History of St James'

1665 Great Plague of London

1666 Great Fire of London

1533 Buggery Act

St James' is in Westminster.

Great Plague of London

John Evelyn's Diary 07 September 1665. 07 Sep 1665. Came home, there perishing near 10,000 poor creatures weekly; however, I went all along the city and suburbs from Kent Street to St James', a dismal passage, and dangerous to see so many coffins exposed in the streets, now thin of people; the shops shut up, and all in mournful silence, not knowing whose turn might be next. I went to the Duke of Albemarle (56) for a pest-ship, to wait on our infected men, who were not a few. See Great Plague of London.

On 22 May 1681 Robert Cholmondeley 1st Viscount Cholmondley 1640-1681 (41) died at St James'. His son Hugh Cholmondeley 1st Earl Cholmondeley 1662-1725 (19) succeeded 2nd Viscount Cholmondley of Kells in County Meath.

On 20 Jul 1723 Robert Shirley 6th Earl Ferrers 1723-1787 was born to Laurence Shirley 1693-1743 (29) and Anne Clarges 1695-1782 (28) at St James'.

On 13 May 1737 William Wodehouse 1706-1737 (31) died of smallpox wihout issue. He was buried in St James'.

On 27 Dec 1741 Reginald Courtenay Bishop of Bristol Bishop of Exeter 1741-1803 was born to Henry Reginald Courtenay 1714-1763 (27) and Catherine Bathurst -1783 at St James'.

On 14 Aug 1769 George Chichester 2nd Marquess Donegal 1769-1844 was born to Arthur Chichester 1st Marquess Donegal 1739-1799 (30) and Anne Hamilton Countess Donegal 1738-1780 (31) at St James'.

Around 1780 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of Arthur Chichester 1st Marquess Donegal 1739-1799.

On 21 Dec 1820 Thomas George Lyon Bowes 1801-1834 (19) and Charlotte Grimstead 1797-1881 (23) were married at St James'.

Arlington Street, St James', Westminster

On 02 Jan 1763 John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763 (72) died at Arlington Street. His son Robert Carteret 3rd Earl Granville 1721-1776 (42) succeeded 3rd Earl Granville 1C 1715, 3rd Baron Carteret of Hawnes 1C 1681.

