History of Somerset

878 Battle of Edington

1085 Doomsday Book

1477 Trial and Execution of Ankarette Twynyho

1497 Cornish Rebellion

1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

1607 Bristol Channel Floods

1645 Battle of Lanport

Somerset is in Wessex.

In 1186 Godeheut Tosny 1130-1186 (56) died at Somerset.

In 1480 John Vere 1433-1480 (47) died at Somerset.

Before 01 Mar 1590 Edward Bourchier 4th Earl Bath 1590-1636 was born to William Bourchier 3rd Earl Bath 1557-1623 and Elizabeth Russell Countess Bath and Eu -1605 at Somerset.

In 1642 George Hawley 1st Baron Hawley 1608-1684 (33) was appointed Commissioner of Array for Somerset.

Three Shires Stone is three blocks of limestone, each dated 1736 and with the initial of one of the three counties, with a large cap, mark where the historical counties of Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset meet. Each stone is approximately 9–12 feet in height and weighs four to five tons, with the cap being of a similar size and weight.

Aller, Somerset

Church of St Andrew Aller, Somerset

In 1420 Reginald Botreaux -1420 died. He was buried at Church of St Andrew Aller.

Ashington, Somerset

Around 1132 Robert Fitzwilliam Hastings 1132-1186 was born at Ashington.

Around 1186 Robert Fitzwilliam Hastings 1132-1186 (54) died at Ashington.

Athelney, Somerset

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 878. This year about mid-winter, after twelfth-night, the Danish army stole out to Chippenham, and rode over the land of the West-Saxons; where they settled, and drove many of the people over sea; and of the rest the greatest part they rode down, and subdued to their will;—ALL BUT ALFRED THE KING (29). He, with a little band, uneasily sought the woods and fastnesses of the moors. And in the winter of this same year the brother of Ingwar and Healfden landed in Wessex, in Devonshire, with three and twenty ships, and there was he slain, and eight hundred men with him, and forty of his army. There also was taken the war-flag, which they called the RAVEN. In the Easter of this year King Alfred (29) with his little force raised a work at Athelney; from which he assailed the army, assisted by that part of Somersetshire which was nighest to it.

Battle of Edington

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. Around 12 May 878. Then, in the seventh week after Easter, he rode to Brixton by the eastern side of Selwood; and there came out to meet him all the people of Somersersetshire, and Wiltshire, and that part of Hampshire which is on this side of the sea; and they rejoiced to see him. Then within one night he went from this retreat to Hey; and within one night after he proceeded to Heddington; and there fought with all the army, and put them to flight, riding after them as far as the fortress, where he remained a fortnight. Then the army gave him hostages with many oaths, that they would go out of his kingdom. They told him also, that their king would receive baptism. And they acted accordingly; for in the course of three weeks after, King Guthrum, attended by some thirty of the worthiest men that were in the army, came to him at Aller, which is near Athelney, and there the king became his sponsor in baptism; and his crisom-leasing was at Wedmor. He was there twelve nights with the king (29), who honoured him and his attendants with many presents.

Baltonsborough, Somerset

Around 909 Archbishop Dunstan 909-988 was born to Heorstan in Baltonsborough.

Barrington, Somerset

Barrington Court, Somerset

Around 1570 Gervase Clifton 1st Baron Clifton 1570-1618 was born to John Clifton 1538-1593 (32) and Anne Stanley 1532-1591 (38) in Barrington Court.

Bath

Beacon's Hill, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Beckington, Somerset

Around 1390 Bishop Thomas Beckington 1390-1465 was born at Beckington.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 June 1668. 12 Jun 1668. Friday. Up, finding our beds good, but lousy; which made us merry. We set out, the reckoning and servants coming to 9s. 6d.; my guide thither, 2s.; coachman, advanced, 10s. So rode a very good way, led to my great content by our landlord to Philips-Norton, with great pleasure, being now come into Somersetshire; where my wife and Deb. mightily joyed thereat1, I commending the country, as indeed it deserves. And the first town we came to was Brekington, where, we stopping for something for the horses, we called two or three little boys to us, and pleased ourselves with their manner of speech, and did make one of them kiss Deb., and another say the Lord's Prayer (hallowed be thy kingdom come). At Philips-Norton I walked to the Church, and there saw a very ancient tomb of some Knight Templar, I think; and here saw the tombstone whereon there were only two heads cut, which, the story goes, and credibly, were two sisters, called the Fair Maids of Foscott, that had two bodies upward and one belly, and there lie buried. Here is also a very fine ring of six bells, and they mighty tuneable. Having dined very well, 10s., we come before night to the Bath; where I presently stepped out with my landlord, and saw the baths, with people in them. They are not so large as I expected, but yet pleasant; and the town most of stone, and clean, though the streets generally narrow. I home, and being weary, went to bed without supper; the rest supping.
Note 1. They were natives of that county.-B.

Bicknoller, Somerset

On 01 Dec 1769 Robert Dashwood 1710-1769 (59) died at Bicknoller.

Bleadon, Somerset

In 1068 Eadnoth the Constable -1068 was killed in Bleadon leading a force against the two sons of Harold Godwinson II King England 1022-1066 (46) who had invaded Somerset.

Bridgwater

Brooke, Somerset

Around 1391 Thomas Brooke 1391-1439 was born at Brooke.

Around 1415 Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 was born to Thomas Brooke 1391-1439 (24) and Joan Braybrooke 5th Baroness Cobham 1403-1442 (12) at Brooke.

Around 1433 Elizabeth Brooke 1433- was born to Edward Brooke 6th Baron Cobham 1415-1464 (18) and Elizabeth Tuchet Baroness Cobham 1420-1464 (13) at Brooke.

Bruton, Somerset

In 1541 Henry Berkeley 1541-1601 was born to Maurice Berkeley Standard Bearer 1506-1581 (35) and Catherine Blount 1518-1560 (23) at Bruton.

In 1580 Edward Berkeley 1580-1654 was born to Henry Berkeley 1541-1601 (39) and Margaret Lygon 1540-1617 (40) at Bruton.

Around Dec 1605 William Berkeley 1605-1677 was born to Maurice Berkeley 1576-1617 (29) and Elizabeth Killigrew 1579-1626 (26) at Bruton.

On 24 Mar 1741 William Berkeley 4th Baron Berkeley 1663-1741 (78) died at Bruton. His son John Berkeley 5th Baron Berkeley 1697-1773 (43) succeeded 5th Baron Berkeley of Stratton in Cornwall.

Bruton Abbey, Somerset

On 18 Apr 1773 John Berkeley 5th Baron Berkeley 1697-1773 (75) died without issue at Bruton Abbey.

Brympton d'Evercy, Somerset

Before 1440 Before 1440 John Sydenham 1420-1468 and Joan Stourton 1418-1472 were married by which Brympton d'Evercy came into the possession of the Sydenham family.

On 26 Mar 1857 Jane Huck Saunders Countess Westmoreland 1783-1857 (74) died at Brympton d'Evercy.

