History of Sussex

858 Death of King Æthelwulf

1194 Richard Lionheart Returns to England

1287 Great Storm

1322 Despencer War Executions

1350 Battle of Winchelsea

1666 Great Fire of London

1815 Battle of Waterloo

Sussex is in Home Counties.

On 12 Jan 1405 Eleanor Maltravers Baroness Cobham Sternborough 2nd Baroness Maltravers Baroness Arundel 1345-1405 (60) died at Sussex. She was buried at Lewes Priory. Her grandson John Fitzalan 13th Earl Arundel 1385-1421 (19) succeeded 3rd Baron Maltravers 1C 1330.

Arundel, Sussex

Around 1263 Matilda aka Maud Fitzalan 1263- was born to John Fitzalan 7th Earl Arundel 1246-1272 (16) and Isabella Mortimer Countess Arundel -1291 at Arundel. She a great x 3 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

On 11 Jan 1372 Eleanor Plantagenet Countess Arundel Countess Surrey 1318-1372 (53) died at Arundel. She was buried at Lewes Priory.

John Evelyn's Diary 09 July 1638. 09 Jul 1638. I went home to visit my friends, and, on the 26th, with my brother (21) and sister to Lewes, where we abode till the 31st; and thence to one Mr. Michael's, of Houghton, near Arundel, where we were very well treated; and, on the 2d of August, to Portsmouth, and thence, having surveyed the fortifications (a great rarity in that blessed halcyon time in England), we passed into the Isle of Wight, to the house of my Baroness Richards, in a place called Yaverland; but were turned the following day to Chichester, where, having viewed the city and fair cathedral, we returned home.

On 12 May 1680 James Colebrooke 1680-1752 was born at Arundel.

Arundel Cathedral Arundel, Sussex

On 19 Oct 1595 Philip Howard 20th Earl Arundel 1557-1595 (38) died of dysentery at Tower of London. He was buried at St Peter ad Vincula Church Tower of London, reburied at Arundel Cathedral Arundel and then reburied in the Fitzalan Chapel Arundel Castle. His son Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 (10) succeeded 21st Earl Arundel Sussex, 4th Earl Surrey 3C 1483, 11th Baron Maltravers 1C 1330, 11th Baron Arundel 1C 1377.

Around 1575 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. Portrait of Philip Howard 20th Earl Arundel 1557-1595.In 1618 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646.In 1630 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 and wearing his Garter Collar.Around 1629 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646.

Ashburnham, Sussex

On 16 Jun 1710 William Ashburnham 2nd Baron Ashburnham 1679-1710 (31) died of smallpox at Ashburnham. His brother John Ashburnham 1st Earl Ashburham 1687-1737 (23) succeeded 3rd Baron Ashburnham of Ashburnham in Sussex.

Balcombe Sussex

St Mary's Church Balcombe, Balcombe Sussex

In 1551 Bishop William Overton 1525-1609 (26) was appointed Rector of St Mary's Church Balcombe.

Battle Abbey, Sussex

Flowers of History by Matthew of Westminster Volume 2 Chapter 1 1066 1087 The Abbey of Battle is built. 1067. King William (39), exulting in his victory, gave praise to God. The same year also, the king built an abbey, which, in reference to the battle that had been fought there, he called Battle, in order that glory, and praise, and thanks, might be offered up in it to God for ever for the victory which he had given him, and also that offices for the souls of the dead who were slain there might be perfonned by the monks who were established in it, with the offering of salutary victims; and he endowed and enriched the church with estates and priyileges, and committed it to the patronage and protection of the kings who should reign in England after him.

On 08 Apr 1608 Magdalen Dacre Viscountess Montague 1538-1608 (70) died at Battle Abbey. She was buried at Midhurst; subsequently moved to St Mary's Church Easebourne Midhurst.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 64 To Richard Bentley, Esq. Now you are fully master of Hurst Monceaux, I shall carry you on to Battel—By the way, we bring you a thousand sketches, that you may show us what we have seen. Battel Abbey stands at the end of the town, exactly as Warwick Castle does of Warwick; but the house of Webster have taken due care that it should not resemble it in any thing else. A vast building, which they call the old refectory, but which I believe was the original church, is now barn, coach-house, etc. The situation is noble, above the level of abbeys: what does remain of gateways and towers is beautiful, particularly the flat side of a cloister, which is now the front of the mansion-house. Miss of the family has clothed a fragment of a portico with cockle-shells! The grounds, and what has been a park, lie in a vile condition. In the church is the tomb of Sir Anthony Browne, master of the horse for life to Harry VIII.: from whose descendants the estate was purchased. The head of John Hanimond, the last abbot, is still perfect in one of the windows. Mr. Chute says, "What charming things we should have done if Battel Abbey had been to be sold at Mrs. Chenevix's, as Strawberry was!" Good night!

Bersted, Sussex

On 19 Nov 1246 Henry Audley 1175-1246 (71) died at Bersted.

Mainwaring Bersted, Sussex

Around 1197 Bertrade Mainwaring 1197-1246 was born to Ralph Mainwaring at Mainwaring Bersted.

Bramber, Sussex

After 1135 Bertha Braose Baroness Beauchamp 1135-1200 was born to William Braose 3rd Baron Bramber 1115-1179 and Bertha Gloucester Baroness Bramber 1130- at Bramber.

