme Lacy, Capler Camp, through Ross-on-Wye, past Goodrich Castle, Monmouth, Tintern Abbey and Chepstow Castle joining the Severn Estuary 800m south-east of Thornwell.

Baderon Monmouth Lord Monmouth 1100-1176 undertook building works at Goodrich Castle.

Great Barrington, Gloucestershire

St Mary Church Great Barrington, Gloucestershire

1787. Joseph Nollekens Sculptor 1737-1823 (49). Design for monument to Mary Cardonnel Countess Talbot 1719-1787 (68) at St Mary Church Great Barrington.

1787. Joseph Nollekens Sculptor 1737-1823. Design for monument to Mary Cardonnel Countess Talbot 1719-1787 at St Mary Church Great Barrington.

Hatherop, Gloucestershire

Around 1655 John Webb 3rd Baronet Webb 1655-1745 was born to John Webb 2nd Baronet Webb -1700 and Mary Blomer Lady Webb -1709 in Hatherop.

Saint Nicholas Church Hatherop, Gloucestershire

On 29 May 1709 Mary Blomer Lady Webb -1709 died. She was buried at Saint Nicholas Church Hatherop.

Hinchwich, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

Iron Acton

Little Rissington, Gloucestershire

In 1095 Gilbert Basset 1095-1165 was born to Ralph Basset 1076-1127 (19) at Little Rissington.

Lower Swell, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

Keynsham, Gloucestershire

Around 1492 John Hussey 1st Baron Hussey Sleaford 1465-1537 (27) and Margaret Blount 1474-1509 (17) were married at Keynsham.

In 1617 Thomas Brydges 1617-1705 was born to Edward Brydges 1590-1639 (27) at Keynsham.

The Gloucester River Avon rises near Acton Turville after which it flows past Luckington, Sherston, Easton Grey, Malmesbury, Great Somerford, Christian Malford, Chippenham, Melksham, Bradford on Avon, under the Dundas Aquaduct, through Bath, past Keynsham, through Bristol under the Clifton Suspension Bridge to Avonmouth where it joins the Severn Estuary.

The River Chew rises near Chewton Mendip then flows north past Litton, through reservoirs and lakes to Chew Magna, Pensford, Compton Dando joining the River Avon at Keynsham.

Church of St John the Baptist Keynsham, Gloucestershire

On 25 Dec 1744 Henry Brydges 2nd Duke Chandos 1708-1771 (36) and Anne Wells Duchess Chandos were married. She by marriage Duchess Chandos. Two versions of their meeting are related...
Notes & Queries 1870 4th Series, Vol. 6, p.179: Lord Omery remarked, on 15th January 1745, "Of her person & character people speak variously, but all agree that both are very bad. " He was speaking of Anne, Duchess of Chandos. She was the daughter of one John Wells of Newbury (& St. Marylebone) whose arms appear as azure, three fountains proper, on her hatchment at Keynsham Church. She was chambermaid at the Pelican Inn Newbury, and married to Jeffries the Ostler there. There is a story about the Duchess told by an old lady of Newbury, who was ten years old at the time. Henry Bridges, 2nd Duke of Chandos (36), while on his way to London, dined at the Pelican Inn in Newbury, with a companion (it has been claimed that the Inn was the Marlborough Castle, but this is incorrect). After dinner there was a stir and a bustle in the Inn Yard. The explanation came that "A man is going to sell his wife and they are leading her up the yard with a halter round her neck". "We will go and see the sale, " said the Duke. On entering the yard, however, he was so smitten with the woman's beauty and the patient way she waited to be set free from her ill‑conditioned husband, the Inn's ostler, that he bought her himself. She was his mistress for some years. In August 1738 his wife died, and by 1744 the ostler was dead also, and the two were finally married at Mr. Keith's Chapel, Mayfair on 25th December 1744.
The Gentleman's Magazine 1832. The Duke of Chandos (36), while staying at a small country inn, saw the ostler beating his wife in a most cruel manner; he interfered and literally bought her for half a crown. She was a young and pretty woman; the Duke had her educated; and on the husband's death he married her. On her death-bed, she had her whole household assembled, told them her history, and drew from it a touching moral of reliance on Providence; as from the most wretched situation, she had been suddenly raised to one of the greatest prosperity; she entreated their forgiveness if at any time she had given needless offence, and then dismissed them with gifts; dying almost in the very act.