Before 23 Jan 1810 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Jane Huck Saunders Countess Westmoreland 1783-1857 as Hebe.

Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 800-849. 845. This year Alderman Eanwulf, with the men of Somersetshire, and Bishop Ealstan, and Alderman Osric, with the men of Dorsetshire, fought at the mouth of the Parret with the Danish army; and there, after making a great slaughter, obtained the victory.

Bristol Channel Floods

On 30 Jan 1607 around midday the Bristol Channel suffered from unexpectedly high floodings that broke the coastal defences in several places devastings significant areas of South-Wales and Somerset. It is estimated that 2,000 or more people were drowned, houses and villages were swept away, an estimated 200 square miles (51,800 ha) of farmland inundated, and livestock destroyed, wrecking the local economy along the coasts of the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary. The coast of Devon and the Somerset Levels as far inland as Glastonbury Tor, 14 miles (23 km) from the coast, were also affected. The sea wall at Burnham-on-Sea gave way, and the water flowed over the low-lying levels and moors.

Cannard's Grave, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Cannington, Somerset

In 1730 Hugh Clifford 2nd Baron Clifford Chudleigh 1663-1730 (67) died at Cannington. In 1730 His son Hugh Clifford 3rd Baron Clifford Chudleigh 1700-1732 (29) succeeded 3rd Baron Clifford Chudleigh in Devon. Elizabeth Blount Baroness Clifford Chudleigh -1778 by marriage Baroness Clifford Chudleigh in Devon.

Castle Cary, Somerset

On 19 Feb 1215 Henry Lovel 1215-1251 was born at Castle Cary.

Before 05 Sep 1251 Hugh Lovel 1251-1291 was born to Henry Lovel 1215-1251 at Castle Cary.

Around 1276 Richard Lovel 1276-1351 was born to Hugh Lovel 1251-1291 (24) at Castle Cary.

On 21 May 1291 Hugh Lovel 1251-1291 (39) died at Castle Cary.

Around 1297 Joan Lovel Baroness Maynard 1297-1337 was born to Richard Lovel 1276-1351 (21) at Castle Cary.

On 21 Aug 1337 Joan Lovel Baroness Maynard 1297-1337 (40) died at Castle Cary.

On 03 Mar 1550 John Carey 3rd Baron Hunsdon 1550-1617 was born to Henry Carey 1st Baron Hunsdon 1526-1596 (23) and Anne Morgan Baroness Hunsdon 1529-1607 (21) in Castle Cary.

On 29 Mar 1763 Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817 was born in Castle Cary.

Chaffcombe, Somerset

In 1293 Idonea Lisle 1293-1359 was born to William Lisle at Chaffcombe.

Charterhouse, Somerset

Some sources suggest Charterhouse may have been the Roman settlement of Iscalis whereas others suggest Iscalis may have bee Cheddar with Charterhouse being named Vebriacum. Charterhouse grew up around the north-western edge of prehistoric lead and silver mines, which were exploited by the Romans.

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Cheddar, Somerset

Some sources suggest Charterhouse may have been the Roman settlement of Iscalis whereas others suggest Iscalis may have bee Cheddar with Charterhouse being named Vebriacum. Charterhouse grew up around the north-western edge of prehistoric lead and silver mines, which were exploited by the Romans.

Chew Magna, Somerset

After 1603 Anne Ratclyffe 1539-1603 died at Chew Magna.

The River Chew rises near Chewton Mendip then flows north past Litton, through reservoirs and lakes to Chew Magna, Pensford, Compton Dando joining the River Avon at Keynsham.

Chewton Mendip, Somerset

In 1442 William Bonville 6th Baron Harington 1442-1460 was born to William Bonville 1420-1460 (22) and Elizabeth Harrington 1423-1458 (19) at Chewton Mendip.

The River Chew rises near Chewton Mendip then flows north past Litton, through reservoirs and lakes to Chew Magna, Pensford, Compton Dando joining the River Avon at Keynsham.

Cossington, Somerset

Around 1534 George Paulet of Holberry 1534-1603 was born to Hugh Paulett 1509-1573 (25) and Laura Kellaway 1463- (71) at Cossington.

Chard, Somerset

Fosse Way 5a Axmouth to Ilchester. The Fosse Way starts in Seaton and/or Axmouth after which it travels north through Musbury to Axminster where crosses the Exeter to Dorchester Roman Road. From Axminster the Fosse Way continues through Chard, Dinnington, Yeabridge to Lindinis aka Ilchester.

Chuton, Somerset

In 1399 Robert Harrington 1330-1399 (69) died at Chuton.

Clandown, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Compton Dando, Somerset

The River Chew rises near Chewton Mendip then flows north past Litton, through reservoirs and lakes to Chew Magna, Pensford, Compton Dando joining the River Avon at Keynsham.

Curry Rivel, Somerset

Burton Pynsent, Curry Rivel, Somerset

Around 1715 Edmund Star of New Court and Mary Jennings were married. She brough the estate of Burton Pynsent to the marriage.

On 08 Jan 1765 William Pynsent 2nd Baronet 1679-1765 (86) died having outlived his three daughters and his son, none of whom had issue. He left his estate to William "The Elder" Pitt 1st Earl Chatham 1708-1778 (56) who was no relation and who he had never met. Pitt erected the Burton Pynsent Monument nearby at a cost of £2,000.

Around 1754. William Hoare Painter 1707-1792. Portrait of William "The Elder" Pitt 1st Earl Chatham 1708-1778.

In 1800 Hester Lucy Stanhope Traveller 1776-1839 (23) was sent to live with her maternal grandmother Hester Granville Countess Chatham 1720-1803 (79) at Burton Pynsent.

Mary Jennings was born to Thomas Jennings of Burton Pynsent Somerset.

Edmund Star of New Court and Mary Jennings were married.

Burton Pynsent House, Curry Rivel, Somerset

Around 1756 Burton Pynsent House was built for William "The Elder" Pitt 1st Earl Chatham 1708-1778 (47).

Dinnington, Somerset

Fosse Way 5a Axmouth to Ilchester. The Fosse Way starts in Seaton and/or Axmouth after which it travels north through Musbury to Axminster where crosses the Exeter to Dorchester Roman Road. From Axminster the Fosse Way continues through Chard, Dinnington, Yeabridge to Lindinis aka Ilchester.

Donyatt, Somerset

Around 1369 John Harrington 1369-1421 was born to Robert Harrington 1330-1399 (39) at Donyatt.

Doulting, Somerset

On 25 May 709 Saint Aldhelm 639-709 (70) died in Doulting.

Dunkerton Bottom, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Dunster

Evercreech, Somerset

St Peter's Church, Evercreech, Somerset

On or before 13 Mar 1596 Ralph Hopton 1st Baron Hopton 1596-1652 was born to Robert Hopton of Witham 1575-1638 (21). He was baptised 13 Mar 1596 at St Peter's Church.

Farleigh Hungerford

Fiddington, Somerset

On 08 Dec 1921 Edgar Clifford Arundell 14th Baron Arundel Wardour 1859-1921 (61) died at Fiddington. On 08 Dec 1921 His brother Gerald Arthur Arundell 15th Baron Arundel Wardour 1861-1939 (59) succeeded 15th Baron Arundel Wardour in Wiltshire.

