History of Norwich

1075 Revolt of the Earls

1549 Kett's Rebellion

Norwich is in Norfolk.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1004. This year came Sweyne with his fleet to Norwich, plundering and burning the whole town. Then Ulfkytel agreed with the council in East-Anglia, that it were better to purchase peace with the enemy, ere they did too much harm on the land; for that they had come unawares, and he had not had time to gather his force. Then, under the truce that should have been between them, stole the army up from their ships, and bent their course to Thetford. When Ulfkytel understood that, then sent he an order to hew the ships in pieces; but they frustrated his design. Then he gathered his forces, as secretly as he could. The enemy came to Thetford within three weeks after they had plundered Norwich; and, remaining there one night, they spoiled and burned the town; but, in the morning, as they were proceeding to their ships, came Ulfkytel with his army, and said that they must there come to close quarters. And, accordingly, the two armies met together; and much slaughter was made on both sides. There were many of the veterans of the East-Angles slain; but, if the main army had been there, the enemy had never returned to their ships. As they said themselves, that they never met with worse hand-play in England than Ulfkytel brought them.

Revolt of the Earls

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle William The Conqueror. 1075. This year King William (47) gave Earl Ralph (33) the daughter of William Fitz-Osborne (55) to wife. This same Ralph (33) was British on his mother's side; but his father, whose name was also Ralph (64), was English; and born in Norfolk. The king (47) therefore gave his son the earldom of Norfolk and Suffolk; and he then led the bride to Norwich. There was that bride-ale The source of man's bale. There was Earl Roger, and Earl Waltheof, and bishops, and abbots; who there resolved, that they would drive the king (47) out of the realm of England. But it was soon told the king (47) in Normandy how it was determined. It was Earl Roger and Earl Ralph (33) who were the authors of that plot; and who enticed the Britons to them, and sent eastward to Denmark after a fleet to assist them. Roger went westward to his earldom, and collected his people there, to the king (47)'s annoyance, as he thought; but it was to the great disadvantage of himself. He was however prevented. Ralph (33) also in his earldom would go forth with his people; but the castlemen that were in England and also the people of the land, came against him, and prevented him from doing anything. He escaped however to the ships at Norwich. (97) And his wife was in the castle; which she held until peace was made with her; when she went out of England, with all her men who wished to join her. The king (47) afterwards came to England, and seized Earl Roger, his relative, and put him in prison. And Earl Waltheof went over sea, and bewrayed himself; but he asked forgiveness, and proffered gifts of ransom. The king (47), however, let him off lightly, until he (98) came to England; when he had him seized. Soon after that came east from Denmark two hundred ships; wherein were two captains, Cnute Swainson, and Earl Hacco; but they durst not maintain a fight with King William (47). They went rather to York, and broke into St. Peter's minster, and took therein much treasure, and so went away. They made for Flanders over sea; but they all perished who were privy to that design; that was, the son of Earl Hacco, and many others with him. This year died the Lady Edgitha, who was the relict of King Edward, seven nights before Christmas, at Winchester; and the king (47) caused her to be brought to Westminster with great pomp; and he laid her with King Edward, her lord. And the king (47) was then at Westminster, at midwinter; where all the Britons were condemned who were at the bride-ale at Norwich. Some were punished with blindness; some were driven from the land; and some were towed to Scandinavia. So were the traitors of King William (47) subdued.
97. Whence he sailed to Bretagne, according to Flor. S. Dunelm, etc.; but according to Henry of Huntingdon he fled directly to Denmark, returning afterwards with Cnute and Hacco, who invaded England With a fleet of 200 sail.

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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Henry I Beauclerc 1122. 1122. In this year was the King Henry (54) at Christmas in Norwich, and at Easter in Northampton.

On 30 Oct 1426 Anne Despencer Baroness Hastings Baroness Marshal Baroness Morley 1358-1426 (68) died at Norwich.

On 25 Mar 1434 Margaret Howard 1375-1434 (59) died at Norwich.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1506. This yeare a great parte of the cittie of Norwich was burnt, and the towne of Berkwaye more then halfe burnt. Also a great fier in London betwene the Custome Howsse and Billinsgate, that did great hurte.

Around 1530 Winifred Knightley 1530-1569 was born to William Knightley 1486-1548 (44) at Norwich.

Kett's Rebellion

In Jul 1549 Kett's Rebellion was a revolt in Norwich in response to the enclosure of land. The revolt was suppressed by Thomas Tresham 1500-1559 (49) who received £272, 19.6 for his services.

