History of Kent

851 Battle of Ockley

853 Battle of the Isle of Thanet

1016 Battle of Penselwood

1154 Death of King Stephen

1540 Anne of Cleves Annulment

1554 Wyatt's Rebellion

1415 Battle of Agincourt

1648 Kentish Rebellion

1665 Great Plague of London

1667 Raid on the Medway

1672 Battle of Solebay

1682 Sinking of the Gloucester

1690 Glorious Revolution

Kent is in Home Counties.

Addington Park, Kent

In 1519 Frances Neville 1519-1599 was born to Edward Neville 1471-1538 (48) and Eleanor Windsor Baroness Scrope Masham 1491-1531 (28) at Addington Park.

In 1548 Edward Waldegrave 1517-1561 (31) and Frances Neville 1519-1599 (29) were married at Addington Park. She a great x 4 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

Edward Neville 1471-1538 lived at Addington Park.

Allington, Kent

In 1503 Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542 was born to Henry Wyatt 1460-1537 (43) in Allington.

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542. Around 1550 based on a work of around 1540.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas Wyatt 1503-1542.

Around 1568 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (61) was granted the castle and manor of Allington.

Allington Castle, Kent

On 22 Jan 1554 the conspirators met at Allington Castle.

Henry Isley 1500-1554 (54) attended.

Ashford, Kent

On 23 Oct 1375 Elizabeth Ferrers Countess Atholl 1336-1375 (39) died. She was buried at Ashford.

On 23 Nov 1616 John Wallis Mathematician 1616-1703 was born at Ashford.

Ashurst, Kent

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Aylesford, Kent

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. After 23 Jun 1016. The enemy fled before him with their horses into the Isle of Shepey; and the king slew as many of them as he could overtake. Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017 then went to meet the king at Aylesford; than which no measure could be more ill-advised. The enemy, meanwhile, returned into Essex, and advanced into Mercia, destroying all that he overtook.

On 01 Sep 1308 Henry Grey 1st Baron Grey Codnor 1255-1308 (53) died at Aylesford. Richard Grey 2nd Baron Grey Codnor 1282-1335 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Grey Codnor. Joan Fitzpayn Baroness Grey Codnor 1287-1334 (21) by marriage Baroness Grey Codnor.

On 14 Dec 1392 John Grey 3rd Baron Grey Codnor 1305-1392 (87) died at Aylesford. Richard Grey 1st or 4th Baron Grey Codnor 1371-1418 (21) succeeded 4th Baron Grey Codnor. Elizabeth Bassett Baroness Grey Codnor 1372-1451 (20) by marriage Baroness Grey Codnor. Or he was created 1st Baron Grey Codnor depending on whether the first three Barons were ever summoned to Parliament.

Preston Hall Aylesford, Kent

Around 1430 William Culpepper 1430-1502 was born to William Culpepper 1387-1457 (43) and Elizabeth Ferrers 1390-1460 (40) at Preston Hall Aylesford.

Around 1472 Edward Culpepper 1472-1533 was born to William Culpepper 1430-1502 (42) at Preston Hall Aylesford.

Around 1494 John Culpepper 1494-1550 was born to Edward Culpepper 1472-1533 (22) at Preston Hall Aylesford.

Around 1527 Thomas Culpepper 1527-1587 was born to John Culpepper 1494-1550 (33) at Preston Hall Aylesford.

Bayhall, Kent

Around 1430 Margaret Culpepper 1430-1488 was born to Walter Culpepper 1402-1462 (28) and Agnes Roper 1400-1457 (30) at Bayhall.

Bexley

Biddenham, Kent

In or before 1507 John Guildford 1507-1565 was born to George Guildford 1470-1533 (36) and Elizabeth Mortimer 1478- (28) at Biddenham.

Birchington on Sea, Kent

All Saints Church Birchington on Sea, Kent

On 09 Apr 1882 Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882 (53) died. He was buried at All Saints Church Birchington on Sea. There is a Celtic Cross marking his grave commissioned by his mother Frances Mary Lavinia Polidori 1800-1886 (81), designed by Ford Madox Brown Painter 1821-1893 (60) and erected in the presence of his brother William Michael Rossetti Author 1829-1919 (52) and sister Christina Georgina Rossetti 1830-1894 (51) as written on the base of the cross.

1871. George Frederick Watts 1817-1904. Portrait of Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882. 1853. William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910. Portrait of Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882. Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones 1860. After 09 Jun 1860. It was quite clear that we must give up Paris and get to our own home as soon as the doctor gave Edward leave to travel; so ruefully enough I wrote to Gabriel and told him how things were; and his answer was a comfort to us, for he reported that they were both tired of 1867. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882. Drawing of Ford Madox Brown Painter 1821-1893. 1866. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882. Drawing of Christina Georgina Rossetti 1830-1894.

Birling

Bobbing, Kent

In 1364 Lewis Clifford 1364-1404 was born to Roger Clifford 5th Baron Clifford 1333-1389 (30) and Maud Beauchamp Baroness Clifford 1335-1403 (29) at Bobbing.

On 08 Sep 1420 Arnold Savage 1384-1420 (36) died at Bobbing.

In 1425 John Clifford 1425-1461 was born to William Clifford 1390-1438 (35) and Elizabeth Savage Baroness Cobham 1386-1451 (39) at Bobbing.

On 19 Jan 1488 Margaret Culpepper 1430-1488 (58) died at Bobbing.

In 1494 Alexander Clifford 1429-1494 (64) died at Bobbing.

In 1673 Titus Oates 1649-1705 (23) was vicar of the parish of Bobbing.

St Bartholemew Church Bobbing, Kent

South Chancel St Bartholemew Church Bobbing, Kent

On 29 Nov 1410 Arnold Savage 1358-1410 (52) died. He was buried at South Chancel St Bartholemew Church Bobbing.

Boughton, Kent

Chilston, Boughton, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 08 May 1666. 08 May 1666. Went to visit my cousin, Hales, at a sweetly-watered place at Chilston, near Bockton. The next morning, to Leeds Castle, once a famous hold, now hired by me of my Lord Culpeper (40) for a prison. Here I flowed the dry moat, made a new drawbridge, brought spring water into the court of the Castle to an old fountain, and took order for the repairs.

Boughton Monchelsea, Kent

On 04 Mar 1491 William Brandon 1425-1491 (66) died at Boughton Monchelsea.

Bore Place, Kent

In 1511 Robert Willoughby 1511-1545 was born to Thomas Willoughby 1486-1545 (25) at Bore Place.

Around 1538 Thomas Willoughby 1538-1596 was born to Robert Willoughby 1511-1545 (27) at Bore Place.

Around 1596 Thomas Willoughby 1538-1596 (58) died at Bore Place.

Boughton Street, Kent

Watling Street 1b Canterbury to Rochester. From Durovernum the road continues in a north-east direction through Upper Harbledown, Boughton Street, Durolevo, Key Street, Gillingham to Durobrivae where it crosses the River Medway.

Brasted, Kent

On 23 Oct 1699 John Verney 1699-1741 was born to George Verney 20th Baron Latimer 12th Baron Willoughby Broke 1659-1728 (40) and Margaret Heath Baroness Latimer Baroness Willoughby Broke at Brasted.

Braborne, Kent

St Mary the Virgin's Church Brabourne, Braborne, Kent

On 17 Oct 1485 John Scott Comptroller 1423-1485 (62) died. He was buried in the north wall of the chancel of St Mary the Virgin's Church Brabourne.

In 1487 Agnes Beaufitz -1487 died. She was buried at St Mary the Virgin's Church Brabourne.

Brenchley, Kent

In 1230 Thomas Culpepper 1230-1309 was born at Brenchley.

Around 1260 Thomas Culpepper 1260-1321 was born to Thomas Culpepper 1230-1309 (30) at Brenchley.

Around 1305 John Culpepper 1305-1376 was born to Thomas Culpepper 1260-1321 (45) at Brenchley.

In 1309 Thomas Culpepper 1230-1309 (79) died at Brenchley.

Bridge, Kent

Broadstairs, Kent

St Peter Intra College Broadstairs, Kent

Around 1900 John Granville Cornwallis Eliot 6th Earl St Germans 1890- (9) educated at St Peter Intra College Broadstairs.

Bromley

Bromley Hill Place, Kent

On 15 Jan 1837 Amelia Hume Baroness Farnborough 1772-1837 (64) died at Bromley Hill Place.

Canterbury

Castle Badlesmere, Kent

In 1310 Maud Badlesmere Countess Oxford 1310-1366 was born to Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (34) and Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (22) at Castle Badlesmere.

In 1313 Elizabeth Badlesmere Countess Northampton 1313-1356 was born to Bartholomew Badlesmere 1st Baron Badlesmere 1275-1322 (37) and Margaret Clare Baroness Badlesmere 1287-1333 (25) at Castle Badlesmere.

Charlton, Kent

On 12 Feb 1683 Richard Browne 1st Baronet Deptford 1605-1683 (78) died at Charlton. He was buried at St. Baronet Browne of Depthford in Kent extinct.

On 01 Oct 1756 Charles George Perceval 2nd Baron Arden 1st Baron Arden Arden 1756-1840 was born to John Perceval 2nd Earl Egmont 1711-1770 (45) and Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784 (25) at Charlton.

Around 1759 Joshua Reynolds 1723-1788. Portrait of John Perceval 2nd Earl Egmont 1711-1770 and Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784. Around 1759 Joshua Reynolds 1723-1788. Portrait of John Perceval 2nd Earl Egmont 1711-1770 and Catherine Compton Countess Egmont 1731-1784.

Wricklesmarsh Charlton, Kent

In 1604 Colonel Thomas Blount Inventor 1604- was born to Edward Blount of Middle Temple in Wricklesmarsh Charlton.

Chatham

Chegworth, Kent

The River Len rises at Platts Heath after which it flows past Pollhill, Chegworth, to Leeds Castle, where it forms the Great Water and moat, past Downswood to Maidstone where it joins the River Medway.

Chiddingstone, Kent

On 03 Jun 1706 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 was born to Henry Streatfield 1679-1747 (27) and Elizabeth Beard at Chiddingstone.

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

St Mary's Church Chiddingstone, Kent

Streatfield Vault St Mary's Church Chiddingstone, Kent

On 04 Apr 1762 Henry Streatfield 1706-1762 (55) died. He was buried at Streatfield Vault St Mary's Church Chiddingstone.

Chilham, Kent

Chilham Castle Chilham, Kent

Around 1190 Richard Fitzroy 1190-1246 was born illegitimately to John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216 (23) and Adela Plantagenet in Chilham Castle Chilham. Coefficient of inbreeding 3.38%.

In 1205 Fulbert de Dover 1178-1205 died at Chilham Castle Chilham.

Around 1228 Lorette Plantagenet 1228-1266 was born to Richard Fitzroy 1190-1246 (38) and Rohese de Dover 1186-1261 (42) in Chilham Castle Chilham. She a granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

Chislehurst, Kent

On 28 Dec 1510 Nicholas Bacon Lord Keeper 1510-1579 was born to Robert Bacon 1479-1548 (31) and Isabel or Eleanor Cage 1478-1535 (32) at Chislehurst.

Unknown Painter. Posthumous portrait of Nicholas Bacon Lord Keeper 1510-1579.

In 1560 Barbara Walsingham 1560-1623 was born to Thomas Walsingham 1526-1584 (34) and Dorothy Guildford at Chislehurst.

Around 1564 Mary Walsingham Baroness Pelham Laughton 1564-1624 was born to Thomas Walsingham 1526-1584 (38) and Dorothy Guildford at Chislehurst.

On 03 Jan 1825 Annabella Smith-Powlett 1754-1825 (70) died at Chislehurst.

Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst, Kent

Scadbury Chapel Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst, Kent

On 09 Feb 1550 Edmund Walsingham 1480-1550 (70) died. He was buried at Scadbury Chapel Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst.

On 11 Aug 1630 Thomas Walsingham 1563-1630 (67) died. He was buried at Scadbury Chapel Church of St Nicholas Chislehurst.

Foots Cray Chislehurst, Kent

Around 1532 Francis Walsingham Secretary 1532-1590 was born to William Walsingham -1534 and Joyce Denny 1506-1560 (25) at Foots Cray Chislehurst.

Scadbury Chislehurst, Kent

On 24 Nov 1462 James Walsingham 1462-1540 was born at Scadbury Chislehurst.

Claygate, Kent

The River Teise rises south of Tunbridge Wells from where it flows past Bayham Abbey, Lamberhurst, Claygate, Laddingford to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Cobham

Cooling, Kent

Cooling Castle, Kent

In 1381 John Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham 1321-1408 (60) was licensed to crenellate Cooling Castle.

On 10 Jan 1408 John Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham 1321-1408 (87) died at Cooling Castle. Joan Pole 4th Baroness Cobham -1434 succeeded 4th Baron Cobham.

On 24 Nov 1442 Joan Braybrooke 5th Baroness Cobham 1403-1442 (39) died at Cooling Castle. Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (27) succeeded 6th Baron Cobham. Elizabeth Tuchet Baroness Cobham 1420-1464 (22) by marriage Baroness Cobham.

In 1555 George Brooke 9th Baron Cobham 1497-1558 (58) entertained Cardinal Reginald Pole 1500-1558 (54) at Cooling Castle.

Around 1538 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of George Brooke 9th Baron Cobham 1497-1558.

Cowling, Kent

On 10 Dec 1447 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 was born to Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (32) and Elizabeth Tuchet Baroness Cobham 1420-1464 (27) at Cowling.

On 09 Mar 1512 John Brooke 7th Baron Cobham 1447-1512 (64) died at Cowling. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalene Cobham. Thomas Brooke 8th Baron Cobham 1470-1529 (42) succeeded 8th Baron Cobham.

Cranbrook, Kent

Diary of Henry Machyn February 1554. 20 Feb 1554. The sam day was Mans gohyng in-to-Kent, to Canboroke, and fochyd a-gayn, and browth to sant Gorgeus cyrche, and ther he was hangyd by iiij of the cloke at nyght, for he was a ryche man.

Crayford, Kent

Watling Street 1c Rochester to London. From Durobrivae the road continues through Park Pale, Vagniacis, Dartford, Noviomagus, Bexley, down Shooter's Hill past Eltham Common to Greenwich Park where the road either (or both):

1. went along the Old Kent Road and crossed the River Thames at either the London Bridge or a ford near Westminster Bridge after which it continued north past St Mary le Bow Church Cheapside, Newgate Gate, Ludgate Hill and over the River Fleet at Fleet Bridge to Marble Arch.

2. continued north-west through Camberwell crossing the River Thames near Vauxhall Bridge after which it continued north to Marble Arch.

Cross-at-Hand, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Cuxton, Kent

Whornes Place Cuxton, Kent

On 21 Mar 1555 John Leveson 1555-1615 was born to Thomas Leveson 1532-1576 (23) and Ursula Gresham 1534-1574 (21) at Whornes Place Cuxton.

Dartford

Deal

Deptford

Dormansbridge, Kent

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

Dover

Downswood, Kent

The River Len rises at Platts Heath after which it flows past Pollhill, Chegworth, to Leeds Castle, where it forms the Great Water and moat, past Downswood to Maidstone where it joins the River Medway.

East Farleigh, Kent

In 1317 Geoffrey Culpepper 1317-1390 was born to Walter Culpepper 1266-1321 (51) at East Farleigh.

In 1366 John Culpepper 1366-1414 was born to William Culpepper 1342-1402 (24) at East Farleigh.

East Farleigh Bridge, Kent

East Farleigh Bridge was probably constructed in the 14th century. It comprises four arches, spanning the river and a smaller, later arch spanning the north bank. A long retaining wall carrying the road over the low-lying meadow to the south of the river has a blind arch on one side.

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Eastchurch, Kent

Around 1304 Robert Cheney 1304-1362 was born to William Cheney 1275-1322 (29) and Margaret Shurland 1281-1308 (23) at Eastchurch.

On 12 Apr 1362 Robert Cheney 1304-1362 (58) died at Eastchurch.

In 1390 Alice Cheney 1390- was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (38) at Eastchurch.

In 1392 Simon Cheney 1392-1455 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (40) at Eastchurch.

Around 1442 John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (27) at Eastchurch. When his tomb was opened in the 18th Century his thighbone was measured at 21 inches making his height an estimated six feet eight inches.

In 1467 John Cheney 1415-1467 (52) died at Eastchurch.

Shurland Eastchurch, Kent

In 1308 Margaret Shurland 1281-1308 (27) died at Shurland Eastchurch.

Eastwell, Kent

On 24 Feb 1683 John Finch 6th Earl Winchilsea 1683-1729 was born to Heneage Finch 3rd Earl Winchilsea 1628-1689 (55) and Elizabeth Ayres Countess Winchelsea -1745. He was christened on 06 Mar 1683 at Eastwell.

Eastwell Park, Kent

On 29 Oct 1875 Marie Windsor 1875-1938 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (31) and Maria Holstein Gottorp Romanov 1853-1920 (22) at Eastwell Park. She a granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.