In 1739 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 1 Letter LXX1. Arlington Street, Jul 12, 1765.
If you knew with what difficulty and pain I write to you you would allow my dear sir that I have some zeal for your satisfaction I have been extremely ill for these last sixteen days with the gout all over me in head stomach and both feet but as it never budged from the latter it soon attracted all the venom from the upper parts Oh it is a venomous devil I have lain upon a couch for two days but I question whether I shall be so alert to day as I have had a great deal of pain in the night and little sleep Still I must write to you as it is both for your satisfaction and my own and as this is the first moment that I have enjoyed the liberty of the post for these three years We e may say what we will I may launch out and even you need not be discreet when our letters pass through Mr Conway's office He has already himself told you in form that he is your principal and I repeat how glad of it I am for your sake as well as for all others I told him last night that I believed the Duke of York had obtained the promise of a red riband for you and begged that promise at least of the late odious ministers might be fulfilled and that none of our new aspirants might be thrust in before you He readily with kind expressions towards you promised me his interest.
kind expressions towards you promised me his interest Well at last the four tyrants are gone undone by their own insolence and unpitied Their arrogance to the King and proscriptions of every body but their own crew forced his Majesty to try any thing rather than submit to such task masters Mr Pitt who was ready and willing to have assumed the burden was disappointed by the treachery of Lord Temple who has reconciled and leagued himself with his brother George In this distress the Duke of Čumberland has persuaded the Opposition to accept and form a ministry Without Mr Pitt they were unwilling but pressed and encouraged by Mr Pitt and fearing the crown should be reduced to worse shifts rather than again bend to the yoke they have submitted and every thing promises fairer than could be expected The Duke of Bedford, Grenville and the two secretaries are already dismissed and their places filled by Lord Winchelsea Lord Rockingham and Mr Dowdswell as First Commissioners of the Admiralty and Treasury and Chancellor of the Exchequer the Duke of Grafton and Mr Conway The list of ins and outs will be much more considerable by degrees though not rapidly nor executed with the merciless hand of late years for the present system is composed of men as much more virtuous in that respect as in every other than their predecessors Nobody has resigned yet but those immediately connected with the fallen as Lord Gower Lord Thomond and Lord Weymouth and who would not have been suffered to stay if they had desired it.
The crown of Ireland is offered to Lord Heriford All this sets my family in an illustrious light enough yet it does not dazzle me My wishes and intentions are just the same as they were Moderation privacy and quiet sum up all my future views and having seen my friends landed iny little cock boat shall waft me to Strawberry as soon as I am able to get into it The gout they tell me is to ensure me a length of years and health but as I fear I must now and then renew the patent at the original expense I am not much flattered by so dear an annuity You may judge of my sensations when I tell you I reckon the greatest miracle ever performed was that of bidding the cripple take up his bed and walk I could as soon do the former as the latter .
Since I began to write I hear that this morning have kissed hands Lord Ashburnham (40) for the Great Wardrobe in room of Lord Despencer, Lord Besborough and Lord Grantham Postmasters in the places of Lord Hyde and Lord Trevor Lord Villierst as Vicechamberlain instead of old Will Finch who believe has a pension and Lord Scarborough who succeeds Lord Thomond in the Cofferer's office You will say that all this is strongly tinctured with peerage it is true but the House of Commons will have its dole though not yet as folks do not like a re election depending for six months.
The Duke of Bolton (47) the other morning nobody knows why or wherefore except that there is a good deal of madness in the blood sat himself down upon the floor in his dressing room and shot him self through the head What is more remarkable is that it is the same house and same chamber in which Lord Scarborough (78) performed the same exploit I do not believe that shooting one's self through the head is catching or that any contagion lies in a wainscot that makes one pull a suicide trigger but very possibly the idea might revert and operate on the brain of a splenetic man I am glad he had not a blue garter but a red one as the more plenty the sooner one gets to Florence.
This is a long epistle in my condition Pray unseal and decypher your lips now the tower has no longer the least air of the Bastille. Halifax, Sandwich (46) and General Warrants are sent to the devil though I believe Sandwich (46) will contrive to return like Belphegor even though he should be obliged to marry his own wife (48) again but he can never get rid of the smell of brimstone Adieu.

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Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Richard Lumley 2nd Earl Scarborough 1686-1740.In 1740. Joseph Highmore Painter 1692-1780. Portrait of John Montagu 4th Earl Sandwich 1718-1792.Before 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806. Portrait of John Montagu 4th Earl Sandwich 1718-1792.In 1780 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of John Montagu 4th Earl Sandwich 1718-1792.

16 Arlington Street Arlington Street, St James', Westminster

In 01 Feb 1911 Hugo Francis Charteris 1884-1916 (27) and Violet Catherine Manners 1888-1971 (23) were married at St Margaret's Church. The reception at 16 Arlington Street Arlington Street.

19 Arlington Street Arlington Street, St James', Westminster

On 18 Apr 1834 Harriet Hale Baroness Dundas 1769-1834 (64) died at 19 Arlington Street Arlington Street.

22 Arlington Street Arlington Street, St James', Westminster

Before 08 Oct 1840 John Jeffreys Pratt 1st Marquess Camden 1759-1840 sold 22 Arlington Street Arlington Street to Henry Somerset 7th Duke Beaufort 1792-1853.

In 1802. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of John Jeffreys Pratt 1st Marquess Camden 1759-1840.

Carlton Gardens, St James', Westminster

On 28 Mar 1842 John William Spencer Brownlow Egerton Cust 2nd Earl Brownlow 1842-1867 was born to John Hume Egerton 1812-1851 (29) and Marianne Margaret Compton 1817-1888 (25) at Carlton Gardens.