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Kings Weston, Gloucestershire

King's Weston House Kings Weston, Gloucestershire

On 11 Sep 1702 Robert Southwell 1635-1702 (66) died at King's Weston House Kings Weston.

Around 1695 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Robert Southwell 1635-1702.

Langtree, Gloucestershire

Banishment of the Godwins

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (36), who had the sister (47) of King Edward (48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover. For Eustace (36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (30), his son, over his; and Harold (29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (48), that they would seek Godwin's (50) army if the king (48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (48) held a council, and proclaimed him (50) an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (50) and his wife, and all his three sons — Sweyne (30) and Tosty (25) and Grith (19). And he went south to Thorney, (67) with his wife, and Sweyne (30) his son, and Tosty (25) and his wife (18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria 1033-1094 (18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders 1012-1067 (38)], and his son Grith (19). Earl Harold (29) with Leofwine (16) went to Bristol in the ship that Earl Sweyne (30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (50), and Earl Sweyne (30), and Earl Harold (29), together at Beverstone, and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (48). There was now assembled before the king (48) (68) Earl Siward (41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (50) and his sons, that the king (48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Harold (29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Sweyne (30) to Bosham, and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (48) security. It was from Thorney (69) that Godwin (50) and those that were with him went to Bruges, to Baldwin's (38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (48) darlings; and his daughter (25) wedded and united to the king (48). Soon after this took place, the king (48) dismissed the lady (25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell. Soon after came Earl William (23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (29) before possessed.
67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.
68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

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Lechlade, Gloucestershire

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 06 Aug 1307 King Edward II (23). Dumfries. To the treasurer and the barons of the Exchequer. Order to discharge the Abbot of Hayles of 50l.Yearly, which he used to pay for the town of Leechelade to the late Edmund earl of Cornwall (57), and, after his death, to the late King, the king having granted the earldom of Cornwall and all the lands of the said Edmund to Peter de Gavaston (23), knight.
To the like favour of Michael de Meldon for 4 marks annually for his lands in Worton.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 16 Jan 1310 King Edward II of England (25). The Grove Watford. To the Treasurer and the Barons of the Exchequer. Order to discharge the Abbot of Hayles of 100l.yearly, the rent of the manor of Lychelad, as the King granted it to Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (26) and Margaret his wife.
To the same. Order to discharge the men of Wallingford of the ferm of that town from August 5 last, to Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (26) and Margaret his wife.

Lechlade Bridge, Gloucestershire

Lechlade Bridge is over the River Thames.

The River Coln is a tributary of the River Thames joining at 3m west of Lechlade Bridge.

St John's Bridge Lechlade, Gloucestershire

Newbridge is a 13th Century bridge over the River Thames one of three bridges built on the orders of King John to facilitate the wool trade; the other two being St John's Bridge Lechlade and Radcot Bridge.

Maston, Gloucestershire

On 19 Aug 1689 Henry Selwyn 1689-1734 at Maston.

On 03 Sep 1734 Henry Selwyn 1689-1734 died at Maston.

Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester and Lichfield. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Moreton-in-Marsh, Halford, past Fosse Way Compton Verney, Princethorpe, then Bretford where it crosses the River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Batsford Park Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire

On 16 Jan 1830 John Freeman-Mitford 1st Baron Redesdale 1748-1830 (81) died at Batsford Park Moreton-in-Marsh. His son John Freeman-Mitford 1st Earl Redesdale 1805-1886 (24) succeeded 2nd Baron Redesdale of Redesdale in Northumberland 1C 1802.

North Cerney, Gloucestershire

On 15 Dec 1588 Thomas Vyner 1st Baronet of London 1588-1665 was born to Thomas Vyner 1529-1600 (59) at North Cerney.

Northleach, Gloucestershire

Northleach Fosse Way, Gloucestershire

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester and Lichfield. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Moreton-in-Marsh, Halford, past Fosse Way Compton Verney, Princethorpe, then Bretford where it crosses the River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Oldbury on the Hill, Gloucestershire

In 1667 Philip Bisse Bishop of Hereford 1667-1721 was born at Oldbury on the Hill.