Around 1154 Engram Braose 1154-1210 was born to William Braose 3rd Baron Bramber 1115-1179 (39) and Bertha Gloucester Baroness Bramber 1130- (24) at Bramber.

Around 1157 Sybil Braose Countess Derby 1157-1228 was born to William Braose 3rd Baron Bramber 1115-1179 (42) and Bertha Gloucester Baroness Bramber 1130- (27) at Bramber.

Around 1160 John Braose 1160-1224 was born to William Braose 3rd Baron Bramber 1115-1179 (45) and Bertha Gloucester Baroness Bramber 1130- (30) at Bramber.

On 18 Jul 1232 John "Tadody aka Fatherless" Braose 1197-1232 (35) died at Bramber.

On 18 Jul 1232 John Braose 1197-1232 (35) died at Bramber.

Bramber Castle Bramber, Sussex

Around 1070 William Braose 1st Baron Bramber -1095 built at Bramber Castle Bramber.

Broadwater, Sussex

St Mary's Church Broadwater, Sussex

On 11 Oct 1525 Thomas West 8th Baron De La Warr 5th Baron West 1457-1525 (68) died. He was buried at St Mary's Church Broadwater. His son Thomas West 9th Baron De La Warr 6th Baron West 1475-1554 (50) succeeded 9th Baron De La Warr 1C 1299, 6th Baron West. Elizabeth Bonville Baroness De La Warr Baroness West (51) by marriage Baroness De La Warr, Baron West.

Buckhurst, Sussex

On 01 Oct 1615 Cicely Baker Countess Dorset 1535-1615 (80) died in Buckhurst.

Before 1591. Hieronimo Custodis Painter -1593. Portrait of Cicely Baker Countess Dorset 1535-1615.

Burghesh, Sussex

Around 1254 Robert Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1254-1306 was born at Burghesh.

Burwash, Sussex

Around 1319 Joan Burghesh Baroness Mohun Dunster 1319-1404 was born to Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh 1287-1355 (32) and Elizabeth Verdun Baroness Burghesh 1300-1360 (19) at Burwash.

Buxted, Sussex

On 10 Oct 1827 Catherine Bisshop Countess Liverpool 1744-1827 (82) was buried Buxted.

Climping, Sussex

Atherington Climping, Sussex

Around 1427 John Dudley 1427- was born to John Dudley 1st Baron Dudley 1400-1487 (26) and Elizabeth Berkeley Baroness Cherleton Baroness Dudley at Atherington Climping.

Cuckfield, Sussex

Around 1530 William Butler 1530-1608 was born at Cuckfield.

In 1580 Margaret Greeke 1534-1580 (46) died at Cuckfield.

East Grinstead, Sussex

On 21 Sep 1744 William Neville 18th Baron Bergavenny 1695-1744 (49) died at Bath. On 30 Sep 1744 William Neville 18th Baron Bergavenny 1695-1744 (49) was buried at East Grinstead. His son George Neville 1st Earl Abergavenny 1727-1785 (17) succeeded 19th Baron Bergavenny 1C 1392, 17th Baron Bergavenny 2C 1450.

East Sussex

Findon, Sussex

Around Jan 1291 William Braose 1st Baron Braose 1224-1291 (67) died at Findon. He was buried at Sele Priory. His son William Braose 2nd Baron Braose 1260-1326 (31) succeeded 2nd Baron Braose.

Times Newspaper Obituaries. 27 Jan 1916. The death of Lady Ulrica Thynne (83) took place on Wednesday at 30, Grosvenor-gardens. She was the second daughter of the 12th Duke of Somerset and was born in 1833. She married, in 1858, Lord Henry Frederick Thynne (83), second son of the third Marquess of Bath, who was Treasurer of the Household to Queen Victoria and for over 25 years M.P. for South Wilts. There were four sons and two daughters of the marriage. The funeral will be at Findon, near Worthing, on Monday, at 1 o'clock.

Frant, Sussex

St Alban's Church, Frant, Sussex

On 02 Jun 1898 John Pratt 4th Marquess Camden 1872-1943 (26) and Joan Marion Neville Marchioness Camden 1877-1952 (21) were married at St Alban's Church. She by marriage Countess Camden.

Around 1908. Frank Bernard Dicksee Painter 1853-1928. Portrait of Joan Marion Neville Marchioness Camden 1877-1952.

Hailsham, Sussex

Wartling Hailsham, Sussex

On 20 Aug 1326 John St Leger of Offley 1294-1326 (32) died at Wartling Hailsham.

On 22 Nov 1410 William Hoo 1335-1410 (75) died at Wartling Hailsham.

Sibyl Filiol 1257- was born to William Filiol 1205- in Wartling Hailsham.

Halland, Sussex

Around 22 Sep 1597 Thomas Pelham 2nd Baronet Pelham of Laughton 1597-1654 was born to Thomas Pelham 1st Baronet Pelham of Laughton 1540-1624 (57) and Mary Walsingham Baroness Pelham Laughton 1564-1624 (33) at Halland.

Harting, Sussex

Around 1475 Reginald Bray 1440-1503 (35) and Katherine Hussey -1506 were married. Katherine brought him lands in Harting.