Fivehead, Somerset

Swell Court Fivehead, Somerset

After 1758 Thomas Grosvenor 1734-1795 lived at Swell Court Fivehead.

Freshford, Somerset

The River Frome rises 3km south-west of Witham Friary after which it flows past Tytherinton then through Frome, past Farleigh Hungerford Castle before joining the River Avon at Freshford.

Frome, Somerset

On 11 Jul 1797 Francis Close Dean Carlisle 1797-1882 was born in Frome.

The River Frome rises 3km south-west of Witham Friary after which it flows past Tytherinton then through Frome, past Farleigh Hungerford Castle before joining the River Avon at Freshford.

Church of St John the Baptist Frome, Somerset

On 19 Mar 1711 Thomas Ken Bishop 1637-1711 (73) died. He was buried in Church of St John the Baptist Frome.

Glastonbury

Hache, Somerset

On 25 Aug 1339 Henry Cobham 1st Baron Cobham 1260-1339 (79) died at Hache. His son John Cobham 2nd Baron Cobham 1285-1355 (54) succeeded 2nd Baron Cobham. Agnes Stone Baroness Cobham by marriage Baroness Cobham.

Hatch Beauchamp

Henstridge Bowden, Somerset

The River Yeo rises near Henstridge Bowden then flows south-west past Sherbourne before flowing north past Yeovil and Ilchester joing the River Parrett 1km south-east of Langport.

Hinton St George, Somerset

Around 1407 John Paulett 1407- was born to Thomas Paulett 1378-1407 (29) at Hinton St George.

Around 1456 Alice Paulett 1456-1525 was born to William Paulett 1405-1488 (51) at Hinton St George.

In or before 1509 Hugh Paulett 1509-1573 was born to Amyas Paulett 1457-1538 (52) and Laura Kellaway 1463- (46) at Hinton St George.

Around 1577 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted a portrait of Amyas Paulett 1457-1538.

Around 1533 Amias Paulett Courtier 1533-1588 was born to Hugh Paulett 1509-1573 (24) and Philippa Pollard at Hinton St George.

In 1562 Anthony Paulett 1562-1600 was born to Amias Paulett Courtier 1533-1588 (29) at Hinton St George.

On 06 Dec 1573 Hugh Paulett 1509-1573 (64) died at Hinton St George.

On 26 Sep 1588 Amias Paulett Courtier 1533-1588 (55) died at Hinton St George.