12 Jul 1553. The xij th dale the lady Mary (37) sent to Norwich to be proclaymed, but they wolde not, because they were not certeyn of the kinges death ; but within a daye after they dyd not only proclayme hir, but also sent men and weapons to ayde hir.

Around 1554 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558.Around 1556 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558.

On 08 Jan 1556 Anne Boleyn 1475-1556 (80) died at Norwich.

In 1558 Nicholas Bacon 1st Baronet Bacon 1540-1624 (18) was knighted by Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (24) in Norwich.

Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father.Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

On 09 Jan 1564 Margaret Audley Duchess Norfolk 1540-1564 (24) died at Norwich following the birth of her fourth child. She was buried at Church of St John the Baptist Norwich .

In 1562 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Margaret Audley Duchess Norfolk 1540-1564. The Arms top left not Audley. Neither is the motto partially showing.

On 19 Apr 1593 John Hobart 2nd Baronet Hobart 1593-1647 was born to Henry Hobart 1st Baronet Hobart 1560-1625 (33) and Dorothy Bell Lady Hobart in Norwich.

In 1624 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Henry Hobart 1st Baronet Hobart 1560-1625.

On 30 Nov 1594 Bishop John Cosins 1594-1672 was born at Norwich.

On 28 Sep 1611 Colonel Augustine Warner 1611-1674 was born to Thomas Hoverton Warner 1581-1657 (30) at Norwich.

On 05 Jun 1621 Thomas Pepys Doctor 1621-1665 was born to Talbot Pepys MP 1583-1666 (38) at Norwich. On 15 Jun 1621 Thomas Pepys Doctor 1621-1665 was christended at Church of St Stephen.

On 04 Apr 1657 Thomas Hoverton Warner 1581-1657 (76) died at Norwich.

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1671. 17 Oct 1671. My Lord Henry Howard (43) coming this night to visit my Lord Chamberlain (69), and staying a day, would needs have me go with him to Norwich, promising to convey me back, after a day or two; this, as I could not refuse, I was not hard to be pursuaded to, having a desire to see that famous scholar and physician, Dr. T. Browne (65), author of the "Religio Medici" and "Vulgar Errors", now lately knighted. Thither, then, went my Lord and I alone, in his flying chariot with six horses; and by the way, discoursing with me of several of his concerns, he acquainted me of his going to marry his eldest son (43) to one of the King's (41) natural daughters [Note. Either Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 (10) or Charlotte Fitzroy Countess Lichfield 1664-1718 (7).], by the Duchess of Cleveland (30); by which he reckoned he should come into mighty favor. He also told me that, though he kept that idle creature, Mrs. B—— [Note. Jane Bickerton Duchess Norfolk 1643-1693 (28)], and would leave £200 a year to the son [Note. Henry Howard and Jane Bickerton had three sons; not clear which is being referred to since the eldest may have died and the reference may be to a surviving son.] he had by her (28), he would never marry her (28), and that the King (41) himself had cautioned him against it. All the world knows how he kept his promise [Note. meaning he didn't keep his promise since Henry Howard did marry Jane Bickerton - this a case of John Evelyn writing his diary retrospectively?], and I was sorry at heart to hear what now he confessed to me; and that a person and a family which I so much honored for the sake of that noble and illustrious friend of mine, his grandfather (86), should dishonor and pollute them both with those base and vicious courses he of late had taken since the death of Sir Samuel Tuke (56), and that of his own virtuous lady (my Lady Anne Somerset (40), sister to the Marquis (69)); who, while they lived, preserved this gentleman by their example and advice from those many extravagances that impaired both his fortune and reputation.
Being come to the Ducal palace, my Lord (43) made very much of me; but I had little rest, so exceedingly desirous he was to show me the contrivance he had made for the entertainment of their Majesties, and the whole Court not long before, and which, though much of it was but temporary, apparently framed of boards only, was yet standing. As to the palace, it is an old wretched building, and that part of it newly built of brick, is very ill understood; so as I was of the opinion it had been much better to have demolished all, and set it up in a better place, than to proceed any further; for it stands in the very market-place, and, though near a river, yet a very narrow muddy one, without any extent.
Next morning, I went to see Sir Thomas Browne (65) (with whom I had some time corresponded by letter, though I had never seen him before); his whole house and garden being a paradise and cabinet of rarities; and that of the best collection, especially medals, books, plants, and natural things. Among other curiosities, Sir Thomas (65) had a collection of the eggs of all the fowl and birds he could procure, that country (especially the promontory of Norfolk) being frequented, as he said, by several kinds which seldom or never go further into the land, as cranes, storks, eagles, and variety of water fowl. He led me to see all the remarkable places of this ancient city, being one of the largest, and certainly, after London, one of the noblest of England, for its venerable cathedral, number of stately churches, cleanness of the streets, and buildings of flint so exquisitely headed and squared, as I was much astonished at; but he told me they had lost the art of squaring the flints, in which they so much excelled, and of which the churches, best houses, and walls, are built. The Castle is an antique extent of ground, which now they call Marsfield, and would have been a fitting area to have placed the Ducal palace in. The suburbs are large, the prospects sweet, with other amenities, not omitting the flower gardens, in which all the inhabitants excel. The fabric of stuffs brings a vast trade to this populous town.
Being returned to my Lord's, who had been with me all this morning, he advised with me concerning a plot to rebuild his house, having already, as he said, erected a front next the street, and a left wing, and now resolving to set up another wing and pavilion next the garden, and to convert the bowling green into stables. My advice was, to desist from all, and to meditate wholly on rebuilding a handsome palace at Arundel House, in the Strand, before he proceeded further here, and then to place this in the Castle, that ground belonging to his Lordship.
I observed that most of the church yards (though some of them large enough) were filled up with earth, or rather the congestion of dead bodies one upon another, for want of earth, even to the very top of the walls, and some above the walls, so as the churches seemed to be built in pits.

