History of Middlesex

991 Battle of Maldon

1016-Battle of Brentford

1553 Trial and Execution of Lady Jane Grey's Supporters

1645 Treaty of Uxbridge

1665 Great Plague of London

Middlesex is in Home Counties.

Acton, Middlesex

On 04 Oct 1484 Richard Culpepper 1430-1484 (54) died at Acton.

On 19 Aug 1537 Thomas Cornwall 8th Baron Burford 1467-1537 (70) died at Acton. His son Richard Cornwall 9th Baron Burford 1493-1569 (44) succeeded 9th Baron Burford 1C.

On 08 Aug 1637 Richard Vaughan 2nd Earl Carbery 1600-1686 (37) and Frances Altham Countess Carbery 1621-1650 (16) were married at Acton. She by marriage Countess Carbery.

Around 1650 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699 (attributed). Portrait of Frances Altham Countess Carbery 1621-1650 Probably painted posthumously..

On 11 Dec 1830 John Adams Acton Sculptor 1830-1910 was born in Acton.

Barnet

Brentford, Middlesex

1016-Battle of Brentford

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. After 23 Jun 1016. It was within two nights after that the king (26) went over at Brentford; where he fought with the enemy, and put them to flight: but there many of the English were drowned, from their own carelessness; who went before the main army with a design to plunder. After this the king (26) went into Wessex, and collected his army; but the enemy soon returned to London, and beset the city without, and fought strongly against it both by water and land. But the almighty God delivered them. The enemy went afterward from London with their ships into the Orwell; where they went up and proceeded into Mercia, slaying and burning whatsoever they overtook, as their custom is; and, having provided themselves with meat, they drove their ships and their herds into the Medway. Then assembled King Edmund (26) the fourth time all the English nation, and forded over the Thames at Brentford; whence he proceeded into Kent. The enemy fled before him with their horses into the Isle of Shepey; and the king slew as many of them as he could overtake. Alderman Edric then went to meet the king at Aylesford; than which no measure could be more ill-advised. The enemy, meanwhile, returned into Essex, and advanced into Mercia, destroying all that he overtook.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 January 1660. 17 Jan 1660. Tuesday. Early I went to Mr. Crew's (62), and having given Mr. Edward (12) money to give the servants, I took him into the coach that waited for us and carried him to my house, where the coach waited for me while I and the child went to Westminster Hall, and bought him some pictures. In the Hall I met Mr. Woodfine, and took him to Will's and drank with him. Thence the child and I to the coach, where my wife was ready, and so we went towards Twickenham. In our way, at Kensington we understood how that my Lord Chesterfield (26) had killed another gentleman about half an hour before, and was fled.
NOTE. Philip Stanhope, second Earl of Chesterfield (26), ob. 1713, act. suae 80. We learn, from the memoir prefixed to his "Printed Correspondence", that he fought three duels, disarming and wounding his first and second antagonists, and killing the third. The name of the unfortunate gentleman who fell on this occasion was Woolly. Lord Chesterfield (26), absconding, went to Breda, where he obtained the royal pardon from Charles II (29). He acted a busy part in the eventful times in which he lived, and was remarkable for his steady adherence to the Stuarts. Lord Chesterfield's letter to Charles II, and the King's (29) answer granting the royal pardon, occur in the Correspondence published by General Sir John Murray, in 1829: "Jan. 17th, 1659. The Earl of Chesterfield and Dr. Woolly's son of Hammersmith, had a quarrel about a mare of eighteen pounds price; the quarrel would not be reconciled, insomuch that a challenge passed between them. They fought a duel on the backside of Mr. Colby's house at Kensington, where the Earl and he had several passes. The Earl wounded him in two places, and would fain have then ended, but the stubbornness and pride of heart of Mr. Woolly would not give over, and the next pass [he] was killed on the spot. The Earl fled to Chelsea, and there took water and escaped. The jury found it chance-medley".—Rugge's "Diurnal", Addit MSS.,British Museum. B.].
We went forward and came about one of the clock to Mr. Fuller's (52), but he was out of town, so we had a dinner there, and I gave the child 40s. to give to the two ushers. After that we parted and went homewards, it being market day at Brainford. I set my wife down and went with the coach to Mr. Crew's (62), thinking to have spoke with Mr. Moore and Mrs. Jane, he having told me the reason of his melancholy was some unkindness from her after so great expressions of love, and how he had spoke to her friends and had their consent, and that he would desire me to take an occasion of speaking with her, but by no means not to heighten her discontent or distaste whatever it be, but to make it up if I can.
But he being out of doors, I went away and went to see Mrs Jane, who was now very well again, and after a game or two at cards, I left her. So I went to the Coffee Club, and heard very good discourse; it was in answer to Mr. Harrington's (49) answer, who said that the state of the Roman government was not a settled government, and so it was no wonder that the balance of propriety [i.e., property] was in one hand, and the command in another, it being therefore always in a posture of war; but it was carried by ballot, that it was a steady government, though it is true by the voices it had been carried before that it was an unsteady government; so to-morrow it is to be proved by the opponents that the balance lay in one hand, and the government in another.
Thence I went to Westminster, and met Shaw and Washington, who told me how this day Sydenham (44) was voted out of the House for sitting any more this Parliament, and that Salloway was voted out likewise and sent to the Tower, during the pleasure of the House. Home and wrote by the Post, and carried to Whitehall, and coming back turned in at Harper's, where Jack Price was, and I drank with him and he told me, among other, things, how much the Protector (33) is altered, though he would seem to bear out his trouble very well, yet he is scarce able to talk sense with a man; and how he will say that "Who should a man trust, if he may not trust to a brother and an uncle;" and "how much those men have to answer before God Almighty, for their playing the knave with him as they did". He told me also, that there was; £100,000 offered, and would have been taken for his restitution, had not the Parliament come in as they did again; and that he do believe that the Protector will live to give a testimony of his valour and revenge yet before he dies, and that the Protector will say so himself sometimes. Thence I went home, it being late and my wife in bed.

Read More ...