Around 1871. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Maria Holstein Gottorp Romanov 1853-1920.

On 20 Apr 1884 Beatrice Windsor Duchess Galliera 1884-1966 was born to Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 (39) and Maria Holstein Gottorp Romanov 1853-1920 (30) at Eastwell Park. She a granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.

The Most Eastwell, Kent

In 1520 Elizabeth Cromer 1475-1520 (45) died at The Most Eastwell.

Edenbridge, Kent

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

Erith

Ensfield Bridge, Kent

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Eynesford, Kent

Reginald Cobham 1237- died at Eynesford.

Faversham, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 25 Mar 1672. Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham.

John Evelyn's Diary 13 December 1688. 13 Dec 1688. The King (55) flies to sea, puts in at Faversham for ballast; is rudely treated by the people; comes back to Whitehall.

The Prince of Orange (38) is advanced to Windsor, is invited by the King (55) to St. James's, the messenger sent was the Earl of Faversham (47), the General of the Forces, who going without trumpet, or passport, is detained prisoner by the Prince (38), who accepts the invitation, but requires his Majesty (38) to retire to some distant place, that his own guards may be quartered about the palace and city. This is taken heinously and the King (38) goes privately to Rochester; is persuaded to come back; comes on the Sunday; goes to mass, and dines in public, a Jesuit saying grace (I was present).

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar.

Faversham Abbey, Kent

After 17 Aug 1153 Eustace Blois IV Count Boulogne 1130-1153 was buried at Faversham Abbey.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle King Stephen 1154. 1154. In this year died the King Stephen (60); and he was buried where his wife and his son were buried, at Faversham; which monastery they founded.

Ospringe, Faversham, Kent

Folkestone, Kent

In 640 Eanswith Oiscingas 614-640 (26) died at Folkestone.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1052. At this time Griffin, the Welsh king, plundered in Herefordshire till he came very nigh to Leominster; and they gathered against him both the landsmen and the Frenchmen from the castle; and there were slain very many good men of the English, and also of the French. This was on the same day thirteen years after that Edwin was slain with his companions. In the same year advised the king and his council, that ships should be sent out to Sandwich, and that Earl Ralph and Earl Odda (59) should be appointed headmen thereto. Then went Earl Godwin (51) out from Bruges with his ships to Ysendyck; and sailed forth one day before midsummer-eve, till he came to the Ness that is to the south of Romney. When it came to the knowledge of the earls out at Sandwich, they went out after the other ships; and a land-force was also ordered out against the ships. Meanwhile Earl Godwin (51) had warning, and betook himself into Pevensey: and the weather was so boisterous, that the earls could not learn what had become of Earl Godwin. But Earl Godwin then went out again until he came back to Bruges; and the other ships returned back again to Sandwich. Then it was advised that the ships should go back again to London, and that other earls and other pilots should be appointed over them. But it was delayed so long that the marine army all deserted; and they all betook themselves home. When Earl Godwin (51) understood that, he drew up his sail and his ship: and they (70) went west at once to the Isle of Wight; and landing there, they plundered so long that the people gave them as much as they required of them. Then proceeded they westward until they came to Portland, where they landed and did as much harm as they could possibly do. Meanwhile Harold (30) had gone out from Ireland with nine ships, and came up at Porlock with his ships to the mouth of the Severn, near the boundaries of Somerset and Devonshire, and there plundered much. The land-folk collected against him, both from Somerset and from Devonshire: but he put them to flight, and slew there more than thirty good thanes, besides others; and went soon after about Penwithstert [Note. Possibly Plymouth], where was much people gathered against him; but he spared not to provide himself with meat, and went up and slew on the spot a great number of the people—seizing in cattle, in men, and in money, whatever he could. Then went he eastward to his father; and they went both together eastward (71) until they came to the Isle of Wight, where they seized whatever had been left them before. Thence they went to Pevensey, and got out with them as many ships as had gone in there, and so proceeded forth till they came to the Ness; (72) getting all the ships that were at Romney, and at Hithe, and at Folkstone. Then ordered King Edward (49) to fit out forty smacks that lay at Sandwich many weeks, to watch Earl Godwin (51), who was at Bruges during the winter; but he nevertheless came hither first to land, so as to escape their notice. And whilst he abode in this land, he enticed to him all the Kentish men, and all the boatmen from Hastings, and everywhere thereabout by the sea-coast, and all the men of Essex and Sussex and Surrey, and many others besides. Then said they all that they would with him live or die. When the fleet that lay at Sandwich had intelligence about Godwin's expedition, they set sail after him; but he escaped them, and betook himself wherever he might: and the fleet returned to Sandwich, and so homeward to London. When Godwin understood that the fleet that lay at Sandwich was gone home, then went he back again to the Isle of Wight, and lay thereabout by the sea-coast so long that they came together—he and his son Earl Harold. But they did no great harm after they came together; save that they took meat, and enticed to them all the land-folk by the sea-coast and also upward in the land. And they proceeded toward Sandwich, ever alluring forth with them all the boatmen that they met; and to Sandwich they came with an increasing army. They then steered eastward round to Dover, and landing there, took as many ships and hostages as they chose, and so returned to Sandwich, where they did the same; and men everywhere gave them hostages and provisions, wherever they required them.

70 i.e. Earl Godwin and his crew.

71 i.e. from the Isle of Portland; where Godwin had landed after the plunder of the Isle of Wight.

72 i.e. Dungeness; where they collected all the ships stationed in the great bay formed by the ports of Romney, Hithe, and Folkstone.

Around 1470 John Clinton 7th Baron Clinton 1470-1514 was born to John Clinton 6th Baron Clinton 1429-1488 (41) and Anne Stafford Baroness Clinton 1447-1508 (23) at Folkestone.

Folkestone Racecourse, Kent

On 08 May 1929 James Joicey 1907-1929 (21) died at Folkestone Racecourse. He was brought down at the last fence of the Dover Hunters Steeplechase whilst riding his own horse Fancy Laureate.

Westenhanger Castle, Folkestone, Kent

After 1440 John Fogge 1417-1490 and Alice de Kyriell were married. She brought Westenhanger Castle to the marriage.

Gillingham, Kent

Diary of Samuel Pepys 02 October 1665. 02 Oct 1665. We having sailed all night (and I do wonder how they in the dark could find the way) we got by morning to Gillingham, and thence all walked to Chatham; and there with Commissioner Pett (55) viewed the Yard; and among other things, a teame of four horses come close by us, he being with me, drawing a piece of timber that I am confident one man could easily have carried upon his back. I made the horses be taken away, and a man or two to take the timber away with their hands. This the Commissioner did see, but said nothing, but I think had cause to be ashamed of.

We walked, he and I and Cocke (48), to the Hill-house, where we find Sir W. Pen (44) in bed and there much talke and much dissembling of kindnesse from him, but he is a false rogue, and I shall not trust him, but my being there did procure his consent to have his silk carried away before the money received, which he would not have done for Cocke (48) I am sure.

Thence to Rochester, walked to the Crowne, and while dinner was getting ready, I did there walk to visit the old Castle ruines, which hath been a noble place, and there going up I did upon the stairs overtake three pretty mayds or women and took them up with me, and I did 'baiser sur mouches et toucher leur mains1' and necks to my great pleasure: but, Lord! to see what a dreadfull thing it is to look down the precipices, for it did fright me mightily, and hinder me of much pleasure which I would have made to myself in the company of these three, if it had not been for that. The place hath been very noble and great and strong in former ages.

So to walk up and down the Cathedral, and thence to the Crowne, whither Mr. Fowler, the Mayor of the towne, was come in his gowne, and is a very reverend magistrate. After I had eat a bit, not staying to eat with them, I went away, and so took horses and to Gravesend, and there staid not, but got a boat, the sicknesse being very much in the towne still, and so called on board my Lord Bruncker (45) and Sir John Minnes (66), on board one of the East Indiamen at Erith, and there do find them full of envious complaints for the pillageing of the ships, but I did pacify them, and discoursed about making money of some of the goods, and do hope to be the better by it honestly.

So took leave (Madam Williams being here also with my Lord (45)), and about 8 o'clock got to Woolwich and there supped and mighty pleasant with my wife, who is, for ought I see, all friends with her mayds, and so in great joy and content to bed.

Note 1. TT. baiser sur mouches et toucher leur mains. Kiss their beauty spots and touched their hands.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 June 1667. 30 Jun 1667. Lord's Day. Up about three o'clock, and Creed and I got ourselves ready, and took coach at our gate, it being very fine weather, and the cool of the morning, and with much pleasure, without any stop, got to Rochester about ten of the clock, all the way having mighty pleasant talk of the fate that is over all we do, that it seems as if we were designed in every thing, by land by sea, to undo ourselves.

At the foot of Rochester bridge, at the landing-place, I met my Lord Bruncker (47) and my Lord Douglas (21), and all the officers of the soldiers in the town, waiting there for the Duke of York (33), whom they heard was coming thither this day; by and by comes my Lord_Middleton (59), the first time I remember to have seen him, well mounted, who had been to meet him, but come back without him; he seems a fine soldier, and so every body says he is; and a man, like my Lord Teviott, and indeed most of the Scotch gentry, as I observe, of few words. After staying here by the water-side and seeing the boats come up from Chatham, with them that rowed with bandeleeres about their shoulders, and muskets in their boats, they being the workmen of the Yard, who have promised to redeem their credit, lost by their deserting the service when the Dutch were there, my Lord Bruncker (47) went with Lord Middleton to his inne, the Crowne, to dinner, which I took unkindly, but he was slightly invited.

So I and Creed down by boat to Chatham-yard (our watermen having their bandeleeres about them all the way), and to Commissioner Pett's (56) house, where my Lord Bruncker (47) told me that I should meet with his dinner two dishes of meat, but did not, but however by the help of Mr. Wiles had some beer and ale brought me, and a good piece of roast beef from somebody's table, and eat well at two, and after dinner into the garden to shew Creed, and I must confess it must needs be thought a sorrowful thing for a man that hath taken so much pains to make a place neat to lose it as Commissioner Pett (56) must now this.

Thence to see the batteries made; which, indeed, are very fine, and guns placed so as one would think the River should be very secure. I was glad, as also it was new to me, to see so many fortifications as I have of late seen, and so up to the top of the Hill, there to look, and could see towards Sheerenesse, to spy the Dutch fleete, but could make [out] none but one vessel, they being all gone. But here I was told, that, in all the late attempt, there was but one man that they knew killed on shore: and that was a man that had laid himself upon his belly upon one of the hills, on the other side of the River, to see the action; and a bullet come, took the ground away just under his belly, and ripped up his belly, and so was killed.

Thence back to the docke, and in my way saw how they are fain to take the deals of the rope-house to supply other occasions, and how sillily the country troopers look, that stand upon the passes there; and, methinks, as if they were more willing to run away than to fight, and it is said that the country soldiers did first run at Sheerenesse, but that then my Lord Douglas's (21) men did run also; but it is excused that there was no defence for them towards the sea, that so the very beach did fly in their faces as the bullets come, and annoyed them, they having, after all this preparation of the officers of the ordnance, only done something towards the land, and nothing at all towards the sea. The people here everywhere do speak very badly of Sir Edward Spragge (47), as not behaving himself as he should have done in that business, going away with the first, and that old Captain Pyne, who, I am here told, and no sooner, is Master-Gunner of England, was the last that staid there.

Thence by barge, it raining hard, down to the chaine; and in our way did see the sad wrackes of the poor "Royall Oake", "James", and "London"1 and several other of our ships by us sunk, and several of the enemy's, whereof three men-of-war that they could not get off, and so burned. We did also see several dead bodies lie by the side of the water. I do not see that Upnor Castle hath received any hurt by them, though they played long against it; and they themselves shot till they had hardly a gun left upon the carriages, so badly provided they were: they have now made two batteries on that side, which will be very good, and do good service.

So to the chaine, and there saw it fast at the end on Upnor side of the River; very fast, and borne up upon the several stages across the River; and where it is broke nobody can tell me. I went on shore on Upnor side to look upon the end of the chaine; and caused the link to be measured, and it was six inches and one-fourth in circumference. They have burned the Crane House that was to hawl it taught. It seems very remarkable to me, and of great honour to the Dutch, that those of them that did go on shore to Gillingham, though they went in fear of their lives, and were some of them killed; and, notwithstanding their provocation at Schelling, yet killed none of our people nor plundered their houses, but did take some things of easy carriage, and left the rest, and not a house burned; and, which is to our eternal disgrace, that what my Lord Douglas's (21) men, who come after them, found there, they plundered and took all away; and the watermen that carried us did further tell us, that our own soldiers are far more terrible to those people of the country-towns than the Dutch themselves. We were told at the batteries, upon my seeing of the field-guns that were there, that, had they come a day sooner, they had been able to have saved all; but they had no orders, and lay lingering upon the way, and did not come forward for want of direction. Commissioner Pett's (56) house was all unfurnished, he having carried away all his goods. I met with no satisfaction whereabouts the chaine was broke, but do confess I met with nobody that I could well expect to have satisfaction [from], it being Sunday; and the officers of the Yard most of them abroad, or at the Hill house, at the pay of the Chest, which they did make use of to day to do part in.

Several complaints, I hear, of the Monmouth's coming away too soon from the chaine, where she was placed with the two guard-ships to secure it; and Captain Robert Clerke, my friend, is blamed for so doing there, but I hear nothing of him at London about it; but Captain Brookes's running aground with the "Sancta Maria", which was one of the three ships that were ordered to be sunk to have dammed up the River at the chaine, is mightily cried against, and with reason, he being the chief man to approve of the abilities of other men, and the other two slips did get safe thither and he run aground; but yet I do hear that though he be blameable, yet if she had been there, she nor two more to them three would have been able to have commanded the river all over. I find that here, as it hath been in our river, fire-ships, when fitted, have been sunk afterwards, and particularly those here at the Mussle, where they did no good at all. Our great ships that were run aground and sunk are all well raised but the "Vanguard", which they go about to raise to-morrow. "the Henery", being let loose to drive up the river of herself, did run up as high as the bridge, and broke down some of the rails of the bridge, and so back again with the tide, and up again, and then berthed himself so well as no pilot could ever have done better; and Punnet says he would not, for his life, have undertaken to have done it, with all his skill. I find it is true that the Dutch did heele "The Charles" to get her down, and yet run aground twice or thrice, and yet got her safe away, and have her, with a great many good guns in her, which none of our pilots would ever have undertaken. It is very considerable the quantity of goods, which the making of these platforms and batterys do take out of the King's stores: so that we shall have little left there, and, God knows! no credit to buy any; besides, the taking away and spending of (it is possible) several goods that would have been either rejected or abatement made for them before used. It is a strange thing to see that, while my Lords Douglas and Middleton do ride up and down upon single horses, my Lord Bruncker (47) do go up and down with his Hackney-coach and six horses at the King's charge, which will do, for all this time, and the time that he is likely to stay, must amount to a great deal. But I do not see that he hath any command over the seamen, he being affronted by three or four seamen before my very face, which he took sillily, methought; and is not able to do so much good as a good boatswain in this business. My Lord Bruncker (47), I perceive, do endeavour to speak well of Commissioner Pett (56), saying that he did exercise great care and pains while he was there, but do not undertake to answer for his not carrying up of the great ships. Back again to Rochester, and there walked to the Cathedral as they were beginning of the service, but would not be seen to stay to church there, besides had no mind, but rather to go to our inne, the White Hart, where we drank and were fain (the towne being so full of soldiers) to have a bed corded for us to lie in, I being unwilling to lie at the Hill house for one night, being desirous to be near our coach to be gone betimes to-morrow morning. Here in the streets, I did hear the Scotch march beat by the drums before the soldiers, which is very odde.

Thence to the Castle, and viewed it with Creed, and had good satisfaction from him that showed it us touching the history of it. Then into the fields, a fine walk, and there saw Sir Francis Clerke's house, which is a pretty seat, and then back to our inne and bespoke supper, and so back to the fields and into the Cherry garden, where we had them fresh gathered, and here met with a young, plain, silly shopkeeper, and his wife, a pretty young woman, the man's name Hawkins, and I did kiss her, and we talked (and the woman of the house is a very talking bawdy jade), and eat cherries together, and then to walk in the fields till it was late, and did kiss her, and I believe had I had a fit time and place I might have done what I would with her. Walked back and left them at their house near our inne, and then to our inne, where, I hear, my Lord Bruncker (47) hath sent for me to speak with me before I go: so I took his coach, which stands there with two horses, and to him and to his bedside, where he was in bed, and hath a watchman with a halbert at his door; and to him, and did talk a little, and find him a very weak man for this business that he is upon; and do pity the King's service, that is no better handled, and his folly to call away Pett before we could have found a better man to have staid in his stead; so took leave of him, and with Creed back again, it being now about 10 at night, and to our inne to supper, and then to bed, being both sleepy, but could get no sheets to our bed, only linen to our mouths, and so to sleep, merrily talking of Hawkins and his wife, and troubled that Creed did see so much of my dalliance, though very little.