On 03 Sep 1670 Edward Ford 1605-1670 (65) died at Ireland. His body was brought to England, and interred in the family burial-place at Harting.

Up Park, Harting, Sussex

In 1605 Edward Ford 1605-1670 was born to William Ford of Harting 1570-1653 (35) at Up Park.

Horsted Keynes, Sussex

St Giles' Church Horsted Keynes, Sussex

On 09 Jan 1685 Elias Leighton Engineer -1685 died at the Parish of St Andrew's Holborn. He was buried at St Giles' Church Horsted Keynes.

Mayfield, Sussex

On 26 Apr 1366 Simon Islip Archbishop of Canterbury -1366 died at Mayfield. During his last three years he was unable to speak as a consequence of a stroke.

Midhurst, Sussex

Around 1245 Cecilia Bohun 1245- was born to Ralph Bohun 1220-1273 (25) and Sibyl Ferrers in Midhurst.

Around 28 Sep 1247 John Bohun 1247-1284 was born to Ralph Bohun 1220-1273 (27) and Sibyl Ferrers in Midhurst.

Around 05 Dec 1367 John Bohun 1301-1367 (66) died in Midhurst.

On 29 Jun 1592 Anthony Browne 1552-1592 (39) died at Riverbank House Cowdray Midhurst. He was buried at Midhurst.

Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Anthony Browne 1552-1592.

On 08 Apr 1608 Magdalen Dacre Viscountess Montague 1538-1608 (70) died at Battle Abbey. She was buried at Midhurst; subsequently moved to St Mary's Church Easebourne Midhurst.

Cowdray Midhurst, Sussex

Riverbank House Cowdray Midhurst, Sussex

On 29 Jun 1592 Anthony Browne 1552-1592 (39) died at Riverbank House Cowdray Midhurst. He was buried at Midhurst.

Easebourne Midhurst, Sussex

Newtimber

Petworth

Preston, Sussex

On 20 Apr 1887 Dorothy Una Ratcliffe nee Clough 1887-1967 was born to George Benson Clough at Preston.

After 1909. Ambrose McEvoy Painter 1877-1927. Portrait of Dorothy Una Ratcliffe nee Clough 1887-1967.

Racton, Sussex

Rother, Sussex

Penhurst Rother, Sussex

On 20 Jul 1639 Henry Spencer 1st Earl of Sunderland 1620-1643 (18) and Dorothy Sidney Countess Sunderland 1617-1683 (21) were married at Penhurst Rother. She by marriage Baroness Spencer Wormleighton. Her long-term suitor Edmund Waller Poet 1606-1687 (33) wrote a long, graceful, and eminently sober letter to the bride's sister (12) on the occasion of the wedding.

Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Dorothy Sidney Countess Sunderland 1617-1683.Around 1687. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Edmund Waller Poet 1606-1687.

Rougham, Sussex

Around 1430 Roger Copley 1430-1490 was born to Richard Copley 1394-1434 (36) in Rougham.

On 21 Dec 1490 Roger Copley 1430-1490 (60) died in Rougham.

Rye, Sussex

Richard Lionheart Returns to England

On 04 Mar 1194 Richard "Lionheart" I King England 1157-1199 (36) and his mother Eleanor of Aquitaine (72) sailed from Antwerp on board the Trenchemer. The royal admiral, Stephen of Turnham, who was commanding in person, had to employ experienced pilots to take her through the coastal islets and out into the estuary of the Scheldt. It was a long crossing, perhaps deliberately so, to avoid ambush. The Trenchemer was escorted by a large cog from the Cinque port of Rye.

1287 Great Storm

On 14 Dec 1287 a great storm caused a significant number of deaths on both sides of the English Channel. In the Low Countries around 50,000 people are believed to have died. In England hundreds were killed. The port of New Romney was so changed as to be replaced by Rye through which the course of the River Rother now ran. The port of Dunwich never recovered from the storm and thereafter declined.

On or before 20 Dec 1579 John Fletcher Playwright 1579-1625 was born at Rye. He was baptised 20 Dec 1579.

Around 1620. Unknown Painter. Portrait of John Fletcher Playwright 1579-1625.

John Evelyn's Diary 03 June 1652. 03 Jun 1652. I received a letter from Colonel Morley (36) to the Magistrates and Searchers at Rye, to assist my wife (17) at her landing, and show her all civility.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 June 1652. 04 Jun 1652. I set out to meet her (17) now on her journey from Paris, after she had obtained leave to come out of that city, which had now been besieged some time by the Prince of Condé's army in the time of the rebellion, and after she had been now near twelve years from her own country, that is, since five years of age, at which time she went over. I went to Rye to meet her, where was an embargo on occasion of the late conflict with the Holland fleet, the two nations being now in war, and which made sailing very unsafe.
On Whit Sunday, I went to the church (which is a very fair one), and heard one of the canters, who dismissed the assembly rudely, and without any blessing. Here I stayed till the 10th with no small impatience, when I walked over to survey the ruins of Winchelsea, that ancient cinq-port, which by the remains and ruins of ancient streets and public structures, discovers it to have been formerly a considerable and large city. There are to be seen vast caves and vaults, walls and towers, ruins of monasteries and of a sumptuous church, in which are some handsome monuments, especially of the Templars, buried just in the manner of those in the Temple at London. This place being now all in rubbish, and a few despicable hovels and cottages only standing, hath yet a Mayor. The sea, which formerly rendered it a rich and commodious port, has now forsaken it.