Great Plague of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 August 1665. 20 Aug 1665. Lord's Day. Sir G. Carteret (55) come and walked by my bedside half an houre, talking and telling me how my Lord is in this unblameable in all this ill-successe, he having followed orders; and that all ought to be imputed to the falsenesse of the King (35) of Denmarke, who, he told me as a secret, had promised to deliver up the Dutch ships to us, and we expected no less; and swears it will, and will easily, be the ruine of him and his kingdom, if we fall out with him, as we must in honour do; but that all that can be, must be to get the fleete out again to intercept De Witt, who certainly will be coming home with the East India ships, he being gone thither. He being gone, I up and with Fenn, being ready to walk forth to see the place; and I find it to be a very noble seat in a noble forest, with the noblest prospect towards Windsor, and round about over many countys, that can be desired; but otherwise a very melancholy place, and little variety save only trees. I had thoughts of going home by water, and of seeing Windsor Chappell and Castle, but finding at my coming in that Sir G. Carteret (55) did prevent me in speaking for my sudden return to look after business, I did presently eat a bit off the spit about 10 o'clock, and so took horse for Stanes, and thence to Brainford to Mr. Povy's (51), the weather being very pleasant to ride in. Mr. Povy (51) not being at home I lost my labour, only eat and drank there with his lady, and told my bad newes, and hear the plague is round about them there. So away to Brainford; and there at the inn that goes down to the water-side, I 'light and paid off my post-horses, and so slipped on my shoes, and laid my things by, the tide not serving, and to church, where a dull sermon, and many Londoners. After church to my inn, and eat and drank, and so about seven o'clock by water, and got between nine and ten to Queenhive, very dark. And I could not get my waterman to go elsewhere for fear of the plague.
Thence with a lanthorn, in great fear of meeting of dead corpses, carried to be buried; but, blessed be God, met none, but did see now and then a linke (which is the mark of them) at a distance. So got safe home about 10 o'clock, my people not all abed, and after supper I weary to bed.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 September 1665. 07 Sep 1665. Up by 5 of the clock, mighty full of fear of an ague, but was obliged to go, and so by water, wrapping myself up warm, to the Tower, and there sent for the Weekely Bill, and find 8,252 dead in all, and of them 6,878 of the plague; which is a most dreadfull number, and shows reason to fear that the plague hath got that hold that it will yet continue among us.
Thence to Brainford, reading "The Villaine", a pretty good play, all the way. There a coach of Mr. Povy's (51) stood ready for me, and he at his house ready to come in, and so we together merrily to Swakely, Sir R. Viner's (34). A very pleasant place, bought by him of Sir James Harrington's (57) lady (48). He took us up and down with great respect, and showed us all his house and grounds; and it is a place not very moderne in the garden nor house, but the most uniforme in all that ever I saw; and some things to excess. Pretty to see over the screene of the hall (put up by Sir Mr. Harrington (57), a Long Parliamentman) the King's head, and my Lord of Essex (33) on one side, and Fairfax on the other; and upon the other side of the screene, the parson of the parish, and the lord of the manor and his sisters. The window-cases, door-cases, and chimnys of all the house are marble. He showed me a black boy that he had, that died of a consumption, and being dead, he caused him to be dried in an oven, and lies there entire in a box.
By and by to dinner, where his lady I find yet handsome, but hath been a very handsome woman; now is old. Hath brought him near £100,000 and now he lives, no man in England in greater plenty, and commands both King and Council with his credit he gives them. Here was a fine lady a merchant's wife at dinner with us, and who should be here in the quality of a woman but Mrs. Worship's daughter, Dr. Clerke's niece, and after dinner Sir Robert (34) led us up to his Long gallery, very fine, above stairs (and better, or such, furniture I never did see), and there Mrs. Worship did give us three or four very good songs, and sings very neatly, to my great delight.
After all this, and ending the chief business to my content about getting a promise of some money of him, we took leave, being exceedingly well treated here, and a most pleasant journey we had back, Povy (51) and I, and his company most excellent in anything but business, he here giving me an account of as many persons at Court as I had a mind or thought of enquiring after. He tells me by a letter he showed me, that the King (35) is not, nor hath been of late, very well, but quite out of humour; and, as some think, in a consumption, and weary of every thing. He showed me my Lord Arlington's (47) house that he was born in, in a towne called Harlington: and so carried me through a most pleasant country to Brainford, and there put me into my boat, and good night. So I wrapt myself warm, and by water got to Woolwich about one in the morning, my wife and all in bed.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 15 October 1665. 15 Oct 1665. Lord's Day. Up, and while I staid for the barber, tried to compose a duo of counterpoint, and I think it will do very well, it being by Mr. Berckenshaw's rule.
By and by by appointment comes Mr. Povy's (51) coach, and, more than I expected, him himself, to fetch me to Brainford: so he and I immediately set out, having drunk a draft of mulled sacke; and so rode most nobly, in his most pretty and best contrived charriott in the world, with many new conveniences, his never having till now, within a day or two, been yet finished; our discourse upon Tangier business, want of money, and then of publique miscarriages, nobody minding the publique, but every body himself and his lusts.
Anon we come to his house, and there I eat a bit, and so with fresh horses, his noble fine horses, the best confessedly in England, the King (35) having none such, he sent me to Sir Robert Viner's (34), whom I met coming just from church, and so after having spent half-an-hour almost looking upon the horses with some gentlemen that were in company, he and I into his garden to discourse of money, but none is to be had, he confessing himself in great straits, and I believe it. Having this answer, and that I could not get better, we fell to publique talke, and to think how the fleete and seamen will be paid, which he protests he do not think it possible to compass, as the world is now: no money got by trade, nor the persons that have it by them in the City to be come at. The Parliament, it seems, have voted the King (35) £1,250,000 at £50,000 per month, tax for the war; and voted to assist the King (35) against the Dutch, and all that shall adhere to them; and thanks to be given him for his care of the Duke of Yorke (32), which last is a very popular vote on the Duke's behalf. He tells me how the taxes of the last assessment, which should have been in good part gathered, are not yet laid, and that even in part of the City of London; and the Chimny-money comes almost to nothing, nor any thing else looked after.
Having done this I parted, my mind not eased by any money, but only that I had done my part to the King's service. And so in a very pleasant evening back to Mr. Povy's (51), and there supped, and after supper to talke and to sing, his man Dutton's wife singing very pleasantly (a mighty fat woman), and I wrote out one song from her and pricked the tune, both very pretty. But I did never heare one sing with so much pleasure to herself as this lady do, relishing it to her very heart, which was mighty pleasant.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 January 1666. 28 Jan 1666. And up again about six (Lord's day), and being dressed in my velvett coate and plain cravatte took a Hackney coach provided ready for me by eight o'clock, and so to my Lord Bruncker's (46) with all my papers, and there took his coach with four horses and away toward Hampton Court, having a great deale of good discourse with him, particularly about his coming to lie at the office, when I went further in inviting him to than I intended, having not yet considered whether it will be convenient for me or no to have him here so near us, and then of getting Mr. Evelyn (45) or Sir Robert Murray (58) into the Navy in the room of Sir Thomas Harvey (40).
At Brainford I 'light, having need to shit, and went into an Inne doore that stood open, found the house of office and used it, but saw no people, only after I was in the house, heard a great dogg barke, and so was afeard how I should get safe back again, and therefore drew my sword and scabbard out of my belt to have ready in my hand, but did not need to use it, but got safe into the coach again, but lost my belt by the shift, not missing it till I come to Hampton Court. At the Wicke found Sir J. Minnes (66) and Sir W. Batten (65) at a lodging provided for us by our messenger, and there a good dinner ready.
After dinner took coach and to Court, where we find the King (35), and Duke (32), and Lords, all in council; so we walked up and down: there being none of the ladies come, and so much the more business I hope will be done.
The Council being up, out comes the King (35), and I kissed his hand, and he grasped me very kindly by the hand. The Duke (32) also, I kissed his, and he mighty kind, and Sir W. Coventry (38). I found my Lord Sandwich (40) there, poor man! I see with a melancholy face, and suffers his beard to grow on his upper lip more than usual. I took him a little aside to know when I should wait on him, and where: he told me, and that it would be best to meet at his lodgings, without being seen to walk together. Which I liked very well; and, Lord! to see in what difficulty I stand, that I dare not walk with Sir W. Coventry (38), for fear my Lord or Sir G. Carteret (56) should see me; nor with either of them, for fear Sir W. Coventry (38) should.
After changing a few words with Sir W. Coventry (38), who assures me of his respect and love to me, and his concernment for my health in all this sickness, I went down into one of the Courts, and there met the King (35) and Duke (32); and the Duke called me to him. And the King (35) come to me of himself, and told me, "Mr. Pepys", says he, "I do give you thanks for your good service all this year, and I assure you I am very sensible of it". And the Duke of Yorke (32) did tell me with pleasure, that he had read over my discourse about pursers, and would have it ordered in my way, and so fell from one discourse to another.
I walked with them quite out of the Court into the fields, and then back to my Lord Sandwich's (40) chamber, where I find him very melancholy and not well satisfied, I perceive, with my carriage to Sir G. Carteret (56), but I did satisfy him and made him confess to me, that I have a very hard game to play; and told me he was sorry to see it, and the inconveniences which likely may fall upon me with him; but, for all that, I am not much afeard, if I can but keepe out of harm's way in not being found too much concerned in my Lord's or Sir G. Carteret's (56) matters, and that I will not be if I can helpe it. He hath got over his business of the prizes, so far as to have a privy seale passed for all that was in his distribution to the officers, which I am heartily glad of; and, for the rest, he must be answerable for what he is proved to have. But for his pardon for anything else, he thinks it not seasonable to aske it, and not usefull to him; because that will not stop a Parliament's mouth, and for the King (35), he is sure enough of him. I did aske him whether he was sure of the interest and friendship of any great Ministers of State and he told me, yes.
As we were going further, in comes my Lord Mandeville (31), so we were forced to breake off and I away, and to Sir W. Coventry's (38) chamber, where he not come in but I find Sir W. Pen (44), and he and I to discourse. I find him very much out of humour, so that I do not think matters go very well with him, and I am glad of it. He and I staying till late, and Sir W. Coventry (38) not coming in (being shut up close all the afternoon with the Duke of Albemarle (57)), we took boat, and by water to Kingston, and so to our lodgings, where a good supper and merry, only I sleepy, and therefore after supper I slunk away from the rest to bed, and lay very well and slept soundly, my mind being in a great delirium between joy for what the King (35) and Duke (32) have said to me and Sir W. Coventry (38), and trouble for my Lord Sandwich's (40) concernments, and how hard it will be for me to preserve myself from feeling thereof.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 25 February 1666. 25 Feb 1666. Lord's Day. My wife up between three and four of the clock in the morning to dress herself, and I about five, and were all ready to take coach, she and I and Mercer, a little past five, but, to our trouble, the coach did not come till six. Then with our coach of four horses I hire on purpose, and Leshmore to ride by, we through the City to Branford and so to Windsor, Captain Ferrers overtaking us at Kensington, being to go with us, and here drank, and so through, making no stay, to Cranborne, about eleven o'clock, and found my Lord and the ladies at a sermon in the house; which being ended we to them, and all the company glad to see us, and mighty merry to dinner. Here was my Lord, and Lord Hinchingbrooke (18), and Mr. Sidney (15), Sir Charles Herbert (26), and Mr. Carteret (25), my Baroness Carteret (64), my Lady Jemimah, and Lady Slaning.
After dinner to talk to and again, and then to walke in the Parke, my Lord and I alone, talking upon these heads; first, he has left his business of the prizes as well as is possible for him, having cleared himself before the Commissioners by the King's commands, so that nothing or little is to be feared from that point, he goes fully assured, he tells me, of the King's favour. That upon occasion I may know, I desired to know, his friends I may trust to, he tells me, but that he is not yet in England, but continues this summer in Ireland, my Lord Orrery (44) is his father almost in affection.
He tells me my Lord of Suffolke (47), Lord Arlington (48), Archbishop of Canterbury (67), Lord Treasurer (58), Mr. Atturny Montagu (48), Sir Thomas Clifford (35) in the House of Commons, Sir G. Carteret (56), and some others I cannot presently remember, are friends that I may rely on for him. He tells me my Chancellor (57) seems his very good friend, but doubts that he may not think him so much a servant of the Duke of Yorke's (32) as he would have him, and indeed my Lord tells me he hath lately made it his business to be seen studious of the King's favour, and not of the Duke's, and by the King (35) will stand or fall, for factions there are, as he tells me, and God knows how high they may come.
The Duke of Albemarle's (57) post is so great, having had the name of bringing in the King (35), that he is like to stand, or, if it were not for him, God knows in what troubles we might be from some private faction, if an army could be got into another hand, which God forbid! It is believed that though Mr. Coventry (38) be in appearance so great against the Chancellor (57), yet that there is a good understanding between the Duke and him. He dreads the issue of this year, and fears there will be some very great revolutions before his coming back again. He doubts it is needful for him to have a pardon for his last year's actions, all which he did without commission, and at most but the King's private single word for that of Bergen; but he dares not ask it at this time, lest it should make them think that there is something more in it than yet they know; and if it should be denied, it would be of very ill consequence. He says also, if it should in Parliament be enquired into the selling of Dunkirke (though the Chancellor (57) was the man that would have it sold to France, saying the King of Spayne (60) had no money to give for it); yet he will be found to have been the greatest adviser of it; which he is a little apprehensive may be called upon this Parliament. He told me it would not be necessary for him to tell me his debts, because he thinks I know them so well. He tells me, that for the match propounded of Mrs. Mallett (15) for my Lord Hinchingbrooke (18), it hath been lately off, and now her friends bring it on again, and an overture hath been made to him by a servant of hers, to compass the thing without consent of friends, she herself having a respect to my Lord's family, but my Lord will not listen to it but in a way of honour. The Duke hath for this weeke or two been very kind to him, more than lately; and so others, which he thinks is a good sign of faire weather again. He says the Archbishopp of Canterbury (67) hath been very kind to him, and hath plainly said to him that he and all the world knows the difference between his judgment and brains and the Duke of Albemarle's (57), and then calls my Lady Duchesse (46) the veryst slut and drudge and the foulest worde that can be spoke of a woman almost.
My Lord having walked an houre with me talking thus and going in, and my Baroness Carteret (64) not suffering me to go back again to-night, my Lord to walke again with me about some of this and other discourse, and then in a-doors and to talke with all and with my Baroness Carteret (64), and I with the young ladies and gentle men, who played on the guittar, and mighty merry, and anon to supper, and then my Lord going away to write, the young gentlemen to flinging of cushions, and other mad sports; at this late till towards twelve at night, and then being sleepy, I and my wife in a passage-room to bed, and slept not very well because of noise.

Read More ...

Chiswick

Clerkenwell

Cornhill

Cranford, Middlesex

St Dunstan Church Cranford, Middlesex

On 23 Apr 1635 Elizabeth Carey 1576-1635 (58) died. She was buried at St Dunstan Church Cranford.

On 16 Aug 1661 Thomas Fuller Author 1608-1661 (53)typhus at his lodgings in Covent Garden. He was buried in St Dunstan Church Cranford.

On 26 Feb 1694 Charles Scarburgh Physician 1615-1694 (78) died. He was buried at St Dunstan Church Cranford where his wife Mary Daniell commissioned a memorial.

In or before 1679. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Mary Daniell.

On 10 Oct 1698 George Berkeley 1st Earl Berkeley 1628-1698 (70) died. He was buried at St Dunstan Church Cranford. His son Charles Berkeley 2nd Earl Berkeley 1649-1710 (49) succeeded 2nd Earl Berkeley, 2nd Viscount Dursley, 10th Baron Berkeley 2C 1421. Elizabeth Noel Countess Berkeley 1654-1719 (44) by marriage Countess Berkeley.

Before 10 Dec 1708 Elizabeth Massingberd Couness Berkeley -1708 died. She was buried in St Dunstan Church Cranford.

Enfield

Ely House, Middlesex

In Feb 1638 Francis White Bishop of Norwich 1564-1638 (74) died at Ely House.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 February 1661. 10 Feb 1661. Dr. Baldero preached at Ely-house, on Matthew vi. 33, of seeking early the Kingdom of God; after sermon, the Bishop (75) (Dr. Wren) gave us the blessing, very pontifically.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 November 1668. 14 Nov 1668. To London, invited to the consecration of that excellent person, the Dean of Ripon, Dr. Wilkins (54), now made Bishop of Chester; it was at Ely House, the Archbishop of Canterbury (70), Dr. Cosin (73), Bishop of Durham, the Bishops of Ely (77), Salisbury (51), Rochester (43), and others officiating. Dr. Tillotson (38) preached. Then, we went to a sumptuous dinner in the hall, where were the Duke of Buckingham (40), Judges, Secretaries of State, Lord-Keeper, Council, Noblemen, and innumerable other company, who were honorers of this incomparable man, universally beloved by all who knew him.
This being the Queen's birthday, great was the gallantry at Whitehall, and the night celebrated with very fine fireworks.
My poor brother (66) continuing ill, I went not from him till the 17th, when, dining at the Groom Porters, I heard Sir Edward Sutton play excellently on the Irish harp; he performs genteelly, but not approaching my worthy friend, Mr. Clark, a gentleman of Northumberland, who makes it execute lute, viol, and all the harmony an instrument is capable of; pity it is that it is not more in use; but, indeed, to play well, takes up the whole man, as Mr. Clark has assured me, who, though a gentleman of quality and parts, was yet brought up to that instrument from five years old, as I remember he told me.