Note 1. "The bottom of 'The Royal James' is got afloat, and those of the 'Loyal London' and 'Royal Oak' soon will be so. Many men are at work to put Sheerness in a posture of defence, and a boom is being fitted over the river by Upnor Castle, which with the good fortifications will leave nothing to fear".—Calendar of State Papers, 1667, p. 285.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Before 12 Dec 1676 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of John Middleton 1st Earl Middleton 1608-1674.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 23 Mar 1672. Captain Cox, one of the Commissioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yacht, I sailed to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished; several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with redoubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds were stolen.

Watling Street 1b Canterbury to Rochester. From Durovernum the road continues in a north-east direction through Upper Harbledown, Boughton Street, Durolevo, Key Street, Gillingham to Durobrivae where it crosses the River Medway.

Penselwood, Gillingham, Kent

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1016. After his decease, all the peers that were in London, and the citizens, chose Edmund king (26); who bravely defended his kingdom while his time was. Then came the ships to Greenwich, about the gang-days, and within a short interval went to London; where they sunk a deep ditch on the south side, and dragged their ships to the west side of the bridge. Afterwards they trenched the city without, so that no man could go in or out, and often fought against it: but the citizens bravely withstood them. King Edmund (26) had ere this gone out, and invaded the West-Saxons, who all submitted to him; and soon afterward he fought with the enemy at Pen near Gillingham.

Goudhurst, Kent

In 1424 John Culpepper 1424-1480 was born to Walter Culpepper 1402-1462 (22) and Agnes Roper 1400-1457 (24) at Goudhurst.

Before 02 Dec 1457 Alexander Culpepper 1457-1541 was born to John Culpepper 1424-1480 and Agnes Gaynsford 1426-1457 at Goudhurst. Based on his mother's death in 1457.

Before 02 Dec 1457 Agnes Gaynsford 1426-1457 died at Goudhurst.

On 24 Nov 1462 Walter Culpepper 1402-1462 (60) died at Goudhurst.

On 22 Dec 1480 John Culpepper 1424-1480 (56) died at Goudhurst.

On 21 Jun 1541 Alexander Culpepper 1457-1541 (83) died at Goudhurst.

Bedgebury Goudhurst, Kent

Around 1509 William Culpepper 1509-1559 was born to Walter Culpepper 1457-1515 (51) at Bedgebury Goudhurst.

On 24 Feb 1718 Rachel Hungerford Viscountess Falkland 1635-1718 (83) died at Bedgebury Goudhurst.

Bedgebury Manor, Bedgebury Goudhurst, Kent

In 1682 James Hayes 1637-1694 (45) bought from Thomas Culpepper at Bedgebury Manor.

Gravesend

Great Chart, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Greenwich

Groombridge, Kent

On 24 Jun 1618 Philip Packer Lawyer Architect 1618-1686 was born to John Packer Clerk to the Privy Seal 1572-1649 (45) in Groombridge.

On or before 11 Mar 1624 Katherine Packer of Shelingford Lady Gell 1624-1671 was born to John Packer Clerk to the Privy Seal 1572-1649 (51) in Groombridge. She was baptised on 11 Mar 1624 in Westminster Abbey.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 August 1674. 06 Aug 1674. I went to Groombridge, to see my old friend, Mr. Packer (56); the house built within a moat, in a woody valley. The old house had been the place of confinement of the Duke of Orléans, taken by one Waller (whose house it then was) at the Battle of Agincourt, now demolished, and a new one built in its place, though a far better situation had been on the south of the wood, on a graceful ascent. At some small distance, is a large chapel, not long since built by Mr. Packer's father, on a vow he made to do it on the return of King Charles I (73) out of Spain, 1625, and dedicated to St. Charles, but what saint there was then of that name I am to seek, for, being a Protestant, I conceive it was not Borromeo.

I went to see my farm at Ripe, near Lewes.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

The River Grom rises south-west of Tunbridge Wells and flows west past Groombridge Place, where it is diverted for the moat, and Groombridge before joining the River Medway.

Groombridge Place, Kent

Around 1395 Richard Waller 1395-1462 was born at Groombridge Place.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 August 1674. 06 Aug 1674. I went to Groombridge, to see my old friend, Mr. Packer (56); the house built within a moat, in a woody valley. The old house had been the place of confinement of the Duke of Orléans, taken by one Waller (whose house it then was) at the Battle of Agincourt, now demolished, and a new one built in its place, though a far better situation had been on the south of the wood, on a graceful ascent. At some small distance, is a large chapel, not long since built by Mr. Packer's father, on a vow he made to do it on the return of King Charles I (73) out of Spain, 1625, and dedicated to St. Charles, but what saint there was then of that name I am to seek, for, being a Protestant, I conceive it was not Borromeo.

I went to see my farm at Ripe, near Lewes.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

The River Grom rises south-west of Tunbridge Wells and flows west past Groombridge Place, where it is diverted for the moat, and Groombridge before joining the River Medway.

Grovehurst, Kent

In 1539 Ursula Finch 1539-1600 was born to Roger Finch 1510-1539 (29) at Grovehurst.

Halling, Kent

In 1184 Richard de Dover Archbishop of Canterbury -1184 died at Halling.

Harrietsham, Kent

In 1575 Thomas Culpepper 1575-1662 was born to Francis Culpepper 1538-1591 (37) and Joan Pordage at Harrietsham.

Hartlip, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1672. 25 Mar 1672. Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order respecting the building a strong and high wall about a house I had hired of a gentleman, at a place called Hartlip, for a prison, paying £50 yearly rent. Here I settled a Provost-Marshal and other officers, returning by Feversham.

Haudlo, Kent

Around 1267 John Haudlo 1267-1346 was born to Richard Haudlo at Haudlo.

Robert Haudlo was born to Richard Haudlo at Haudlo.

William Haudlo was born to Richard Haudlo at Haudlo.

Hawkenbury, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Headcorn, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Hedge Barton, Kent

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Hever, Kent

Hever Castle, Kent

In 1462 Geoffrey Boleyn Lord Mayor London 1406-1463 (56) purchased at Hever Castle.

Around 1477 Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539 was born to William Boleyn 1451-1505 (26) and Margaret Butler 1454-1537 (23) at Hever Castle.

Before 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539.

On 09 Jul 1540 Henry VIII's (49) marriage to Anne of Cleves (24) was annulled. He gave her a generours settlement including Richmond Palace and Hever Castle. Bishop Robert Parfew aka Warton -1557 signed the delcaration. She was given precedence above all other women other than the King's wife future wives and daughters, referring to her thereafter as The King's Sister. She lived seventeen more years outliving Henry's two next wives Queen Catherine Howard of England 1523-1542 (17) and Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548 (27), and Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553 (2).

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1539 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Anne of Cleves. In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548. Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548. Around 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553 Around 1546 Unknown Painter. After William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553. Around 1547. Workshop of Master John Painter. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 64 To Richard Bentley, Esq. Tunbridge, Friday.

We are returned hither, where we have established our head-quarters. On our way, we had an opportunity of surveying that formidable mountain, Silver Hill, which we had floundered down in the dark: it commands a whole horizon of the richest blue prospect you ever saw. I take it to be the Individual spot to which the Duke of Newcastle carries the smugglers, and, showing them Sussex and Kent, says, "All this will I give you, if you will fall down and worship me." Indeed one of them, who exceeded the tempter's warrant, hangs in chains on the very spot where they finished the life of that wretched customhouse officer whom they were two days in murdering.

This morning we have been to Penshurst - but, oh! how fallen!(341) The park seems to have never answered its character: at present it is forlorn; and instead of Sacharissa's(342) cipher carved on the beeches, I should sooner have expected to have found the milkwoman's score. Over the gate is an inscription, purporting the manor to have been a boon from Edward VI. to Sir William Sydney (90). The apartments are the grandest I have seen in any of these old palaces, but furnished in tawdry modern taste. There are loads of portraits; but most of them seem christened by chance, like children at a foundling hospital. There is a portrait of Languet, (343) the friend of Sir Philip Sydney (17); and divers of himself and all his great kindred; particularly his sister-in-law, with a vast lute, and Sacharissa, charmingly handsome, But there are really four very great curiosities, I believe as old portraits as any extant in England: they are, Fitzallen, Archbishop of Canterbury, Humphry Stafford, the first Duke of Buckingham; T. Wentworth, and John Foxle; all four with the dates of their commissions as constables of Queenborough Castle, from whence I suppose they were brought. The last is actually receiving his investiture from Edward the Third, and Wentworth is in the dress of Richard the Third's time. They are really not very ill done.(344) There are six more, only heads; and we have found since we came home that Penshurst belonged for a time to that Duke of Buckingham. There are some good tombs in the church, and a very Vandal one. called Sir Stephen of Penchester. When we had seen Penshurst, we borrowed saddles, and, bestriding the horses of our postchaise, set out for Hever,(345) to visit a tomb of Sir Thomas Bullen, Earl of Wiltshire (95), partly with a view to talk of it in Anna Bullen's walk at Strawberry Hill. But the measure of our woes was not full, we could not find our way and were forced to return; and again lost ourselves in coming from Penshurst, having been directed to what they call a better road than the execrable one we had gone.

(341) Evelyn, who visited Penshurst exactly a century before Walpole, gives the Following brief notice of the place:-"July 9, 1652. We went to see Penshurst, the Earl of Leicester's, famous once for its gardens and excellent fruit, and for the noble conversation which Was wont to meet there, celebrated by that illustrious person Sir Philip Sidney, who there composed divers of his pieces. It stands in a park, is finely watered, and was now full of company, on the marriage of my old fellow-collegiate, Mr. Robert Smith, who marries Lady Dorothy Sidney, widow of the Earl of Sunderland."-E.

(342) Lady Dorothy Sidney, daughter of Philip, Earl of Leicester [Note. Mistake. She was a daughterof Richard, Earl of Liecester, she was a sister of Philip Earl of Leicester]; of whom Waller was the unsuccessful suitor, and to whom he addressed those elegant effusions of poetical gallantry, in which she is celebrated under the name of Sacharissa. Walpole here alludes to the lines written at Penshurst-

"Go, boy, and carve this passion on the bark

Of yonder tree, which stands the sacred mark

Of noble Sydney's birth; when such benign,

Such more than mortal-making stars did shine,

That there they cannot but for ever prove

The monument and pledge of humble love;

His humble love, whose hope shall ne'er rise higher,

Than for a pardon that he dares admire."-E.

(343) Hubert Tanguet, who quitted the service of the Elector of Saxony on account of his religion, and attached himself to the Prince of Orange. He died in 1581.-E.

(344) In Harris's History of Kent, he gives from Philpot a list of the constables of Queenborough Castle, p. 376; the last but one of whom, Sir Edward Hobby, is said to have collected all their portraits, of which number most probably were these ten.

(345) Hever Castle was built in the reign of Edward III., by William de Hevre, and subsequently became the property of the Boleyn family. In this castle Henry VIII. passed the time of his courtship to the unfortunate Anne Boleyn; whose father, Sir Thomas Boleyn, was Created Earl of wiltshire and Ormond, 1529 and 1538.-E.

Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Philip Sidney Poet 1554-1586. Around 1615 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of Mary Sidney Lady Wroth 1587-1653 holding a Theorbo. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Dorothy Sidney Countess Sunderland 1617-1683. Around 1687. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Edmund Waller Poet 1606-1687.

In 1626 Charles Waldegrave 3rd Baronet Waldegrave of Hever Castle 1626-1684 was born to Henry Waldegrave 2nd Baronet 1598-1658 (28) and Anne Paston 1600-1658 (26) at Hever Castle.

The Kent River Eden rises just north of Clacket Lane Services from where it flows past Limsfield, Oxted, Dormansbridge, Edenbridge, Hever Castle where it forms the moat, past Chiddingstone to Penshurst where it joins the River Medway.

High Halden, Kent

Hales Place High Halden, Kent

Around 1325 Robert Hales 1325-1381 was born at Hales Place High Halden.

Hollingbourne, Kent

On 31 May 1591 Francis Culpepper 1538-1591 (53) died at Hollingbourne.

Before 16 Sep 1630 Philippa Snelling -1630 died. She was buried on 16 Sep 1630 at Hollingbourne.

On 21 Mar 1635 Thomas Culpepper 2nd Baron Culpepper 1635-1689 was born to John Culpepper 1st Baron Culpeper 1600-1660 (35) and Judith Culpeper 1606-1653 (29) in Hollingbourne.

In Jan 1662 Thomas Culpepper 1575-1662 (87) died at Hollingbourne.

In Feb 1709 Elizabeth Culpepper 1632-1709 (76) died in Hollingbourne.

Hoo St Werburgh Kent

In 1614 Peter Gunning Bishop 1614-1684 was born to Peter Gunning 1585-1615 (29) at Hoo St Werburgh Kent.

Before 1684. Circle of Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Peter Gunning Bishop 1614-1684.

Hythe, Kent

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1052. At this time Griffin, the Welsh king, plundered in Herefordshire till he came very nigh to Leominster; and they gathered against him both the landsmen and the Frenchmen from the castle; and there were slain very many good men of the English, and also of the French. This was on the same day thirteen years after that Edwin was slain with his companions. In the same year advised the king and his council, that ships should be sent out to Sandwich, and that Earl Ralph and Earl Odda (59) should be appointed headmen thereto. Then went Earl Godwin (51) out from Bruges with his ships to Ysendyck; and sailed forth one day before midsummer-eve, till he came to the Ness that is to the south of Romney. When it came to the knowledge of the earls out at Sandwich, they went out after the other ships; and a land-force was also ordered out against the ships. Meanwhile Earl Godwin (51) had warning, and betook himself into Pevensey: and the weather was so boisterous, that the earls could not learn what had become of Earl Godwin. But Earl Godwin then went out again until he came back to Bruges; and the other ships returned back again to Sandwich. Then it was advised that the ships should go back again to London, and that other earls and other pilots should be appointed over them. But it was delayed so long that the marine army all deserted; and they all betook themselves home. When Earl Godwin (51) understood that, he drew up his sail and his ship: and they (70) went west at once to the Isle of Wight; and landing there, they plundered so long that the people gave them as much as they required of them. Then proceeded they westward until they came to Portland, where they landed and did as much harm as they could possibly do. Meanwhile Harold (30) had gone out from Ireland with nine ships, and came up at Porlock with his ships to the mouth of the Severn, near the boundaries of Somerset and Devonshire, and there plundered much. The land-folk collected against him, both from Somerset and from Devonshire: but he put them to flight, and slew there more than thirty good thanes, besides others; and went soon after about Penwithstert [Note. Possibly Plymouth], where was much people gathered against him; but he spared not to provide himself with meat, and went up and slew on the spot a great number of the people—seizing in cattle, in men, and in money, whatever he could. Then went he eastward to his father; and they went both together eastward (71) until they came to the Isle of Wight, where they seized whatever had been left them before. Thence they went to Pevensey, and got out with them as many ships as had gone in there, and so proceeded forth till they came to the Ness; (72) getting all the ships that were at Romney, and at Hithe, and at Folkstone. Then ordered King Edward (49) to fit out forty smacks that lay at Sandwich many weeks, to watch Earl Godwin (51), who was at Bruges during the winter; but he nevertheless came hither first to land, so as to escape their notice. And whilst he abode in this land, he enticed to him all the Kentish men, and all the boatmen from Hastings, and everywhere thereabout by the sea-coast, and all the men of Essex and Sussex and Surrey, and many others besides. Then said they all that they would with him live or die. When the fleet that lay at Sandwich had intelligence about Godwin's expedition, they set sail after him; but he escaped them, and betook himself wherever he might: and the fleet returned to Sandwich, and so homeward to London. When Godwin understood that the fleet that lay at Sandwich was gone home, then went he back again to the Isle of Wight, and lay thereabout by the sea-coast so long that they came together—he and his son Earl Harold. But they did no great harm after they came together; save that they took meat, and enticed to them all the land-folk by the sea-coast and also upward in the land. And they proceeded toward Sandwich, ever alluring forth with them all the boatmen that they met; and to Sandwich they came with an increasing army. They then steered eastward round to Dover, and landing there, took as many ships and hostages as they chose, and so returned to Sandwich, where they did the same; and men everywhere gave them hostages and provisions, wherever they required them.

70 i.e. Earl Godwin and his crew.

71 i.e. from the Isle of Portland; where Godwin had landed after the plunder of the Isle of Wight.

72 i.e. Dungeness; where they collected all the ships stationed in the great bay formed by the ports of Romney, Hithe, and Folkstone.

Ingham, Kent

Ingham Mote, Kent

In 1521 Richard Clement of Ingham Mote 1482-1538 (39) purchased Ingham Mote.