1857 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of John William Spencer Brownlow Egerton Cust 2nd Earl Brownlow 1842-1867.1851 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of John Hume Egerton 1812-1851.1841 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of Marianne Margaret Compton 1817-1888.Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of Marianne Margaret Compton 1817-1888.

Cartlon House, St James', Westminster

On 08 Feb 1772 Augusta Saxe Coburg Altenburg 1719-1772 (52) died at Cartlon House.

Around 1750 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779 (attributed). Portrait of Augusta Saxe Coburg Altenburg 1719-1772.

On 07 Jan 1796 Princess Charlotte Augusta Hanover 1796-1817 was born to George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (33) and Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (27) at Cartlon House.

Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 when Prince of Wales.In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.In 1798. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.1819. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839. Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.1820. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839. Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.

Clarence House, St James', Westminster

On 21 Dec 1919 Alexander Ramsay 1919-2000 was born to Alexander Ramsay 1881-1972 (38) and Victoria Patricia "Patsy" Windsor 1886-1974 (33) at Clarence House. He a great grandson of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.

Cleveland Court, St James', Westminster

3 Cleveland Court, St James', Westminster

On 16 Apr 1745 Noel Hill 1st Baron Berwick 1745-1789 was born to Thomas Hill at 3 Cleveland Court.

Cleveland Row, St James', Westminster

On 30 Mar 1691 Charles Hamilton Comte d'Arran 1691-1754 was born illegitimately to James Hamilton 4th Duke Hamilton 1st Duke Brandon 1658-1712 (32) and Barbara Fitzroy 1672-1737 (18) at Cleveland Row. He a grandson of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

1 Cleveland Row, St James', Westminster

On 07 May 1878 Colonel William de Horsey 1826-1915 (52) was declared bankrupt whilst living at 1 Cleveland Row.

14 Cleveland Row, St James', Westminster

Berkshire House, 14 Cleveland Row, St James', Westminster

Diary of Samuel Pepys 19 November 1666. 19 Nov 1666. Lay pretty long in bed talking with pleasure with my wife, and then up and all the morning at my own chamber fitting some Tangier matters against the afternoon for a meeting. This morning also came Mr. Caesar, and I heard him on the lute very finely, and my boy begins to play well.
After dinner I carried and set my wife down at her brother's, and then to Barkeshire-house, where my Chancellor (57) hath been ever since the fire, but he is not come home yet, so I to Westminster Hall, where the Lords newly up and the Commons still sitting. Here I met with Mr. Robinson, who did give me a printed paper wherein he states his pretence to the post office, and intends to petition the Parliament in it.
Thence I to the Bull-head tavern, where I have not been since Mr. Chetwind and the time of our club, and here had six bottles of claret filled, and I sent them to Mrs. Martin, whom I had promised some of my owne, and, having none of my owne, sent her this.
Thence to my Chancellor's (57), and there Mr. Creed and Gawden, Cholmley (34), and Sir G. Carteret (56) walking in the Park over against the house. I walked with Sir G. Carteret (56), who I find displeased with the letter I have drawn and sent in yesterday, finding fault with the account we give of the ill state of the Navy, but I said little, only will justify the truth of it.
Here we walked to and again till one dropped away after another, and so I took coach to White Hall, and there visited my Lady Jemimah, at Sir G. Carteret's (56) lodgings. Here was Sir Thomas Crew (42), and he told me how hot words grew again to-day in the House of Lords between my Lord Ossory (32) and Ashly (45), the former saying that something said by the other was said like one of Oliver's Council. Ashly (45) said that he must give him reparation, or he would take it his owne way. The House therefore did bring my Lord Ossory (32) to confess his fault, and ask pardon for it, as he was also to my Lord Buckingham (38), for saying that something was not truth that my Lord Buckingham (38) had said. This will render my Lord Ossory (32) very little in a little time.
By and by away, and calling my wife went home, and then a little at Sir W. Batten's (65) to hear news, but nothing, and then home to supper, whither Captain Cocke (49), half foxed, come and sat with us, and so away, and then we to bed.