Read More ...

John Evelyn's Diary 27 June 1675. 27 Jun 1675. At Ely House, I went to the consecration of my worthy friend, the learned Dr. Barlow (51), Warden of Queen's College, Oxford, now made Bishop of Lincoln. After it succeeded a magnificent feast, where were the Duke of Ormond (64), Earl of Lauderdale (59), the Lord Treasurer (43), Lord Keeper (69), etc.

St Ethedreda's Chapel Ely House, Middlesex

On or before 27 Apr 1693 William Draper and Susannah Evelyn 1669-1754 (24) were married in St Ethedreda's Chapel Ely House by Thomas Tenison Archbishop of Canterbury 1636-1715 (56).

John Evelyn's Diary 27 April 1693. 27 Apr 1693. My daughter Susanna (24) was married to William Draper, Esq, in the chapel of Ely House, by Dr. Tenison (56), Bishop of Lincoln (since Archbishop). I gave her in portion £4,000, her jointure is £500 per annum. I pray Almighty God to give his blessing to this marriage! She is a good child, religious, discreet, ingenious, and qualified with all the ornaments of her sex. She has a peculiar talent in design, as painting in oil and miniature, and an extraordinary genius for whatever hands can do with a needle. She has the French tongue, has read most of the Greek and Roman authors and poets, using her talents with great modesty; exquisitely shaped, and of an agreeable countenance. This character is due to her, though coming from her father. Much of this week spent in ceremonies, receiving visits and entertaining relations, and a great part of the next in returning visits.

On 18 Oct 1759 John Reade 5th Baronet 1721-1773 (38) and Harriet Barker -1811 were married at St Ethedreda's Chapel Ely House.

Finchley, Middlesex

On 07 Jul 1755 George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis 1755-1801 was born to Henry Herbert 1st Earl Powis 1703-1772 (52) and Barbara Herbert Countess Powis 1735-1786 (20) at Finchley. He a great x 3 grandson of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701.

In 1776 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis 1755-1801.Around 1740 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Henry Herbert 1st Earl Powis 1703-1772.

East Finchley, Middlesex

St Pancras and Islington Cemetery, East Finchley, Middlesex

On 06 Oct 1893 Ford Madox Brown Painter 1821-1893 (72) died. He was buried at St Pancras and Islington Cemetery.

Finsbury, Middlesex

Diary of Henry Machyn January 1557. 04 Jan 1557. The iiij day of January at nyght was serten feyres [fires] [seen] in Fynsbere feyld and in More-feld at the wynd-mylle, and at the Doge-howse, and in gardens by mony men, and yt was sene at Damanes cler [Dame Agnes Clare], and mo plases.

Diary of Henry Machyn August 1559. 27 Aug 1559. The xxvij day of August ther was a tentt sett up at Fynsbere for my lord mare (50) and the enbassadurs and the masters the althermen, and mony commenars, and ther was the shutyng of the standard for the best gune, and dyvers odur dyd shut for odur games, after the wyche was .. to be wrastelyng—Bathellmuw day and iij [3] sondays after.

Fulham

Gunnersbury, Middlesex

Around 1460 Thomas Frowyk 1460-1506 was born at Gunnersbury.

Hackney

Hammersmith, Middlesex

John Evelyn's Diary 25 October 1695. 25 Oct 1695. The Archbishop (59) and myself went to Hammersmith, to visit Sir Samuel Morland (70), who was entirely blind; a very mortifying sight. He showed us his invention of writing, which was very ingenious; also his wooden calendar, which instructed him all by feeling; and other pretty and useful inventions of mills, pumps, etc., and the pump he had erected that serves water to his garden, and to passengers, with an inscription, and brings from a filthy part of the Thames near it a most perfect and pure water. He had newly buried £200 worth of music books six feet under ground, being, as he said, love songs and vanity. He plays himself psalms and religious hymns on the theorbo. Very mild weather the whole of October.

Hammersmith Bridge, Middlesex

Hammersmith Bridge is a bridge on the River Thames designed by Joseph Bazalgette 1819-1891 (8) opened on 06 Oct 1827.

Parson's Green, Hammersmith, Middlesex

John Evelyn's Diary 26 February 1661. 26 Feb 1661. I went to Lord Mordaunt's (34), at Parson's Green.

John Evelyn's Diary 29 November 1661. 29 Nov 1661. I dined at the Countess of Peterborough's (39) and went that evening to Parson's Green with my Lord Mordaunt (35), with whom I stayed that night.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 December 1675. 02 Dec 1675. Being returned home, I visited Baroness Mordaunt (43) at Parson's Green, my Lord, her son, being sick. This pious woman delivered to me £100 to bestow as I thought fit for the release of poor prisoners, and other charitable uses.

John Evelyn's Diary 16 March 1676. 16 Mar 1676. The Countess of Sunderland (30) and I went by water to Parson's Green, to visit my Baroness Mordaunt (44), and to consult with her about my Lord's (49) monument. We returned by coach.

John Evelyn's Diary 14 July 1679. 14 Jul 1679. I went to see how things stood at Parson's Green, my Lady Viscountess Mordaunt (47) (now sick in Paris, whither she went for health) having made me a trustee for her children, an office I could not refuse to this most excellent, pious, and virtuous lady, my long acquaintance.

John Evelyn's Diary 30 April 1680. 30 Apr 1680. To a meeting of the executors of late Viscountess Mordaunt's (48) estate, to consider of the sale of Parson's Green, being in treaty with Mr. Loftus, and to settle the half year's account.

Hampstead

Hanworth, Middlesex

On 02 Jun 1603 Thomas Grimes -1624 was knighted at Hanworth.

On 11 Feb 1613 Henry Killigrew Chaplain 1613-1700 was born to Robert Killigrew 1580-1633 (33) and Mary Woodhouse -1756 at Hanworth.

On 09 Feb 1802 Aubrey Beauclerk 5th Duke St Albans 1740-1802 (61) died. He was buried at Hanworth. His son Aubrey Beauclerk 6th Duke St Albans 1765-1815 (36) succeeded 6th Duke St Albans 1C 1684, 6th Earl Burford, 6th Baron Heddington.

Harefield, Middlesex

In May 1580 Anne Stanley Countess Castlehaven 1580-1647 was born to Ferdinando Stanley 5th Earl Derby 1559-1594 (21) and Alice Spencer Countess Derby 1549-1637 (30) at Harefield. She a great x 3 granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

On 22 Jul 1624 Mervyn Tuchet 2nd Earl Castlehaven 1593-1631 (31) and Anne Stanley Countess Castlehaven 1580-1647 (44) were married at Harefield. She a great x 3 granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. She by marriage Countess Castlehaven.

On 01 Jan 1681 John Pritchett Bishop -1681 died at Harefield where he is buried.

On 07 Sep 1731 Daniel Pulteney 1684-1731 (47) died in Harefield. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

Harlington, Middlesex

Great Plague of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 September 1665. 07 Sep 1665. Up by 5 of the clock, mighty full of fear of an ague, but was obliged to go, and so by water, wrapping myself up warm, to the Tower, and there sent for the Weekely Bill, and find 8,252 dead in all, and of them 6,878 of the plague; which is a most dreadfull number, and shows reason to fear that the plague hath got that hold that it will yet continue among us.
Thence to Brainford, reading "The Villaine", a pretty good play, all the way. There a coach of Mr. Povy's (51) stood ready for me, and he at his house ready to come in, and so we together merrily to Swakely, Sir R. Viner's (34). A very pleasant place, bought by him of Sir James Harrington's (57) lady (48). He took us up and down with great respect, and showed us all his house and grounds; and it is a place not very moderne in the garden nor house, but the most uniforme in all that ever I saw; and some things to excess. Pretty to see over the screene of the hall (put up by Sir Mr. Harrington (57), a Long Parliamentman) the King's head, and my Lord of Essex (33) on one side, and Fairfax on the other; and upon the other side of the screene, the parson of the parish, and the lord of the manor and his sisters. The window-cases, door-cases, and chimnys of all the house are marble. He showed me a black boy that he had, that died of a consumption, and being dead, he caused him to be dried in an oven, and lies there entire in a box.
By and by to dinner, where his lady I find yet handsome, but hath been a very handsome woman; now is old. Hath brought him near £100,000 and now he lives, no man in England in greater plenty, and commands both King and Council with his credit he gives them. Here was a fine lady a merchant's wife at dinner with us, and who should be here in the quality of a woman but Mrs. Worship's daughter, Dr. Clerke's niece, and after dinner Sir Robert (34) led us up to his Long gallery, very fine, above stairs (and better, or such, furniture I never did see), and there Mrs. Worship did give us three or four very good songs, and sings very neatly, to my great delight.
After all this, and ending the chief business to my content about getting a promise of some money of him, we took leave, being exceedingly well treated here, and a most pleasant journey we had back, Povy (51) and I, and his company most excellent in anything but business, he here giving me an account of as many persons at Court as I had a mind or thought of enquiring after. He tells me by a letter he showed me, that the King (35) is not, nor hath been of late, very well, but quite out of humour; and, as some think, in a consumption, and weary of every thing. He showed me my Lord Arlington's (47) house that he was born in, in a towne called Harlington: and so carried me through a most pleasant country to Brainford, and there put me into my boat, and good night. So I wrapt myself warm, and by water got to Woolwich about one in the morning, my wife and all in bed.

Read More ...

On 11 Feb 1695 John Bennet 1st Baron Ossulston 1616-1695 (78) died. He was buried at Harlington. His son Charles Bennet 1st Earl Tankerville 1674-1722 (21) succeeded 2nd Baron Ossulston of Ossulston in Middlesex.

Harrow, Middlesex

Flambards House, Harrow, Middlesex

In 1609 William Gerard 1551-1609 (58) died. His son Gilbert Gerard 1st Baronet 1587-1670 (21) inherited Flambards House.

Harrow on the Hill Harrow, Middlesex

In 1843 John Wordsworth Bishop 1843-1911 was born in Harrow on the Hill Harrow.

Highgate

Holborn

Holloway, Middlesex

Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 September 1661. 24 Sep 1661. We rose, and set forth, but found a most sad alteration in the road by reason of last night's rains, they being now all dirty and washy, though not deep. So we rode easily through, and only drinking at Holloway, at the sign of a woman with cakes in one hand and a pot of ale in the other, which did give good occasion of mirth, resembling her to the maid that served us, we got home very timely and well, and finding there all well, and letters from sea, that speak of my Lord's being well, and his action, though not considerable of any side, at Argier. [Algiers] I went straight to my Lady, and there sat and talked with her, and so home again, and after supper we to bed somewhat weary, hearing of nothing ill since my absence but my brother Tom (27), who is pretty well though again.

Holloway Prison Holloway, Middlesex

In 1915 George Reresby Sitwell 4th Baronet Sitwell 1860-1943 (54) refused to pay off his wife's (46) creditors. She was jailed in Holloway Prison Holloway.