Isle of Sheppey

Isle of Thanet, Kent

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 851. This year Alderman Ceorl, with the men of Devonshire, fought the heathen army at Wemburg, and after making great slaughter obtained the victory. The same year King Athelstan and Alderman Elchere fought in their ships, and slew a large army at Sandwich in Kent, taking nine ships and dispersing the rest. The heathens now for the first time remained over winter in the Isle of Thanet. The same year came three hundred and fifty ships into the mouth of the Thames; the crew of which went upon land, and stormed Canterbury and London; putting to flight Bertulf, king of the Mercians, with his army; and then marched southward over the Thames into Surrey. Here Ethelwulf and his son Ethelbald, at the head of the West-Saxon army, fought with them at Ockley, and made the greatest slaughter of the heathen army that we have ever heard reported to this present day. There also they obtained the victory.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 853. This year Burhred, King of Mercia, with his council, besought King Ethelwulf to assist him to subdue North-Wales. He did so; and with an army marched over Mercia into North-Wales, and made all the inhabitants subject to him. The same year King Ethelwulf sent his son Alfred to Rome (4); and Leo, who was then pope, consecrated him king, and adopted him as his spiritual son. The same year also Elchere with the men of Kent, and Huda with the men of Surrey, fought in the Isle of Thanet with the heathen army, and soon obtained the victory; but there were many men slain and drowned on either hand, and both the aldermen killed. Burhred, the Mercian king, about this time received in marriage the daughter (15) of Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. In the year of our Lord's incarnation 864, the pagans wintered in the isle of Thanet, and made a firm treaty with the men of Kent, who promised them money for adhering to their covenant; but the pagans, like cunning foxes, burst from their camp by night, and setting at naught their engagements, and spurning at the promised money, which they knew was less than they could get by plunder, they ravaged all the eastern coast of Kent.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 865. This year sat the heathen army in the isle of Thanet, and made peace with the men of Kent, who promised money therewith; but under the security of peace, and the promise of money, the army in the night stole up the country, and overran all Kent eastward.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 969. This year King Edgar (26) ordered all Thanet-land to be plundered.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 980. In this year was Ethelgarconsecrated bishop, on the sixth day before the nones of May, to the bishopric of Selsey; and in the same year was Southampton plundered by a pirate-army, and most of the population slain or imprisoned. And the same year was the Isle of Thanet overrun, and the county of Chester was plundered by the pirate-army of the North. In this year Alderman Alfere fetched the body of the holy King Edward (18) at Wareham, and carried him with great solemnity to Shaftsbury

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1047. This year died Athelstan, Abbot of Abingdon, on the fourth day before the calends of April; and Sparhawk, monk of St. Edmundsbury, succeeded him. Easter day was then on the third day before the nones of April; and there was over all England very great loss of men this year also. The same year came to Sandwich Lothen and Irling, with twenty-five ships, and plundered and took incalculable spoil, in men, and in gold, and in silver, so that no man wist what it all was; and went then about Thanet, and would there have done the same; but the land-folk firmly withstood, and resisted them both by land and sea, and thence put them to flight withal. They betook themselves thence into Essex, where they plundered and took men, and whatsoever they could find, whence they departed eastward to Baldwin's (34) land, and having deposited the booty they had gained, they returned east to the place whence they had come before.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. 9. Eodem quoque anno Ealhere comes, cum Cantuariis, et Huda, cum Suthriis, contra paganorum exercitum in insula, quae dicitur in Saxonica lingua Tenet, Britannico autem sermone Ruim, animose et acriter belligeraverunt, et primitus Christiani victoriam habuerunt, prolongatoque diu proelio ibidem ex utraque parte plurimi ceciderunt et in aqua mersi suffocati sunt, et comites illi ambo ibidem occubuerunt. Necnon et eodem anno Æthelwulfus, Occidentalium Saxonum rex, post Pascha filiam suam Burgredo Merciorum regi in villa regia, quae dicitur Cippanhamme, nuptiis regaliter factis, ad reginam dedit.

9 The same year also, earl Ealhere, with the men of Kent, and Iluda with the men of Surrey, fought bravely and resolutely against an army of the pagans, in the island, which is called in the Saxon tongue, Tenet, but Ruim in the British language. The battle lasted a long time, and many fell on both sides, and also were drowned in the water; and both the earls were there slain. In the same year also, after Easter, Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, gave His daughter to Burhred, king of the Mercians, and the marriage was celebrated royally at the royal villa of Chippenham.

Key Street, Kent

Watling Street 1b Canterbury to Rochester. From Durovernum the road continues in a north-east direction through Upper Harbledown, Boughton Street, Durolevo, Key Street, Gillingham to Durobrivae where it crosses the River Medway.

Lydden Hill, Kent

Kearnsey, Kent

Kennington, Kent

Kettle Bridge, Kent

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Laddingford, Kent

The River Teise rises south of Tunbridge Wells from where it flows past Bayham Abbey, Lamberhurst, Claygate, Laddingford to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Lamberhurst, Kent

In Apr 2006 Elizabeth "Betty" Maude Kerr-Smiley 1907-2006 (98) died. She was buried at Lamberhurst.

Around 1930. Simon Elwes Painter 1902-1975. Portrait of Elizabeth

The River Teise rises south of Tunbridge Wells from where it flows past Bayham Abbey, Lamberhurst, Claygate, Laddingford to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Scotney Castle, Lamberhurst, Kent

Christopher Edward Clive Hussey 1899-1970 inherited Scotney Castle from his uncle.

Leeds Castle

Lewisham, Kent

Diary of Henry Machyn September 1560. 20 Sep 1560. The xx day of September was bered in (Kent) master Recherd Howllett of Sydnam sqwyre, in the parryche of Lussam, with a pennon of armes and a cott armur and a ij dosen of skochyons of armes and a d' of [buckram,] and master West dyd pryche, and after to Sydnam to dener, the wyche was a fyse [fish] dener and the godlest dener that has bene in Kentt for all kyndes of fysse [both] fresse and salt, and ther was (unfinished)

John Evelyn's Diary 14 March 1652. 14 Mar 1652. I went to Lewisham, where I heard an honest sermon on 1 Cor. II 5-7, being the first Sunday I had been at church since my return, it being now a rare thing to find a priest of the Church of England in a parish pulpit, most of which were filled with Independents and Fanatics.

In 1719 John Lethieullier Merchant 1633-1719 (86) died at Lewisham. He was buried at St Alfege Church.

Brookmill, Lewisham, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 28 April 1668. 28 Apr 1668. To London, about the purchase of Ravensbourne Mills, and land around it, in Upper Deptford, of one Mr. Becher.

New Cross, Lewisham, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 10 November 1675. 10 Nov 1675. Being the day appointed for my Lord Ambassador (47) to set out, I met them with my coach at New Cross. There were with him my Lady his wife, and my dear friend, Mrs. Godolphin (23), who, out of an extraordinary friendship, would needs accompany my lady to Paris, and stay with her some time, which was the chief inducement for permitting my son (20) to travel, but I knew him safe under her inspection, and in regard my Lord (47) himself had promised to take him into his special favor, he having intrusted all he had to my care.

Thus we set out three coaches (besides mine), three wagons, and about forty horses. It being late, and my Lord (47) as yet but valetudinary, we got but to Dartford, the first day, the next to Sittingbourne.

At Rochester, the major, Mr. Cony, then an officer of mine for the sick and wounded of that place, gave the ladies a handsome refreshment as we came by his house.

In 1673. Unknown Painter, possibly Matthew Dixon. Portrait of Margaret Blagge Maid of Honour 1652-1678.

Sydenham Wells, Lewisham, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 02 September 1675. 02 Sep 1675. I went to see Dulwich College, being the pious foundation of one Alleyn, a famous comedian, in King James's time. The chapel is pretty, the rest of the hospital very ill contrived; it yet maintains divers poor of both sexes. It is in a melancholy part of Camberwell parish. I came back by certain medicinal Spa waters, at a place called Sydenham Wells, in Lewisham parish, much frequented in summer.

Around 1600 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted the portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. Around 1605 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 with Garter Collar and Leg Garter. In 1621 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter. Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. In 1583 Pieter Bronckhorst Painter -1583. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1623. Adam de Colone 1572-1651. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625. 1580. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of King James I of England and Ireland and VI of Scotland 1566-1625.

Lingfield, Kent

In 1412 Thomas Cobham 5th Baron Cobham Sternborough 1412-1471 was born to Reginald Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham Sternborough 1381-1446 (31) and Eleanor Culpepper Baroness Cobham Sternborough 1385-1421 (27) at Lingfield.

Before 1422 Eleanor Culpepper Baroness Cobham Sternborough 1385-1421 died. She was buried at Lingfield.

In Apr 1472 Anne Stafford Baroness Cobham Sternborough 1446-1472 (26) died. She was buried at Lingfield.

Thomas Cobham 5th Baron Cobham Sternborough 1412-1471 and Anne Stafford Baroness Cobham Sternborough 1446-1472 were married at Lingfield. They were fourth cousins. She a great x 2 granddaughter of King Edward III England. She by marriage Baroness Cobham Sternborough in Kent.

Sterborough Castle Lingfield, Kent

In 1381 Reginald Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham Sternborough 1381-1446 was born to Reginald Cobham 2nd Baron Cobham Sternborough 1348-1403 (32) and Eleanor Maltravers 2nd Baroness Maltravers Baroness Arundel and Cobham 1345-1405 (36) at Sterborough Castle Lingfield.

After Aug 1446 Reginald Cobham 3rd Baron Cobham Sternborough 1381-1446 died at Sterborough Castle Lingfield. Reginald Cobham 4th Baron Cobham Sternborough 1411-1446 succeeded 4th Baron Cobham Sternborough in Kent 4C 1347. Elizabeth Savage Baroness Cobham 1386-1451 by marriage Baroness Cobham.

Linton, Kent

On 27 Aug 1862 William Archer Amherst 3rd Earl Amherst 1836-1910 (26) and Julia Mann Countess Amherst were married at Linton.

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Loring Hall, Kent

On 12 Aug 1822 Robert Stewart 2nd Marquess Londonderry 1769-1822 (53) committed suicide at Loring Hall. Charles William Vane 3rd Marquess Londonderry 1778-1854 (44) succeeded 3rd Marquess Londonderry. Frances Vane Tempest Marchioness Londonderry 1800-1865 (22) by marriage Marchioness Londonderry.

Around 1800. Hugh Douglas Hamilton Painter 1740-1808. Portrait of Robert Stewart 2nd Marquess Londonderry 1769-1822.

Lullingstone, Kent

In 1450 John Peche 1450-1548 was born to William Peche 1421-1487 (29) and Beatrix Chicheley 1425-1485 (25) at Lullingstone.

Castle Lullingstone Lullingstone, Kent

In 1540 Catherine Hart 1540-1602 was born to Percival Hart 1496-1580 (44) at Castle Lullingstone Lullingstone.

Lympne, Kent

275. Portus Lemanis is a Roman settlement near Lympne. It is first mentioned in the late 3rd Century although archeaological evidence suggests an earlier use.

Portus Lemanis, Lympne, Kent

275. Portus Lemanis is a Roman settlement near Lympne. It is first mentioned in the late 3rd Century although archeaological evidence suggests an earlier use.

Watling Street 10 Richborough to Canterbury. Richborough__Sandwich, Reculver, Lympne__Kent to Durovernum. This route wasn't included in Margery's scheme for Watling Street.

Lyminge, Kent

Around 647 Æthelburh Oiscingas Queen Consort Northumbria 605-647 (42) died at Lyminge.

Maidstone

Malling, Kent

Leybourne Manor Malling, Kent

Around 1281 Idonea Leybourne Baroness Say 1281-1322 was born to William Leybourne 1st Baron Leybourne 1242-1309 (39) at Leybourne Manor Malling.

On 15 Apr 1322 Idonea Leybourne Baroness Say 1281-1322 (41) died at Leybourne Manor Malling.

Margate, Kent

Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 September 1660. 23 Sep 1660. Lord's Day. my wife got up to put on her mourning to-day and to go to Church this morning. I up and set down my journall for these 5 days past. This morning came one from my father's (59) with a black cloth coat, made of my short cloak, to walk up and down in. To church my wife and I, with Sir W. Batten (59), where we heard of Mr. Mills a very good sermon upon these words, "So run that ye may obtain". After dinner all alone to Westminster. At Whitehall I met with Mr. Pierce and his wife (she newly come forth after childbirth) both in mourning for the Duke of Gloucester (20). She went with Mr. Child to Whitehall chapel and Mr. Pierce with me to the Abbey, where I expected to hear Mr. Baxter or Mr. Rowe preach their farewell sermon, and in Mr. Symons's pew I sat and heard Mr. Rowe. Before sermon I laughed at the reader, who in his prayer desires of God that He would imprint his word on the thumbs of our right hands and on the right great toes of our right feet. In the midst of the sermon some plaster fell from the top of the Abbey, that made me and all the rest in our pew afeard, and I wished myself out. After sermon with Mr. Pierce to Whitehall, and from thence to my Lord, but Diana did not come according to our agreement. So calling at my father's (59) (where my wife had been this afternoon but was gone home) I went home. This afternoon, the King having news of the Princess being come to Margate, he and the Duke of York went down thither in barges to her.

In 1656 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Henry Stewart 1st Duke Gloucester 1640-1660.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 January 1665. 12 Jan 1665. Up, and to White Hall about getting a privy seal for felling of the King's timber for the navy, and to the Lords' House to speak with my Lord Privy Seale about it, and so to the 'Change, where to my last night's ill news I met more. Spoke with a Frenchman who was taken, but released, by a Dutch man-of-war of thirty-six guns (with seven more of the like or greater ships), off the North Foreland, by Margett. Which is a strange attempt, that they should come to our teeth; but the wind being easterly, the wind that should bring our force from Portsmouth, will carry them away home. God preserve us against them, and pardon our making them in our discourse so contemptible an enemy!

So home and to dinner, where Mr. Hollyard (56) with us dined.

So to the office, and there late till 11 at night and more, and then home to supper and to bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 13 January 1665. 13 Jan 1665. So to the Hall awhile and thence to the Exchange, where yesterday's newes confirmed, though in a little different manner; but a couple of ships in the Straights we have lost, and the Dutch have been in Margaret [Margate] Road.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 October 1665. 16 Oct 1665. Up about seven o'clock; and, after drinking, and I observing Mr. Povy's (51) being mightily mortifyed in his eating and drinking, and coaches and horses, he desiring to sell his best, and every thing else, his furniture of his house, he walked with me to Syon1, and there I took water, in our way he discoursing of the wantonnesse of the Court, and how it minds nothing else, and I saying that that would leave the King (35) shortly if he did not leave it, he told me "No", for the King (35) do spend most of his time in feeling and kissing them naked... But this lechery will never leave him.

Here I took boat (leaving him there) and down to the Tower, where I hear the Duke of Albemarle (56) is, and I to Lombard Street, but can get no money. So upon the Exchange, which is very empty, God knows! and but mean people there. The newes for certain that the Dutch are come with their fleete before Margett, and some men were endeavouring to come on shore when the post come away, perhaps to steal some sheep.

But, Lord! how Colvill talks of the businesse of publique revenue like a madman, and yet I doubt all true; that nobody minds it, but that the King (35) and Kingdom must speedily be undone, and rails at my Lord about the prizes, but I think knows not my relation to him. Here I endeavoured to satisfy all I could, people about Bills of Exchange from Tangier, but it is only with good words, for money I have not, nor can get. God knows what will become of all the King's matters in a little time, for he runs in debt every day, and nothing to pay them looked after.

Thence I walked to the Tower; but, Lord! how empty the streets are and melancholy, so many poor sick people in the streets full of sores; and so many sad stories overheard as I walk, every body talking of this dead, and that man sick, and so many in this place, and so many in that. And they tell me that, in Westminster, there is never a physician and but one apothecary left, all being dead; but that there are great hopes of a great decrease this week: God send it!

At the Tower found my Lord Duke (56) and Duchesse (46) at dinner; so I sat down. And much good cheer, the Lieutenant (50) and his lady (53), and several officers with the Duke. But, Lord! to hear the silly talk that was there, would make one mad; the Duke having none almost but fools about him. Much of their talke about the Dutch coming on shore, which they believe they may some of them have been and steal sheep, and speak all in reproach of them in whose hands the fleete is; but, Lord helpe him, there is something will hinder him and all the world in going to sea, which is want of victuals; for we have not wherewith to answer our service; and how much better it would have been if the Duke's advice had been taken for the fleete to have gone presently out; but, God helpe the King (35)! while no better counsels are given, and what is given no better taken.