Church of St George Hinton St George, Somerset

Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

The Letter Books of Amias Paulet Keeper of Mary queen of Scots Published 1874 Marys Execution. Execution of Mary Queen of Scots. The inventory of the property of the Queen of Scots (44), alluded to in the foregoing letter, is printed in Prince Labanoff's collection, in which it occupies more than twenty pages. Poulet (54) compiled it by summoning Mary's servants before him, and requesting each of them to give him a written note of all that the Queen (44) had given them. A comparison of this inventory, made after Mary's death, with a former one, dated June 13, 1586, which Prince Labanoff found amongst M. de Chateauneuf's papers enables us to see that Mr. Froude has been led into a curious error respecting Mary Stuart's dress at the scaffold by the anonymous writer whose account he follows in preference to the narratives drawn up by responsible witnesses. It may seem to be of little importance, but as Mr. Froude has chosen to represent the last moments of Mary's life as "brilliant acting throughout," he should at least have been accurate in his details. He even goes so far as to say that she was deprived of the assistance of her chaplain for "fear of some religious melodrame." As to her dress, he says, "She stood on the black scaffold with the black figures all around her, blood-red from head to foot. Her reasons for adopting so extraordinary a costume must be left to conjecture. It is only certain that it must have been carefully studied, and that the pictorial effect must have been appalling." And he quotes from the Vray Rapport the words, "Ainsy fut executee toute en rouge. [Translation: So was executed all in red.]".
The rouge was not " blood-red," but a dark red brown. Blackwood says that she wore, with a pourpoint or bodice of black satin, "une Juppe de vellours cramoisi brun," and the narrative called La Mort de la Royne d'Escosse says the same. There it is in the June inventory, "Une juppe de velloux cramoisy brun, bandee de passement noir, doublee de taffetas de couleur brune." In the inventory taken after her death it is wanting. As it happens, if she had wished to be "blood-red," she might have been so, for in the wardrobe there was "satin figure incarnat," " escarlate," and " satin incarnate." These figure both in the June and February inventories. When she was dressed "le plus proprement qu'elle put et mieux que de coutume," she said to her maids of honour, "Mes amies, je vous eusse laisse plustost cet accoustrement que celui d'hier, sinon qu'il faut que j'aille a la mort un peu honnorablement, et que j'aye quelque chose plus que le commun." "La tragedie finie," continues Blackwood, " les pauvres damoiselles, soigneuses de rhonneur de leur maistresse s'adresserent a Paulet son gardien, et le prierent que le bourreau ne touchast plus au corps de sa Majeste, et qu'il leur fust permis de la despouiller, apres que le monde seroit retire, afin qu'aucune indignite ne fust faitte au corps, promettant de luy rendre la despouille, et tout ce qu'il pourroit demander. Mais ce maudict et espou- ventable Cerbere les renvoya fort lourdement, leur commandant de sortir de la salle. Cependant le bourreau la dechausse, et la manie a sa discretion. Apres qu'il eust fait tout ce qu'il voulust, le corps fut porte en une chambre joignante celle de ces serviteurs, bien fermee de peur qu'ils n'y entrassent pour luy rendre leurs debvoirs. Ce qui augmenta grandement leur ennuy, ils la voyoient par le trou de la serrure demy couverte d'un morceau de drop de bure qu'on avoit arrache de la table du billard, dont nous avous parle cy dessus, et prioyent Dieu a la porte, dont Paulet (54) s'appercevant fist boucher le trou.".
The executioner snatched from her hand the little gold cross that she took from her neck. "Sa Majeste osta hors de son col line croix d'or, qu'elle vouloit bailler a mie de ses filles, disant au maistre d'oeuvres, Mon amy, cecy n'est pas k vostre usage, laissez la a cette damoiselle elle vous baillera en Argent plus qu'elle ne vaut; il luy arracha d'entre les mains fort rudement, disant, C'est mon droit. C'eust este merveille qu'elle eust trouve courtoisie en un bourreau Anglois, qui ne I'avoit jamais sceu trouver entre les plus honestes du pais, sinon tant qu'ils en pouvoient tirer de profit." It was worthy of Poulet (54) to insist that, even though everything Mary wore was to be burnt and the headsman was to lose his perquisites lest he should sell them for relics, it was to be by his hands that they should be taken from the person of his victim.
Several narratives of the execution exist. The most complete, attributed to Bourgoin, is printed in Jebb. Sir H. Ellis and Robertson print the official report of the Commissioners. Then there is Chateauneuf's Report to Henry III., February 27, 1587, N.S., in Teulet, and a narrative drawn up for Burghley by R. W. (Richard Wigmore). Blackwood also furnishes an interesting and trustworthy description. The anonymous Vray Rapport will be found in Teulet. Mr. Froude appears to have selected it, partly because it was possible to expand the Realistic description of the dissevered head, and in particular the inevitable contraction of the features, into the gross and pitiless caricature which he permits himself of the poor wreck of humanity; partly too, because the Vray Rapport, in direct contradiction to the other accounts, supports his assertion that Mary was "dreadfully agitated" on receiving the message of death from the two Earls. To convey the impression that the writer was bodily present on that occasion, Mr. Froude introduces him as "evidently an eye-witness, one of the Queen of Scots' (44) own attendants, probably her surgeon." But the narrative shows us that the writer, whoever he was, could not have been one of Mary's attendants, nor even acquainted with them, for he designates the two ladies who assisted their mistress at the scaffold as "deux damoiselles, I'une Francoise nommee damoiselle Ramete, et l'autre Escossoise, qui avait nom Ersex." There were no such names in Mary's household. The two ladies were both Scottish, Jane Kennedy and Elspeth Curie, Gilbert Curle's sister. Mr. Froude says, "Barbara Mowbray bound her eyes with a handkerchief." It was Jane Kennedy who performed for her this last service.
Poulet's (54) inventory, amongst other things, contains the following entry: "Memorandum that the Priest claimeth as of the said late Queen's gift, a silver chalice with a cover, two silver cruets, four images, the one of our Lady in red coral, with divers other vestments and necessaries belonging to a Massing Priest." When the scaffold had been taken away, the Priest was allowed to leave his room and join the rest of the household. On the morning after the execution he said Mass for Mary's soul; but on the afternoon of that day Melville and Bourgoin were sent for by Poulet, who gave orders that the altar should be taken down, and demanded an oath that Mass should not be said again. Melville excused himself as he was a Protestant and not concerned; the physician stoutly refused. Poulet (54) sent for the Priest, and required the coffer in which the vestments were kept to be brought to him. Du Preau, who was evidently a timid man, took the oath that Poulet (54) insisted on, little thinking that he was pledging himself for six months. "II jura sur la bible de ne faire aucune office de religion, craignant d'estre resserre en prison.".
The household of the late Queen (44) were not allowed to depart as soon as Poulet (54) expected. They were detained at Fotheringay, from motives of policy, till the 3rd of August, when the funeral of their mistress having been at last performed, they were set free. Some of them were taken to Peterborough to accompany the corpse and to be present at the funeral ceremonies on the 1st of August. Amongst them, in the order of the procession, it is surprising to find Mary's chaplain, "Monsieur du Preau, aumosnier, en long manteau, portant une croix d'Argent en main." The account of the funeral from which this is taken, written by one of the late Queen's (44) household, takes care to mention that when they reached the choir of Peterborough Minster, and the choristers began "a chanter a leur fagon en langage Anglois," they all, with the exception of Andrew Melville and Barbara Mowbray, left the church and walked in the cloisters till the service was finished. "Si les Anglois," he says, "et principalement le Roy des heraux ... estoit en extreme cholere, d'autant estoient joieux et contents les Catholiques.".
Poulet left for London, and as long as Mary's servants were detained at Fotheringay, he seems to have retained jurisdiction over them. It was to him, therefore, that Melville and Bourgoin applied in March for leave to sell their horses and to write into France respecting the bequests made to them by the Queen of Scots; and to him that Darrell forwarded in June "the petition of the whole household and servants of the late Queen of Scotland remaining at Fotheringay," begging to be released from their prison and to be allowed to leave the country.
Poulet (54), as has already been said, was made Chancellor of the Garter in April, 1587, but he did not retain this preferment for a whole year. He continued in the Captaincy of Jersey up to his death, but he appears to have resided in and near London. In the British Museum are two letters from him of small importance. One, addressed to the Lord High Admiral, is dated, "From my poor lodging in Fleet Street, the 14th of January, 1587," about "right of tenths in Jersey, belonging to the Government." The other, "From my little lodge at Twickenham, the 24th of April, 1588," "on behalf of Berry," whose divorce was referred by the Justices of the Common Pleas to four Doctors of the Civil Law, of whom Mr. Doctor Caesar, Judge of the Admiralty, to whom the letter was written, was one.
His name also occurs in a letter, from Walsingham to Burghley, dated May 23, 1587, while Elizabeth still kept up the farce of Burghley's disgrace for despatching Mary Stuart's death-warrant. "Touching the Chancellorship of the Duchy, she told Sir Amias Poulet that in respect of her promise made unto me, she would not dispose of it otherwise. But yet hath he no power to deliver the seals unto me, though for that purpose the Attorney is commanded to attend him, who I suppose will be dismissed hence this day with- out any resolution." And on the 4th of January following, together with the other lords of the Council, he signed a letter addressed by the Privy Council to the Lord Admiral and to Lord Buckhurst, the Lieutenants of Sussex, against such Catholics as "most obstinately have refused to come to the church to prayers and divine service," requiring them to " cause the most obstinate and noted persons to be committed to such prisons as are fittest for their safe keeping: the rest that are of value, and not so obstinate, are to be referred to the custody of some -ecclesiastical persons and other gentlemen well affected, to remain at the charges of the recusant, to be restrained in such sort as they may be forthcoming, and kept from intelligence with one another." On the 26th of September, in the year in which this letter was written, 1588, Sir Amias Poulet died.
Poulet was buried in St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London.When that church was pulled down to be rebuilt, his remains, with the handsome. Monument erected over them, were removed to the parish church of Hinton St. George. After various panegyrics in Latin, French, and English inscribed on his. Monument, a quatrain, expressive apparently of royal favour, pays the following tribute to the service rendered by him to the State as Keeper of the Queen of Scots: Never shall cease to spread wise Poulet's fame; These will speak, and men shall blush for shame: Without offence to speak what I do know, Great is the debt England to him doth owe.

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Around 1559 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587.Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587.In 1576. After Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots 1542-1587.

Holford, Somerset

On 14 Jul 1591 Hugh Cholmondeley 1591-1665 was born to Hugh "The Younger" Cholmondeley 1552-1601 (39) and Mary Holford 1562-1625 (29) at Holford.

Ilchester, Somerset

1085 Doomsday Book

In 1086 the name Ilchester is first used in the 1085 Doomsday Book where it appears as Givelcestre meaning 'Roman fort on the River Yeo'.

In the Roman period, Ilchester was named Lindinis and was the site of a fort and then a town on the Fosse Way. It eventually served as one of two regional capitals for the Durotriges tribe.

Fosse Way 5a Axmouth to Ilchester. The Fosse Way starts in Seaton and/or Axmouth after which it travels north through Musbury to Axminster where crosses the Exeter to Dorchester Roman Road. From Axminster the Fosse Way continues through Chard, Dinnington, Yeabridge to Lindinis aka Ilchester.