Hornsey, Middlesex

Stroud Green Hornsey, Middlesex

Green Man Stroud Green Hornsey, Middlesex

Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 October 1667. 07 Oct 1667. Up betimes, and did do several things towards the settling all matters both of house and office in order for my journey this day, and did leave my chief care, and the key of my closet, with Mr. Hater, with directions what papers to secure, in case of fire or other accident; and so, about nine o'clock, I, and my wife, and Willet, set out in a coach I have hired, with four horses; and W. Hewer (25) and Murford rode by us on horseback; and so my wife and she in their morning gowns, very handsome and pretty, and to my great liking. We set out, and so out at Allgate, and so to the Green Man, and so on to Enfield, in our way seeing Mr. Lowther (26) and his lady (16) in a coach, going to Walthamstow; and he told us that he would overtake us at night, he being to go that way.
So we to Enfield, and there bayted, it being but a foul, bad day, and there Lowther and Mr. Burford, an acquaintance of his, did overtake us, and there drank and eat together; and, by and by, we parted, we going before them, and very merry, my wife and girle and I talking, and telling tales, and singing, and before night come to Bishop Stafford, where Lowther and his friend did meet us again, and carried us to the Raynedeere, where Mrs. Aynsworth1, who lived heretofore at Cambridge, and whom I knew better than they think for, do live. It was the woman that, among other things, was great with my cozen Barnston, of Cottenham, and did use to sing to him, and did teach me "Full forty times over", a very lewd song: a woman they are very well acquainted with, and is here what she was at Cambridge, and all the good fellows of the country come hither. Lowther and his friend stayed and drank, and then went further this night; but here we stayed, and supped, and lodged. But, as soon as they were gone, and my supper getting ready, I fell to write my letter to my Lord Sandwich (42), which I could not finish before my coming from London; so did finish it to my good content, and a good letter, telling him the present state of all matters, and did get a man to promise to carry it to-morrow morning, to be there, at my house, by noon, and I paid him well for it; so, that being done, and my mind at ease, we to supper, and so to bed, my wife and I in one bed, and the girl in another, in the same room, and lay very well, but there was so much tearing company in the house, that we could not see my landlady; so I had no opportunity of renewing my old acquaintance with her, but here we slept very well.
Note 1. Elizabeth Aynsworth, here mentioned, was a noted procurerss at Cambridge, banished from that town by the university authorities for her evil courses. She subsequently kept the Rein Deer Inn at Bishops Stortford, at which the Vice-Chancellor, and some of the heads of colleges, had occasion to sleep, in their way to London, and were nobly entertained, their supper being served off plate. The next morning their hostess refused to make any charge, saying, that she was still indebted to the Vice-Chancellor, who, by driving her out of Cambridge, had made her fortune. No tradition of this woman has been preserved at Bishops Stortford; but it appears, from the register of that parish, that she was buried there 26th of March, 1686. It is recorded in the "History of Essex", vol. iii., (p. 130) 8vo., 1770, and in a pamphlet in the British Museum, entitled, "Boteler's Case", that she was implicated in the murder of Captain Wood, a Hertfordshire gentleman, at Manuden, in Essex, and for which offence a person named Boteler was executed at Chelmsford, September 10th, 1667, and that Mrs. Aynsworth, tried at the same time as an accessory before the fact, was acquitted for want of evidence; though in her way to the jail she endeavoured to throw herself into the river, but was prevented. See Postea, May 25th, 1668. B.

Read More ...

Hounslow

Isleworth, Middlesex

In 1462 Richard Pole 1462-1504 was born to Geoffrey Pole 1430-1474 (32) and Edith St John 1430- (32) at Isleworth.

In 1462 Eleanor Pole 1462- was born to Geoffrey Pole 1430-1474 (32) and Edith St John 1430- (32) at Isleworth.

On 05 Sep 1733 Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773 (38) and Petronilla Melusine Schulenburg Countess Chesterfield 1693-1778 (40) were married at Isleworth. She a daughter of George I King Great Britain and Ireland 1660-1727. She by marriage Countess Chesterfield.

1742. William Hoare Painter 1707-1792. Portrait of Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773.Before 28 May 1745 Johnathan "The Elder" Richardson Painter 1667-1745. Portrait of Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773. Cromwell Museum.Around 1745 George Knapton Painter 1698-1778. Portrait of Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773.In 1730 John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of Philip Stanhope 4th Earl Chesterfield 1694-1773 in his Garter Robes

Spring Grove House, Isleworth, Middlesex

On 19 Jun 1820 Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820 (77) died at Spring Grove House.

Around 1773 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820.1773. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820.1810. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820. 1810. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820.

Islington

Kingsbury, Middlesex

St Andrew's Church Kingsbury, Middlesex

On 01 Apr 1876 Frederick Walpole 1822-1876 (53) died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church Kingsbury.

On 26 Jan 1901 Laura Sophia Frances Walpole 1832-1901 (69) died. She was buried St Andrew's Church Kingsbury.

Kingsland

Limehouse, Middlesex

Diary of Henry Machyn May 1554. 03 May 1554. The iij day of May, at the cowrt of sant James, the quen('s) (38) grace whent a prossessyon within sant James with harolds and serjants of armes, and iiij bysshopes mytred, and all iij days thay whent her chapell a-bowt the feldes, first day to sant Gylles and ther song masse; the next day tuwyse-day to sant Martens in the feldes, [and there] a sermon and song masse, and so thay dronke ther; and the iij day to Westmynster, and ther a sermon and then masse, and mad good chere; and after a-bowt the Parke, and so to sant James cowrt ther.
[The same Rogation Week went out of the Tower, on procession, priests and clerks, and the lieutenant with all his waiters; and the ax of the Tower borne in procession: the waits attended. There joined in this procession the inhabitants of] sant Katheryns, Radclyff, Limehouse, Popular, Sthracfford, Sordyche, with all them [that belonged to] the Towre, with ther halbards, a-bowt the feldes of sant Katheryns and the prevelegys.

Diary of Henry Machyn June 1563. 14 Jun 1563. The xiiij day of June the Quen('s) (29) grace removyd from Whythall by water toward Grenwyche, and a-bowt Ratclyff and Lymhowse capten Stukely dyd shuwe here grace the pleysur that cold be on the water with shuttyng of gones after lyke warle with plahhyng of drumes and trum[pets.]

Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1660. 23 Mar 1660. Up early, carried my Lord's will in a black box to Mr. William Montagu (42) for him to keep for him. Then to the barber's and put on my cravat there. So to my Lord again, who was almost ready to be gone and had staid for me. Hither came Gilb. Holland, and brought me a stick rapier and Shelston a sugar-loaf, and had brought his wife who he said was a very pretty woman to the Ship tavern hard by for me to see but I could not go. Young Reeve also brought me a little perspective glass which I bought for my Lord, it cost me 8s. So after that my Lord in Sir H. Wright's (23) coach with Captain Isham (32), Mr. Thomas, John Crew, W. Howe, and I in a Hackney to the Tower, where the barges staid for us; my Lord and the Captain in one, and W. Howe and I, &c., in the other, to the Long Reach, where the Swiftsure lay at anchor; (in our way we saw the great breach which the late high water had made, to the loss of many £1000 to the people about Limehouse.) Soon as my Lord on board, the guns went off bravely from the ships. And a little while after comes the Vice-Admiral Lawson (45), and seemed very respectful to my Lord, and so did the rest of the Commanders of the frigates that were thereabouts. I to the cabin allotted for me, which was the best that any had that belonged to my Lord. I got out some things out of my chest for writing and to work presently, Mr. Burr and I both. I supped at the deck table with Mr. Sheply. We were late writing of orders for the getting of ships ready, &c.; and also making of others to all the seaports between Hastings and Yarmouth, to stop all dangerous persons that are going or coming between Flanders and there. After that to bed in my cabin, which was but short; however I made shift with it and slept very well, and the weather being good I was not sick at all yet, I know not what I shall be.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 October 1661. 19 Oct 1661. At the office all the morning, and at noon Mr. Coventry (33), who sat with us all the morning, and Sir G. Carteret (51), Sir W. Pen (40), and myself, by coach to Captain Marshe's, at Limehouse, to a house that hath been their ancestors for this 250 years, close by the lime-house which gives the name to the place. Here they have a design to get the King to hire a dock for the herring busses, which is now the great design on foot, to lie up in. We had a very good and handsome dinner, and excellent wine. I not being neat in clothes, which I find a great fault in me, could not be so merry as otherwise, and at all times I am and can be, when I am in good habitt, which makes me remember my father Osborne's' rule for a gentleman to spare in all things rather than in that. So by coach home, and so to write letters by post, and so to bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 03 December 1662. 03 Dec 1662. Called up by Commissioner Pett (52), and with him by water, much against my will, to Deptford, and after drinking a warm morning draft, with Mr. Wood and our officers measuring all the morning his New England masts, with which sight I was much pleased for my information, though I perceive great neglect and indifference in all the King's officers in what they do for the King (32).
That done, to the Globe, and there dined with Mr. Wood, and so by water with Mr. Pett (52) home again, all the way reading his Chest accounts, in which I did see things did not please me; as his allowing himself 1300 for one year's looking to the business of the Chest, and £150 per annum for the rest of the years. But I found no fault to him himself, but shall when they come to be read at the Board. We did also call at Limehouse to view two Busses that are building, that being a thing we are now very hot upon. Our call was to see what dimensions they are of, being 50 feet by the keel and about 60 tons.
Home and did a little business, and so taking Mr. Pett (52) by the way, we walked to the Temple, in our way seeing one of the Russia Embassador's (17) coaches go along, with his footmen not in liverys, but their country habits; one of one colour and another of another, which was very strange. At the Temple spoke with Mr. Turner and Calthrop (38), and so walked home again, being in some pain through the cold which I have got to-day by water, which troubles me. At the office doing business a good while, and so home and had a posset, and so to bed.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 25 August 1663. 25 Aug 1663. Up very early and removed the things out of my chamber into the dining room, it being to be new floored this day. So the workmen being come and falling to work there, I to the office, and thence down to Lymehouse to Phin. Pett's about masts, and so back to the office, where we sat; and being rose, and Mr. Coventry (35) being gone, taking his leave, for that he is to go to the Bath with the Duke (29) to-morrow, I to the 'Change and there spoke with several persons, and lastly with Sir W. Warren, and with him to a Coffee House, and there sat two hours talking of office business and Mr. Wood's knavery, which I verily believe, and lastly he tells me that he hears that Captain Cocke (46) is like to become a principal officer, either a Controller or a Surveyor, at which I am not sorry so either of the other may be gone, and I think it probable enough that it may be so.
So home at 2 o'clock, and there I found Ashwell gone, and her wages come to 50s., and my wife, by a mistake from me, did give her 20s. more; but I am glad that she is gone and the charge saved.
After dinner among my joyners, and with them till dark night, and this night they made an end of all; and so having paid them 40s. for their six days' work, I am glad they have ended and are gone, for I am weary and my wife too of this dirt. My wife growing peevish at night, being weary, and I a little vexed to see that she do not retain things in her memory that belong to the house as she ought and I myself do, I went out in a little seeming discontent to the office, and after being there a while, home to supper and to bed.
To-morrow they say the King (33) and the Duke (29) set out for the Bath.
This noon going to the Exchange, I met a fine fellow with trumpets before him in Leadenhall-street, and upon enquiry I find that he is the clerk of the City Market; and three or four men carried each of them an arrow of a pound weight in their hands. It seems this Lord Mayor begins again an old custome, that upon the three first days of Bartholomew Fayre, the first, there is a match of wrestling, which was done, and the Lord Mayor (48) there and Aldermen in Moorefields yesterday: to-day, shooting: and to-morrow, hunting. And this officer of course is to perform this ceremony of riding through the city, I think to proclaim or challenge any to shoot. It seems that the people of the fayre cry out upon it as a great hindrance to them.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 September 1664. 07 Sep 1664. Lay long to-day, pleasantly discoursing with my wife about the dinner we are to have for the Joyces, a day or two hence.
Then up and with Mr. Margetts to Limehouse to see his ground and Ropeyarde there, which is very fine, and I believe we shall employ it for the Navy, for the King's grounds are not sufficient to supply our defence if a warr comes.
Thence back to the 'Change, where great talke of the forwardnesse of the Dutch, which puts us all to a stand, and particularly myself for my Lord Sandwich (39), to think him to lie where he is for a sacrifice, if they should begin with us.
So home and Creed with me, and to dinner, and after dinner I out to my office, taking in Bagwell's wife, who I knew waited for me, but company came to me so soon that I could have no discourse with her, as I intended, of pleasure.
So anon abroad with Creed walked to Bartholomew Fayre, this being the last day, and there saw the best dancing on the ropes that I think I ever saw in my life, and so all say, and so by coach home, where I find my wife hath had her head dressed by her woman, Mercer, which is to come to her to-morrow, but my wife being to go to a christening tomorrow, she came to do her head up to-night. So a while to my office, and then to supper and to bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 13 February 1665. 13 Feb 1665. Up and to St. James's, did our usual business before the Duke (31).
Thence I to Westminster and by water (taking Mr. Stapely the rope-maker by the way), to his rope-ground and to Limehouse, there to see the manner of stoves and did excellently inform myself therein, and coming home did go on board Sir W. Petty's (41) "The Experiment", which is a brave roomy vessel, and I hope may do well. So went on shore to a Dutch House to drink some mum, and there light upon some Dutchmen, with whom we had good discourse touching stoveing1 and making of cables. But to see how despicably they speak of us for our using so many hands more to do anything than they do, they closing a cable with 20, that we use 60 men upon.
Thence home and eat something, and then to my office, where very late, and then to supper and to bed. Captain Stokes, it seems, is at last dead at Portsmouth.
Note 1. Stoveing, in sail-making, is the heating of the bolt-ropes, so as to make them pliable. B.