Thence after dinner receiving many commands from the Duke (56), I to our office on the Hill, and there did a little business and to Colvill's again, and so took water at the Tower, and there met with Captain Cocke (48), and he down with me to Greenwich, I having received letters from my Lord Sandwich (40) to-day, speaking very high about the prize goods, that he would have us to fear nobody, but be very confident in what we have done, and not to confess any fault or doubt of what he hath done; for the King (35) hath allowed it, and do now confirm it, and sent orders, as he says, for nothing to be disturbed that his Lordshipp hath ordered therein as to the division of the goods to the fleete; which do comfort us, but my Lord writes to me that both he and I may hence learn by what we see in this business. But that which pleases me best is that Cocke (48) tells me that he now understands that Fisher was set on in this business by the design of some of the Duke of Albemarle's (56) people, Warcupp and others, who lent him money to set him out in it, and he has spent high. Who now curse him for a rogue to take £100 when he might have had as well £1,500, and they are mightily fallen out about it. Which in due time shall be discovered, but that now that troubles me afresh is, after I am got to the office at Greenwich that some new troubles are come, and Captain Cocke's (48) house is beset before and behind with guards, and more, I do fear they may come to my office here to search for Cocke's (48) goods and find some small things of my clerk's. So I assisted them in helping to remove their small trade, but by and by I am told that it is only the Custome House men who came to seize the things that did lie at Mr. Glanville's (47), for which they did never yet see our Transire, nor did know of them till to-day. So that my fear is now over, for a transire is ready for them. Cocke (48) did get a great many of his goods to London to-day.

To the Still Yarde, which place, however, is now shut up of the plague; but I was there, and we now make no bones of it. Much talke there is of the Chancellor's (56) speech and the King's at the Parliament's meeting, which are very well liked; and that we shall certainly, by their speeches, fall out with France at this time, together with the Dutch, which will find us work. Late at the office entering my Journall for 8 days past, the greatness of my business hindering me of late to put it down daily, but I have done it now very true and particularly, and hereafter will, I hope, be able to fall into my old way of doing it daily.

So to my lodging, and there had a good pullet to my supper, and so to bed, it being very cold again, God be thanked for it!

Note 1. Sion House, granted by Edward VI to his uncle, the Duke of Somerset. After his execution, 1552, it was forfeited, and given to John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland. The duke being beheaded in 1553, it reverted to the Crown, and was granted in 1604 to Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland. It still belongs to the Duke of Northumberland.

Around 1657 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Thomas Povey Master of Requests 1614-1705. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes. Around 1662 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of John Robinson Lord Mayor of London 1st Baronet 1615-1680. Around 1650 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Around 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553 Around 1546 Unknown Painter. After William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553. Around 1547. Workshop of Master John Painter. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Percy 8th Earl of Northumberland 1532-1585.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 May 1672. 14 May 1672. To Dover; but the fleet did not appear till the 16th, when the Duke of York (38) with his and the French squadron, in all 170 ships (of which above 100 were men-of-war), sailed by, after the Dutch, who were newly withdrawn. Such a gallant and formidable navy never, I think, spread sail upon the seas. It was a goodly yet terrible sight, to behold them as I did, passing eastward by the straits between Dover and Calais in a glorious day. The wind was yet so high, that I could not well go aboard, and they were soon got out of sight. The next day, having visited our prisoners and the Castle, and saluted the Governor, I took horse for Margate. Here, from the North Foreland Lighthouse top (which is a pharos, built of brick, and having on the top a cradle of iron, in which a man attends a great sea-coal fire all the year long, when the nights are dark, for the safeguard of sailors), we could see our fleet as they lay at anchor. The next morning, they weighed, and sailed out of sight to the N. E.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 May 1672. 19 May 1672. Went to Margate; and, the following day, was carried to see a gallant widow, brought up a farmeress, and I think of gigantic race, rich, comely, and exceedingly industrious. She put me in mind of Deborah and Abigail, her house was so plentifully stored with all manner of country provisions, all of her own growth, and all her conveniences so substantial, neat, and well understood; she herself so jolly and hospitable; and her land so trim and rarely husbanded, that it struck me with admiration at her economy.

This town much consists of brewers of a certain heady ale, and they deal much in malt, etc. For the rest, it is raggedly built, and has an ill haven, with a small fort of little concernment, nor is the island well disciplined; but as to the husbandry and rural part, far exceeding any part of England for the accurate culture of their ground, in which they exceed, even to curiosity and emulation.

We passed by Rickborough, and in sight of Reculvers, and so through a sweet garden, as it were, to Canterbury.

On 02 Apr 1814 Horatio Mann 2nd Baronet 1744-1814 (70) died at Margate.

Margate Roads, Kent

On 03 May 1682 the Duke of York (48) and his retinue including John Churchill 1st Duke Marlborough 1650-1722 (31) and George Legge 1st Baron Dartmouth 1647-1691 (35) were seen off on their journey north by King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (81) from Margate Roads. James (48) was possibly travelling to Edinburgh to collect his six months pregnant wife Mary of Modena (23) to ensure their child was born in England.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of John Churchill 1st Duke Marlborough 1650-1722. Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of John Churchill 1st Duke Marlborough 1650-1722 known as The Triumph of the John, 1st Duke of Marlborough. In 1702. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of John Churchill 1st Duke Marlborough 1650-1722. Before 1744 Enoch In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649. In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718. In 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718. Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718. Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718.

North Foreland Lighthouse, Margate, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 14 May 1672. 14 May 1672. To Dover; but the fleet did not appear till the 16th, when the Duke of York (38) with his and the French squadron, in all 170 ships (of which above 100 were men-of-war), sailed by, after the Dutch, who were newly withdrawn. Such a gallant and formidable navy never, I think, spread sail upon the seas. It was a goodly yet terrible sight, to behold them as I did, passing eastward by the straits between Dover and Calais in a glorious day. The wind was yet so high, that I could not well go aboard, and they were soon got out of sight. The next day, having visited our prisoners and the Castle, and saluted the Governor, I took horse for Margate. Here, from the North Foreland Lighthouse top (which is a pharos, built of brick, and having on the top a cradle of iron, in which a man attends a great sea-coal fire all the year long, when the nights are dark, for the safeguard of sailors), we could see our fleet as they lay at anchor. The next morning, they weighed, and sailed out of sight to the N. E.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

Mereworth, Kent

In 1520 Margaret Neville 1520-1575 was born to Thomas Neville 1475-1542 (45) and Catherine Dacre 1485-1532 (35) at Mereworth.

On 01 May 1536 Robert Southwell 1506-1559 (30) and Margaret Neville 1520-1575 (16) were married at Mereworth. She a great x 4 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

On 24 Mar 1537 Thomas Southwell 1537-1567 was born to Robert Southwell 1506-1559 (31) and Margaret Neville 1520-1575 (17) at Mereworth.

On 26 Oct 1559 Robert Southwell 1506-1559 (53) died at Mereworth.

On 28 Jun 1626 Mary Neville 7th Baroness Bergavenny 3rd Baroness Despencer 1554-1626 (72) died. She was buried at Mereworth. Francis Fane 1st Earl Westmoreland 1580-1629 (46) de jure 8th Baron Bergavenny 1C 1392, 6th Baron Bergavenny 2C 1450, 4th Baron Despencer 1C 1264 or 1295. Mary Mildmay Countess Westmoreland 1582-1640 (44) by marriage Baroness Bergavenny, Baron Despencer 1C 1264 or 1295.

Around 1625 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of Francis Fane 1st Earl Westmoreland 1580-1629.

Mereworth Castle, Kent

On 28 Jan 1613 Rachael Fane Countess Bath, Eu and Middlesex 1613-1680 was born to Francis Fane 1st Earl Westmoreland 1580-1629 (32) and Mary Mildmay Countess Westmoreland 1582-1640 (31) at Mereworth Castle.

Around 1625 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of Francis Fane 1st Earl Westmoreland 1580-1629.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 64 To Richard Bentley, Esq. Since dinner we have been to Lord Westmorland's which is so perfect in a Palladian taste, that I must own it has recovered me a little from Gothic. It is better situated than I had expected from the bad reputation it bears, and some prospect, though it is in a moat, and mightily besprinkled with small ponds. The design, you know, is taken from the Villa del Capra by Vicenza, but on a larger scale: yet, though it has cost an hundred thousand pounds, it is still only a fine villa: the finishing of in and outside has been exceedingly Expensive. A wood that runs up a hill behind the house is broke like an Albano landscape, with an octagon temple and a triumphal arch; But then there are some dismal clipt hedges, and a pyramid, which by a most unnatural copulation is at once a grotto and a greenhouse. Does it not put you in mind of the proposal for your drawing a garden-seat, Chinese on one side and Gothic on the other? The chimneys, which are collected to a centre, spoil the dome of the house, and the hall is a dark well. The gallery is eighty-two feet long, hung with green velvet and pictures, among which is a fine Rembrandt and a pretty La Hire. The ceilings are painted, and there is a fine bed of silk and gold tapestry. The attic is good, and the wings extremely pretty, with porticoes formed on the style of the house. The Earl has built a new church, with a steeple which seems designed for the latitude, of Cheapside, and is so tall that the poor church curtsies under it, like Mary Rich (346) in a vast high-crown hat: it has a round portico, like St. Clement's, with vast Doric pillars supporting a thin shelf. The inside is the most abominable piece of tawdriness that ever was seen, stuffed with pillars painted in imitation of verd antique, as all the sides are like Sienna marble: but the greatest absurdity is a Doric frieze, between the triglyphs of which is the Jehovah, the I. H. S. and the Dove. There is a little chapel with Nevil tombs, particularly of the first Fane, Earl of Westmorland, and of the founder of the old church, and the heart of a knight who was killed in the wars. On the Fane tomb is a pedigree of brass in relief, and a genealogy of virtues to answer it. There is an entire window of painted-glass arms, chiefly modern, in the chapel, and another over the high altar. The hospitality of the house was truly Gothic; for they made our postilion drunk, and he overturned us close to a water and the bank did but just save us from being in the middle of it. Pray, whenever you travel in Kentish roads, take care of keeping your driver sober.

(346) Daughter of Sir Robert Rich, and elder sister of Elizabeth Rich, Lady Lyttelton.

In 1729 William Aikman Painter 1682-1731. Portrait of Robert Rich 4th Baronet Rich 1685-1768.

Mersham, Kent

Diary of Isabella Twysden 1645. 13 Apr 1645. the 13 aprill there begane a rising in Kent about mersam and thereabouts, but it was presently laid being but a few.

St John the Baptist Church Mersham, Kent

In 1822 Bishop John Lonsdale 1788-1867 (33) was given the Rectory of St John the Baptist Church Mersham by Charles Manners-Sutton Archbishop of Canterbury 1755-1828 (66).

Before 23 Jan 1810 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810 (attributed). Portrait of Charles Manners-Sutton Archbishop of Canterbury 1755-1828.

Milstead, Kent

Higham Milstead, Kent

Around 1455 Amy Cheney 1455- was born to Robert Cheney 1421-1488 (34) at Higham Milstead.

Around 1457 Humphrey Cheney 1457-1526 was born to Robert Cheney 1421-1488 (36) at Higham Milstead.

In 1490 John Cheney 1490-1545 was born to Humphrey Cheney 1457-1526 (33) at Higham Milstead.

Around 1524 Richard Cheney 1524-1591 was born to John Cheney 1490-1545 (34) at Higham Milstead.

On 03 Jun 1526 Humphrey Cheney 1457-1526 (69) died at Higham Milstead.

In 1545 John Cheney 1490-1545 (55) died at Higham Milstead.

John Cheney was born to Josias Cheney at Higham Milstead.

Nettlestead, Kent

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Orpington, Kent

In 1628 Richard Spencer 1593-1661 (34) and Mary Sandya were married. He was buried at Orpington.

Park Pale, Kent

Watling Street 1c Rochester to London. From Durobrivae the road continues through Park Pale, Vagniacis, Dartford, Noviomagus, Bexley, down Shooter's Hill past Eltham Common to Greenwich Park where the road either (or both):

1. went along the Old Kent Road and crossed the River Thames at either the London Bridge or a ford near Westminster Bridge after which it continued north past St Mary le Bow Church Cheapside, Newgate Gate, Ludgate Hill and over the River Fleet at Fleet Bridge to Marble Arch.

2. continued north-west through Camberwell crossing the River Thames near Vauxhall Bridge after which it continued north to Marble Arch.

Patrixbourne, Kent

St Marys Church Patrixbourne, Kent

On 02 Jun 1882 George Henry Conyngham 3rd Marquess Conyngham 1825-1882 (57) died at Belgrave Square, Belgravia, Westminster. He was buried at St Marys Church Patrixbourne. Henry Conyngham 4th Marquess Conyngham 1857-1897 (24) succeeded 4th Marquess Conyngham in Donegal.

Patrixborne Cheyne, Kent

In 1295 Alexander Cheney 1248-1295 (47) died at Patrixborne Cheyne.

Pembury, Kent

In 1376 John Culpepper 1305-1376 (71) died at Pembury.

Penshurst

Platts Heath, Kent

The River Len rises at Platts Heath after which it flows past Pollhill, Chegworth, to Leeds Castle, where it forms the Great Water and moat, past Downswood to Maidstone where it joins the River Medway.

Pluckley, Kent

Surrenden Dering Pluckley, Kent

On 08 Nov 1625 Edward Dering 2nd Baronet Dering 1625-1684 was born to Edward Dering 1st Baronet Dering 1598-1644 (27) at Surrenden Dering Pluckley.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Dering 1st Baronet Dering 1598-1644.

Pollhill, Kent

The River Len rises at Platts Heath after which it flows past Pollhill, Chegworth, to Leeds Castle, where it forms the Great Water and moat, past Downswood to Maidstone where it joins the River Medway.

Rainham, Kent

Around 1385 Margery Cheney 1385-1408 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (33) at Rainham.

Ramsgate, Kent

On 05 Mar 1830 Augusta Murray Duchess Sussex 1768-1830 (62) died at Ramsgate.

Reculver, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 19 May 1672. 19 May 1672. Went to Margate; and, the following day, was carried to see a gallant widow, brought up a farmeress, and I think of gigantic race, rich, comely, and exceedingly industrious. She put me in mind of Deborah and Abigail, her house was so plentifully stored with all manner of country provisions, all of her own growth, and all her conveniences so substantial, neat, and well understood; she herself so jolly and hospitable; and her land so trim and rarely husbanded, that it struck me with admiration at her economy.

This town much consists of brewers of a certain heady ale, and they deal much in malt, etc. For the rest, it is raggedly built, and has an ill haven, with a small fort of little concernment, nor is the island well disciplined; but as to the husbandry and rural part, far exceeding any part of England for the accurate culture of their ground, in which they exceed, even to curiosity and emulation.

We passed by Rickborough, and in sight of Reculvers, and so through a sweet garden, as it were, to Canterbury.

Watling Street 10 Richborough to Canterbury. Richborough__Sandwich, Reculver, Lympne__Kent to Durovernum. This route wasn't included in Margery's scheme for Watling Street.

Reculver Abbey, Kent

Anglo Saxon Chronicle 650 699. 669. This year King Egbert gave to Bass, a mass-priest, Reculver — to build a minster upon.

Anglo Saxon Chronicle 650 699. 690. This year Archbishop Theodore (88), who had been bishop twenty-two winters, departed this life, and was buried within the city of Canterbury. Bertwald, who before this was abbot of Reculver, on the calends of July succeeded him in the see; which was ere this filled by Romish bishops, but henceforth with English. Then were there two kings in Kent, Wihtred (20) and Webherd.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 8 How when Archbishop Theodore died Bertwald succeeded him as archbishop and among many others whom he ordained he made the learned Tobias bishop of the church of Rochester. [690 a.d.]. Bertwald succeeded Theodore (90) in the archbishopric, being abbot of the monastery called Racuulfe, which stands at the northern mouth of the river Genlade. He was a man learned in the Scriptures, and perfectly instructed in ecclesiastical and monastic teaching, yet in no wise to be compared to his predecessor. He was chosen bishop in the year of our Lord 692, on the first day of July, when Wictred (23) and Suaebhard were kings in Kent; but he was ordained the next year, on Sunday the 29th of June, by Godwin, metropolitan bishop of Gaul, and was enthroned on Sunday the 31st of August. Among the many bishops whom he ordained was Tobias, a man instructed in the Latin, Greek, and Saxon tongues, and otherwise of manifold learning, whom he consecrated in the stead of Gedmund, bishop of the Church of Rochester, who had died.

Before 784 Ealmund King Kent was appointed King Kent. The only contemporary evidence of him is an abstract of a charter dated 784 in which Ealmund granted land to the Abbot of Reculver.

Renville, Kent

Rochester

Rolvenden, Kent

Cranbrook Rolvenden, Kent

In 1430 John Guildford 1430-1493 was born at Cranbrook Rolvenden.

Around 1450 Richard Guildford 1450-1506 was born to John Guildford 1430-1493 (20) and Alice Waller 1434-1461 (16) at Cranbrook Rolvenden.

Romney

Sandwich

Scott's Hall, Kent

John Evelyn's Diary 16 July 1663. 16 Jul 1663. A most extraordinary wet and cold season.

Sir George Carteret (53), Treasurer of the Navy, had now married his daughter, Caroline, to Sir Thomas Scott (25), of Scott's Hall, in Kent. This gentleman was thought to be the son of Prince Rupert (43).