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

The River Yeo rises near Henstridge Bowden then flows south-west past Sherbourne before flowing north past Yeovil and Ilchester joing the River Parrett 1km south-east of Langport.

Illubruar Manor, Somerset

In 1484 Edward Redman Lord Harewood 1455-1510 (29) was awarded the manor at Illubruar Manor.

Ilton, Somerset

Merryfield Ilton, Somerset

In 1531 Nicholas Wadham 1531-1609 was born to John Wadham -1578 at Merryfield Ilton.

Keyford, Somerset

Trial and Execution of Ankarette Twynyho

On 12 Apr 1477 Ankarette Twynyho -1477 was arrested at Keyford and taken to Bath.

Keynsham, Somerset

In 1847 Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861 (49) was declared bankrupt with debts of over a million pounds. He was required to sell his estate in Keynsham, Avington Park Itchen Valley Winchester and the contents of Stowe House in 1848.

Before 01 Jun 1831. John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861.

Kingsbury, Somerset

Kingsbury is a village in Somerset. Episcopi, meaning Bishop, refers to it having been owned by the Bishop of Bath and Wells.

The River Parrett rises in the hills around Chedington after which it flows broadly north past Kingsbury, Muchelney, through Langport, then north-west through Bridgwater before joining the Severn Estuary.

Kilmersdon, Somerset

Walton Kilmersdon, Somerset

On 20 Feb 1389 William Botreaux 3rd Baron Botreaux 1389-1462 was born to William Botreaux 2nd Baron Botreaux 1367-1395 (22) and Elizabeth St Lo Baroness Botreaux 1364-1389 (25) at Walton Kilmersdon.

Langport, Somerset

Battle of Lanport

On 10 Jul 1645 the Battle of Lanport was fought at Langport.
Charles Goring 2nd Earl Norwich 1615-1671 (30) was Colonel of a Regiment of Horse.

The River Parrett rises in the hills around Chedington after which it flows broadly north past Kingsbury, Muchelney, through Langport, then north-west through Bridgwater before joining the Severn Estuary.

The River Yeo rises near Henstridge Bowden then flows south-west past Sherbourne before flowing north past Yeovil and Ilchester joing the River Parrett 1km south-east of Langport.

Lansdown, Somerset

On 12 Mar 1716 Georgiana Caroline Carteret 1716-1780 was born to John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763 (25) and Frances Worsley Countess Granville 1693-1743 (23) at Lansdown.

In 1739 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763.

Lillesdon, Somerset

Around 1290 Hugh Beauchamp 1290-1338 was born to Humphrey Beauchamp 1253-1317 (36) at Lillesdon.

In Jun 1338 Hugh Beauchamp 1290-1338 (48) died at Lillesdon.

On 08 Feb 1443 Alice Beauchamp Baroness Sudeley 1366-1443 (77) died at Lillesdon.

Litton, Somerset

The River Chew rises near Chewton Mendip then flows north past Litton, through reservoirs and lakes to Chew Magna, Pensford, Compton Dando joining the River Avon at Keynsham.

Low Ham, Somerset

On 29 Feb 1624 Edward Hext 1550-1624 (74) died at Low Ham.

On 08 Aug 1689 Ralph Stawell 1st Baron Stawell 1641-1689 (48) died at Low Ham. His son John Stawell 2nd Baron Stawell 1669-1692 (20) succeeded 2nd Baron Stawell of Somerton in Somerset 1C 1683. Margaret Cecil Countess Ranelagh 1672-1728 (17) by marriage Baroness Stawell of Somerton in Somerset.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Margaret Cecil Countess Ranelagh 1672-1728. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Mark, Somerset

Southwich House Mark, Somerset

On 26 Oct 1808 John Allen Giles Historian 1808-1884 was born to William Giles and Sophia Allen at Southwich House Mark.

Mells, Somerset

Midsomer Norton, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Montacute

Muchelney, Somerset

The River Parrett rises in the hills around Chedington after which it flows broadly north past Kingsbury, Muchelney, through Langport, then north-west through Bridgwater before joining the Severn Estuary.

Nether Stowey, Somerset

In 1155 Simon Valletort 1155-1199 was born at Nether Stowey.

In 1398 Margaret Tuchet 1398-1438 was born to John Tuchet 4th Baron Audley Heighley 1371-1408 (26) and Elizabeth Stafford Baroness Audley Heighley in Nether Stowey.

Nettlecombe, Somerset

St Mary's Church Nettlecombe, Somerset

Before 28 Nov 1689 Mary Willoughby Lady Trevelyan -1689 died. She was buried at St Mary's Church Nettlecombe.

Newton St Loe, Somerset

In 1347 Margaret Clivedon 1347-1411 was born to John Clivedon 1322-1348 (25) at Newton St Loe.

Around 1550 Edward Neville 8th Baron Bergavenny 1550-1622 was born to Edward Neville 7th Baron Bergavenny 1526-1588 (24) and Katherine Brome Baroness Bergavenny at Newton St Loe.

Around 1584 Christopher Neville 1584-1649 was born to Edward Neville 8th Baron Bergavenny 1550-1622 (34) and Rachel Lennard Baroness Bergavenny 1553-1616 (31) at Newton St Loe.

Around 1590 Mary Neville 1590-1648 was born to Edward Neville 8th Baron Bergavenny 1550-1622 (40) and Rachel Lennard Baroness Bergavenny 1553-1616 (37) at Newton St Loe.

Richard Neville -1643 was born to Christopher Neville 1584-1649 and Mary Darcy 1580- at Newton St Loe.

Northover, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

North Cadbury, Somerset

On 14 Jun 1596 Maud aka Magdelan Longford -1596 died at North Cadbury.

Church of St Michael North Cadbury, Somerset

On 16 May 1462 William Botreaux 3rd Baron Botreaux 1389-1462 (73) died. He was buried at Church of St Michael North Cadbury.

North Curry, Somerset

Calmady House North Curry, Somerset

On 03 May 1948 Reverend George Edmund Warlow 1864-1948 (84) died at Calmady House North Curry.

North Petherton, Somerset

Huntworth North Petherton, Somerset

In 1531 John Popham Lord Chief Justice 1531-1607 was born in Huntworth North Petherton.

Norton-St-Philip, Somerset

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 June 1668. 12 Jun 1668. Friday. Up, finding our beds good, but lousy; which made us merry. We set out, the reckoning and servants coming to 9s. 6d.; my guide thither, 2s.; coachman, advanced, 10s. So rode a very good way, led to my great content by our landlord to Philips-Norton, with great pleasure, being now come into Somersetshire; where my wife and Deb. mightily joyed thereat1, I commending the country, as indeed it deserves. And the first town we came to was Brekington, where, we stopping for something for the horses, we called two or three little boys to us, and pleased ourselves with their manner of speech, and did make one of them kiss Deb., and another say the Lord's Prayer (hallowed be thy kingdom come). At Philips-Norton I walked to the Church, and there saw a very ancient tomb of some Knight Templar, I think; and here saw the tombstone whereon there were only two heads cut, which, the story goes, and credibly, were two sisters, called the Fair Maids of Foscott, that had two bodies upward and one belly, and there lie buried. Here is also a very fine ring of six bells, and they mighty tuneable. Having dined very well, 10s., we come before night to the Bath; where I presently stepped out with my landlord, and saw the baths, with people in them. They are not so large as I expected, but yet pleasant; and the town most of stone, and clean, though the streets generally narrow. I home, and being weary, went to bed without supper; the rest supping.
Note 1. They were natives of that county.-B.