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In 1747 John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793 (23) was elected MP Norwich.

1765. Francis Cotes Painter 1726-1770. Portrait of John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793.Before 02 Aug 1788 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793.In 1780 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793.

In 1756 Harbord Harbord 1st Baron Suffield 1734-1810 (21) was elected MP Norwich.

On 29 Dec 1803 Godfrey Bosville Macdonald 1775-1832 (28) and Louisa Maria La Coast Hanover 1782-1835 (21) were married at Norwich. She a great granddaughter of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

Dorothy Hobart was born to Henry Hobart 1st Baronet Hobart 1560-1625 and Dorothy Bell Lady Hobart in Norwich.

Austin Friars Norwich, Norfolk

In 1379 William Morley 4th Baron Marshal 3rd Baron Morley 1319-1379 (60) died. He was buried at Austin Friars Norwich. In 1379 His son Thomas Morley 5th Baron Marshal 4th Baron Morley 1354-1416 (25) succeeded 5th Baron Marshal, 4th Baron Morley. Joan Hastings Baroness Marshal Baroness Morley 1357- (22) by marriage Baroness Marshal, Baron Morley.

On 23 Nov 1386 Cecily Bardolf Baroness Marshal Baroness Morley -1386 died. She was buried at Austin Friars Norwich.

Church of St Peter Mancroft Norwich, Norfolk

In 1670 Thomas Tenison Archbishop of Canterbury 1636-1715 (33) was presented with the living of Church of St Peter Mancroft Norwich.

Church of St John the Baptist Norwich, Norfolk

On 09 Jan 1564 Margaret Audley Duchess Norfolk 1540-1564 (24) died at Norwich following the birth of her fourth child. She was buried at Church of St John the Baptist Norwich .

Church of St Stephen, Norwich, Norfolk

On 05 Jun 1621 Thomas Pepys Doctor 1621-1665 was born to Talbot Pepys MP 1583-1666 (38) at Norwich. On 15 Jun 1621 Thomas Pepys Doctor 1621-1665 was christended at Church of St Stephen.