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Great Plague of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 November 1666. 20 Nov 1666. Called up by Mr. Sheply, who is going into the country to-day to Hinchingbroke, I sent my service to my Lady, and in general for newes: that the world do think well of my Lord, and do wish he were here again, but that the publique matters of the State as to the war are in the worst condition that is possible.
By and by Sir W. Warren, and with him half an hour discoursing of several businesses, and some I hope will bring me a little profit.
He gone, and Sheply, I to the office a little, and then to church, it being thanksgiving-day for the cessation of the plague; but, Lord! how the towne do say that it is hastened before the plague is quite over, there dying some people still1, but only to get ground for plays to be publickly acted, which the Bishops would not suffer till the plague was over; and one would thinke so, by the suddenness of the notice given of the day, which was last Sunday, and the little ceremony. The sermon being dull of Mr. Minnes, and people with great indifferency come to hear him.
After church home, where I met Mr. Gregory, who I did then agree with to come to teach my wife to play on the Viall, and he being an able and sober man, I am mightily glad of it. He had dined, therefore went away, and I to dinner, and after dinner by coach to Barkeshire-house, and there did get a very great meeting; the Duke of York (33) being there, and much business done, though not in proportion to the greatness of the business, and my Chancellor (57) sleeping and snoring the greater part of the time. Among other things I declared the state of our credit as to tallys to raise money by, and there was an order for payment of £5000 to Mr. Gawden, out of which I hope to get something against Christmas.
Here we sat late, and here I did hear that there are some troubles like to be in Scotland, there being a discontented party already risen, that have seized on the Governor of Dumfreeze and imprisoned him2, but the story is yet very uncertain, and therefore I set no great weight on it. I home by Mr. Gawden in his coach, and so with great pleasure to spend the evening at home upon my Lyra Viall, and then to supper and to bed. With mighty peace of mind and a hearty desire that I had but what I have quietly in the country, but, I fear, I do at this day see the best that either I or the rest of our nation will ever see.
Note 1. According to the Bills of Mortality seven persons died in London of the plague during the week November 20th to 27th; and for some weeks after deaths continued from this cause.
Note 2. William Fielding, writing to Sir Phil. Musgrave from Carlisle on November 15th, says: "Major Baxter, who has arrived from Dumfries, reports that this morning a great number of horse and foot came into that town, with drawn swords and pistols, gallopped up to Sir Jas. Turner's lodgings, seized him in his bed, carried him without clothes to the marketplace, threatened to cut him to pieces, and seized and put into the Tollbooth all the foot soldiers that were with him; they also secured the minister of Dumfries. Many of the party were lairds and county people from Galloway—200 horse well mounted, one minister was with them who had swords and pistols, and 200 or 300 foot, some with clubs, others with scythes". On November 17th Rob. Meine wrote to Williamson: "On the 15th 120 fanatics from the Glenkins, Deray; and neighbouring parishes in Dumfriesshire, none worth £10 except two mad fellows, the lairds of Barscob and Corsuck, came to Dumfries early in the morning, seized Sir Jas. Turner, commander of a company of men in Dumfriesshire, and carried him, without violence to others, to a strong house in Maxwell town, Galloway, declaring they sought only revenge against the tyrant who had been severe with them for not keeping to church, and had laid their families waste" (Calendar of State Papers, 1666-67, pp. 262, 268).