Nunney, Somerset

On 27 Nov 1442 Constance Poynings 1408-1442 (34) died at Nunney.

Nunney Castle, Somerset

Around 1400 John Paulet 1400-1436 was born to William Paulet 1368-1435 (31) at Nunney Castle.

Around 1408 Constance Poynings 1408-1442 was born to Hugh Poynings 1370-1426 (38) and Eleanor Welles 1387- (21) at Nunney Castle.

Around 1430 William Paulett 1430-1443 was born to John Paulet 1400-1436 (30) and Constance Poynings 1408-1442 (22) at Nunney Castle.

Orchard Portman, Somerset

Around 1613 Anne Portman Baroness Seymour 1613-1695 was born to John Portman 1st Baronet Portman 1575-1612 (38) in Orchard Portman.

Joan Portman was born to John Portman 1st Baronet Portman 1575-1612 in Orchard Portman.

Over Stowey, Somerset

On 15 Aug 1798 Henry Labouchere 1st Baron Taunton 1798-1869 was born at Over Stowey.

On 13 Jul 1869 Henry Labouchere 1st Baron Taunton 1798-1869 (70) died at Belgrave Square Belgravia. He was buried at Over Stowey.

Paulet, Somerset

Melcomb Paulet, Somerset

On 20 Jul 1368 William Paulet 1368-1435 was born to John Paulett 1354-1391 (14) at Melcomb Paulet.

On 17 Aug 1435 William Paulet 1368-1435 (67) died at Melcomb Paulet.

Peasdown, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Pensford, Somerset

The River Chew rises near Chewton Mendip then flows north past Litton, through reservoirs and lakes to Chew Magna, Pensford, Compton Dando joining the River Avon at Keynsham.

Pitminster, Somerset

Before 09 Apr 1588 Anne Thynne 1550-1588 died. She was buried on 09 Apr 1588 at Pitminster.

Podimore Roundabout, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Porlock, Somerset

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 917. This year came a great naval armament over hither south from the Lidwiccians; (40) and two earls with it, Ohter and Rhoald. They went then west about, till they entered the mouth of the Severn; and plundered in North-Wales everywhere by the sea, where it then suited them; and took Camlac the bishop in Archenfield, and led him with them to their ships; whom King Edward (43) afterwards released for forty pounds. After this went the army all up; and would proceed yet on plunder against Archenfield [Note. South and west Herefordshire]; but the men of Hertford [Note. Probably a mistake for Hereforshire] met them, and of Glocester, and of the nighest towns; and fought with them, and put them to flight; and they slew the Earl Rhoald, and the brother of Ohter the other earl, and many of the army. And they drove them into a park; and beset them there without, until they gave them hostages, that they would depart from the realm of King Edward (43). And the king had contrived that a guard should be set against them on the south side of Severnmouth; west from Wales, eastward to the mouth of the Avon; so that they durst nowhere seek that land on that side. Nevertheless, they eluded them at night, by stealing up twice; at one time to the east of Watchet, and at another time at Porlock. There was a great slaughter each time; so that few of them came away, except those only who swam out to the ships. Then sat they outward on an island, called the Flat-holms; till they were very short of meat, and many men died of hunger, because they could not reach any meat. Thence went they to Dimmet [Note. Possibly Braunton], and then out to Ireland. This was in harvest. After this, in the same year, before Martinmas, went King Edward (43) to Buckingham with his army, and sat there four weeks, during which he built the two forts on either side of the water, ere he departed thence. And Earl Thurkytel sought him for his lord; and all the captains, and almost all the first men that belonged to Bedford; and also many of those that belonged to Northampton. This year Ethelfleda, lady of the Mercians (47), with the help of God, before Laminas, conquered the town called Derby, with all that thereto belonged; and there were also slain four of her thanes, that were most dear to her, within the gates.
40. The pirates of Armorica, now Bretagne; so called, because they abode day and night in their ships; from lid, a ship, and wiccian, to watch or abide day and night.

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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1052. At this time Griffin, the Welsh king, plundered in Herefordshire till he came very nigh to Leominster; and they gathered against him both the landsmen and the Frenchmen from the castle; and there were slain very many good men of the English, and also of the French. This was on the same day thirteen years after that Edwin was slain with his companions. In the same year advised the king and his council, that ships should be sent out to Sandwich, and that Earl Ralph and Earl Odda (59) should be appointed headmen thereto. Then went Earl Godwin (51) out from Bruges with his ships to Ysendyck; and sailed forth one day before midsummer-eve, till he came to the Ness that is to the south of Romney. When it came to the knowledge of the earls out at Sandwich, they went out after the other ships; and a land-force was also ordered out against the ships. Meanwhile Earl Godwin (51) had warning, and betook himself into Pevensey: and the weather was so boisterous, that the earls could not learn what had become of Earl Godwin. But Earl Godwin then went out again until he came back to Bruges; and the other ships returned back again to Sandwich. Then it was advised that the ships should go back again to London, and that other earls and other pilots should be appointed over them. But it was delayed so long that the marine army all deserted; and they all betook themselves home. When Earl Godwin (51) understood that, he drew up his sail and his ship: and they (70) went west at once to the Isle of Wight; and landing there, they plundered so long that the people gave them as much as they required of them. Then proceeded they westward until they came to Portland, where they landed and did as much harm as they could possibly do. Meanwhile Harold (30) had gone out from Ireland with nine ships, and came up at Porlock with his ships to the mouth of the Severn, near the boundaries of Somerset and Devonshire, and there plundered much. The land-folk collected against him, both from Somerset and from Devonshire: but he put them to flight, and slew there more than thirty good thanes, besides others; and went soon after about Penwithstert [Note. Possibly Plymouth], where was much people gathered against him; but he spared not to provide himself with meat, and went up and slew on the spot a great number of the people—seizing in cattle, in men, and in money, whatever he could. Then went he eastward to his father; and they went both together eastward (71) until they came to the Isle of Wight, where they seized whatever had been left them before. Thence they went to Pevensey, and got out with them as many ships as had gone in there, and so proceeded forth till they came to the Ness; (72) getting all the ships that were at Romney, and at Hithe, and at Folkstone. Then ordered King Edward (49) to fit out forty smacks that lay at Sandwich many weeks, to watch Earl Godwin (51), who was at Bruges during the winter; but he nevertheless came hither first to land, so as to escape their notice. And whilst he abode in this land, he enticed to him all the Kentish men, and all the boatmen from Hastings, and everywhere thereabout by the sea-coast, and all the men of Essex and Sussex and Surrey, and many others besides. Then said they all that they would with him live or die. When the fleet that lay at Sandwich had intelligence about Godwin's expedition, they set sail after him; but he escaped them, and betook himself wherever he might: and the fleet returned to Sandwich, and so homeward to London. When Godwin understood that the fleet that lay at Sandwich was gone home, then went he back again to the Isle of Wight, and lay thereabout by the sea-coast so long that they came together—he and his son Earl Harold. But they did no great harm after they came together; save that they took meat, and enticed to them all the land-folk by the sea-coast and also upward in the land. And they proceeded toward Sandwich, ever alluring forth with them all the boatmen that they met; and to Sandwich they came with an increasing army. They then steered eastward round to Dover, and landing there, took as many ships and hostages as they chose, and so returned to Sandwich, where they did the same; and men everywhere gave them hostages and provisions, wherever they required them.
70 i.e. Earl Godwin and his crew.
71 i.e. from the Isle of Portland; where Godwin had landed after the plunder of the Isle of Wight.
72 i.e. Dungeness; where they collected all the ships stationed in the great bay formed by the ports of Romney, Hithe, and Folkstone.