After 15 May 1660 Henry Mildmay 1593-1668 was captured by Heneage Finch 3rd Earl Winchilsea 1628-1689 at Rye.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 July 1661. 27 Jul 1661. To Westminster, where at Mr. Montagu's chamber I heard a Frenchman play, a friend of Monsieur Eschar's, upon the guitar, most extreme well, though at the best methinks it is but a bawble.
From thence to Westminster Hall, where it was expected that the Parliament was to have been adjourned for two or three months, but something hinders it for a day or two. In the lobby I spoke with Mr. George Montagu (38), and advised about a ship to carry my Lord Hinchingbroke and the rest of the young gentlemen to France, and they have resolved of going in a hired vessell from Rye, and not in a man of war. He told me in discourse that my Lord Chancellor (52) is much envied, and that many great men, such as the Duke of Buckingham (33) and my Lord of Bristoll (48), do endeavour to undermine him, and that he believes it will not be done; for that the King (though he loves him not in the way of a companion, as he do these young gallants that can answer him in his pleasures), yet cannot be without him, for his policy and service.
From thence to the Wardrobe, where my wife met me, it being my Lord of Sandwich's birthday, and so we had many friends here, Mr. Townsend and his wife, and Captain Ferrers lady and Captain Isham (33), and were very merry, and had a good venison pasty. Mr. Pargiter, the merchant, was with us also.
After dinner Mr. Townsend was called upon by Captain Cooke (45): so we three went to a tavern hard by, and there he did give us a song or two; and without doubt he hath the best manner of singing in the world.
Back to my wife, and with my Lady Jem. and Pall by water through bridge, and showed them the ships with great pleasure, and then took them to my house to show it them (my Lady their mother having been lately all alone to see it and my wife, in my absence in the country), and we treated them well, and were very merry.
Then back again through bridge, and set them safe at home, and so my wife and I by coach home again, and after writing a letter to my father at Brampton, who, poor man, is there all alone, and I have not heard from him since my coming from him, which troubles me. To bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 August 1661. 27 Aug 1661. This morning to the Wardrobe, and there took leave of my Lord Hinchingbroke and his brother, and saw them go out by coach toward Rye in their way to France, whom God bless. Then I was called up to my Lady's bedside, where we talked an hour about Mr. Edward Montagu's disposing of the £5000 for my Lord's departure for Portugal, and our fears that he will not do it to my Lord's honour, and less to his profit, which I am to enquire a little after. Hence to the office, and there sat till noon, and then my wife and I by coach to my cozen, Thos. Pepys, the Executor, to dinner, where some ladies and my father and mother, where very merry, but methinks he makes but poor dinners for such guests, though there was a poor venison pasty. !Hence my wife and I to the Theatre, and there saw "The Joviall Crew", where the King, Duke (27) and Duchess (24), and Madame Palmer (20), were; and my wife, to her great content, had a full sight of them all the while. The play full of mirth.
Hence to my father's, and there staid to talk a while and so by foot home by moonshine. In my way and at home, my wife making a sad story to me of her brother Balty's (21) a condition, and would have me to do something for him, which I shall endeavour to do, but am afeard to meddle therein for fear I shall not be able to wipe my hands of him again, when I once concern myself for him. I went to bed, my wife all the while telling me his case with tears, which troubled me.