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Great Fire of London

John Evelyn's Diary 28 November 1666. 28 Nov 1666. Went to see Clarendon House, now almost finished, a goodly pile to see, but had many defects as to the architecture, yet placed most gracefully. After this, I waited on the Lord Chancellor (57), who was now at Berkshire House, since the burning of London.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 08 May 1668. 08 May 1668. Up, and to the office, where busy all the morning. Towards noon I to Westminster and there understand that the Lords' House did sit till eleven o'clock last night, about the business in difference between them and the Commons, in the matter of the East India Company. Here took a turn or two, and up to my Lord Crew's (70), and there dined; where Mr. Case, the minister, a dull fellow in his talk, and all in the Presbyterian manner; a great deal of noise and a kind of religious tone, but very dull.
After dinner my Lord and I together. He tells me he hears that there are great disputes like to be at Court, between the factions of the two women, my Baroness Castlemayne (27) and Mrs. Stewart (20), who is now well again, and the King (37) hath made several public visits to her, and like to come to Court: the other is to go to Barkeshire-house, which is taken for her, and they say a Privy-Seal is passed for £5000 for it. He believes all will come to ruin.
Thence I to White Hall, where the Duke of York (34) gone to the Lords' House, where there is to be a conference on the Lords' side to the Commons this afternoon, giving in their Reasons, which I would have been at, but could not; for, going by direction to the D. Gawden's chamber, there Brouncker (48), W. Pen (47), and Mr. Wren (39), and I, met, and did our business with the Duke of York (34). But, Lord! to see how this play of Sir Positive At-all, ["The Impertinents".] in abuse of Sir Robert Howard (42), do take, all the Duke's and every body's talk being of that, and telling more stories of him, of the like nature, that it is now the town and country talk, and, they say, is most exactly true. The Duke of York (34) himself said that of his playing at trap-ball is true, and told several other stories of him. This being done, Brouncker (48), Pen, and I to Brouncker's house, and there sat and talked, I asking many questions in mathematics to my Lord, which he do me the pleasure to satisfy me in, and here we drank and so spent an hour, and so W. Pen (47) and I home, and after being with W. Pen (47) at his house an hour, I home and to bed.

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Clifford Street, St James', Westminster

On 16 May 1741 Richard Onslow 3rd Baron Onslow 1713-1776 (28) and Mary Elwill -1812 were married at Clifford Street.

On 03 Nov 1785 James Everard Arundell 10th Baron Arundel Wardour 1785-1834 was born to James Everard Arundell 9th Baron Arundel Wardour 1763-1817 (22) and Mary Christina Arundell Baroness Arundel Wardour at Clifford Street.

Duke Street, St James', Westminster

On 03 Jul 1750 Richard Griffin 2nd Baron Braybrook 1750-1825 was born to Richard Neville Aldworth Neville Griffin 1717-1793 (32) and Magdalen Calandrini at Duke Street.

Before 15 Nov 1802 George Romney Painter 1734-1802. Portrait of Richard Griffin 2nd Baron Braybrook 1750-1825.

Haymarket, St James', Westminster

1533 Buggery Act

On 08 Jul 1810 the Bow Street police raided the White Swan on Vere Street in London that had been established as a molly-house in early 1810 by two men, James Cook and Yardley. Twenty-seven men were arrested, but the majority of them were released (perhaps as a result of bribe); eight were tried and convicted. On 27 Sep 1810 six men were pilloried at the Haymarket. On 07 Mar 1811 John Hepburn (46) and Thomas White (16), a drummer boy, were hanged at Newgate Prison despite not being present on the night of the raid.

Oxendon Street Haymarket, St James', Westminster

Survey London Volume 20 Part 3 Pages 101 103 Volume 20. In 1669 Shaver's Hall with all its appurtenances was bought by Thomas Panton, succinctly described by the Dictionary of National Biography as a "gambler," who in 1671 petitioned the Privy Council "that having been at great charge in purchasing a parcell of ground, lying at Pickadilly, part of it being the two bowling greens fronting the Haymarket, the other part lying on the north of Tennis Court," he might have leave to continue with his development of the property in spite of the king's "late proclamation" against building. Sir Christopher Wren (45) reported that "by opening a new street from the Hay-markett into Leicester-fields" Panton's scheme would "ease in some measure the great passage of the Strand, and will cure the noysomness of that part," and recommended that a licence to build be granted provided that the houses were built of brick "with sufficient scantlings, good paving in the streets, and sufficient sewers and conveighances for the water." Panton Street first appears in the ratebooks in 1674 and Oxendon Street, named after Baker's son-in-law, in 1675. Panton was also responsible for the erection of houses on the east side of the Haymarket at this time.