Duke of Norfolk's Palace, Norwich

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1671. 17 Oct 1671. My Lord Henry Howard (43) coming this night to visit my Lord Chamberlain (69), and staying a day, would needs have me go with him to Norwich, promising to convey me back, after a day or two; this, as I could not refuse, I was not hard to be pursuaded to, having a desire to see that famous scholar and physician, Dr. T. Browne (65), author of the "Religio Medici" and "Vulgar Errors", now lately knighted. Thither, then, went my Lord and I alone, in his flying chariot with six horses; and by the way, discoursing with me of several of his concerns, he acquainted me of his going to marry his eldest son (43) to one of the King's (41) natural daughters [Note. Either Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 (10) or Charlotte Fitzroy Countess Lichfield 1664-1718 (7).], by the Duchess of Cleveland (30); by which he reckoned he should come into mighty favor. He also told me that, though he kept that idle creature, Mrs. B—— [Note. Jane Bickerton Duchess Norfolk 1643-1693 (28)], and would leave £200 a year to the son [Note. Henry Howard and Jane Bickerton had three sons; not clear which is being referred to since the eldest may have died and the reference may be to a surviving son.] he had by her (28), he would never marry her (28), and that the King (41) himself had cautioned him against it. All the world knows how he kept his promise [Note. meaning he didn't keep his promise since Henry Howard did marry Jane Bickerton - this a case of John Evelyn writing his diary retrospectively?], and I was sorry at heart to hear what now he confessed to me; and that a person and a family which I so much honored for the sake of that noble and illustrious friend of mine, his grandfather (86), should dishonor and pollute them both with those base and vicious courses he of late had taken since the death of Sir Samuel Tuke (56), and that of his own virtuous lady (my Lady Anne Somerset (40), sister to the Marquis (69)); who, while they lived, preserved this gentleman by their example and advice from those many extravagances that impaired both his fortune and reputation.
Being come to the Ducal palace, my Lord (43) made very much of me; but I had little rest, so exceedingly desirous he was to show me the contrivance he had made for the entertainment of their Majesties, and the whole Court not long before, and which, though much of it was but temporary, apparently framed of boards only, was yet standing. As to the palace, it is an old wretched building, and that part of it newly built of brick, is very ill understood; so as I was of the opinion it had been much better to have demolished all, and set it up in a better place, than to proceed any further; for it stands in the very market-place, and, though near a river, yet a very narrow muddy one, without any extent.
Next morning, I went to see Sir Thomas Browne (65) (with whom I had some time corresponded by letter, though I had never seen him before); his whole house and garden being a paradise and cabinet of rarities; and that of the best collection, especially medals, books, plants, and natural things. Among other curiosities, Sir Thomas (65) had a collection of the eggs of all the fowl and birds he could procure, that country (especially the promontory of Norfolk) being frequented, as he said, by several kinds which seldom or never go further into the land, as cranes, storks, eagles, and variety of water fowl. He led me to see all the remarkable places of this ancient city, being one of the largest, and certainly, after London, one of the noblest of England, for its venerable cathedral, number of stately churches, cleanness of the streets, and buildings of flint so exquisitely headed and squared, as I was much astonished at; but he told me they had lost the art of squaring the flints, in which they so much excelled, and of which the churches, best houses, and walls, are built. The Castle is an antique extent of ground, which now they call Marsfield, and would have been a fitting area to have placed the Ducal palace in. The suburbs are large, the prospects sweet, with other amenities, not omitting the flower gardens, in which all the inhabitants excel. The fabric of stuffs brings a vast trade to this populous town.
Being returned to my Lord's, who had been with me all this morning, he advised with me concerning a plot to rebuild his house, having already, as he said, erected a front next the street, and a left wing, and now resolving to set up another wing and pavilion next the garden, and to convert the bowling green into stables. My advice was, to desist from all, and to meditate wholly on rebuilding a handsome palace at Arundel House, in the Strand, before he proceeded further here, and then to place this in the Castle, that ground belonging to his Lordship.
I observed that most of the church yards (though some of them large enough) were filled up with earth, or rather the congestion of dead bodies one upon another, for want of earth, even to the very top of the walls, and some above the walls, so as the churches seemed to be built in pits.

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Mousehold Heath Norwich, Norfolk

Kett's Rebellion

On 27 Aug 1549 the rebels were defeated by an army led by John Dudley 1st Duke Northumberland 1504-1553 (45). Henry Willoughby 1517-1549 (32) was killed at Mousehold Heath Norwich.

Norwich Castle, Norfolk

Letter XXXIV. Joanna de Kynnesley to King Henry IV. After 1412. Letter XXXIV. Joanna de Kynnesley to King Henry IV (44).
Supplicates most humbly a poor and simple woman, Joanna de Kynnesley; that whereas John de Kynnesley, her husband, by hate and malice, was put in prison within the castle of Norwich, where he has long lain through false suggestions, that it would please your most gracious lordship, for the love of God, and for the souls of your most noble faher and mother, whom God assoil, to grant and give to your said suppliant your gracious letters, sealed under your seal, made in due form, directed to the Sheriff of the county of Norfolk, charging and straitly commanding him to deliver up the body of the said John out of prison, that he may go at large, to an swer before your royalty, in case any one should accuse him; and she will pray God for you and for your progenitors for ever.

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 21 Jul 1461. Westminster Palace. The like to John Howard (36), king's knight, the office of the constableship and custody of Norwich Castle from Exeter lats, with the fees as in the times of Edward III and Richard II from the issues of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk.