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Great Fire of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 September 1666. 04 Sep 1666. Up by break of day to get away the remainder of my things; which I did by a lighter at the Iron gate and my hands so few, that it was the afternoon before we could get them all away. Sir W. Pen (45) and I to Tower-streete, and there met the fire burning three or four doors beyond Mr. Hovell's, whose goods, poor man, his trayes, and dishes, shovells, &c., were flung all along Tower-street in the kennels, and people working therewith from one end to the other; the fire coming on in that narrow streete, on both sides, with infinite fury. Sir W. Batten (65) not knowing how to remove his wine, did dig a pit in the garden, and laid it in there; and I took the opportunity of laying all the papers of my office that I could not otherwise dispose of.
And in the evening Sir W. Pen (45) and I did dig another, and put our wine in it; and I my Parmazan cheese, as well as my wine and some other things. The Duke of Yorke (32) was at the office this day, at Sir W. Pen's (45); but I happened not to be within.
This afternoon, sitting melancholy with Sir W. Pen (45) in our garden, and thinking of the certain burning of this office, without extraordinary means, I did propose for the sending up of all our workmen from Woolwich and Deptford yards (none whereof yet appeared), and to write to Sir W. Coventry (38) to have the Duke of Yorke's (32) permission to pull down houses, rather than lose this office, which would, much hinder, the King's business. So Sir W. Pen (45) he went down this night, in order to the sending them up to-morrow morning; and I wrote to Sir W. Coventry (38) about the business, but received no answer. This night Mrs. Turner (43) (who, poor woman, was removing her goods all this day, good goods into the garden, and knows not how to dispose of them), and her husband supped with my wife and I at night, in the office; upon a shoulder of mutton from the cook's, without any napkin or any thing, in a sad manner, but were merry. Only now and then walking into the garden, and saw how horridly the sky looks, all on a fire in the night, was enough to put us out of our wits; and, indeed, it was extremely dreadful, for it looks just as if it was at us; and the whole heaven on fire. I after supper walked in the darke down to Tower-streete, and there saw it all on fire, at the Trinity House on that side, and the Dolphin Taverne on this side, which was very near us; and the fire with extraordinary vehemence.
Now begins the practice of blowing up of houses in Tower-streete, those next the Tower, which at first did frighten people more than anything, but it stopped the fire where it was done, it bringing down the1 houses to the ground in the same places they stood, and then it was easy to quench what little fire was in it, though it kindled nothing almost. W. Newer this day went to see how his mother did, and comes late home, telling us how he hath been forced to remove her to Islington, her house in Pye-corner being burned; so that the fire is got so far that way, and all the Old Bayly, and was running down to Fleete-streete; and Paul's is burned, and all Cheapside. I wrote to my father this night, but the post-house being burned, the letter could not go2. 5th. I lay down in the office again upon W. Hewer's (24), quilt, being mighty weary, and sore in my feet with going till I was hardly able to stand. About two in the morning my wife calls me up and tells me of new cRyes of fire, it being come to Barkeing Church, which is the bottom of our lane. I up, and finding it so, resolved presently to take her away, and did, and took my gold, which was about £2350, W. Newer, and Jane, down by Proundy's boat to Woolwich; but, Lord! what sad sight it was by moone-light to see, the whole City almost on fire, that you might see it plain at Woolwich, as if you were by it. There, when I come, I find the gates shut, but no guard kept at all, which troubled me, because of discourse now begun, that there is plot in it, and that the French had done it. I got the gates open, and to Mr. Shelden's, where I locked up my gold, and charged, my wife and W. Newer never to leave the room without one of them in it, night, or day. So back again, by the way seeing my goods well in the lighters at Deptford, and watched well by people.
Home; and whereas I expected to have seen our house on fire, it being now about seven o'clock, it was not. But to the fyre, and there find greater hopes than I expected; for my confidence of finding our Office on fire was such, that I durst not ask any body how it was with us, till I come and saw it not burned. But going to the fire, I find by the blowing up of houses, and the great helpe given by the workmen out of the King's yards, sent up by Sir W. Pen (45), there is a good stop given to it, as well as at Marke-lane end as ours; it having only burned the dyall of Barking Church, and part of the porch, and was there quenched. I up to the top of Barking steeple, and there saw the saddest sight of desolation that I ever saw; every where great fires, oyle-cellars, and brimstone, and other things burning. I became afeard to stay there long, and therefore down again as fast as I could, the fire being spread as far as I could see it; and to Sir W. Pen's (45), and there eat a piece of cold meat, having eaten nothing since Sunday, but the remains of Sunday's dinner.
Here I met with Mr. Young and Whistler; and having removed all my things, and received good hopes that the fire at our end; is stopped, they and I walked into the town, and find Fanchurch-streete, Gracious-streete; and Lumbard-streete all in dust. The Exchange a sad sight, nothing standing there, of all the statues or pillars, but Sir Thomas Gresham's picture in the corner.
Walked into Moorefields (our feet ready to burn, walking through the towne among the hot coles), and find that full of people, and poor wretches carrying their good there, and every body keeping his goods together by themselves (and a great blessing it is to them that it is fair weathe for them to keep abroad night and day); drank there, and paid two-pence for a plain penny loaf.
Thence homeward, having passed through Cheapside and Newgate Market, all burned, and seen Anthony_Joyce_1668's House in fire. And took up (which I keep by me) a piece of glasse of Mercers' Chappell in the streete, where much more was, so melted and buckled with the heat of the fire like parchment. I also did see a poor cat taken out of a hole in the chimney, joyning to the wall of the Exchange; with, the hair all burned off the body, and yet alive.
So home at night, and find there good hopes of saving our office; but great endeavours of watching all night, and having men ready; and so we lodged them in the office, and had drink and bread and cheese for them. And I lay down and slept a good night about midnight, though when I rose I heard that there had been a great alarme of French and Dutch being risen, which proved, nothing. But it is a strange thing to see how long this time did look since Sunday, having been always full of variety of actions, and little sleep, that it looked like a week or more, and I had forgot, almost the day of the week.
Note 1. A copy of this letter, preserved among the Pepys MSS. in the author's own handwriting, is subjoined: "SIR, The fire is now very neere us as well on Tower Streete as Fanchurch Street side, and we little hope of our escape but by this remedy, to ye want whereof we doe certainly owe ye loss of ye City namely, ye pulling down of houses, in ye way of ye fire. This way Sir W. Pen (45) and myself have so far concluded upon ye practising, that he is gone to Woolwich and Deptford to supply himself with men and necessarys in order to the doeing thereof, in case at his returne our condition be not bettered and that he meets with his R. Hs. approbation, which I had thus undertaken to learn of you. Pray please to let me have this night (at whatever hour it is) what his R. Hs. directions are in this particular; Sir J. Minnes (67) and Sir W. Batten (65) having left us, we cannot add, though we are well assured of their, as well as all ye neighbourhood's concurrence. "Yr. obedient servnt. "S. P. "Sir W. Coventry (38), "Septr. 4, 1666"..
Note 2. J. Hickes wrote to Williamson on September 3rd from the "Golden Lyon", Red Cross Street Posthouse. Sir Philip (Frowde) and his lady fled from the (letter) office at midnight for: safety; stayed himself till 1 am. till his wife and childrens' patience could stay, no longer, fearing lest they should be quite stopped up; the passage was so tedious they had much ado to get where they are. The Chester and Irish, mails have come-in; sends him his letters, knows not how to dispose of the business (Calendar of State Papers, 1666-67, p. 95).