Prescott, Gloucestershire

On 05 May 1957 Robert Grosvenor 5th Baron Ebury 1914-1957 (43) died in a car accident at Prescott whilst driving a Jaguar C-type. His son Francis Grosvenor 8th Earl Wilton 1934- (23) succeeded 6th Baron Ebury.

Pucklechurch, Gloucestershire

Death of King Edmund

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 946. This year King Edmund (25) died, on St. Augustine's mass day. That was widely known, how he ended his days:—that Leof stabbed him at Pucklechurch. And Ethelfleda of Damerham, daughter of Alderman Elgar, was then his queen. And he reigned six years and a half: and then succeeded to the kingdom Edred Atheling his brother, who soon after reduced all the land of the Northumbrians to his dominion; and the Scots gave him oaths, that they would do all that he desired.

On 26 May 946 Edmund I King England 921-946 (25) was murdered by Leofa, an exiled thief, whilst attending mass at Pucklechurch. He was buried at Glastonbury Abbey. His brother Eadred I King England -955 succeeded I King England.

Sandywell, Gloucestershire

On 13 Feb 1716 Jane Bowden -1716 died at Sandywell.

Sapperton, Gloucestershire

On 31 Aug 1616 Henry Poole of Sapperton 1541-1616 (75) died. He was buried in Sapperton.

Seven Springs, Gloucestershire

Source of the River Churn, Seven Springs, Gloucestershire

Thameshead is considered to the source of the River Thames although the head of the River Churn at Seven Springs is further away from the mouth of the Thames than Thameshead.

The River Churn is a tributary of the River Thames that rises at Seven Springs in Gloucestershire. Some consider this to be the source of the River Thames since its is further from the mouth of the Thames than the official source Thameshead. The River Churn joins the River Thames near Cricklade.

Sherborne, Gloucestershire

Around 1507 Thomas Dutton 1507-1581 was born to William Dutton 1482-1512 (25) at Sherborne.

In 1581 Thomas Dutton 1507-1581 (74) died at Sherborne. He was buried at Church of Saint Mary Magdalene Sherborne.

On 26 Nov 1638 Thomas Pope 2nd Earl Downe 1622-1660 (15) and Lucy Dutton Countess Downe 1638-1665 were married in Sherborne. She by marriage Countess Downe.

Around 1645 Ralph Dutton 1st Baronet Dutton 1645-1721 was born to Ralph Dutton 1575-1646 (70) and Mary Duncombe at Sherborne.

In 1721 Ralph Dutton 1st Baronet Dutton 1645-1721 (76) died at midnight in Sherborne. His son John Dutton 2nd Baronet Dutton 1684-1743 (36) succeeded 2nd Baronet Dutton.

In 1726. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of John Dutton 2nd Baronet Dutton 1684-1743.

On 29 Nov 1753 Jane Dutton 1753-1800 was born to James Lenox Dutton 1713-1776 (40) and Jane Bond -1776 at Sherborne.

On 25 Oct 1775 Thomas Coke 1st Earl of Leicester 1754-1842 (21) and Jane Dutton 1753-1800 (21) were married at Sherborne.

Around 1730 William Aikman Painter 1682-1731. Portrait of Thomas Coke 1st Earl of Leicester 1754-1842.

On 05 Aug 1821 Ralph Heneage Dutton 1821-1892 was born to John Dutton 2nd Baron Sherborne 1779-1862 (42) at Sherborne.

Springhill, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

St Briavels, Gloucestershire

St Briavels Castle, Gloucestershire

In 1291 John Botetort 1st Baron Botetort 1265-1324 (26) was appointed Governor of St Briavels Castle.

Stoke, Gloucestershire

Around 1319 Margaret Despencer 1319-1337 was born to Hugh "Younger" Despencer 1286-1326 (33) and Eleanor Clare Baroness Zouche Mortimer 1292-1337 (26) at Stoke. She a great granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Stoke Giffard

Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire

On or before 03 Dec 1633 Anthony Deane Shipbuilder 1633-1721 was born. On 03 Dec 1633 he was baptised at Stow-on-the-Wold.