Duke Shore, Limehouse, Middlesex

Diary of Samuel Pepys 15 January 1661. 15 Jan 1661. Up and down the yard all the morning and seeing the seamen exercise, which they do already very handsomely. Then to dinner at Mr. Ackworth's, where there also dined with us one Captain Bethell, a friend of the Comptroller's (50). A good dinner and very handsome. After that and taking our leaves of the officers of the yard, we walked to the waterside and in our way walked into the rope-yard, where I do look into the tar-houses and other places, and took great notice of all the several works belonging to the making of a cable.
So after a cup of burnt wine1 at the tavern there, we took barge and went to Blackwall and viewed the dock and the new Wet dock, which is newly made there, and a brave new merchantman which is to be launched shortly, and they say to be called the Royal Oak. Hence we walked to Dick-Shore, and thence to the Towre and so home. Where I found my wife and Pall abroad, so I went to see Sir W. Pen (39), and there found Mr. Coventry (33) come to see him, and now had an opportunity to thank him, and he did express much kindness to me. I sat a great while with Sir Wm. after he was gone, and had much talk with him. I perceive none of our officers care much for one another, but I do keep in with them all as much as I can. Sir W. Pen (39) is still very ill as when I went.
Home, where my wife not yet come home, so I went up to put my papers in order, and then was much troubled my wife was not come, it being 10 o'clock just now striking as I write this last line. This day I hear the Princess (16) is recovered again. The King hath been this afternoon at Deptford, to see the yacht that Commissioner Pett (50) is building, which will be very pretty; as also that that his brother at Woolwich is in making. By and by comes in my boy and tells me that his mistress do lie this night at Mrs. Hunt's, who is very ill, with which being something satisfied, I went to bed.
Note 1. Burnt wine was somewhat similar to mulled wine, and a favourite drink.

Read More ...

Little Stanmore, Middlesex

Cannons House Little Stanmore, Middlesex

On 09 Aug 1744 James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 (71) died at Cannons House Little Stanmore. He was buried at Chandos Mausoleum Church of St Lawrence Whitchurch Lane Little Stanmore. His son Henry Brydges 2nd Duke Chandos 1708-1771 (36) succeeded 2nd Duke Chandos, 2nd Earl Carnarvon 2C 1714, 10th Baron Chandos of Sudeley, 4th Baronet Wilton.

Before 1690. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Mary Lake 1668-1712. Frequently described as 'Mary Lake Duchess of Chandos' Mary died two years before her husband James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 was created Duke on 19 Oct 1714.

Whitchurch Lan Little Stanmore, Middlesex

Church of St Lawrence Whitchurch Lane Little Stanmore, Whitchurch Lan Little Stanmore, Middlesex

Chandos Mausoleum Church of St Lawrence Whitchurch Lane Little Stanmore, Whitchurch Lan Little Stanmore, Middlesex

On 15 Sep 1712 Mary Lake 1668-1712 (44) died. She was buried at Chandos Mausoleum Church of St Lawrence Whitchurch Lane Little Stanmore.

On 16 Jul 1735 Cassandra Willoughby Duchess Chandos 1670-1735 (65) died. She was buried at Chandos Mausoleum Church of St Lawrence Whitchurch Lane Little Stanmore.

On 09 Aug 1744 James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 (71) died at Cannons House Little Stanmore. He was buried at Chandos Mausoleum Church of St Lawrence Whitchurch Lane Little Stanmore. His son Henry Brydges 2nd Duke Chandos 1708-1771 (36) succeeded 2nd Duke Chandos, 2nd Earl Carnarvon 2C 1714, 10th Baron Chandos of Sudeley, 4th Baronet Wilton.

Ludgate

Mary le Strand, Middlesex

After 20 Feb 1616 George Tuchet 1st Earl Castlehaven 1551-1617 and Elizabeth Noel Countess Castlehaven were married at Mary le Strand. She by marriage Baroness Audley Heighley in Staffordshire, Baron Tuchet.

On 18 Dec 1743 Mary Beauclerk 1743- was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 02 Sep 1745 Henry Beauclerk 1745-1817 was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 17 Dec 1746 Charlotte Beauclerk 1746- was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 08 Jan 1748 Martha Beauclerk 1747- was baptised at Mary le Strand.

On 27 Oct 1749 Anne Beauclerk 1749-1809 was baptised at Mary le Strand.

Monkden Hadleigh, Middlesex

On 31 Jul 1616 Roger Wilbraham 1553-1616 (62) died in Monkden Hadleigh. He was buried in St Mary the Virgin Church Monkden Hadleigh.

St Mary the Virgin Church Monkden Hadleigh, Middlesex

On 31 Jul 1616 Roger Wilbraham 1553-1616 (62) died in Monkden Hadleigh. He was buried in St Mary the Virgin Church Monkden Hadleigh.

Osterley Park, Middlesex

On 31 May 1915 Victor Albert George Child Villiers 7th Earl Jersey 1845-1915 (70) died at Osterley Park.

Ratclyffe, Middlesex

Diary of Henry Machyn April 1553. 11 Apr 1553. [The xj day of April the King (15) removed from Westminster by water to Greenwich; and passed by the] Towre, and ther wher a [great shot of guns and] chamburs, and all the shypes shott of gonnes [all the way to] Ratclyff, and ther the iij shypes that was rygyng [there, appointed to go] to the Nuw-fouland, and the ij pennons shott gunnes and chamburs a grett nombur.

Trial and Execution of Lady Jane Grey's Supporters

Diary of Henry Machyn August 1553. 21 Aug 1553. The xxj of August was, by viij of the cloke in the mornyng, on the Towre hylle a-boythe x M1. men and women for to have [seen] the execussyon of the duke of Northumberland (49), for the skaffold was mad rede, and sand and straw was browth, and all the men [that] longest to the Towre, as Hogston, Shordyche, Bow, Ratclyff, Lymhouse, Sant Kateryns, and the waters of the Towre, and the gard, and shyreyffs offesers, and evere man stand in order with ther holbardes, and lanes made, and the hangman was ther, and sodenly they wher commondyd to [depart].
And the sam tym after was send for my lord mer and the aldermen and cheyffest of the craftes in London, and dyvers of the consell, and ther was sed mas a-for the Duke [and the rest] of the presonars.

Diary of Henry Machyn May 1554. 03 May 1554. The iij day of May, at the cowrt of sant James, the quen('s) (38) grace whent a prossessyon within sant James with harolds and serjants of armes, and iiij bysshopes mytred, and all iij days thay whent her chapell a-bowt the feldes, first day to sant Gylles and ther song masse; the next day tuwyse-day to sant Martens in the feldes, [and there] a sermon and song masse, and so thay dronke ther; and the iij day to Westmynster, and ther a sermon and then masse, and mad good chere; and after a-bowt the Parke, and so to sant James cowrt ther.
[The same Rogation Week went out of the Tower, on procession, priests and clerks, and the lieutenant with all his waiters; and the ax of the Tower borne in procession: the waits attended. There joined in this procession the inhabitants of] sant Katheryns, Radclyff, Limehouse, Popular, Sthracfford, Sordyche, with all them [that belonged to] the Towre, with ther halbards, a-bowt the feldes of sant Katheryns and the prevelegys.

Diary of Henry Machyn June 1563. 14 Jun 1563. The xiiij day of June the Quen('s) (29) grace removyd from Whythall by water toward Grenwyche, and a-bowt Ratclyff and Lymhowse capten Stukely dyd shuwe here grace the pleysur that cold be on the water with shuttyng of gones after lyke warle with plahhyng of drumes and trum[pets.]

Ruislip, Middlesex

On 06 Oct 1272 Edmund "Almain" Cornwall 2nd Earl Cornwall 1249-1300 (22) and Margaret Clare Countess Cornwall were married at the Ruislip. He a grandson of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216. She a great x 4 granddaughter of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England 1068-1135. She by marriage Countess Cornwall.