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Portbury, Somerset

Portbury Church Portbury, Somerset

On 05 Dec 1314 Eva Zouche 1281-1314 (33) died. She was buried at Portbury Church Portbury.

Pylle, Somerset

On 26 May 1709 Henry William Berkeley Portman 1709-1761 was born to William Berkeley aka Portman 1681-1737 (28) in Pylle.

Queen Camel, Somerset

On 12 Oct 1772 Edith Phelips 1694-1772 (78) died in Queen Camel. She was buried in Church of St Barnabus Queen Camel.

In 1736 Enoch "The Younger" Seeman Painter 1694-1744. Portrait of Edith Phelips 1694-1772.Around 1750 Andrea Soldi Painter 1703-1771. Portrait of Edith Phelips 1694-1772.

Church of St Barnabus Queen Camel, Somerset

On 12 Oct 1772 Edith Phelips 1694-1772 (78) died in Queen Camel. She was buried in Church of St Barnabus Queen Camel.

Redlynch, Somerset

On 10 Apr 1635 Helena Snakenbourg Marchioness Northampton 1549-1635 (86) died at Redlynch.

In 1672 Stephen Fox Paymaster 1627-1716 (44) bought the manor of Redlynch.

Before 1725. John James Baker Painter -1725. Portrait of Stephen Fox Paymaster 1627-1716.

Rode, Somerset

In 1354 John Paulett 1354-1391 was born at Rode.

On 28 Nov 1391 John Paulett 1354-1391 (37) died at Rode.

Rodney Stoke, Somerset

Around 1416 Walter Rodney 1416-1467 was born to John Rodney -1417 and Agnes St John at Rodney Stoke.

Seaborough, Somerset

Around 1315 Isabel Zouche 1315-1350 was born to William Zouche 1st Baron Zouche Harringworth 1276-1352 (38) and Maud Lovell Baroness Zouche Harringworth 1280-1346 (35) at Seaborough.

Shepton Montacute, Somerset

Around 1213 William Montagu 1213-1270 was born at Shepton Montacute.

Solsbury Hill, Somerset

300BC. Solsbury Hill is a 191m hill overlooking Bath on which an Iron Age Univallate Hill Fort, occupied between 300BC and 100BC, is located.

In 1977 musician Peter Gabriel 1950- (26) released Solsbury Hill as his first solo single.

Fosse Way 5c Bath to Cirencester. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road where it curves around Solsbury Hill to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone, Fosse Gate, crossing the River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey before reaching the Cotswold Airport after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester.

Somerton, Somerset

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 700-749. 733. This year Ethelbald took Somerton; the sun was eclipsed; and Acca (73) was driven from his bishopric.

South Petherton, Somerset

In 1220 Ralph D'Aubigny 1173-1220 (47) died at South Petherton.

In 1424 William Daubeney 1424-1460 was born to Giles Daubeney 1393-1446 (31) at South Petherton.

Before 1436 Joan Darcy 1398-1435 died at South Petherton.

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 29 Apr 1461. Durham. Grant to Cecilia, late wife of Thomas Kyriell 1396-1461 (65), knight, and executrix of his will, during the minority of Giles (9) the son and heir of William Daubeney 1424-1460 (37) late of Southpederton, co Somerset, esquire, deceased, of all the possessions of the latter, with the custody and marriage of the heir, saving to Alice (29) the late wife of the said William her reaonsable dower. If the heir dire during the minority she hsall have the same during the minority of the next heir, and so on. By p.s.

Stogumber, Somerset

In 1574 Samuel Dashwood 1574-1638 was born at Stogumber.

In 1638 Samuel Dashwood 1574-1638 (64) died at Stogumber.

In 1759 Robert Dashwood 1665-1759 (94) died at Stogumber.

Stoke sub Hambdon, Somerset

On 04 Oct 1306 John Beauchamp 2nd Baron Beauchamp Somerset 1306-1343 was born to John Beauchamp 1st Baron Beauchamp Somerset 1274-1336 (32) and Joan Cheduit Baroness Beauchamp Somerset at Stoke sub Hambdon.

On 29 Jan 1330 John Beauchamp 3rd Baron Beauchamp Somerset 1330-1361 was born to John Beauchamp 2nd Baron Beauchamp Somerset 1306-1343 (23) and Margaret St John Baroness Beauchamp Somerset 1304-1361 (26) at Stoke sub Hambdon.

Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Sydenham, Somerset

Around 1200 William Sydenham 1200-1233 was born at Sydenham.

In 1846 Alexander Dalton Cockburn 1846-1887 was born to Alexander Cockburn 1802-1880 (43) at Sydenham.

Three Shires Stone, Somerset

Three Shires Stone is three blocks of limestone, each dated 1736 and with the initial of one of the three counties, with a large cap, mark where the historical counties of Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset meet. Each stone is approximately 9–12 feet in height and weighs four to five tons, with the cap being of a similar size and weight.

Fosse Way 5c Bath to Cirencester. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road where it curves around Solsbury Hill to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone, Fosse Gate, crossing the River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey before reaching the Cotswold Airport after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester.

Tytherinton, Somerset

The River Frome rises 3km south-west of Witham Friary after which it flows past Tytherinton then through Frome, past Farleigh Hungerford Castle before joining the River Avon at Freshford.