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Salehurst, Sussex

Around 06 Dec 1559 William Culpepper 1509-1559 (50) diedWilliam Culpepper 1509-1559 (50) at Salehurst.

Sele Priory, Sussex

Around Jan 1291 William Braose 1st Baron Braose 1224-1291 (67) died at Findon. He was buried at Sele Priory. His son William Braose 2nd Baron Braose 1260-1326 (31) succeeded 2nd Baron Braose.

Steyning, Sussex

Death of King Æthelwulf

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. But when king Ethelwulf was dead, and buried at Stemrugam [Note. Possibly Winchester Old Minster], his son Ethelbald, contrary to God's prohibition and the dignity of a Christian, contrary also to the custom of all the pagans, ascended his father's bed, and married Judith (14), daughter of Charles (34), king of the Franks, and drew down much infamy upon himself from all who heard of it. During two years and a half of licentiousness after his father he held the government of the West-Saxons.

On 03 Jan 1835 Sarah Cox aka Fanny Cornforth Model 1835-1909 was born to William Cox Blacksmith 1814-1859 (21) and Jane Woolgar 1814-1847 (21) at Steyning. She was baptised 01 Feb 1835.

Stopham, Sussex

Around 1300 Isabella St John 1300-1350 was born to Edward St John 1259-1368 (41) and Eve Hauterive at Stopham.

Storrington, Sussex

Battle of Waterloo

On 07 Dec 1816 Lieutentant-Colonel Henry Hollis Bradford 1781-1816 (35) died at La Vacherie from wounds he had received at the Battle of Waterloo. He was buried at Storrington.

Street, Sussex

Around 1275 William Cheney 1275-1322 was born to Alexander Cheney 1248-1295 (27) and Agnes Saye 1250-1275 (25) at Street.

Trotton, Sussex

Around 1351 Thomas Camoys 1st Baron Camoys 1351-1421 was born to John Camoys 1310-1383 (41) and Elizabeth Latimer at Trotton.

Around 1469 Roger Lewknor 1469-1543 was born to Roger Lewknor 1415-1478 (54) at Trotton.

On 15 Jan 1543 Roger Lewknor 1469-1543 (74) died at Trotton.

On 03 Mar 1652 Thomas Otway 1652-1685 was born in Trotton.

Before 16 Apr 1685. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Thomas Otway 1652-1685.

St George's Church Trotton, Sussex

On 20 Apr 1417 Elizabeth Mortimer Baroness Camoys 1371-1417 (46) died. She was buried at St George's Church Trotton.

On 28 Mar 1421 Thomas Camoys 1st Baron Camoys 1351-1421 (70) died. He was buried at St George's Church Trotton. His grandson Hugh Camoys 2nd Baron Camoys 1413-1426 (8) succeeded 2nd Baron Camoys 2C 1383.

Uckfield, Sussex

Uckfield House Uckfield, Sussex

Times Newspaper Marriages. 05 Jan 1938. MR. J. NEVILL (23) AND MISS HARRISON (22).
The Duke (37) and Duchess of Gloucester (36) have sent a silver condiments set to Mr. John Nevill (23), Life Guards, elder son of Major (54) and Mrs. Guy Larnach-Nevill (47), of Uckfield House, and Miss Patricia Harrison (22), daughter of Major and the Hon. Mrs. J. F. Harrison, of Kings Walden Bury, Hitchin, whose marriage took place yesterday at St. Paul's, Knightsbridge. The Rev. G. S. Shackleford officiated, assisted by the Rev. E. C. Dunford. The bride (22), who was given away by her father, wore a gown of ivory-tinted panne velvet, embossed with sprays of silver flowers. The bodice was fashioned with a square neckline and long sleeves, slightly full at the shoulder, and the square train was lined with silver tissue. A headdress of silver-tipped doves' wings surmounted her long tulle veil, and she carried a spray of mixed white flowers. A retinue of six little girls and four pages folowed the bride. They were Penelope Harrison (sister of the bride), the Hon. Clare Beckett, Marye Pepys (niece of the bridegroom), Margaret Rosselli, Caroline Bury, Joanna Spencer, Hugh Lawson (cousin of the bride), David Myddelton (cousin of the bridegroom), Thomas Pilkington (nephew of the bride), and Charles Smith-Bingham. The pages wore replicas of the uniform of the Life Guards of the early nineteenth century, and the little girls wore long frocks of silver lame, the high-waisted bodices cut with short, puff sleeves, and square necks. They wore caps of silver lame, trimmed with white fur, and carried white fur muffs. Lord Roderic Pratt (22), Life Guards, was best man, and there was a guard of honour from the same regiment. The Hon. Mrs. J. F. Harrison afterwards held a reception at 28, Grosvenor Square, W1. The honeymoon wil be spent in Switzerland.