Shadwell, Middlesex

Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 October 1666. 23 Oct 1666. Up, and to the office all the morning. At noon Sir W. Batten (65) told me Sir Richard Ford (52) would accept of one-third of my profit of our private man-of-war, and bear one-third of the charge, and be bound in the Admiralty, so I shall be excused being bound, which I like mightily of, and did draw up a writing, as well as I could, to that purpose and signed and sealed it, and so he and Sir R. Ford (52) are to go to enter into bond this afternoon.
Home to dinner, and after dinner, it being late, I down by water to Shadwell, to see Betty Michell, the first time I was ever at their new dwelling since the fire, and there find her in the house all alone. I find her mighty modest. But had her lips as much as I would, and indeed she is mighty pretty, that I love her exceedingly. I paid her £10 1s. that I received upon a ticket for her husband, which is a great kindness I have done them, and having kissed her as much as I would, I away, poor wretch, and down to Deptford to see Sir J. Minnes (67) ordering of the pay of some ships there, which he do most miserably, and so home. Bagwell's wife, seeing me come the fields way, did get over her pales to come after and talk with me, which she did for a good way, and so parted, and I home, and to the office, very busy, and so to supper and to bed.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 01 November 1666. 01 Nov 1666. Up, and was presented by Burton, one of our smith's wives, with a very noble cake, which I presently resolved to have my wife go with to-day, and some wine, and house-warme my Betty Michell, which she readily resolved to do.
So I to the office and sat all the morning, where little to do but answer people about want of money; so that there is little service done the King (36) by us, and great disquiet to ourselves; I am sure there is to me very much, for I do not enjoy myself as I would and should do in my employment if my pains could do the King (36) better service, and with the peace that we used to do it.
At noon to dinner, and from dinner my wife and my brother, and W. Hewer (24) and Barker away to Betty Michell's, to Shadwell, and I to my office, where I took in Mrs. Bagwell and did what I would with her, and so she went away, and I all the afternoon till almost night there, and then, my wife being come back, I took her and set her at her brother's (26), who is very sicke, and I to White Hall, and there all alone a pretty while with Sir W. Coventry (38) at his chamber. I find him very melancholy under the same considerations of the King's service that I am. He confesses with me he expects all will be undone, and all ruined; he complains and sees perfectly what I with grief do, and said it first himself to me that all discipline is lost in the fleete, no order nor no command, and concurs with me that it is necessary we do again and again represent all things more and more plainly to the Duke of York (33), for a guard to ourselves hereafter when things shall come to be worse. He says the House goes on slowly in finding of money, and that the discontented party do say they have not done with us, for they will have a further bout with us as to our accounts, and they are exceedingly well instructed where to hit us. I left him with a thousand sad reflections upon the times, and the state of the King's matters, and so away, and took up my wife and home, where a little at the office, and then home to supper, and talk with my wife (with whom I have much comfort) and my brother, and so to bed.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 December 1667. 30 Dec 1667. Up before day, and by coach to Westminster, and there first to Sir H. Cholmly (35), and there I did to my great content deliver him up his little several papers for sums of money paid him, and took his regular receipts upon his orders, wherein I am safe.
Thence to White Hall, and there to visit Sir G. Carteret (57), and there was with him a great while, and my Lady and they seem in very good humour, but by and by Sir G. Carteret (57) and I alone, and there we did talk of the ruinous condition we are in, the King (37) being going to put out of the Council so many able men; such as my Lord Anglesey (53), Ashly (46), Hollis (68), Secretary Morrice (65) (to bring in Mr. Trevor), and the Archbishop of Canterbury (69), and my Lord Bridgewater (44). He tells me that this is true, only the Duke of York (34) do endeavour to hinder it, and the Duke of York (34) himself did tell him so: that the King (37) and the Duke of York (34) do not in company disagree, but are friendly; but that there is a core in their hearts, he doubts, which is not to be easily removed; for these men do suffer only for their constancy to the Chancellor (58), or at least from the King's ill-will against him: that they do now all they can to vilify the clergy, and do accuse Rochester [Dolben]... and so do raise scandals, all that is possible, against other of the Bishops. He do suggest that something is intended for the Duke of Monmouth (18), and it may be, against the Queene (58) also: that we are in no manner sure against an invasion the next year: that the Duke of Buckingham (39) do rule all now, and the Duke of York (34) comes indeed to the Caball, but signifies little there. That this new faction do not endure, nor the King (37), Sir W. Coventry (39); but yet that he is so usefull that they cannot be without him; but that he is not now called to the Caball. That my Lord of Buckingham (39), Bristoll (55), and Arlington (49), do seem to agree in these things; but that they do not in their hearts trust one another, but do drive several ways, all of them. In short, he do bless himself that he is no more concerned in matters now; and the hopes he hath of being at liberty, when his accounts are over, to retire into the country. That he do give over the Kingdom for wholly lost. So after some other little discourse, I away, meeting with Mr. Cooling. I with him by coach to the Wardrobe, where I never was since the fire in Hatton Garden, but did not 'light: and he tells me he fears that my Lord Sandwich (42) will suffer much by Mr. Townsend's being untrue to him, he being now unable to give the Commissioners of the Treasury an account of his money received by many thousands of pounds, which I am troubled for.
Thence to the Old Exchange together, he telling me that he believes there will be no such turning out of great men as is talked of, but that it is only to fright people, but I do fear there may be such a thing doing. He do mightily inveigh against the folly of the King (37) to bring his matters to wrack thus, and that we must all be undone without help. I met with Cooling at the Temple-gate, after I had been at both my booksellers and there laid out several pounds in books now against the new year. From the 'Change (where I met with Captain Cocke (50), who would have borrowed money of me, but I had the grace to deny him, he would have had 3 or £400) I with Cocke (50) and Mr. Temple (whose wife was just now brought to bed of a boy, but he seems not to be at all taken with it, which is a strange consideration how others do rejoice to have a child born), to Sir G. Carteret's (57), in Lincoln's Inn Fields, and there did dine together, there being there, among other company, Mr. Attorney Montagu (49), and his fine lady, a fine woman.
After dinner, I did understand from my Lady Jemimah that her brother Hinchingbroke's business was to be ended this day, as she thinks, towards his match, and they do talk here of their intent to buy themselves some new clothes against the wedding, which I am very glad of.
After dinner I did even with Sir G. Carteret (57) the accounts of the interest of the money which I did so long put out for him in Sir R. Viner's (36) hands, and by it I think I shall be a gainer about £28, which is a very good reward for the little trouble I have had in it.
Thence with Sir Philip Carteret (26) to the King's playhouse, there to see "Love's Cruelty", an old play, but which I have not seen before; and in the first act Orange Moll come to me, with one of our porters by my house, to tell me that Mrs. Pierce and Knepp did dine at my house to-day, and that I was desired to come home. So I went out presently, and by coach home, and they were just gone away so, after a very little stay with my wife, I took coach again, and to the King's playhouse again, and come in the fourth act; and it proves to me a very silly play, and to everybody else, as far as I could judge. But the jest is, that here telling Moll how I had lost my journey, she told me that Mrs. Knepp was in the house, and so shews me to her, and I went to her, and sat out the play, and then with her to Mrs. Manuel's, where Mrs. Pierce was, and her boy and girl; and here I did hear Mrs. Manuel and one of the Italians, her gallant, sing well. But yet I confess I am not delighted so much with it, as to admire it: for, not understanding the words, I lose the benefit of the vocalitys of the musick, and it proves only instrumental; and therefore was more pleased to hear Knepp sing two or three little English things that I understood, though the composition of the other, and performance, was very fine.
Thence, after sitting and talking a pretty while, I took leave and left them there, and so to my bookseller's, and paid for the books I had bought, and away home, where I told my wife where I had been. But she was as mad as a devil, and nothing but ill words between us all the evening while we sat at cards—W. Hewer (25) and the girl by—even to gross ill words, which I was troubled for, but do see that I must use policy to keep her spirit down, and to give her no offence by my being with Knepp and Pierce, of which, though she will not own it, yet she is heartily jealous. At last it ended in few words and my silence (which for fear of growing higher between us I did forbear), and so to supper and to bed without one word one to another.
This day I did carry money out, and paid several debts. Among others, my tailor, and shoemaker, and draper, Sir W. Turner (52), who begun to talk of the Commission of accounts, wherein he is one; but though they are the greatest people that ever were in the nation as to power, and like to be our judges, yet I did never speak one word to him of desiring favour, or bidding him joy in it, but did answer him to what he said, and do resolve to stand or fall by my silent preparing to answer whatever can be laid to me, and that will be my best proceeding, I think. This day I got a little rent in my new fine camlett cloak with the latch of Sir G. Carteret's (57) door; but it is darned up at my tailor's, that it will be no great blemish to it; but it troubled me. I could not but observe that Sir Philip Carteret (26) would fain have given me my going into a play; but yet, when he come to the door, he had no money to pay for himself, I having refused to accept of it for myself, but was fain; and I perceive he is known there, and do run upon the score for plays, which is a shame; but I perceive always he is in want of money1. In the pit I met with Sir Ch. North (31), formerly Mr. North, who was with my Lord at sea; and he, of his own accord, was so silly as to tell me he is married; and for her (36) quality (being a Lord's daughter, my Lord Grey (74)), and person, and beauty, and years, and estate, and disposition, he is the happiest man in the world. I am sure he is an ugly fellow; but a good scholar and sober gentleman; and heir to his father, now Lord North (74), the old Lord being dead.
Note 1. The practice of gallants attending the Theatre without payment is illustrated by Mr. Lowe in his "Betterton (32)", from Shadwell's "True Widow": "1st Doorkeeper. Pray, sir, pay me: my masters will make me pay it. 3d Man. Impudent rascal, do you ask me for money? Take that, sirrah. 2nd Doorkeeper. Will you pay me, sir? 4th Man. No; I don't intend to stay. 2nd Doorkeeper. So you say every day, and see two or three acts for nothing"..

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 September 1668. 19 Sep 1668. Up, and to the office, where all the morning busy, and so dined with my people at home, and then to the King's playhouse, and there saw "The Silent Woman"; the best comedy, I think, that ever was wrote; and sitting by Shadwell the poet, he was big with admiration of it. Here was my Lord Brouncker (48) and W. Pen (47) and their ladies in the box, being grown mighty kind of a sudden; but, God knows, it will last but a little while, I dare swear. Knepp did her part mighty well. And so home straight, and to work, and particularly to my cozen Roger (51), who, W. Hewer (26) and my wife writes me, do use them with mighty plenty and noble entertainment: so home to supper, and to bed. All the news now is, that Mr. Trevor (44) is for certain now to be Secretary, in Morrice's (65) place, which the Duke of York (34) did himself tell me yesterday; and also that Parliament is to be adjourned to the 1st of March, which do please me well, hoping thereby to get my things in a little better order than I should have done; and the less attendances at that end of the town in winter.
So home to supper and to bed.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 September 1668. 20 Sep 1668. Lord's Day. Up, and to set some papers to rights in my chamber, and the like in my office, and so to church, at our own church, and heard but a dull sermon of one Dr. Hicks, who is a suitor to Mrs. Hovell, the widow of our turner of the Navy; thence home to dinner, staying till past one o'clock for Harris (34), whom I invited, and to bring Shadwell the poet with him; but they come not, and so a good dinner lost, through my own folly. And so to dinner alone, having since church heard the boy read over Dryden's (37) Reply to Sir R. Howard's (42) Answer, about his Essay of Poesy, and a letter in answer to that; the last whereof is mighty silly, in behalf of Howard1.
Thence walked forth and got a coach and to visit Mrs. Pierce, with whom, and him, I staid a little while, and do hear how the Duchesse of Monmouth is at this time in great trouble of the shortness of her lame leg, which is likely to grow shorter and shorter, that she will never recover it.
Thence to St. Margaret's Church, thinking to have seen Betty Michell, but she was not there. So back, and walked to Gray's Inn walks a while, but little company; and so over the fields to Clerkenwell, to see whether I could find that the fair Botelers do live there still, I seeing Frances the other day in a coach with Cary Dillon (41), her old servant, but know not where she lives. So walked home, and there walked in the garden an hour, it being mighty pleasant weather, and so took my Lady Pen (44) and Mrs. Markham home with me and sent for Mrs. Turner (45), and by and by comes Sir W. Pen (47) and supped with me, a good supper, part of my dinner to-day. They gone, Mrs. Turner (45) staid an hour talking with me.... [Note. Missing text "and yo did now the first time tocar her cosa with my hand and did make her do the like con su hand to my thing, whereto neither did she show any aversion really, but a merry kind of opposition, but yo did both and yo do believe I might have hecho la cosa too mit her. ] So parted, and I to bed.
Note 1. The title of the letter is as follows: "A Letter from a Gentleman to the Honourable Ed. Howard, Esq., occasioned by a Civiliz'd Epistle of Mr. Dryden's (37) before his Second Edition of his Indian Emperour. In the Savoy, printed by Thomas Newcomb, 1668". The "Civiliz'd Epistle" was a caustic attack on Sir Robert Howard; and the Letter is signed, "Sir, your faithful and humble servant, R. F".-i.e., Richard Flecknoe.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 25 February 1669. 25 Feb 1669. All the morning at the office.
At noon home and eat a bit myself, and then followed my wife and girls to the Duke of York's (35) house, and there before one, but the house infinite full, where, by and by, the King (38) and Court come, it being a new play, or an old one new vamped, by Shadwell, called "The Royall Shepherdesse"; but the silliest for words and design, and everything, that ever I saw in my whole life, there being nothing in the world pleasing in it, but a good martial dance of pikemen, where Harris (35) and another do handle their pikes in a dance to admiration; but never less satisfied with a play in my life.
Thence to the office I, and did a little business, and so home to supper with my girls, and pretty merry, only my eyes, which continue very bad, and my cold, that I cannot speak at all, do trouble me.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 April 1669. 16 Apr 1669. Up, and to my chamber, where with Mr. Gibson all the morning, and there by noon did almost finish what I had to write about the Administration of the Office to present to the Duke of York (35), and my wife being gone abroad with W. Hewer (27), to see the new play to-day, at the Duke of York's (35) house, "Guzman", I dined alone with my people, and in the afternoon away by coach to White Hall; and there the Office attended the Duke of York (35); and being despatched pretty soon, and told that we should not wait on the King (38), as intended, till Sunday, I thence presently to the Duke of York's playhouse, and there, in the 18d. seat, did get room to see almost three acts of the play; but it seemed to me but very ordinary. After the play done, I into the pit, and there find my wife and W. Hewer (27); and Sheres got to them, which, so jealous is my nature, did trouble me, though my judgment tells me there is no hurt in it, on neither side; but here I did meet with Shadwell, the poet, who, to my great wonder, do tell me that my Lord of [Orrery] (47) did write this play, trying what he could do in comedy, since his heroique plays could do no more wonders. This do trouble me; for it is as mean a thing, and so he says, as hath been upon the stage a great while; and Harris (35), who hath no part in it, did come to me, and told me in discourse that he was glad of it, it being a play that will not take.
Thence home, and to my business at the office, to finish it, but was in great pain about yesterday still, lest my wife should have sent her porter to enquire anything, though for my heart I cannot see it possible how anything could be discovered of it, but yet such is fear as to render me full of doubt and disgust. At night to supper and to bed.