Watchet, Somerset

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 917. This year came a great naval armament over hither south from the Lidwiccians; (40) and two earls with it, Ohter and Rhoald. They went then west about, till they entered the mouth of the Severn; and plundered in North-Wales everywhere by the sea, where it then suited them; and took Camlac the bishop in Archenfield, and led him with them to their ships; whom King Edward (43) afterwards released for forty pounds. After this went the army all up; and would proceed yet on plunder against Archenfield [Note. South and west Herefordshire]; but the men of Hertford [Note. Probably a mistake for Hereforshire] met them, and of Glocester, and of the nighest towns; and fought with them, and put them to flight; and they slew the Earl Rhoald, and the brother of Ohter the other earl, and many of the army. And they drove them into a park; and beset them there without, until they gave them hostages, that they would depart from the realm of King Edward (43). And the king had contrived that a guard should be set against them on the south side of Severnmouth; west from Wales, eastward to the mouth of the Avon; so that they durst nowhere seek that land on that side. Nevertheless, they eluded them at night, by stealing up twice; at one time to the east of Watchet, and at another time at Porlock. There was a great slaughter each time; so that few of them came away, except those only who swam out to the ships. Then sat they outward on an island, called the Flat-holms; till they were very short of meat, and many men died of hunger, because they could not reach any meat. Thence went they to Dimmet [Note. Possibly Braunton], and then out to Ireland. This was in harvest. After this, in the same year, before Martinmas, went King Edward (43) to Buckingham with his army, and sat there four weeks, during which he built the two forts on either side of the water, ere he departed thence. And Earl Thurkytel sought him for his lord; and all the captains, and almost all the first men that belonged to Bedford; and also many of those that belonged to Northampton. This year Ethelfleda, lady of the Mercians (47), with the help of God, before Laminas, conquered the town called Derby, with all that thereto belonged; and there were also slain four of her thanes, that were most dear to her, within the gates.
40. The pirates of Armorica, now Bretagne; so called, because they abode day and night in their ships; from lid, a ship, and wiccian, to watch or abide day and night.

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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 987. This year was the port of Watchet plundered.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 997. This year went the army about Devonshire into Severn-mouth, and equally plundered the people of Cornwall, North-Wales, (50) and Devon. Then went they up at Watchet, and there much evil wrought in burning and manslaughter. Afterwards they coasted back about Penwithstert on the south side, and, turning into the mouth of the Tamer, went up till they came to Liddyford, burning and slaying everything that they met. Moreover, Ordulf's minster at Tavistock they burned to the ground, and brought to their ships incalculable plunder. This year Archbishop Elfric went to Rome after his staff.
50. Not the present district so-called, but all that north of the Sea of Severn, as opposed to West-Wales, another name for Cornwall.

Orchard Wyndham Watchet, Somerset

In 1558 John Wyndham of Orchard 1558-1645 was born to John Wyndham 1516-1572 (42) and Florence Wadham 1538-1596 (20) at Orchard Wyndham Watchet.

In 1602 Hugh Wyndham Baron of the Exchequer 1602-1684 was born to John Wyndham of Orchard 1558-1645 (44) and Joan Portman in Orchard Wyndham Watchet.

On 29 Oct 1609 Judge Wadham Wyndham 1609-1668 was born to John Wyndham of Orchard 1558-1645 (51) and Joan Portman in Orchard Wyndham Watchet.

Saint Decumans Watchet, Somerset

In 1572 John Wyndham 1516-1572 (56) died at Saint Decumans Watchet.

Wells, Somerset

On 14 Jan 1465 Bishop Thomas Beckington 1390-1465 (75) died at Wells.

1497 Cornish Rebellion

Around Apr 1497 Cornish rose in rebellion against taxes being raised by Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (40) to support his wars against Scotland and against changes to the operation and privileges of the Cornish tin mining industry. The rebel army of 15,000 sought to replace Henry's ministers who they saw as responsible for the taxation: Cardinal John Morton 1420-1500 (77) and Reginald Bray 1440-1503 (57), the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. The army travelled from Cornwall through Devon and Somerset attempting, unsuccessfully, to recruit more men. At Wells they were joined by James Tuchet 7th Baron Audley Heighley 1463-1497 (34) who took on command. The rebel army then travelled through Salisbury and Winchester.
When Henry became aware of the rebel army he diverted his main army led by Giles Daubeney 1st Baron Daubeney 1451-1508 (45) to meet the rebels. Daubeny's army camped at Hounslow Heath on 13 Jun 1497.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1590 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 was born in Wells.

On 17 Feb 1734 Robert Creighton 1639-1734 (95) died at Wells.

Bishop's Palace Wells, Somerset

In 1703 Richard Kidder Bishop 1633-1703 (70) was killed accidentally when a chimney from the Bishop's Palace Wells fell on him and his wife whilst they were in bed during the 1703 Great Storm.

Wellsway, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

West Bradley, Somerset

After 1594 Leonor Foix 1547-1594 died at West Bradley.

Williton, Somerset

St Decumans Williton, Somerset

On 19 Nov 1696 Frances Hungerford 1635-1696 (61) died at St Decumans Williton.

Wincanton, Somerset

On 31 Jan 1350 Isabel Zouche 1315-1350 (35) died at Wincanton.

Witham Friary, Somerset

On 19 May 1400 John Stourton 1st Baron Stourton 1400-1462 was born to William Stourton 1373-1413 (27) at Witham Friary.

The River Frome rises 3km south-west of Witham Friary after which it flows past Tytherinton then through Frome, past Farleigh Hungerford Castle before joining the River Avon at Freshford.

Wraxall, Somerset

Around 1454 Edmund Gorges 1454-1512 was born to Walter Gorges 1422-1466 (32) in Wraxall.

In 1474 Anne Howard 1446-1474 (28) died in Wraxall.

On 22 Apr 1512 Edmund Gorges 1454-1512 (58) died in Wraxall.

In 1536 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle 1536-1610 was born to Edward Gorges 1474-1567 (62) and Mary Poyntz 1500-1565 (36) in Wraxall.

In 1537 Edward Gorges 1537-1568 was born to Edmund Gorges -1558 at Wraxall.

In 1629 Ferdinando Gorges 1565-1647 (64) and Elizabeth Gorges 1578-1659 (51) were married at Wraxall. They were first cousins once removed.

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Pye Hill, Wraxall, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Wraxall Hill, Somerset

Fosse Way 5b Ilchester to Bath. From Lindinis aka Ilchester the Fosse Way crosses the River Yeo at Northover, then travels just west of the Podimore Roundabout, to Wraxall where there is a slight deviation to climb Wraxall Hill, and then descend Pye Hill. Then through Cannard's Grave to Beacon's Hill where the Fosse Way is crossed by the Sorviodunum aka Old Sarum to Charterhouse Roman Road. Then through Stratton-on-the-Fosse, Midsomer Norton, Clandown, Peasdown, Dunkerton Bottom, Wellsway, Holloway to the Roman Bridge over the River Avon into Aquae Sulis aka Bath.

Wrington, Somerset

Around 1587 Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645 was born to Thomas Kerr 9th of Ferniehirst 1529-1586 (57) at Wrington.

Around 1628 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (copy from original). Portrait of Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645.

Yeabridge, Somerset

Fosse Way 5a Axmouth to Ilchester. The Fosse Way starts in Seaton and/or Axmouth after which it travels north through Musbury to Axminster where crosses the Exeter to Dorchester Roman Road. From Axminster the Fosse Way continues through Chard, Dinnington, Yeabridge to Lindinis aka Ilchester.

Yeovil, Somerset

The River Yeo rises near Henstridge Bowden then flows south-west past Sherbourne before flowing north past Yeovil and Ilchester joing the River Parrett 1km south-east of Langport.