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1956. Simon Elwes Painter 1902-1975. Portrait of Henry Windsor 1st Duke Gloucester 1900-1974.

Warbleton, Sussex

Around 1516 Thomas Cheney 1516-1565 was born to Thomas Cheney 1474- (42) at Warbleton.

In 1563 John Cheney 1563-1603 was born to Thomas Cheney 1516-1565 (47) at Warbleton.

Cralle Manor Warbleton, Sussex

Around 1384 Elizabeth Cheney 1384-1450 was born to Richard Cheney 1352-1392 (32) at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

Around 1417 William Cheney 1417-1487 was born to Simon Cheney 1392-1455 (25) at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

In 1417 Alexander Cheney 1417- was born to Simon Cheney 1392-1455 (25) at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

In 1419 Richard Cheney 1419- was born to Simon Cheney 1392-1455 (27) at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

In 1421 Robert Cheney 1421-1488 was born to Simon Cheney 1392-1455 (29) at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

In 1443 John Cheney 1443-1494 was born to William Cheney 1417-1487 (26) at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

On 06 Jun 1494 John Cheney 1443-1494 (51) died at Cralle Manor Warbleton.

West Poyning, Sussex

On 25 Sep 1410 Elizabeth Carew 1372-1410 (38) died at West Poyning.

West Sussex

Wigsell, Sussex

In 1538 Francis Culpepper 1538-1591 was born to William Culpepper 1509-1559 (29) and Cicely Barrett 1512- (26) at Wigsell.

Winchelsea, Sussex

In 1321 Walter Culpepper 1266-1321 (55) died at Winchelsea.

In 1321 Thomas Culpepper 1260-1321 (61) died at Winchelsea.

Despencer War Executions

The Chronicles of Froissart Book 1 Chapter 6 Of the earl Thomas of Lancaster and twenty two other of the great lords and knights of England that were beheaded. 1322. THE foresaid king Edward the second (37), father to the noble king Edward the third (9), on whom our matter is founded, this said king governed right diversely his realm by the exhortation of sir Hugh Spencer (36), who had been nourished with him sith the beginning of his yongth; the which sir Hugh (36) had so enticed the king (37), that his father and he were the greatest masters in all the realm, and by envy thought to surmount all other barons of England; whereby after the great discomfiture that the Scots had made at Stirling great murmuring there arose in England between. The noble barons and the king's council, and namely against sir Hugh Spencer (36). They put on him that by his counsel they were discomfited, and that he was favourable to the king of Scots. And on this point the barons had divers times communication together, to be advised what they might do, whereof Thomas earl of Lancaster (44), who was uncle to the king, was chief. And anon when sir Hugh Spencer (36) had espied this, he purveyed for remedy, for he was so great with the king (37) and so near him, that he was more beloved with the king (37) than all the world after. So on a day he came to the king (37) and said, `Sir, certain lords of your realm have made alliance together against you, and without ye take heed thereto betimes, they purpose to put you out of your realm': and so by his malicious means he caused that the king made all the said lords to be taken, and their heads to be stricken off without delay, and without knowledge or answer to any cause. First of all sir Thomas earl of Lancaster (44), who was a noble and a wise, holy knight, and hath done sith many fair miracles in Pomfret, where he was beheaded, for the which deed the said sir Hugh Spencer (36) achieved great hate in all the realm, and specially of the queen (27) and of the earl of Kent (20), brother to the king (37). And when he perceived the displeasure of the queen (27), by his subtle wit he set great discord between the king and the queen (27), so that the king (37) would not see the queen nor come in her company, the which discord endured a long space. Then was it skewed to the queen (27) secretly and to the earl of Kent (20), that without they took good heed to themselves, they were likely to be destroyage to Saint Thomas of Canterbury, and so to Winchelsea, and in the night went into a ship that was ready for her, and her young son Edward (9) with her, and the earl of Kent (20) and sir Roger Mortimer (34), and in another ship they had put all their purveyance, and had wind at will, and the next morning they arrived in the haven of Boulogne.

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Battle of Winchelsea

On 29 Aug 1350 the English fleet defeated a Castilian fleet at Winchelsea during the Battle of Winchelsea. Around twenty Castilian ships were captured; several were sunk. For the English King Edward III England (37) and his son Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince of Wales 1330-1376 (20), James Audley 1318-1369 (32), Henry Scrope 1st Baron Scrope Masham 1312-1392 (37), Henry of Grosmont (40) and John Sully 1283-1388 (67) fought.