In 1711 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Christopher Wren 1632-1723.

Panton Street Haymarket, St James', Westminster

Panton Street Haymarket was built by Colonel Thomas Panton -1685 who had a large house nearby.

Survey London Volume 20 Part 3 Pages 101 103 Volume 20. Panton Street was described by Strype in 1720 as "a good open street, inhabited by tradesmen." On the south side lived in 1696–1730 Thomas Hickford, proprietor of "Hickford's Great Room" used for auction sales and entertainments.

Shaver's Hall Haymarket, St James', Westminster

Survey London Volume 20 Part 3 Pages 101 103 Volume 20. In 1669 Shaver's Hall with all its appurtenances was bought by Thomas Panton, succinctly described by the Dictionary of National Biography as a "gambler," who in 1671 petitioned the Privy Council "that having been at great charge in purchasing a parcell of ground, lying at Pickadilly, part of it being the two bowling greens fronting the Haymarket, the other part lying on the north of Tennis Court," he might have leave to continue with his development of the property in spite of the king's "late proclamation" against building. Sir Christopher Wren (45) reported that "by opening a new street from the Hay-markett into Leicester-fields" Panton's scheme would "ease in some measure the great passage of the Strand, and will cure the noysomness of that part," and recommended that a licence to build be granted provided that the houses were built of brick "with sufficient scantlings, good paving in the streets, and sufficient sewers and conveighances for the water." Panton Street first appears in the ratebooks in 1674 and Oxendon Street, named after Baker's son-in-law, in 1675. Panton was also responsible for the erection of houses on the east side of the Haymarket at this time.

Jermyn Street, St James', Westminster

On 02 Nov 1752 Philip Twysden Bishop Raphoe 1713-1752 (39) died at Jermyn Street. Possibly East Peckham. Somewhat curously his death was embroiled in a scandal that suggested he had, as a result of his impeecunious situation, been shot whilst attempting to rob a stagecoch.

On 14 Jul 1774 Matthew Blakiston 1st Baronet Blakiston of London 1702-1774 (72) died at Jermyn Street. His son Matthew Blakiston 2nd Baronet 1761-1806 (13) succeeded 2nd Baronet Blakiston of London.

Rose Tavern, Jermyn Street, St James', Westminster

In Nov 1879 John Schott -1891 and Sarah Cox aka Fanny Cornforth Model 1835-1909 (43) were married after which they ran the Rose Tavern.