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray. Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1672 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 August 1663. 02 Aug 1663. This evening I accompanied Mr. Treasurer and Vice-Chamberlain Carteret (53) to his lately married son-in-law's, Sir Thomas Scott (25), to Scott's Hall. We took barge as far as Gravesend, and thence by post to Rochester, whence in coach and six horses to Scott's Hall; a right noble seat, uniformly built, with a handsome gallery. It stands in a park well stored, the land fat and good. We were exceedingly feasted by the young knight, and in his pretty chapel heard an excellent sermon by his chaplain. In the afternoon, preached the learned Sir Norton Knatchbull (who has a noble seat hard by, and a plantation of stately fir trees). In the churchyard of the parish church I measured an overgrown yew tree, that was eighteen of my paces in compass, out of some branches of which, torn off by the winds, were sawed divers goodly planks.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 September 1665. 14 Sep 1665. Up, and walked to Greenwich, and there fitted myself in several businesses to go to London, where I have not been now a pretty while. But before I went from the office newes is brought by word of mouth that letters are now just now brought from the fleete of our taking a great many more of the Dutch fleete, in which I did never more plainly see my command of my temper in my not admitting myself to receive any kind of joy from it till I had heard the certainty of it, and therefore went by water directly to the Duke of Albemarle (56), where I find a letter of the Lath from Solebay, from my Lord Sandwich (40), of the fleete's meeting with about eighteen more of the Dutch fleete, and his taking of most of them; and the messenger says, they had taken three after the letter was wrote and sealed; which being twenty-one, and the fourteen took the other day, is forty-five sail; some of which are good, and others rich ships, which is so great a cause of joy in us all that my Lord and everybody is highly joyed thereat. And having taken a copy of my Lord's letter, I away back again to the Beare at the bridge foot, being full of wind and out of order, and there called for a biscuit and a piece of cheese and gill of sacke, being forced to walk over the Bridge, toward the 'Change, and the plague being all thereabouts.

Here my news was highly welcome, and I did wonder to see the 'Change so full, I believe 200 people; but not a man or merchant of any fashion, but plain men all. And Lord! to see how I did endeavour all I could to talk with as few as I could, there being now no observation of shutting up of houses infected, that to be sure we do converse and meet with people that have the plague upon them. I to Sir Robert Viner's (34), where my main business was about settling the business of Debusty's £5000 tallys, which I did for the present to enable me to have some money, and so home, buying some things for my wife in the way.

So home, and put up several things to carry to Woolwich, and upon serious thoughts I am advised by W. Griffin to let my money and plate rest there, as being as safe as any place, nobody imagining that people would leave money in their houses now, when all their families are gone. So for the present that being my opinion, I did leave them there still. But, Lord! to see the trouble that it puts a man to, to keep safe what with pain a man hath been getting together, and there is good reason for it.

Down to the office, and there wrote letters to and again about this good newes of our victory, and so by water home late. Where, when I come home I spent some thoughts upon the occurrences of this day, giving matter for as much content on one hand and melancholy on another, as any day in all my life. For the first; the finding of my money and plate, and all safe at London, and speeding in my business of money this day.

The hearing of this good news to such excess, after so great a despair of my Lord's doing anything this year; adding to that, the decrease of 500 and more, which is the first decrease we have yet had in the sickness since it begun: and great hopes that the next week it will be greater.

Then, on the other side, my finding that though the Bill in general is abated, yet the City within the walls is encreased, and likely to continue so, and is close to our house there. My meeting dead corpses of the plague, carried to be buried close to me at noon-day through the City in Fanchurch-street. To see a person sick of the sores, carried close by me by Gracechurch in a hackney-coach. My finding the Angell tavern, at the lower end of Tower-hill shut up, and more than that, the alehouse at the Tower-stairs, and more than that, the person was then dying of the plague when I was last there, a little while ago, at night, to write a short letter there, and I overheard the mistresse of the house sadly saying to her husband somebody was very ill, but did not think it was of the plague.

To hear that poor Payne, my waiter, hath buried a child, and is dying himself. To hear that a labourer I sent but the other day to Dagenhams, to know how they did there, is dead of the plague; and that one of my own watermen, that carried me daily, fell sick as soon as he had landed me on Friday morning last, when I had been all night upon the water (and I believe he did get his infection that day at Brainford), and is now dead of the plague. To hear that Captain Lambert and Cuttle are killed in the taking these ships; and that Mr. Sidney Montague (84) is sick of a desperate fever at my Baroness Carteret's (63), at Scott's-hall. To hear that Mr. Lewes hath another daughter sick.

And, lastly, that both my servants, W. Hewer (23) and Tom Edwards, have lost their fathers, both in St. Sepulchre's parish, of the plague this week, do put me into great apprehensions of melancholy, and with good reason. But I put off the thoughts of sadness as much as I can, and the rather to keep my wife in good heart and family also. After supper (having eat nothing all this day) upon a fine tench of Mr. Shelden's taking, we to bed.

Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes. Around 1650 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672. Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Robert Vyner Banker 1st Baronet 1631-1688 and Mary Whitchurch Lady Vyner -1674 and their children. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715.

Sevenoaks

Sheldwich, Kent

Shipbourne, Kent

In 1534 Richard Clement of Ingham Mote 1482-1538 (52) was imprisoned in the Fleet Prison for having used excessive force in his roile as Justice of the Peace Kent during a property dispute in Shipbourne between the rector and Robert Brenner of Hadlow, a servant of Edward Guildford 1474-1534 (60) who was the father-in-law of John Dudley 1504-1553 (30), the future Duke of Northumberland.

On 18 Dec 1679 Frances Wray 1617-1679 (62) died. She was buried at Shipbourne.

On 28 Oct 1723 Christopher Vane 1st Baron Barnard 1653-1723 (70) died at Shipbourne. Gilbert Vane 2nd Baron Barnard 1678-1753 (45) succeeded 2nd Baron Barnard.

Fairlawne Shipbourne, Kent

On 20 May 1734 William Vane 1st Viscount Vane 1682-1734 (52) died at Fairlawne Shipbourne. William Vane 2nd Viscount Vane 1714-1789 (20) succeeded 2nd Viscount Vane.

Sissinghurst, Kent

In 1535 Cicely Baker Countess Dorset 1535-1615 was born to John Baker 1488-1558 (47) and Elizabeth Dinley 1495-1550 (40) in Sissinghurst.

Before 1591. Hieronimo Custodis Painter -1593. Portrait of Cicely Baker Countess Dorset 1535-1615.

Sittingbourne

Smarden, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Smeeth, Kent

St Mary's Church Smeeth, Kent

On 13 May 1578 Warham St Leger 1525-1597 (53) and Ursula Neville 1528-1575 (50) were married at St Mary's Church Smeeth. She a great x 4 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

Springhead, Kent

Watling Street 1c Rochester to London. From Durobrivae the road continues through Park Pale, Vagniacis, Dartford, Noviomagus, Bexley, down Shooter's Hill past Eltham Common to Greenwich Park where the road either (or both):

1. went along the Old Kent Road and crossed the River Thames at either the London Bridge or a ford near Westminster Bridge after which it continued north past St Mary le Bow Church Cheapside, Newgate Gate, Ludgate Hill and over the River Fleet at Fleet Bridge to Marble Arch.

2. continued north-west through Camberwell crossing the River Thames near Vauxhall Bridge after which it continued north to Marble Arch.

Stanford Bridge, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

Staplehurst, Kent

On 16 Apr 1866 Henry Hoare of Staplehurst 1807-1866 (58) died at Staplehurst.

Sternborough, Kent

Around 1295 Reginald Cobham 1st Baron Cobham Sternborough 1295-1361 was born to Reginald Cobham 1237- (58) and Joan Devereux 1290- (5) at Sternborough.

On 13 Apr 1358 Henry Grey 1331-1392 (27) and Joan Cobham 1345-1396 (13) were married at Sternborough. She a great x 5 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

Stirling, Kent

On 24 Sep 1366 Elizabeth Saye 5th Baroness Say 1366-1399 was born to William Saye 3rd Baron Say 1340-1375 (26) and Beatrice Brewes Baroness Say 1352-1383 (14) at Stirling.

Swanscombe, Kent

On 21 Apr 1741 Jacob Bouverie 1st Viscount Folkestone 1694-1761 (46) and Elizabeth Marsham Baroness Longford 1711-1782 (29) were married at Swanscombe.

Teston, Kent

Barham Court, Teston, Kent

On 18 Sep 1762 Diana Middleton 2nd Baroness Barham 1762-1823 was born to Admiral Charles Middleton 1st Baron Barham 1726-1813 (35) at Barham Court and Margaret Gambier -1792.

Teston Bridge, Kent

Teston Bridge bridge was constructed in the 14th or 15th century and comprises six arches of various heights and widths, the middle three of which span the River Medway.

The River Medway rises near Turners Hill from where it flows through Wood Weir Reservoir, past Forest Row, between Hartwell and Hartfield, after which it is joined by the River Grom, past Ashurst, Hedge Barton, Penshurst, under Ensfield Bridge, through Tonbridge, past East Peckham, Nettlestead, under Teston Bridge, under Kettle Bridge and East Farleigh Bridge, through Maidstone.

Tonbridge

Tunbridge Wells

Tunstall, Kent

Around 1416 William Cromer 1416-1450 was born in Tunstall.

Around 1435 James Cromer 1435-1502 was born to William Cromer 1416-1450 (19) and Elizabeth Fiennes 1420-1459 (15) at Tunstall.

In 1502 James Cromer 1435-1502 (67) died at Tunstall.

Ulcomb, Kent

On 10 Jul 1628 Thomas Culpepper 1602-1652 (26) and Katherine St Leger 1606-1658 (22) were married at Ulcomb.

Upnor Castle, Kent

Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 August 1662. 04 Aug 1662. Up by four o'clock in the morning and walked to the Dock, where Commissioner Pett (51) and I took barge and went to the guardships and mustered them, finding them but badly manned; thence to the Sovereign, which we found kept in good order and very clean, which pleased us well, but few of the officers on board.

Thence to the Charles, and were troubled to see her kept so neglectedly by the boatswain Clements, who I always took for a very good officer; it is a very brave ship.

Thence to Upnor Castle, and there went up to the top, where there is a fine prospect, but of very small force; so to the yard, and there mustered the whole ordinary, where great disorder by multitude of servants and old decrepid men, which must be remedied.

So to all the storehouses and viewed the stores of all sorts and the hemp, where we found Captain Cocke's (45) (which he came down to see along with me) very bad, and some others, and with much content (God forgive me) I did hear by the Clerk of the Ropeyard how it was by Sir W. Batten's (61) private letter that one parcel of Alderman Barker's' was received.

At two o'clock to dinner to the Hill-house, and after dinner dispatched many people's business, and then to the yard again, and looked over Mr. Gregory's and Barrow's houses to see the matter of difference between them concerning an alteration that Barrow would make, which I shall report to the board, but both their houses very pretty, and deserve to be so, being well kept.

Then to a trial of several sorts of hemp, but could not perform it here so well as at Woolwich, but we did do it pretty well.

So took barge at the dock and to Rochester, and there Captain Cocke (45) and I and our two men took coach about 8 at night and to Gravesend, where it was very dark before we got thither to the Swan; and there, meeting with Doncaster, an old waterman of mine above bridge, we eat a short supper, being very merry with the drolling, drunken coachman that brought us, and so took water. It being very dark, and the wind rising, and our waterman unacquainted with this part of the river, so that we presently cast upon the Essex shore, but got off again, and so, as well as we could, went on, but I in such fear that I could not sleep till we came to Erith, and there it begun to be calm, and the stars to shine, and so I began to take heart again, and the rest too, and so made shift to slumber a little. Above Woolwich we lost our way, and went back to Blackwall, and up and down, being guided by nothing but the barking of a dog, which we had observed in passing by Blackwall, and so, [Continued tomorrow]

Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 August 1666. 17 Aug 1666. Up and betimes with Captain Erwin down by water to Woolwich, I walking alone from Greenwich thither, making an end of the "The Adventures of Five Hours", which when all is done is the best play that ever I read in my life. Being come thither I did some business there and at the Rope Yarde, and had a piece of bride-cake sent me by Mrs. Barbary into the boate after me, she being here at her uncle's, with her husband, Mr. Wood's son, the mast-maker, and mighty nobly married, they say, she was, very fine, and he very rich, a strange fortune for so odd a looked mayde, though her hands and body be good, and nature very good, I think.

Back with Captain Erwin, discoursing about the East Indys, where he hath often been. And among other things he tells me how the King of Syam seldom goes out without thirty or forty thousand people with him, and not a word spoke, nor a hum or cough in the whole company to be heard. He tells me the punishment frequently there for malefactors is cutting off the crowne of their head, which they do very dexterously, leaving their brains bare, which kills them presently. He told me what I remember he hath once done heretofore: that every body is to lie flat down at the coming by of the King (36), and nobody to look upon him upon pain of death. And that he and his fellows, being strangers, were invited to see the sport of taking of a wild elephant, and they did only kneel, and look toward the King. Their druggerman did desire them to fall down, for otherwise he should suffer for their contempt of the King. The sport being ended, a messenger comes from the King, which the druggerman thought had been to have taken away his life; but it was to enquire how the strangers liked the sport. The druggerman answered that they did cry it up to be the best that ever they saw, and that they never heard of any Prince so great in every thing as this King. The messenger being gone back, Erwin and his company asked their druggerman what he had said, which he told them. "But why", say they, "would you say that without our leave, it being not true?"—"It is no matter for that", says he, "I must have said it, or have been hanged, for our King do not live by meat, nor drink, but by having great lyes told him". In our way back we come by a little vessel that come into the river this morning, and says he left the fleete in Sole Bay, and that he hath not heard (he belonging to Sir W. Jenings, in the fleete) of any such prizes taken as the ten or twelve I inquired about, and said by Sir W. Batten (65) yesterday to be taken, so I fear it is not true.

So to Westminster, and there, to my great content, did receive my £2000 of Mr. Spicer's telling, which I was to receive of Colvill, and brought it home with me [to] my house by water, and there I find one of my new presses for my books brought home, which pleases me mightily. As, also, do my wife's progresse upon her head that she is making.

So to dinner, and thence abroad with my wife, leaving her at Unthanke's; I to White Hall, waiting at the Council door till it rose, and there spoke with Sir W. Coventry (38), who and I do much fear our Victuallers, they having missed the fleete in their going. But Sir W. Coventry (38) says it is not our fault, but theirs, if they have not left ships to secure them. This he spoke in a chagrin sort of way, methought. After a little more discourse of several businesses, I away homeward, having in the gallery the good fortune to see Mrs. Stewart (19), who is grown a little too tall, but is a woman of most excellent features. The narrative of the late expedition in burning the ships is in print, and makes it a great thing, and I hope it is so.

So took up my wife and home, there I to the office, and thence with Sympson the joyner home to put together the press he hath brought me for my books this day, which pleases me exceedingly. Then to Sir W. Batten's (65), where Sir Richard Ford (52) did very understandingly, methought, give us an account of the originall of the Hollands Bank1, and the nature of it, and how they do never give any interest at all to any person that brings in their money, though what is brought in upon the public faith interest is given by the State for. The unsafe condition of a Bank under a Monarch, and the little safety to a Monarch to have any; or Corporation alone (as London in answer to Amsterdam) to have so great a wealth or credit, it is, that makes it hard to have a Bank here. And as to the former, he did tell us how it sticks in the memory of most merchants how the late King (when by the war between Holland and France and Spayne all the bullion of Spayne was brought hither, one-third of it to be coyned; and indeed it was found advantageous to the merchant to coyne most of it), was persuaded in a strait by my Lord Cottington (87) to seize upon the money in the Tower, which, though in a few days the merchants concerned did prevail to get it released, yet the thing will never be forgot.

So home to supper and to bed, understanding this evening, since I come home, that our Victuallers are all come in to the fleete, which is good newes. Sir John Minnes (67) come home tonight not well, from Chatham, where he hath been at a pay, holding it at Upnor Castle, because of the plague so much in the towne of Chatham. He hath, they say, got an ague, being so much on the water.

Note 1. This bank at Amsterdam is referred to in a tract entitled "An Appeal to Caesar", 1660, p. 22. In 1640 Charles I seized the money in the mint in the Tower entrusted to the safe keeping of the Crown. It was the practice of the London goldsmiths at this time to allow interest at the rate of six or eight per cent. on money deposited with them (J. Biddulph Martin, "The Grasshopper in Lombard Street", 1892, p. 152).

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Frances Teresa Stewart Duchess Lennox and Richmond 1647-1702. One of the Windsor Beauties. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 June 1667. 08 Jun 1667. To London, alarmed by the Dutch, who were fallen on our fleet at Chatham, by a most audacious enterprise, entering the very river with part of their fleet, doing us not only disgrace, but incredible mischief in burning several of our best men-of-war lying at anchor and moored there, and all this through our unaccountable negligence in not setting out our fleet in due time. This alarm caused me, fearing the enemy might venture up the Thames even to London (which they might have done with ease, and fired all the vessels in the river, too), to send away my best goods, plate, etc., from my house to another place. The alarm was so great that it put both country and city into fear, panic, and consternation, such as I hope I shall never see more; everybody was flying, none knew why or whither. Now, there were land forces dispatched with the Duke of Albemarle (58), Lord Middleton (59), Prince Rupert (47), and the Duke (33), to hinder the Dutch coming to Chatham, fortifying Upnor Castle, and laying chains and bombs; but the resolute enemy broke through all, and set fire on our ships, and retreated in spite, stopping up the Thames, the rest of the fleet lying before the mouth of it.

Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes. Before 12 Dec 1676 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of John Middleton 1st Earl Middleton 1608-1674. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray. Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1672 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert. Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 13 June 1667. 13 Jun 1667. No sooner up but hear the sad newes confirmed of the Royall Charles being taken by them, and now in fitting by them—which Pett (56) should have carried up higher by our several orders, and deserves, therefore, to be hanged for not doing it—and turning several others; and that another fleete is come up into the Hope.

Upon which newes the King (37) and Duke of York (33) have been below [Below London Bridge.] since four o'clock in the morning, to command the sinking of ships at Barking-Creeke, and other places, to stop their coming up higher: which put me into such a fear, that I presently resolved of my father's and wife's going into the country; and, at two hours' warning, they did go by the coach this day, with about £1300 in gold in their night-bag. Pray God give them good passage, and good care to hide it when they come home! but my heart is full of fear.

They gone, I continued in fright and fear what to do with the rest. W. Hewer (25) hath been at the banker's, and hath got £500 out of Backewell's hands of his own money; but they are so called upon that they will be all broke, hundreds coming to them for money: and their answer is, "It is payable at twenty days—when the days are out, we will pay you"; and those that are not so, they make tell over their money, and make their bags false, on purpose to give cause to retell it, and so spend time. I cannot have my 200 pieces of gold again for silver, all being bought up last night that were to be had, and sold for 24 and 25s. a-piece. So I must keep the silver by me, which sometimes I think to fling into the house of office, and then again know not how I shall come by it, if we be made to leave the office. Every minute some one or other calls for this or that order; and so I forced to be at the office, most of the day, about the fire-ships which are to be suddenly fitted out: and it's a most strange thing that we hear nothing from any of my brethren at Chatham; so that we are wholly in the dark, various being the reports of what is done there; insomuch that I sent Mr. Clapham express thither to see how matters go: I did, about noon, resolve to send Mr. Gibson away after my wife with another 1000 pieces, under colour of an express to Sir Jeremy Smith; who is, as I hear, with some ships at Newcastle; which I did really send to him, and may, possibly, prove of good use to the King (37); for it is possible, in the hurry of business, they may not think of it at Court, and the charge of an express is not considerable to the King (37).

So though I intend Gibson no further than to Huntingdon I direct him to send the packet forward. My business the most of the afternoon is listening to every body that comes to the office, what news? which is variously related, some better, some worse, but nothing certain. The King (37) and Duke of York (33) up and down all the day here and there: some time on Tower Hill, where the City militia was; where the King (37) did make a speech to them, that they should venture themselves no further than he would himself. I also sent, my mind being in pain, Saunders after my wife and father, to overtake them at their night's lodgings, to see how matters go with them.

In the evening, I sent for my cousin Sarah [Gyles] and her husband, who come; and I did deliver them my chest of writings about Brampton, and my brother Tom's (33) papers, and my journalls, which I value much; and did send my two silver flaggons to Kate Joyce's: that so, being scattered what I have, something might be saved. I have also made a girdle, by which, with some trouble, I do carry about me £300 in gold about my body, that I may not be without something in case I should be surprised: for I think, in any nation but our's, people that appear (for we are not indeed so) so faulty as we, would have their throats cut.

In the evening comes Mr. Pelling, and several others, to the office, and tell me that never were people so dejected as they are in the City all over at this day; and do talk most loudly, even treason; as, that we are bought and sold—that we are betrayed by the Papists, and others, about the King (37); cry out that the office of the Ordnance hath been so backward as no powder to have been at Chatham nor Upnor Castle till such a time, and the carriages all broken; that Legg is a Papist; that Upnor, the old good castle built by Queen Elizabeth, should be lately slighted; that the ships at Chatham should not be carried up higher. They look upon us as lost, and remove their families and rich goods in the City; and do think verily that the French, being come down with his army to Dunkirke, it is to invade us, and that we shall be invaded. Mr. Clerke (44), the solicitor, comes to me about business, and tells me that he hears that the King (37) hath chosen Mr. Pierpont (59) and Vaughan (63) of the West, Privy-councillors; that my Chancellor (58) was affronted in the Hall this day, by people telling him of his Dunkirke house; and that there are regiments ordered to be got together, whereof to be commanders my Lord Fairfax (55), Ingoldsby (49), Bethell, Norton, and Birch (51), and other Presbyterians; and that Dr. Bates will have liberty to preach. Now, whether this be true or not, I know not; but do think that nothing but this will unite us together.

Late at night comes Mr. Hudson, the cooper, my neighbour, and tells me that he come from Chatham this evening at five o'clock, and saw this afternoon "The Royal James", "Oake", and "London", burnt by the enemy with their fire-ships: that two or three men-of-war come up with them, and made no more of Upnor's shooting, than of a fly; that those ships lay below Upnor Castle, but therein, I conceive, he is in an error; that the Dutch are fitting out "The Royall Charles"; that we shot so far as from the Yard thither, so that the shot did no good, for the bullets grazed on the water; that Upnor played hard with their guns at first, but slowly afterwards, either from the men being beat off, or their powder spent. But we hear that the fleete in the Hope is not come up any higher the last flood; and Sir W. Batten (66) tells me that ships are provided to sink in the River, about Woolwich, that will prevent their coming up higher if they should attempt it. I made my will also this day, and did give all I had equally between my father and wife, and left copies of it in each of Mr. Hater and W. Hewer's (25) hands, who both witnessed the will, and so to supper and then to bed, and slept pretty well, but yet often waking.

In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715. Before 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Colonel William Legge -1670 (copy after original). Before 17 Jul 1678 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Pierrepoint of Thoresby 1608-1678. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 June 1667. 14 Jun 1667. Up, and to the office; where Mr. fryer comes and tells me that there are several Frenchmen and Flemish ships in the River, with passes from the Duke of York (33) for carrying of prisoners, that ought to be parted from the rest of the ships, and their powder taken, lest they do fire themselves when the enemy comes, and so spoil us; which is good advice, and I think I will give notice of it; and did so. But it is pretty odd to see how every body, even at this high time of danger, puts business off of their own hands! He says that he told this to the Lieutenant of the Tower (52), to whom I, for the same reason, was directing him to go; and the Lieutenant of the Tower bade him come to us, for he had nothing to do with it; and yesterday comes Captain Crew, of one of the fireships, and told me that the officers of the Ordnance would deliver his gunner's materials, but not compound them1, 2 but that we must do it; whereupon I was forced to write to them about it; and one that like a great many come to me this morning by and by comes—Mr. Wilson, and by direction of his, a man of Mr. Gawden's; who come from Chatham last night, and saw the three ships burnt, they lying all dry, and boats going from the men-of-war and fire them. But that, that he tells me of worst consequence is, that he himself, I think he said, did hear many Englishmen on board the Dutch ships speaking to one another in English; and that they did cry and say, "We did heretofore fight for tickets; now we fight for dollars!" and did ask how such and such a one did, and would commend themselves to them: which is a sad consideration.

And Mr. Lewes, who was present at this fellow's discourse to me, did tell me, that he is told that when they took "The Royall Charles", they said that they had their tickets signed, and showed some, and that now they come to have them paid, and would have them paid before they parted. And several seamen come this morning to me, to tell me that, if I would get their tickets paid, they would go and do all they could against the Dutch; but otherwise they would not venture being killed, and lose all they have already fought for: so that I was forced to try what I could do to get them paid.

This man tells me that the ships burnt last night did lie above Upnor Castle, over against the Docke; and the boats come from the ships of war and burnt them all which is very sad. And masters of ships, that we are now taking up, do keep from their ships all their stores, or as much as they can, so that we can despatch them, having not time to appraise them nor secure their payment; only some little money we have, which we are fain to pay the men we have with, every night, or they will not work. And indeed the hearts as well as affections of the seamen are turned away; and in the open streets in Wapping, and up and down, the wives have cried publickly, "This comes of your not paying our husbands; and now your work is undone, or done by hands that understand it not". And Sir W. Batten (66) told me that he was himself affronted with a woman, in language of this kind, on Tower Hill publickly yesterday; and we are fain to bear it, and to keep one at the office door to let no idle people in, for fear of firing of the office and doing us mischief.

The City is troubled at their being put upon duty: summoned one hour, and discharged two hours after; and then again summoned two hours after that; to their great charge as well as trouble. And Pelling, the Potticary, tells me the world says all over, that less charge than what the Kingdom is put to, of one kind or other, by this business, would have set out all our great ships. It is said they did in open streets yesterday, at Westminster, cry, "A Parliament! a Parliament!" and I do believe it will cost blood to answer for these miscarriages. We do not hear that the Dutch are come to Gravesend; which is a wonder. But a wonderful thing it is that to this day we have not one word yet from Bruncker (47), or Peter Pett (56), or J. Minnes (68), of any thing at Chatham. The people that come hither to hear how things go, make me ashamed to be found unable to answer them: for I am left alone here at the office; and the truth is, I am glad my station is to be here, near my own home and out of danger, yet in a place of doing the King (37) good service.

I have this morning good news from Gibson; three letters from three several stages, that he was safe last night as far as Royston, at between nine and ten at night. The dismay that is upon us all, in the business of the Kingdom and Navy at this day, is not to be expressed otherwise than by the condition the citizens were in when the City was on fire, nobody knowing which way to turn themselves, while every thing concurred to greaten the fire; as here the easterly gale and spring-tides for coming up both rivers, and enabling them to break the chaine. D. Gauden did tell me yesterday, that the day before at the Council they were ready to fall together by the ears at the Council-table, arraigning one another of being guilty of the counsel that brought us into this misery, by laying up all the great ships. Mr. Hater tells me at noon that some rude people have been, as he hears, at my Chancellor's (58), where they have cut down the trees before his house and broke his windows; and a gibbet either set up before or painted upon his gate, and these three words writ: "Three sights to be seen; Dunkirke, Tangier, and a barren Queene (57)"3.

It gives great matter of talk that it is said there is at this hour, in the Exchequer, as much money as is ready to break down the floor. This arises, I believe, from Sir G. Downing's (42) late talk of the greatness of the sum lying there of people's money, that they would not fetch away, which he shewed me and a great many others. Most people that I speak with are in doubt how we shall do to secure our seamen from running over to the Dutch; which is a sad but very true consideration at this day.

At noon I am told that my Lord Duke of Albemarle (58) is made Lord High Constable; the meaning whereof at this time I know not, nor whether it, be true or no.

Dined, and Mr. Hater and W. Hewer (25) with me; where they do speak very sorrowfully of the posture of the times, and how people do cry out in the streets of their being bought and sold; and both they, and every body that come to me, do tell me that people make nothing of talking treason in the streets openly: as, that we are bought and sold, and governed by Papists, and that we are betrayed by people about the King (37), and shall be delivered up to the French, and I know not what.

At dinner we discoursed of Tom of the Wood, a fellow that lives like a hermit near Woolwich, who, as they say, and Mr. Bodham, they tell me, affirms that he was by at the justice's when some did accuse him there for it, did foretell the burning of the City, and now says that a greater desolation is at hand. Thence we read and laughed at Lilly's prophecies this month, in his Almanack this year! !So to the office after dinner; and thither comes Mr. Pierce, who tells me his condition, how he cannot get his money, about £500, which, he says, is a very great part of what he hath for his family and children, out of Viner's (36) hand: and indeed it is to be feared that this will wholly undo the bankers. He says he knows nothing of the late affronts to my Chancellor's (58) house, as is said, nor hears of the Duke of Albemarle's (58) being made High Constable; but says that they are in great distraction at White Hall, and that every where people do speak high against Sir W. Coventry (39): but he agrees with me, that he is the best Minister of State the King (37) hath, and so from my heart I believe.

At night come home Sir W. Batten (66) and W. Pen (46), who only can tell me that they have placed guns at Woolwich and Deptford, and sunk some ships below Woolwich and Blackewall, and are in hopes that they will stop the enemy's coming up. But strange our confusion! that among them that are sunk they have gone and sunk without consideration "The Franakin",' one of the King's ships, with stores to a very considerable value, that hath been long loaden for supply of the ships; and the new ship at Bristoll, and much wanted there; and nobody will own that they directed it, but do lay it on Sir W. Rider. They speak also of another ship, loaden to the value of £80,000, sunk with the goods in her, or at least was mightily contended for by him, and a foreign ship, that had the faith of the nation for her security: this Sir R. Ford (53) tells us: And it is too plain a truth, that both here and at Chatham the ships that we have sunk have many, and the first of them, been ships completely fitted for fire-ships at great charge. But most strange the backwardness and disorder of all people, especially the King's people in pay, to do any work, Sir W. Pen (46) tells me, all crying out for money; and it was so at Chatham, that this night comes an order from Sir W. Coventry (39) to stop the pay of the wages of that Yard; the Duke of Albemarle (58) having related, that not above three of 1100 in pay there did attend to do any work there.

This evening having sent a messenger to Chatham on purpose, we have received a dull letter from my Lord Bruncker (47) and Peter Pett (56), how matters have gone there this week; but not so much, or so particularly, as we knew it by common talk before, and as true. I doubt they will be found to have been but slow men in this business; and they say the Duke of Albemarle (58) did tell my Lord Bruncker (47) to his face that his discharging of the great ships there was the cause of all this; and I am told that it is become common talk against my Lord Bruncker (47). But in that he is to be justified, for he did it by verbal order from Sir W. Coventry (39), and with good intent; and it was to good purpose, whatever the success be, for the men would have but spent the King (37) so much the more in wages, and yet not attended on board to have done the King (37) any service; and as an evidence of that, just now, being the 15th day in the morning that I am writing yesterday's passages, one is with me, Jacob Bryan, Purser of "The Princesse", who confesses to me that he hath about 180 men borne at this day in victuals and wages on that ship lying at Chatham, being lately brought in thither; of which 180 there was not above five appeared to do the King (37) any service at this late business. And this morning also, some of the Cambridge's men come up from Portsmouth, by order from Sir Fretcheville Hollis (25), who boasted to us the other day that he had sent for 50, and would be hanged if 100 did not come up that would do as much as twice the number of other men: I say some of them, instead of being at work at Deptford, where they were intended, do come to the office this morning to demand the payment of their tickets; for otherwise they would, they said, do no more work; and are, as I understand from every body that has to do with them, the most debauched, damning, swearing rogues that ever were in the Navy, just like their prophane commander.

So to Sir W. Batten's (66) to sit and talk a little, and then home to my flageolet, my heart being at pretty good ease by a letter from my wife, brought by Saunders, that my father and wife got well last night to their Inne and out again this morning, and Gibson's being got safe to Caxton at twelve last night.

So to supper, and then to bed. No news to-day of any motion of the enemy either upwards towards Chatham or this way.

Note 1. Meaning, apparently, that the Ordnance would deliver the charcoal, sulphur, and saltpetre separately, but not mix them as gunpowder.

Note 2. The want of ammunition when the Dutch burnt the fleet, and the revenge of the deserter sailors, are well described by Marvell "Our Seamen, whom no danger's shape could fright, Unpaid, refuse to mount their ships, for spite Or to their fellows swim, on board the Dutch, Who show the tempting metal in their clutch.

Note 3. "Pride, Lust, Ambition, and the People's Hate, the Kingdom's broker, ruin of the State, Dunkirk's sad loss, divider of the fleet, Tangier's compounder for a barren sheet This shrub of gentry, married to the crown, His daughter to the heir, is tumbled down". Poems on State Affairs, vol. i., p. 253. B.

Around 1662 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of John Robinson Lord Mayor of London 1st Baronet 1615-1680. Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669. Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Robert Vyner Banker 1st Baronet 1631-1688 and Mary Whitchurch Lady Vyner -1674 and their children. Around 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Freschville Holles 1642-1672 and Admiral Robert Holmes 1622-1692.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 June 1667. 17 Jun 1667. Up, and to my office, where busy all the morning, particularly setting my people to work in transcribing pieces of letters publique and private, which I do collect against a black day to defend the office with and myself.

At noon dined at home, Mr. Hater with me alone, who do seem to be confident that this nation will be undone, and with good reason: Wishes himself at Hambrough, as a great many more, he says, he believes do, but nothing but the reconciling of the Presbyterian party will save us, and I am of his mind. At the office all the afternoon, where every moment business of one kind or other about the fire-ships and other businesses, most of them vexatious for want of money, the commanders all complaining that, if they miss to pay their men a night, they run away; seamen demanding money of them by way of advance, and some of Sir Fretcheville Hollis's (25) men, that he so bragged of, demanding their tickets to be paid, or they would not work: this Hollis (25), Sir W. Batten (66) and W. Pen (46) say, proves a very...[Missing text: 'wind-fucker' apparently], as Sir W. B. (66) terms him, and the other called him a conceited, idle, prating, lying fellow.