Chronicle of Gregory 1403-1419. 1405. Ande that yere Syr Thomas (16) the kyngys sone was Amerelle of the See, and he wente unto Flaundrys and brent bothe in Cachante and in Flaundrys, ande londyd at Scluse and gaffe there to a stronge sawte. Alle so he toke carrekys of Jene and brought them unto Wynchylse, and they were brent thorowe mysse governaunce and moche of the goode ther ynne.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 June 1652. 04 Jun 1652. I set out to meet her (17) now on her journey from Paris, after she had obtained leave to come out of that city, which had now been besieged some time by the Prince of Condé's army in the time of the rebellion, and after she had been now near twelve years from her own country, that is, since five years of age, at which time she went over. I went to Rye to meet her, where was an embargo on occasion of the late conflict with the Holland fleet, the two nations being now in war, and which made sailing very unsafe.
On Whit Sunday, I went to the church (which is a very fair one), and heard one of the canters, who dismissed the assembly rudely, and without any blessing. Here I stayed till the 10th with no small impatience, when I walked over to survey the ruins of Winchelsea, that ancient cinq-port, which by the remains and ruins of ancient streets and public structures, discovers it to have been formerly a considerable and large city. There are to be seen vast caves and vaults, walls and towers, ruins of monasteries and of a sumptuous church, in which are some handsome monuments, especially of the Templars, buried just in the manner of those in the Temple at London. This place being now all in rubbish, and a few despicable hovels and cottages only standing, hath yet a Mayor. The sea, which formerly rendered it a rich and commodious port, has now forsaken it.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 21 October 1666. 21 Oct 1666. Lord's Day. Up, and with my wife to church, and her new woman Barker with her the first time. The girle will, I think, do very well. Here a lazy sermon, and so home to dinner, and took in my Lady Pen (42) and Peg (15) (Sir William being below with the fleete), and mighty merry we were, and then after dinner presently (it being a mighty cool day) I by coach to White Hall, and there attended the Cabinet, and was called in before the King (36) and them to give an account of our want of money for Tangier, which troubles me that it should be my place so often and so soon after one another to come to speak there of their wants—the thing of the world that they love least to hear of, and that which is no welcome thing to be the solicitor for—and to see how like an image the King (36) sat and could not speak one word when I had delivered myself was very strange; only my Chancellor (57) did ask me, whether I thought it was in nature at this time to help us to anything. So I was referred to another meeting of the Lords Commissioners for Tangier and my Lord Treasurer (59), and so went away, and by coach home, where I spent the evening in reading Stillingfleet's (31) defence of the Archbishopp (93), the part about Purgatory, a point I had never considered before, what was said for it or against it, and though I do believe we are in the right, yet I do not see any great matter in this book.
So to supper; and my people being gone, most of them, to bed, my boy and Jane and I did get two of my iron chests out of the cellar into my closett, and the money to my great satisfaction to see it there again, and the rather because the damp cellar spoils all my chests. This being done, and I weary, to bed.
This afternoon walking with Sir H. Cholmly (34) long in the gallery, he told me, among many other things, how Harry Killigrew (29) is banished the Court lately, for saying that my Baroness Castlemayne (25) was a little lecherous girle when she was young.... This she complained to the King (36) of, and he sent to the Duke of York (33), whose servant he is, to turn him away. The Duke of York (33) hath done it, but takes it ill of my Lady that he was not complained to first. She attended him to excute it, but ill blood is made by it. He told me how Mr. Williamson (33) stood in a little place to have come into the House of Commons, and they would not choose him; they said, "No courtier". And which is worse, Bab May (38) went down in great state to Winchelsea with the Duke of York's (33) letters, not doubting to be chosen; and there the people chose a private gentleman in spite of him, and cried out they would have no Court pimp to be their burgesse; which are things that bode very ill. This afternoon I went to see and sat a good while with Mrs. Martin, and there was her sister Doll, with whom, contrary to all expectation, I did what I would, and might have done anything else.

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Wiston, Sussex

In 1443 Ralph Shirley 1443-1504 was born to Ralph Shirley 1413-1466 (30) and Elizabeth Blount 1416-1455 (27) at Wiston.

In 1451 Alice Shirley 1451- was born to Ralph Shirley 1413-1466 (38) and Elizabeth Blount 1416-1455 (35) at Wiston.

Around 1478 Richard Shirley 1478-1540 was born to Ralph Shirley 1443-1504 (35) and Jane Bellingham 1456-1486 (22) at Wiston.

In 1498 William Shirley 1498-1551 was born to Richard Shirley 1478-1540 (20) at Wiston.

On 10 Nov 1540 Richard Shirley 1478-1540 (62) died at Wiston.

On 09 May 1542 Thomas Shirley 1542-1612 was born to William Shirley 1498-1551 (44) at Wiston.

Around 1625 Unknown Painter. Double Portrait of Thomas Shirley 1542-1612 and his Cicassian wife. He wears the exotic Persian clothes which so impressed his European hosts upon his return to Europe from Persia; she wears her native style of dress but also holds a flintlock pistol and a pocket watch, symbols of the technologies Europe was introducing to Persia.

Around 1546 Anthony Shirley 1546-1624 was born to William Shirley 1498-1551 (48) at Wiston.

On 29 May 1551 William Shirley 1498-1551 (53) died at Wiston.

Withyham, Sussex

Buckhurst Withyham, Sussex

Before 1601 Henry Neville 9th Baron Bergavenny 1579-1641 and Mary Sackville 1584-1613 were married at Buckhurst Withyham.

Worthing, Sussex

Offington Worthing, Sussex

Around 1474 Edward Guildford 1474-1534 was born to Richard Guildford 1450-1506 (24) and Ann Pympe 1454-1490 (20) at Offington Worthing.

On 25 Sep 1554 Thomas West 9th Baron De La Warr 6th Baron West 1475-1554 (79) died at Offington Worthing.