Read More ...

St Pancras, Middlesex

Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 April 1665. 23 Apr 1665. Lord's Day. Mr. Povy (51), according to promise, sent his coach betimes, and I carried my wife and her woman to White Hall Chappell and set them in the Organ Loft, and I having left to untruss went to the Harp and Ball and there drank also, and entertained myself in talke with the mayde of the house, a pretty mayde and very modest.
Thence to the Chappell and heard the famous young Stillingfleete (30), whom I knew at Cambridge, and is now newly admitted one of the King's chaplains; and was presented, they say, to my Lord Treasurer (58) for St. Andrew's, Holborne, where he is now minister, with these words: that they (the Bishops of Canterbury, London, and another) believed he is the ablest young man to preach the Gospel of any since the Apostles. He did make the most plain, honest, good, grave sermon, in the most unconcerned and easy yet substantial manner, that ever I heard in my life, upon the words of Samuell to the people, "Fear the Lord in truth with all your heart, and remember the great things that he hath done for you". It being proper to this day, the day of the King's Coronation.
Thence to Mr. Povy's (51), where mightily treated, and Creed with us. But Lord! to see how Povy (51) overdoes every thing in commending it, do make it nauseous to me, and was not (by reason of my large praise of his house) over acceptable to my wife.
Thence after dinner Creed and we by coach took the ayre in the fields beyond St. Pancras, it raining now and then, which it seems is most welcome weather, and then all to my house, where comes Mr. Hill (35), Andrews, and Captain Taylor, and good musique, but at supper to hear the arguments we had against Taylor concerning a Corant, he saying that the law of a dancing Corant is to have every barr to end in a pricked crochet and quaver, which I did deny, was very strange. It proceeded till I vexed him, but all parted friends, for Creed and I to laugh at when he was gone. After supper, Creed and I together to bed, in Mercer's bed, and so to sleep.

Read More ...

In Apr 1797 John Webb 5th Baronet Webb 1742-1797 (54) died. He was buried at St Pancras. His nephew Thomas Webb6th Baronet Webb succeeded 6th Baronet Webb of Odstock in Wiltshire. Frances Charlotte Dillon Lee Lady Webb Lady Heathcote 1780-1819 (17) by marriage Lady Webb of Odstock in Wiltshire.

In 1937 James Fawcett 1913-1991 (23) and Frances Beatrice Lowe were married at St Pancras.

Edward Street, St Pancras, Middlesex

8 Edward Street, St Pancras, Middlesex

1861. Census. 8 Edward Street.
James Forsyth Sculptor 1828-1910 (33). 33. Sculptor.
Eliza Hastie 1834-1867 (27). Wife. 26.
Agnes Forsyth 1860- (1). Daughter. 12 months.

02 Apr 1871. Census. 8 Edward Street.
James Forsyth Sculptor 1828-1910 (43). 43. Sculptor.
Annie Hardie 1839- (32). 32.
James Nesfield Forsyth Sculptor 1864-1942 (7). Son. 7. Scholar.
Agnes Ellen Forsyth 1866- (5). Daughter. 5. Scholar.
Eliza Forsyth 1868- (3). Daughter. 3.
William Adam Forsyth 1873-. Son. 8. Scholar.
Agnes m Forsyth 1805-. Mother. 66. No occupation.
Mary Blackall 1845-. Servant. 16.

Read More ...

1881. Census. 8 Edward Street.
James Forsyth Sculptor 1828-1910 (53). 53. Sculptor.
Annie Hardie 1839- (42). 42.
James Nesfield Forsyth Sculptor 1864-1942 (17). Son. 17. Sculptor.
Agnes Ellen Forsyth 1866- (15). Daughter. 15. Dressmaker.
Eliza Forsyth 1868- (12). Daughter. 13. Scholar.
William Adam Forsyth 1873- (8). Son. 8. Scholar.
John Dudley Forsyth 1875- (6). Son. 6. Scholar.
Annie Fosyth 1876- (5). Daughter. 5. Scholar.
Jessie Forsyth 1878- (3). Daughter. 3.
Agnes m Forsyth 1805-. Mother. 77. No occupation.
Adam Forsyth 1859-. Nephew.
Adelaide Stansell 1860-. 21. Servant
Fanny Dann 1863-. Servant.

Read More ...

St Pancras Old Church, Middlesex

On 1834 Eliza Hastie 1834-1867 was born to Benjamin Hastie. She was baptised on 10 Aug 1834 at St Pancras Old Church.

On 09 Mar 1850 William Hamo Thornycroft Sculptor 1850-1925 was born to Thomas Thornycroft 1815-1885 (34). He was baptised on 09 Jun 1850 at St Pancras Old Church.

Around 1884. Joseph Parkin Mayall Photographer 1839-1906. Portrait of William Hamo Thornycroft Sculptor 1850-1925.

Staines, Middlesex

Battle of Maldon

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 993. This year came Anlaf with three and ninety ships to Staines, which he plundered without, and went thence to Sandwich. Thence to Ipswich, which he laid waste; and so to Maldon, where Alderman Britnoth came against him with his force, and fought with him; and there they slew the alderman, and gained the field of battle; whereupon peace was made with him, and the king received him afterwards at episcopal hands by the advice of Siric, Bishop of Canterbury, and Elfeah of Winchester. This year was Bamborough destroyed, and much spoil was there taken. Afterwards came the army to the mouth of the Humber; and there did much evil both in Lindsey and in Northumbria. Then was collected a great force; but when the armies were to engage, then the generals first commenced a flight; namely, Frene and Godwin and Frithgist. In this same year the king ordered Elfgar, son of Alderman Elfric, to be punished with blindness.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1009. This year were the ships ready, that we before spoke about; and there were so many of them as never were in England before, in any king (43) days, as books tell us. And they were all transported together to Sandwich; that they should lie there, and defend this land against any out-force. But we have not yet had the prosperity and the honour, that the naval armament should be useful to this land, any more than it often before was. It was at this same time, or a little earlier, that Brihtric, brother of Alderman Edric, bewrayed Wulnoth, the South-Saxon knight, father of Earl Godwin (8), to the king (43); and he went into exile, and enticed the navy, till he had with him twenty ships; with which he plundered everywhere by the south coast, and wrought every kind of mischief. When it was told the navy that they might easily seize him, if they would look about them, then took Brihtric with him eighty ships; and thought that he should acquire for himself much reputation, by getting Wulnoth into his hands alive or dead. But, whilst they were proceeding thitherward, there came such a wind against them, as no man remembered before; which beat and tossed the ships, and drove them aground; whereupon Wulnoth soon came, and burned them. When this was known to the remaining ships, where the king (43) was, how the others fared, it was then as if all were lost. The king (43) went home, with the aldermen and the nobility; and thus lightly did they forsake the ships; whilst the men that were in them rowed them back to London. Thus lightly did they suffer the labour of all the people to be in vain; nor was the terror lessened, as all England hoped. When this naval expedition was thus ended, then came, soon after Lammas, the formidable army of the enemy, called Thurkill's army, to Sandwich; and soon they bent their march to Canterbury; which city they would quickly have stormed, had they not rather desired peace; and all the men of East-Kent made peace with the army, and gave them 3,000 pounds for security. The army soon after that went about till they came to the Isle of Wight; and everywhere in Sussex, and in Hampshire, and also in Berkshire, they plundered and burned, as THEIR CUSTOM IS. (54) Then ordered the king (43) to summon out all the population, that men might hold firm against them on every side; but nevertheless they marched as they pleased. On one occasion the king (43) had begun his march before them, as they proceeded to their ships, and all the people were ready to fall upon them; but the plan was then frustrated through Alderman Edric, AS IT EVER IS STILL. Then after Martinmas they went back again to Kent, and chose their winter-quarters on the Thames; obtaining their provisions from Essex, and from the shires that were next, on both sides of the Thames. And oft they fought against the city of London; but glory be to God, that it yet standeth firm: and they ever there met with ill fare. Then after midwinter took they an excursion up through Chiltern, (55) and so to Oxford; which city they burned, and plundered on both sides of the Thames to their ships. Being fore-warned that there was an army gathered against them at London, they went over at Staines; and thus were they in motion all the winter, and in spring, appeared again in Kent, and repaired their ships.
54. These expressions in the present tense afford a strong proof that the original records of these transactions are nearly coeval with the transactions themselves. Later MSS. use the past tense.
55. i.e. the Chiltern Hills; from which the south-eastern part of Oxfordshire is called the Chiltern district.

Read More ...

Diary of Henry Machyn March 1557. 02 Mar 1557. The ij day of Marche rod from the Towre my lord Sturtun (37) with ser Robart Oxinbryge (49) the leyff-tenantt, and iiij of my lordes servandes, and with serten of the gard, thrugh London, and so to Honsley, and ther thay lay alle nyght at the seyne of the Angell, and the morow after to Staynes, and so to Bassyng-stoke, and so to Sturtun (37), to sufer deth, and ys iiij men; and to more men for robyng of a ryche farmer in that contrey, to be hangyd, for ther was layd by the sam farmer a-for the consell that a knyght and ys men dyd rob him, and the knyght was layd in the Flett tylle yt plessyd God that the theyff was taken; the knyght ys nam ys callyd ser [blank] Wrothun knyght.

On 21 Apr 1821 George Gammon Adams Sculptor 1821-1898 was born to James Adams Upholsterer and Auctioneer at Staines.

Stepney

Stratford, Middlesex

On 25 Dec 1475 Elizabeth Howard Countess Oxford 1410-1475 (65) died at Stratford.

Tottenham, Middlesex

On 08 Sep 1644 John Coke 1563-1644 (81) died at his home in Tottenham.

Around 1623. Unknown Painter. Portrait of John Coke 1563-1644.