Fosse Way 5d Cirencester to High Cross. From Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester the Fosse Way continues straight through Fossbridge where it crosses the River Coln, then past Northleach where it crosses the modern A40, then past Bourton-on-the-Water after which Icknield Street continues towards Alcester and Lichfield. 4.5km after Bourton-on-the-Water the Fosse Way makes a change in direction heading north passing through Stow-on-the-Wold, Moreton-in-Marsh, Halford, past Fosse Way Compton Verney, Princethorpe, then Bretford where it crosses the River Avon. After it crosses the River Avon it continues straight to Venonae aka High Cross where it crossed Watling Street.

Stowell, Gloucestershire

In 1541 Robert Atkins 1541-1639 was born in Stowell.

Stowell Park Stowell, Gloucestershire

Around 10 Jun 1722 John Grubyham Howe 1657-1722 (65) died at Stowell Park Stowell.

Tetbury, Gloucestershire

On 06 Feb 1312 Peter Brewes 1273-1312 (39) died at Tetbury.

In 1510 Thomas Berkeley 1470-1510 (40) died at Tetbury. His death year if usually reported as after 1500 but since his daughter Elizabeth was born in 1510 we have adjusted his death date to her birth date.

Beverstone Tetbury, Gloucestershire

Before 20 Mar 1413 John Berkeley 1361-1413 died at Beverstone Tetbury.

Around Apr 1421 Richard Poynings 1400-1429 (21) and Eleanor Berkeley Countess Arundel 1382-1455 (39) were married at Beverstone Tetbury. He a great x 5 grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She a great x 5 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

Beverstone Castle, Beverstone Tetbury, Gloucestershire

Banishment of the Godwins

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (36), who had the sister (47) of King Edward (48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover. For Eustace (36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (30), his son, over his; and Harold (29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (48), that they would seek Godwin's (50) army if the king (48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (48) held a council, and proclaimed him (50) an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (50) and his wife, and all his three sons — Sweyne (30) and Tosty (25) and Grith (19). And he went south to Thorney, (67) with his wife, and Sweyne (30) his son, and Tosty (25) and his wife (18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria 1033-1094 (18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders 1012-1067 (38)], and his son Grith (19). Earl Harold (29) with Leofwine (16) went to Bristol in the ship that Earl Sweyne (30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (50), and Earl Sweyne (30), and Earl Harold (29), together at Beverstone, and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (48). There was now assembled before the king (48) (68) Earl Siward (41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (50) and his sons, that the king (48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Harold (29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Sweyne (30) to Bosham, and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (48) security. It was from Thorney (69) that Godwin (50) and those that were with him went to Bruges, to Baldwin's (38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (48) darlings; and his daughter (25) wedded and united to the king (48). Soon after this took place, the king (48) dismissed the lady (25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell. Soon after came Earl William (23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (29) before possessed.
67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.
68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

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In 1434 Edward Berkeley 1434-1506 was born to Maurice Berkeley 1397-1460 (37) and Lora Fitzhugh at Beverstone Castle.

On 04 Feb 1506 Edward Berkeley 1434-1506 (72) died at Beverstone Castle.

In 1598 Elizabeth Hicks 1598-1626 was born to Michael Hicks 1543-1612 (54) and Elizabeth Colston 1556-1634 (42) in Beverstone Castle.

Tewkesbury

Thameshead, Gloucestershire

Thameshead is considered to the source of the River Thames although the head of the River Churn at Seven Springs is further away from the mouth of the Thames than Thameshead.

Thornbury, Gloucestershire

On 04 Apr 1281 Maurice Berkeley 5th Baron Berkeley 1218-1281 (63) died at Thornbury. He was buried at St Augustine's Abbey, Bristol. His son Thomas Berkeley 6th Baron Berkeley 1245-1321 (35) succeeded 6th Baron Berkeley Feudal. Joan Ferrers Baroness Berkeley -1309 by marriage Baroness Berkeley Feudal.

Around 1310 Katherine Clivedon Baroness Berkeley 1310-1385 was born to John Clivedon 1284-1373 (26) at Thornbury.