John Evelyn's Diary 17 October 1671. 17 Oct 1671. My Lord Henry Howard (43) coming this night to visit my Lord Chamberlain (69), and staying a day, would needs have me go with him to Norwich, promising to convey me back, after a day or two; this, as I could not refuse, I was not hard to be pursuaded to, having a desire to see that famous scholar and physician, Dr. T. Browne (65), author of the "Religio Medici" and "Vulgar Errors", now lately knighted. Thither, then, went my Lord and I alone, in his flying chariot with six horses; and by the way, discoursing with me of several of his concerns, he acquainted me of his going to marry his eldest son (43) to one of the King's (41) natural daughters [Note. Either Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 (10) or Charlotte Fitzroy Countess Lichfield 1664-1718 (7).], by the Duchess of Cleveland (30); by which he reckoned he should come into mighty favor. He also told me that, though he kept that idle creature, Mrs. B—— [Note. Jane Bickerton Duchess Norfolk 1643-1693 (28)], and would leave £200 a year to the son [Note. Henry Howard and Jane Bickerton had three sons; not clear which is being referred to since the eldest may have died and the reference may be to a surviving son.] he had by her (28), he would never marry her (28), and that the King (41) himself had cautioned him against it. All the world knows how he kept his promise [Note. meaning he didn't keep his promise since Henry Howard did marry Jane Bickerton - this a case of John Evelyn writing his diary retrospectively?], and I was sorry at heart to hear what now he confessed to me; and that a person and a family which I so much honored for the sake of that noble and illustrious friend of mine, his grandfather (86), should dishonor and pollute them both with those base and vicious courses he of late had taken since the death of Sir Samuel Tuke (56), and that of his own virtuous lady (my Lady Anne Somerset (40), sister to the Marquis (69)); who, while they lived, preserved this gentleman by their example and advice from those many extravagances that impaired both his fortune and reputation.
Being come to the Ducal palace, my Lord (43) made very much of me; but I had little rest, so exceedingly desirous he was to show me the contrivance he had made for the entertainment of their Majesties, and the whole Court not long before, and which, though much of it was but temporary, apparently framed of boards only, was yet standing. As to the palace, it is an old wretched building, and that part of it newly built of brick, is very ill understood; so as I was of the opinion it had been much better to have demolished all, and set it up in a better place, than to proceed any further; for it stands in the very market-place, and, though near a river, yet a very narrow muddy one, without any extent.
Next morning, I went to see Sir Thomas Browne (65) (with whom I had some time corresponded by letter, though I had never seen him before); his whole house and garden being a paradise and cabinet of rarities; and that of the best collection, especially medals, books, plants, and natural things. Among other curiosities, Sir Thomas (65) had a collection of the eggs of all the fowl and birds he could procure, that country (especially the promontory of Norfolk) being frequented, as he said, by several kinds which seldom or never go further into the land, as cranes, storks, eagles, and variety of water fowl. He led me to see all the remarkable places of this ancient city, being one of the largest, and certainly, after London, one of the noblest of England, for its venerable cathedral, number of stately churches, cleanness of the streets, and buildings of flint so exquisitely headed and squared, as I was much astonished at; but he told me they had lost the art of squaring the flints, in which they so much excelled, and of which the churches, best houses, and walls, are built. The Castle is an antique extent of ground, which now they call Marsfield, and would have been a fitting area to have placed the Ducal palace in. The suburbs are large, the prospects sweet, with other amenities, not omitting the flower gardens, in which all the inhabitants excel. The fabric of stuffs brings a vast trade to this populous town.
Being returned to my Lord's, who had been with me all this morning, he advised with me concerning a plot to rebuild his house, having already, as he said, erected a front next the street, and a left wing, and now resolving to set up another wing and pavilion next the garden, and to convert the bowling green into stables. My advice was, to desist from all, and to meditate wholly on rebuilding a handsome palace at Arundel House, in the Strand, before he proceeded further here, and then to place this in the Castle, that ground belonging to his Lordship.
I observed that most of the church yards (though some of them large enough) were filled up with earth, or rather the congestion of dead bodies one upon another, for want of earth, even to the very top of the walls, and some above the walls, so as the churches seemed to be built in pits.

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Thomas Burgh was appointed Constable Norwich Castle.

Norwich Cathedral

St Saviour's Parish Norwich, Norfolk

On 06 Aug 1504 Archbishop Matthew Parker 1504-1575 was born in St Saviour's Parish Norwich.

Whitefriars Norwich, Norfolk

In 1433 Edmund Barry -1433 died. He was buried at Whitefriars Norwich.

On 18 Aug 1479 Agnes Barry -1479 died. She was buried at Whitefriars Norwich.