But it was pleasant this morning to hear Hollis (25) give me the account what, he says, he told the King (37) in Commissioner Pett's (56) presence, whence it was that his ship was fit sooner than others, telling the King (37) how he dealt with the several Commissioners and agents of the Ports where he comes, offering Lanyon to carry him a Ton or two of goods to the Streights, giving Middleton an hour or two's hearing of his stories of Barbadoes, going to prayer with Taylor, and standing bare and calling, "If it please your Honour", to Pett (56), but Sir W. Pen (46) says that he tells this story to every body, and believes it to be a very lie.

At night comes Captain Cocke (50) to see me, and he and I an hour in the garden together. He tells me there have been great endeavours of bringing in the Presbyterian interest, but that it will not do. He named to me several of the insipid lords that are to command the armies that are to be raised. He says the King (37) and Court are all troubled, and the gates of the Court were shut up upon the first coming of the Dutch to us, but they do mind the business no more than ever: that the bankers, he fears, are broke as to ready-money, though Viner (36) had £100,000 by him when our trouble begun: that he and the Duke of Albemarle (58) have received into their own hands, of Viner (36), the former £10,000, and the latter £12,000, in tallies or assignments, to secure what was in his hands of theirs; and many other great men of our. masters have done the like; which is no good sign, when they begin to fear the main. He and every body cries out of the office of the Ordnance, for their neglects, both at Gravesend and Upnor, and everywhere else.

He gone, I to my business again, and then home to supper and to bed. I have lately played the fool much with our Nell, in playing with her breasts. This night, late, comes a porter with a letter from Monsieur Pratt, to borrow £100 for my Lord Hinchingbrooke (19), to enable him to go out with his troop in the country, as he is commanded; but I did find an excuse to decline it. Among other reasons to myself, this is one, to teach him the necessity of being a good husband, and keeping money or credit by him.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 June 1667. 30 Jun 1667. Lord's Day. Up about three o'clock, and Creed and I got ourselves ready, and took coach at our gate, it being very fine weather, and the cool of the morning, and with much pleasure, without any stop, got to Rochester about ten of the clock, all the way having mighty pleasant talk of the fate that is over all we do, that it seems as if we were designed in every thing, by land by sea, to undo ourselves.

At the foot of Rochester bridge, at the landing-place, I met my Lord Bruncker (47) and my Lord Douglas (21), and all the officers of the soldiers in the town, waiting there for the Duke of York (33), whom they heard was coming thither this day; by and by comes my Lord_Middleton (59), the first time I remember to have seen him, well mounted, who had been to meet him, but come back without him; he seems a fine soldier, and so every body says he is; and a man, like my Lord Teviott, and indeed most of the Scotch gentry, as I observe, of few words. After staying here by the water-side and seeing the boats come up from Chatham, with them that rowed with bandeleeres about their shoulders, and muskets in their boats, they being the workmen of the Yard, who have promised to redeem their credit, lost by their deserting the service when the Dutch were there, my Lord Bruncker (47) went with Lord Middleton to his inne, the Crowne, to dinner, which I took unkindly, but he was slightly invited.

So I and Creed down by boat to Chatham-yard (our watermen having their bandeleeres about them all the way), and to Commissioner Pett's (56) house, where my Lord Bruncker (47) told me that I should meet with his dinner two dishes of meat, but did not, but however by the help of Mr. Wiles had some beer and ale brought me, and a good piece of roast beef from somebody's table, and eat well at two, and after dinner into the garden to shew Creed, and I must confess it must needs be thought a sorrowful thing for a man that hath taken so much pains to make a place neat to lose it as Commissioner Pett (56) must now this.

Thence to see the batteries made; which, indeed, are very fine, and guns placed so as one would think the River should be very secure. I was glad, as also it was new to me, to see so many fortifications as I have of late seen, and so up to the top of the Hill, there to look, and could see towards Sheerenesse, to spy the Dutch fleete, but could make [out] none but one vessel, they being all gone. But here I was told, that, in all the late attempt, there was but one man that they knew killed on shore: and that was a man that had laid himself upon his belly upon one of the hills, on the other side of the River, to see the action; and a bullet come, took the ground away just under his belly, and ripped up his belly, and so was killed.

Thence back to the docke, and in my way saw how they are fain to take the deals of the rope-house to supply other occasions, and how sillily the country troopers look, that stand upon the passes there; and, methinks, as if they were more willing to run away than to fight, and it is said that the country soldiers did first run at Sheerenesse, but that then my Lord Douglas's (21) men did run also; but it is excused that there was no defence for them towards the sea, that so the very beach did fly in their faces as the bullets come, and annoyed them, they having, after all this preparation of the officers of the ordnance, only done something towards the land, and nothing at all towards the sea. The people here everywhere do speak very badly of Sir Edward Spragge (47), as not behaving himself as he should have done in that business, going away with the first, and that old Captain Pyne, who, I am here told, and no sooner, is Master-Gunner of England, was the last that staid there.

Thence by barge, it raining hard, down to the chaine; and in our way did see the sad wrackes of the poor "Royall Oake", "James", and "London"1 and several other of our ships by us sunk, and several of the enemy's, whereof three men-of-war that they could not get off, and so burned. We did also see several dead bodies lie by the side of the water. I do not see that Upnor Castle hath received any hurt by them, though they played long against it; and they themselves shot till they had hardly a gun left upon the carriages, so badly provided they were: they have now made two batteries on that side, which will be very good, and do good service.

So to the chaine, and there saw it fast at the end on Upnor side of the River; very fast, and borne up upon the several stages across the River; and where it is broke nobody can tell me. I went on shore on Upnor side to look upon the end of the chaine; and caused the link to be measured, and it was six inches and one-fourth in circumference. They have burned the Crane House that was to hawl it taught. It seems very remarkable to me, and of great honour to the Dutch, that those of them that did go on shore to Gillingham, though they went in fear of their lives, and were some of them killed; and, notwithstanding their provocation at Schelling, yet killed none of our people nor plundered their houses, but did take some things of easy carriage, and left the rest, and not a house burned; and, which is to our eternal disgrace, that what my Lord Douglas's (21) men, who come after them, found there, they plundered and took all away; and the watermen that carried us did further tell us, that our own soldiers are far more terrible to those people of the country-towns than the Dutch themselves. We were told at the batteries, upon my seeing of the field-guns that were there, that, had they come a day sooner, they had been able to have saved all; but they had no orders, and lay lingering upon the way, and did not come forward for want of direction. Commissioner Pett's (56) house was all unfurnished, he having carried away all his goods. I met with no satisfaction whereabouts the chaine was broke, but do confess I met with nobody that I could well expect to have satisfaction [from], it being Sunday; and the officers of the Yard most of them abroad, or at the Hill house, at the pay of the Chest, which they did make use of to day to do part in.

Several complaints, I hear, of the Monmouth's coming away too soon from the chaine, where she was placed with the two guard-ships to secure it; and Captain Robert Clerke, my friend, is blamed for so doing there, but I hear nothing of him at London about it; but Captain Brookes's running aground with the "Sancta Maria", which was one of the three ships that were ordered to be sunk to have dammed up the River at the chaine, is mightily cried against, and with reason, he being the chief man to approve of the abilities of other men, and the other two slips did get safe thither and he run aground; but yet I do hear that though he be blameable, yet if she had been there, she nor two more to them three would have been able to have commanded the river all over. I find that here, as it hath been in our river, fire-ships, when fitted, have been sunk afterwards, and particularly those here at the Mussle, where they did no good at all. Our great ships that were run aground and sunk are all well raised but the "Vanguard", which they go about to raise to-morrow. "the Henery", being let loose to drive up the river of herself, did run up as high as the bridge, and broke down some of the rails of the bridge, and so back again with the tide, and up again, and then berthed himself so well as no pilot could ever have done better; and Punnet says he would not, for his life, have undertaken to have done it, with all his skill. I find it is true that the Dutch did heele "The Charles" to get her down, and yet run aground twice or thrice, and yet got her safe away, and have her, with a great many good guns in her, which none of our pilots would ever have undertaken. It is very considerable the quantity of goods, which the making of these platforms and batterys do take out of the King's stores: so that we shall have little left there, and, God knows! no credit to buy any; besides, the taking away and spending of (it is possible) several goods that would have been either rejected or abatement made for them before used. It is a strange thing to see that, while my Lords Douglas and Middleton do ride up and down upon single horses, my Lord Bruncker (47) do go up and down with his Hackney-coach and six horses at the King's charge, which will do, for all this time, and the time that he is likely to stay, must amount to a great deal. But I do not see that he hath any command over the seamen, he being affronted by three or four seamen before my very face, which he took sillily, methought; and is not able to do so much good as a good boatswain in this business. My Lord Bruncker (47), I perceive, do endeavour to speak well of Commissioner Pett (56), saying that he did exercise great care and pains while he was there, but do not undertake to answer for his not carrying up of the great ships. Back again to Rochester, and there walked to the Cathedral as they were beginning of the service, but would not be seen to stay to church there, besides had no mind, but rather to go to our inne, the White Hart, where we drank and were fain (the towne being so full of soldiers) to have a bed corded for us to lie in, I being unwilling to lie at the Hill house for one night, being desirous to be near our coach to be gone betimes to-morrow morning. Here in the streets, I did hear the Scotch march beat by the drums before the soldiers, which is very odde.

Thence to the Castle, and viewed it with Creed, and had good satisfaction from him that showed it us touching the history of it. Then into the fields, a fine walk, and there saw Sir Francis Clerke's house, which is a pretty seat, and then back to our inne and bespoke supper, and so back to the fields and into the Cherry garden, where we had them fresh gathered, and here met with a young, plain, silly shopkeeper, and his wife, a pretty young woman, the man's name Hawkins, and I did kiss her, and we talked (and the woman of the house is a very talking bawdy jade), and eat cherries together, and then to walk in the fields till it was late, and did kiss her, and I believe had I had a fit time and place I might have done what I would with her. Walked back and left them at their house near our inne, and then to our inne, where, I hear, my Lord Bruncker (47) hath sent for me to speak with me before I go: so I took his coach, which stands there with two horses, and to him and to his bedside, where he was in bed, and hath a watchman with a halbert at his door; and to him, and did talk a little, and find him a very weak man for this business that he is upon; and do pity the King's service, that is no better handled, and his folly to call away Pett before we could have found a better man to have staid in his stead; so took leave of him, and with Creed back again, it being now about 10 at night, and to our inne to supper, and then to bed, being both sleepy, but could get no sheets to our bed, only linen to our mouths, and so to sleep, merrily talking of Hawkins and his wife, and troubled that Creed did see so much of my dalliance, though very little.

Note 1. "The bottom of 'The Royal James' is got afloat, and those of the 'Loyal London' and 'Royal Oak' soon will be so. Many men are at work to put Sheerness in a posture of defence, and a boom is being fitted over the river by Upnor Castle, which with the good fortifications will leave nothing to fear".—Calendar of State Papers, 1667, p. 285.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 25 March 1669. 25 Mar 1669. Up, and by and by, about eight o'clock, come Rear-Admiral Kempthorne (49) and seven Captains more, by the Duke of York's (35) order, as we expected, to hold the Court-martiall about the loss of "The Defyance"; and so presently we by boat to "The Charles", which lies over against Upnor Castle, and there we fell to the business; and there I did manage the business, the Duke of York (35) having, by special order, directed them to take the assistance of Commissioner Middleton and me, forasmuch as there might be need of advice in what relates to the government of the ships in harbour. And so I did lay the law open to them, and rattle the Master Attendants out of their wits almost; and made the trial last till seven at night, not eating a bit all the day; only when we had done examination, and I given my thoughts that the neglect of the Gunner of the ship was as great as I thought any neglect could be, which might by the law deserve death, but Commissioner Middleton did declare that he was against giving the sentence of death, we withdrew, as not being of the Court, and so left them to do what they pleased; and, while they were debating it, the Boatswain of the ship did bring us out of the kettle a piece of hot salt beef, and some brown bread and brandy; and there we did make a little meal, but so good as I never would desire to eat better meat while I live, only I would have cleaner dishes.

By and by they had done, and called us down from the quarterdeck; and there we find they do sentence that the Gunner of "The Defyance" should stand upon "The Charles" three hours with his fault writ upon his breast, and with a halter about his neck, and so be made incapable of any office. The truth is, the man do seem, and is, I believe, a good man; but his neglect, in trusting a girl to carry fire into his cabin, is not to be pardoned. This being done, we took boat and home; and there a good supper was ready for us, which should have been our dinner. The Captains, desirous to be at London, went away presently for Gravesend, to get thither by this night's tide; and so we to supper, it having been a great snowy and mighty cold, foul day; and so after supper to bed.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 June 1672. 02 Jun 1672. Trinity Sunday, I passed at Rochester; and, on the 5th, there was buried in the Cathedral Monsieur Rabiniére, Rear Admiral of the French squadron, a gallant person, who died of the wounds he received in the fight. This ceremony lay on me, which I performed with all the decency I could, inviting the Mayor and Aldermen to come in their formalities. Sir Jonas Atkins was there with his guards; and the Dean and Prebendaries: one of his countrymen pronouncing a funeral oration at the brink of his grave, which I caused to be dug in the choir. This is more at large described in the "Gazette" of that day; Colonel Reymes (58), my colleague in commission, assisting, who was so kind as to accompany me from London, though it was not his district; for indeed the stress of both these wars lay more on me by far than on any of my brethren, who had little to do in theirs. I went to see Upnor Castle, which I found pretty well defended, but of no great moment.

Next day I sailed to the fleet, now riding at the buoy of the "Nore", where I met his Majesty (42), the Duke (38), Lord Arlington (54), and all the great men, in the "Charles", lying miserably shattered; but the miss of Lord Sandwich (46) redoubled the loss to me, and showed the folly of hazarding so brave a fleet, and losing so many good men, for no provocation but that the Hollanders exceeded us in industry, and in all things but envy.

At Sheerness, I gave his Majesty (42) and his Royal Highness (38) an account of my charge, and returned to Queenborough; next day dined at Major Dorel's, Governor of Sheerness; thence, to Rochester; and the following day, home.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 wearing his Garter Robes. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685. Around 1650 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672.

Upper Harbledown, Kent

Watling Street 1b Canterbury to Rochester. From Durovernum the road continues in a north-east direction through Upper Harbledown, Boughton Street, Durolevo, Key Street, Gillingham to Durobrivae where it crosses the River Medway.

Waddenhall, Kent

In 1390 William Haute 1390-1462 was born to Nicholas Haute 1357-1417 (32) at Waddenhall.

Walmer, Kent

On 30 Jan 1805 Philip Stanhope 5th Earl Stanhope 1805-1875 was born to Philip Henry Stanhope 4th Earl Stanhope 1781-1855 (23) and Catherine Lucy Smith Countess Stanhope -1843 at Walmer.

1834. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871. Portrait of Philip Stanhope 5th Earl Stanhope 1805-1875.

Walmer Castle, Kent

Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743 (46). Portrait of Mary Preston Marchioness Powis -1724. Walmer Castle.

Around 1850. Henry Pether 1800-1880 (50). Walmer Castle by Moonlight.

The May 1648 Kentish Rebellion was, in effect, the commencement of the Second Civil War of 1648. The rebels, commanded by George Goring 1st Earl Norwich 1585-1663, raised forces across Kent. Deal Castle, Walmer Castle and Sandown Castle surrendered. The rebels then besieged Dover Castle. Parliament dispatched troops commanded by Nathaniel Rich of Stondon -1701 to suppress the rebels.

West Greenwich, Kent

On 16 Sep 1295 William Saye 1253-1295 (41) died at West Greenwich.

West Malling, Kent

Fartherwell Hall West Malling, Kent

On 22 Apr 1908 Edward Vesey Bligh 1829-1908 (79) died at Fartherwell Hall West Malling.

Wingham, Kent

In 1540 Thomas Palmer 1st Baronet Palmer 1540-1626 was born to Henry Palmer at Wingham.

On 07 Jan 1626 Thomas Palmer 1st Baronet Palmer 1540-1626 (86) died at Barnet. He was buried at Wingham. Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 succeeded 2nd Baronet Palmer of Wingham.

On 20 Apr 1656 Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 died at Wingham. Henry Palmer 3rd Baronet Palmer -1706 succeeded 3rd Baronet Palmer of Wingham.

Thomas Palmer 2nd Baronet Palmer -1656 was born to Thomas Palmer 1575-1608 at Wingham.

Woolwich

Wye, Kent

Yalding, Kent

The River Beult rises at Great Chart from where it flows broadly west under Stanford Bridge, past Smarden, Headcorn, Hawkenbury, Cross-at-Hand, Linton to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.

The River Teise rises south of Tunbridge Wells from where it flows past Bayham Abbey, Lamberhurst, Claygate, Laddingford to Yalding where it joins the River Medway.