In 1671 John Dethick Lord Mayor of London -1671 died at his estate in Tottenham. He was buried at St Andrew Undershaft Aldgate Ward.

Ermine Street 2a London to Braughing leaves the city of London at Bishopsgate Gate and thereafter travelled north through Shoreditch, Stoke Newington, Stamford Hill, Tottenham, Edmonton, Waltham Cross, Broxbourne, Puckeridge to Braughing.

The River Lea rises near Leagrave after which it travels through Wheathampstead, Hertford, Ware, Broxbourne, Waltham Cross, Tottenham before joining the River Thames at Leamouth.

Tottenham High Cross, Middlesex

On 21 Oct 1670 Hugh Smithson 1st Baronet Smithson 1598-1670 (72) died at his home in Tottenham High Cross. His son Jerome Smithson 2nd Baronet Smithson 1632-1684 (38) succeeded 2nd Baronet Smithson of Stanwick in Yorkshire. He was buried in the Church of St John the Baptist Stanwick.
Monument to Hugh Smithson 1st Baronet Smithson 1598-1670 (72) and Dorothy Royston sculpted by William Stanton Sculptor 1639-1705 (31). Note the effigies appears to have been sourced differently since hers has no mottling.

Tyburn

Uxbridge, Middlesex

Treaty of Uxbridge

In 1645 Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675 (39) was appointed Commissioner at Uxbridge during the Treaty of Uxbridge.

In 1634. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675.In 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Bulstrode Whitelocke 1605-1675.

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1664. 17 Oct 1664. I went with my Lord Viscount Cornbury, to Cornbury, in Oxfordshire, to assist him in the planting of the park, and bear him company, with Mr. Belin and Mr. May (43), in a coach with six horses; dined at Uxbridge, lay at Wycombe.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 May 1665. 28 May 1665. Lord's Day. By water to the Duke of Albemarle (56), where I hear that Nixon is condemned to be shot to death, for his cowardice, by a Council of War.
Went to chapel and heard a little musique, and there met with Creed, and with him a little while walking, and to Wilkinson's for me to drink, being troubled with winde, and at noon to Sir Philip Warwicke's (55) to dinner, where abundance of company come in unexpectedly; and here I saw one pretty piece of household stuff, as the company increaseth, to put a larger leaf upon an oval table.
After dinner much good discourse with Sir Philip (55), who I find, I think, a most pious, good man, and a Professor of a philosophical manner of life and principles like Epictetus, whom he cites in many things.
Thence to my Lady Sandwich's (40), where, to my shame, I had not been a great while before. Here, upon my telling her a story of my Lord Rochester's (18) running away on Friday night last with Mrs. Mallett (14), the great beauty and fortune of the North, who had supped at White Hall with Mrs. Stewart (17), and was going home to her lodgings with her grandfather, my Lord Haly (57), by coach; and was at Charing Cross seized on by both horse and foot men, and forcibly taken from him, and put into a coach with six horses, and two women provided to receive her, and carried away. Upon immediate pursuit, my Lord of Rochester (18) (for whom the King (34) had spoke to the lady often, but with no successe) was taken at Uxbridge; but the lady (14) is not yet heard of, and the King (34) mighty angry, and the Lord (18) sent to the Tower. Hereupon my Lady did confess to me, as a great secret, her being concerned in this story. For if this match breaks between my Lord Rochester (18) and her (14), then, by the consent of all her friends, my Lord Hinchingbrooke (17) stands fair, and is invited for her. She is worth, and will be at her mother's (31) death (who keeps but a little from her), £2500 per annum. Pray God give a good success to it! But my poor Lady, who is afeard of the sickness, and resolved to be gone into the country, is forced to stay in towne a day or two, or three about it, to see the event of it.
Thence home and to see my Lady Pen (41), where my wife and I were shown a fine rarity: of fishes kept in a glass of water, that will live so for ever; and finely marked they are, being foreign. [Gold-fish introduced from China.] So to supper at home and to bed, after many people being with me about business, among others the two Bellamys about their old debt due to them from the King (34) for their victualling business, out of which I hope to get some money.

Read More ...

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 July 1666. 12 Jul 1666. But was up again by five o'clock, and was forced to rise, having much business, and so up and dressed myself (enquiring, was told that Mrs. Tooker was gone hence to live at London) and away with Poundy to the Tower, and thence, having shifted myself, but being mighty drowsy for want of sleep, I by coach to St. James's, to Goring House, there to wait on my Lord Arlington (48) to give him an account of my night's worke, but he was not up, being not long since married: so, after walking up and down the house below,—being the house I was once at Hartlib's (66) sister's wedding, and is a very fine house and finely furnished,—and then thinking it too much for me to lose time to wait my Lord's rising, I away to St. James's, and there to Sir W. Coventry (38), and wrote a letter to my Lord Arlington (48) giving him an account of what I have done, and so with Sir W. Coventry (38) into London, to the office. And all the way I observed him mightily to make mirth of the Duke of Albemarle (57) and his people about him, saying, that he was the happiest man in the world for doing of great things by sorry instruments. And so particularized in Sir W. Clerke (43), and Riggs, and Halsey, and others. And then again said that the only quality eminent in him was, that he did persevere; and indeed he is a very drudge, and stands by the King's business. And this he said, that one thing he was good at, that he never would receive an excuse if the thing was not done; listening to no reasoning for it, be it good or bad. But then I told him, what he confessed, that he would however give the man, that he employs, orders for removing of any obstruction that he thinks he shall meet with in the world, and instanced in several warrants that he issued for breaking open of houses and other outrages about the business of prizes, which people bore with either for affection or fear, which he believes would not have been borne with from the King (36), nor Duke (32), nor any man else in England, and I thinke he is in the right, but it is not from their love of him, but from something else I cannot presently say. Sir W. Coventry (38) did further say concerning Warcupp, his kinsman, that had the simplicity to tell Sir W. Coventry (38), that the Duke (32) did intend to go to sea and to leave him his agent on shore for all things that related to the sea. But, says Sir W. Coventry (38), I did believe but the Duke of Yorke (32) would expect to be his agent on shore for all sea matters. And then he begun to say what a great man Warcupp was, and something else, and what was that but a great lyer; and told me a story, how at table he did, they speaking about antipathys, say, that a rose touching his skin any where, would make it rise and pimple; and, by and by, the dessert coming, with roses upon it, the Duchesse (29) bid him try, and they did; but they rubbed and rubbed, but nothing would do in the world, by which his lie was found at then.
He spoke contemptibly of Holmes and his mermidons, that come to take down the ships from hence, and have carried them without any necessaries, or any thing almost, that they will certainly be longer getting ready than if they had staid here.
In fine, I do observe, he hath no esteem nor kindnesse for the Duke's matters, but, contrarily, do slight him and them; and I pray God the Kingdom do not pay too dear by this jarring; though this blockheaded Duke I did never expect better from.
At the office all the morning, at noon home and thought to have slept, my head all day being full of business and yet sleepy and out of order, and so I lay down on my bed in my gowne to sleep, but I could not, therefore about three o'clock up and to dinner and thence to the office, where. Mrs. Burroughs, my pretty widow, was and so I did her business and sent her away by agreement, and presently I by coach after and took her up in Fenchurch Streete and away through the City, hiding my face as much as I could, but she being mighty pretty and well enough clad, I was not afeard, but only lest somebody should see me and think me idle.
I quite through with her, and so into the fields Uxbridge way, a mile or two beyond Tyburne, and then back and then to Paddington, and then back to Lyssen green, a place the coachman led me to (I never knew in my life) and there we eat and drank and so back to Chasing Crosse, and there I set her down. All the way most excellent pretty company. I had her lips as much as I would, and a mighty pretty woman she is and very modest and yet kinde in all fair ways. All this time I passed with mighty pleasure, it being what I have for a long time wished for, and did pay this day 5s. forfeite for her company.
She being gone, I to White Hall and there to Lord Arlington's (48), and met Mr. Williamson (32), and find there is no more need of my trouble about the Galliott, so with content departed, and went straight home, where at the office did the most at the office in that wearied and sleepy state I could, and so home to supper, and after supper falling to singing with Mercer did however sit up with her, she pleasing me with her singing of "Helpe, helpe", 'till past midnight and I not a whit drowsy, and so to bed.

Read More ...

On 11 Oct 1905 Archibald John Stuart Wortley 1849-1905 (56) died at Uxbridge.

West Drayton, Middlesex

On 09 Nov 1734 Frances Pierrepoint Baroness Geneville Beaudasert -1734 was buried at West Drayton.

Hillingdon West Drayton, Middlesex

On 15 Dec 1864 Algernon Frederick Greville 1798-1864 (65) died at Hillingdon West Drayton.

Ickenham, Hillingdon West Drayton, Middlesex

Swakeleys House, Ickenham, Hillingdon West Drayton, Middlesex

In 1629 Edmund Wright Lord Mayor -1643 purchased Swakeleys House from John Bingley.

In Jul 1643 Edmund Wright Lord Mayor -1643 died. His daughter inherited Swakeleys House.

Great Plague of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 September 1665. 07 Sep 1665. Up by 5 of the clock, mighty full of fear of an ague, but was obliged to go, and so by water, wrapping myself up warm, to the Tower, and there sent for the Weekely Bill, and find 8,252 dead in all, and of them 6,878 of the plague; which is a most dreadfull number, and shows reason to fear that the plague hath got that hold that it will yet continue among us.
Thence to Brainford, reading "The Villaine", a pretty good play, all the way. There a coach of Mr. Povy's (51) stood ready for me, and he at his house ready to come in, and so we together merrily to Swakely, Sir R. Viner's (34). A very pleasant place, bought by him of Sir James Harrington's (57) lady (48). He took us up and down with great respect, and showed us all his house and grounds; and it is a place not very moderne in the garden nor house, but the most uniforme in all that ever I saw; and some things to excess. Pretty to see over the screene of the hall (put up by Sir Mr. Harrington (57), a Long Parliamentman) the King's head, and my Lord of Essex (33) on one side, and Fairfax on the other; and upon the other side of the screene, the parson of the parish, and the lord of the manor and his sisters. The window-cases, door-cases, and chimnys of all the house are marble. He showed me a black boy that he had, that died of a consumption, and being dead, he caused him to be dried in an oven, and lies there entire in a box.
By and by to dinner, where his lady I find yet handsome, but hath been a very handsome woman; now is old. Hath brought him near £100,000 and now he lives, no man in England in greater plenty, and commands both King and Council with his credit he gives them. Here was a fine lady a merchant's wife at dinner with us, and who should be here in the quality of a woman but Mrs. Worship's daughter, Dr. Clerke's niece, and after dinner Sir Robert (34) led us up to his Long gallery, very fine, above stairs (and better, or such, furniture I never did see), and there Mrs. Worship did give us three or four very good songs, and sings very neatly, to my great delight.
After all this, and ending the chief business to my content about getting a promise of some money of him, we took leave, being exceedingly well treated here, and a most pleasant journey we had back, Povy (51) and I, and his company most excellent in anything but business, he here giving me an account of as many persons at Court as I had a mind or thought of enquiring after. He tells me by a letter he showed me, that the King (35) is not, nor hath been of late, very well, but quite out of humour; and, as some think, in a consumption, and weary of every thing. He showed me my Lord Arlington's (47) house that he was born in, in a towne called Harlington: and so carried me through a most pleasant country to Brainford, and there put me into my boat, and good night. So I wrapt myself warm, and by water got to Woolwich about one in the morning, my wife and all in bed.

Read More ...

Whitchurch, Middlesex

In 1633 Arthur Lake 1598-1633 (35) died at Whitchurch.