In 1322 John Clivedon 1322-1348 was born to John Clivedon 1284-1373 (38) at Thornbury.

On 18 Nov 1341 Eleanor Beauchamp Baroness Fitzwarin 1278-1341 (63) died at Thornbury.

Alveston Thornbury, Gloucestershire

On 11 Feb 1266 Constance Tosny 1233-1266 (32) died at Alveston Thornbury.

Guillaume Fitzwarin 1251- died at Alveston Thornbury.

Thornbury Manor Thornbury, Gloucestershire

In 1066 Beorhtric son of Aelfgar held the manor of Thornbury Manor Thornbury.

Death of Jasper Tudor Duke Bedford

On 21 Dec 1495 Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford 1431-1495 (64) died at Thornbury Manor without legitimate issue. Duke Bedford 5C 1485 extinct.

Todenham, Gloucestershire

Lemington Todenham, Gloucestershire

In 1431 Richard Greville 1431- was born at Lemington Todenham.

Taddington, Gloucestershire

Source of the River Windrush, Taddington, Gloucestershire

The River Windrush is a tributary of the River Thames. Its is near Taddington in Gloucestershire. It travels broadly south-west through Bourton-on-the-Water, Burford, Minster Lovell, Witney joining the River Thames at Nebridge.

Stanway House, Taddington, Gloucestershire

Stanway House is a Jacobean house constructed in the late 16th and early 17th century for the Tracy family after the land was leased to Richard Tracy 1501-1569.

Toddington, Gloucestershire

Around 1501 William Tracy 1501-1528 was born to William Tracy 1460-1531 (41) at Toddington.

On 20 Sep 1688 Elizabeth Leigh Viscountess Tracy -1688 died. She was buried at Toddington.

On 25 Jan 1708 Jane Leigh Viscountess Tracy 1665-1708 (43) died. She was buried at Toddington.

On 18 Apr 1712 William Tracy 4th Viscount Tracy 1657-1712 (55) died. He was buried at Toddington. His son Charles Tracy 5th Viscount Tracy 1690-1756 (21) succeeded 5th Viscount Tracy of Rathcoole in Dublin.

On 04 Jun 1756 Charles Tracy 5th Viscount Tracy 1690-1756 (65) died. He was buried at Toddington.

St George of England Church Toddington, Gloucestershire

On 23 Apr 1686 Henrietta Marie Wentworth 6th Baroness Wentworth 1660-1686 (25) died. She was buried at St George of England Church Toddington. Her aunt Anne Wentworth 7th Baroness Wentworth Baroness Lovelace -1697 succeeded 7th Baron Wentworth.

On 20 Mar 1688 Frances Devereux 1659-1688 (29) died. She was buried at St George of England Church Toddington.

Uley, Gloucestershire

On 24 Sep 1361 Thomas Berkeley 1332-1361 (29) died at Uley.

Upton, Gloucestershire

Around 1528 Francis Savage 1528-1557 was born to Christopher Savage 1504-1546 (24) at Upton.

Westerleigh, Gloucestershire

The River Frome rises in Dodington Park after which it flows past Westerleigh, Iron Acton, Frampton Coterrel then into Bristol where is covered for a long stretch emerging into Bristol Floating Harbour before joining the River Avon.

Weston-sub-Edge, Gloucestershire

Icknield Street 18a Bourton to Alcester. From Bourton-on-the-Water the Icknield Way travels to Slaughter Pike where it changes direction northwards to Lower Swell, Condicote, Hinchwich, Springhill, Weston-sub-Edge, Ullington to Bidford-on-Avon where it crosses the River Avon before continuing through Wixford to Alauna aka Alcester.

Winchcombe

Wotton under Edge, Gloucestershire

On 20 Mar 1391 Margaret Lisle Baroness Berkeley 3rd Baroness Lisle 1362-1391 (29) died at Wotton under Edge. Thomas Berkeley 9th Baron Berkeley 3rd Baron Lisle 1352-1417 (39) continued to hold Baron Lisle of Kingston Lisle in Oxfordshire 3C 1357 by courtesy.

On 09 Sep 1836 Kenelm Edward Digby 1836-1916 was born to Rev Kenelm Henry Digby 1806-1880 (30) at Wotton under Edge.