King Street, St James', Westminster

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 April 1666. 18 Apr 1666. [Up] and by coach with Sir W. Batten (65) and Sir Thos. Allen (54) to White Hall, and there after attending the Duke (32) as usual and there concluding of many things preparatory to the Prince (46) and Generall's going to sea on Monday next, Sir W. Batten (65) and Sir T. Allen (54) and I to Mr. Lilly's (47), the painter's; and there saw the heads, some finished, and all begun, of the Flaggmen in the late great fight with the Duke of Yorke (32) against the Dutch. The Duke of Yorke (32) hath them done to hang in his chamber, and very finely they are done indeed. Here is the Prince's (46), Sir G. Askue's (50), Sir Thomas Teddiman's, Sir Christopher Mings (40), Sir Joseph Jordan, Sir William Barkeley (27), Sir Thomas Allen (33), and Captain Harman's (41), as also the Duke of Albemarle's (57); and will be my Lord Sandwich's (40), Sir W. Pen's (44), and Sir Jeremy Smith's. Being very well satisfied with this sight, and other good pictures hanging in the house, we parted, and I left them, and [to] pass away a little time went to the printed picture seller's in the way thence to the Exchange, and there did see great plenty of fine prints; but did not buy any, only a print of an old pillar in Rome made for a Navall Triumph1, which for the antiquity of the shape of ships, I buy and keepe.
Thence to the Exchange, that is, the New Exchange, and looked over some play books and intend to get all the late new plays.
So to Westminster, and there at the Swan got a bit of meat and dined alone; and so away toward King's Street, and spying out of my coach Jane that lived heretofore at Jevons, my barber's, I went a little further and stopped, and went on foot back, and overtook her, taking water at Westminster Bridge, and spoke to her, and she telling me whither she was going I over the water and met her at Lambeth, and there drank with her; she telling me how he that was so long her servant, did prove to be a married man, though her master told me (which she denies) that he had lain with her several times in his house.
There left her 'sans essayer alcune cose con elle2', and so away by boat to the 'Change, and took coach and to Mr. Hales (66), where he would have persuaded me to have had the landskipp stand in my picture, but I like it not and will have it otherwise, which I perceive he do not like so well, however is so civil as to say it shall be altered.
Thence away to Mrs. Pierce's, who was not at home, but gone to my house to visit me with Mrs. Knipp. I therefore took up the little girle Betty and my mayde Mary that now lives there and to my house, where they had been but were gone, so in our way back again met them coming back again to my house in Cornehill, and there stopped laughing at our pretty misfortunes, and so I carried them to Fish Streete, and there treated them with prawns and lobsters, and it beginning to grow darke we away, but the jest is our horses would not draw us up the Hill, but we were fain to 'light and stay till the coachman had made them draw down to the bottom of the Hill, thereby warming their legs, and then they came up cheerfully enough, and we got up and I carried them home, and coming home called at my paper ruler's and there found black Nan, which pleases me mightily, and having saluted her again and again away home and to bed.... In all my ridings in the coach and intervals my mind hath been full these three weeks of setting in musique "It is decreed, &c".
Note 1. The columna rostrata erected in the Forum to C. Duilius, who obtained a triumph for the first naval victory over the Carthaginians, B.C. 261. Part of the column was discovered in the ruins of the Forum near the Arch of Septimius, and transferred to the Capitol. B.
Note 2. 'sans essayer alcune cose con elle'. Without trying to do anything with her.

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On 19 Jul 1860 John Elphinstone 13th Lord Elphinstone 1807-1860 (53) died at King Street. His half first cousin John Elphinstone-Fleming 14th Lord Elphinstone 1819-1861 (40) succeeded 14th Lord Elphinstone.

Marlborough House, St James', Westminster

On 03 Jun 1865 George V King United Kingdom 1865-1936 was born to Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (23) and Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (20) at Marlborough House.

1911. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of George V King United Kingdom 1865-1936.1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910.Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales.1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925.

On 20 Feb 1867 Louise Windsor Duchess Fife 1867-1931 was born to Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (25) and Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (22) at Marlborough House.

On 06 Jul 1868 Princess Victoria Windsor 1868-1935 was born to Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (26) and Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (23) at Marlborough House.

1908. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Princess Victoria Windsor 1868-1935.

On 26 Nov 1869 Maud Windsor Queen Consort Norway 1869-1938 was born to Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910 (28) and Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (24) at Marlborough House.

Nag's Head

Pall Mall

Park Place, St James', Westminster

Vernon House Park Place, St James', Westminster

In Jul 1835 Edward Harbord 3rd Baron Suffield 1781-1835 (53) died at Vernon House Park Place after a fall from his horse on Constitution Hill. His son Edward Harbord 4th Baron Suffield 1813-1853 (22) succeeded 4th Baron Suffield, 5th Baronet Harbord.

St James' Church

St James's Palace

St James' Park

St James' Square

St James' Street, Westminster

On 04 Jun 1732 Cornwall Fitzfrederick Vane 1732-1736 was born illegitimately to Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751 (25) and Anne Vane -1736 in St James' Street. He a grandson of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

In 1750 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.

Fenton's Hotel St James' Street, Westminster

On 12 Oct 1837 James Murray 1st Baron Gelnlyon 1782-1837 (55) died at Fenton's Hotel St James' Street. His son George Augustus Frederick Murray 6th Duke Atholl 1814-1864 (23) succeeded 2nd Baron Glenlyon of Glenlyon in Perthshire.

York Street, St James', Westminster

On 03 May 1775 George Boscawen 1712-1775 (62) died in York Street.