History of West Sussex

West Sussex is in Sussex.

Bignor, West Sussex

Bignor Roman Villa, West Sussex

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Billingshurst, West Sussex

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Bognor Regis, West Sussex

On 07 Jul 1815 Son Poyntz -1815 drowned at Bognor Regis.

On 07 Jul 1815 Son Poyntz -1815 drowned at Bognor Regis.

Bosham, West Sussex

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1049. This year the emperor gathered an innumerable army against Baldwin of Bruges (36), because he had destroyed the palace of Nimeguen, and because of many other ungracious acts that he did against him. The army was immense that he had collected together. There was Leo, the Pope of Rome, and the patriarch, and many other great men of several provinces. He sent also to King Edward (46), and requested of him naval aid, that he might not permit him to escape from him by water. Whereupon he went to Sandwich, and lay there with a large naval armament, until the emperor had all that he wished of Baldwin (36). Thither also came back again Earl Sweyne (28), who had gone from this land to Denmark, and there ruined his cause with the Danes. He came hither with a pretence, saying that he would again submit to the king, and be his man; and he requested Earl Beorn to be of assistance to him, and give him land to feed him on. But Harold (27), his brother, and Earl Beorn resisted, and would give him nothing of that which the king had given them. The king also refused him everything. Whereupon Sweyne (28) retired to his ships at Bosham. Then, after the settlement between the emperor and Baldwin (36), many ships went home, and the king remained behind Sandwich with a few ships. Earl Godwin (48) also sailed forty-two ships from Sandwich to Pevensey, and Earl Beorn went with him.

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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1049. Whilst Earl Godwin (48) and Earl Beorn lay at Pevensey with their ships, came Earl Sweyne (28), and with a pretence requested of Earl Beorn, who was his uncle's son, that he would be his companion to the king at Sandwich, and better his condition with him; adding, that he would swear oaths to him, and be faithful to him. Whereupon Beorn concluded, that he would not for their relationship betray him. He therefore took three companions with him, and they rode to Bosham, where his (63) ships lay, as though they should proceed to Sandwich; but they suddenly bound him, and led him to the ships, and went thence with him to Dartmouth, where they ordered him to be slain and buried deep. He was afterwards found, and Harold (27) his cousin fetched him thence, and led him to Winchester, to the old minster, where he buried him with King Knute (54), his uncle.
63. i.e. The ships of Sweyne (28), who had retired thither, as before described.

Banishment of the Godwins

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (36), who had the sister (47) of King Edward (48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover. For Eustace (36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (30), his son, over his; and Harold (29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (48), that they would seek Godwin's (50) army if the king (48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (48) held a council, and proclaimed him (50) an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (50) and his wife, and all his three sons — Sweyne (30) and Tosty (25) and Grith (19). And he went south to Thorney, (67) with his wife, and Sweyne (30) his son, and Tosty (25) and his wife (18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria 1033-1094 (18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders 1012-1067 (38)], and his son Grith (19). Earl Harold (29) with Leofwine (16) went to Bristol in the ship that Earl Sweyne (30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (50), and Earl Sweyne (30), and Earl Harold (29), together at Beverstone, and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (48). There was now assembled before the king (48) (68) Earl Siward (41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (50) and his sons, that the king (48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Harold (29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Sweyne (30) to Bosham, and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (48) security. It was from Thorney (69) that Godwin (50) and those that were with him went to Bruges, to Baldwin's (38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (48) darlings; and his daughter (25) wedded and united to the king (48). Soon after this took place, the king (48) dismissed the lady (25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell. Soon after came Earl William (23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (29) before possessed.
67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.
68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

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Chichester

Goodwood West Sussex

On 29 Dec 1806 Charles Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1735-1806 (71) died at Goodwood West Sussex. He was buried at Chichester Cathedral. His nephew Charles Lennox 4th Duke Richmond 1764-1819 (42) succeeded 4th Duke Richmond 3C 1675, 4th Earl March 4C 1675, 4th Baron Settrington. Charlotte Gordon Duchess Richmond 1768-1842 (38) by marriage Duchess Richmond.

Before 04 Feb 1787 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of Charles Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1735-1806.In 1758 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788. Portrait of Charles Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1735-1806.Around 1776 George Romney Painter 1734-1802. Portrait of Charles Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1735-1806.

Haywards Heath West Sussex

On 16 Apr 1943 William Cecil 1854-1943 (88) died at Haywards Heath West Sussex.

Horsham, West Sussex

Broadridge Heath, Horsham, West Sussex

Field Place, Broadridge Heath, Horsham, West Sussex

On 04 Aug 1792 Percy Bysshe Shelley Poet 1792-1822 was born to Timothy Shelley MP 2nd Baronet Castle Goring 1753-1844 (38) at Field Place.

Rusper, Horsham, West Sussex

The River Mole is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins opposite Hampton Court Palace. It rises near Rusper and flows broadly north through Leatherhead.

North Stoke, West Sussex

John Evelyn's Diary 01 January 1701. 01 Jan 1701. I finished the sale of North Stoake in Sussex to Robert Michell, Esq, appointed by my brother to be sold for payment of portions to my nieces, and other incumbrances on the estate.

Poynings West Sussex

Around 1160 Michael Poynings 1160-1243 was born to Adam Poynings 1126-1202 (34) in Poynings West Sussex.

Around 1202 Thomas Poynings 1202-1275 was born to Michael Poynings 1160-1243 (42) in Poynings West Sussex.

Before 1243 Michael Poynings 1160-1243 died in Poynings West Sussex.

Around 1270 Michael Poynings 1270-1314 was born to Luke Poynings 1231-1294 (38) in Poynings West Sussex.

Around 1294 Thomas Poynings 1st Baron Poynings 1294-1339 was born to Michael Poynings 1270-1314 (24) and Margaret Bardolf 1274-1333 (20) at Poynings West Sussex.

Around 1317 Luke Poynings 4th Baron St John Basing 1317-1376 was born to Thomas Poynings 1st Baron Poynings 1294-1339 (23) at Poynings West Sussex.

Pulborough, West Sussex

Stane Street to Chichester is a 91km Roman Road from Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester to London crossing the land of the Atrebates in use by 70AD. Its route took it from London Bridge along Newington Causeway past Merton Priory to Ewell, through Sutton, past the boundary of Nonsuch Palace to Thirty Acre Barn, then near to Juniper Hall Field Centre near Mickleham, then crossing the River Mole near to Burford Bridge southwards to Dorking (although the route here is vague) to North Holmwood, Ockley, Rowhook after which it crossed the River Arun at Alfodean Bridge where some of the timber piles on which the bridge was built are still present in the river bed. Thereafter the road travels broadly straight to Billingshurst, Pulborough where it crosses the River Arun again, then passing the Roman Villa at Bignor before entering the East Gate at Noviomagus Reginorum aka Chichester.

Selsey West Sussex

Selsey Abbey, Selsey West Sussex

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 18 How the South Saxons received Eadbert and Eolla and the West Saxons Daniel and Aldhelm for their bishops; and of the writings of the same Aldhelm. [705 a.d.]. 705. In the year of our Lord 705, Aldfrid, king of the Northumbrians, died before the end of the twentieth year of his reign. His son Osred (8), a boy about eight years of age, succeeding him in the throne, reigned eleven years. In the beginning of his reign, Haedde, bishop of the West Saxons, departed to the heavenly life; for he was a good man and a just, and his life and doctrine as a bishop were guided rather by his innate love of virtue, than by what he had gained from books. The most reverend bishop, Pechthelm, of whom we shall speak hereafter in the proper place, and who while still deacon or monk was for a long time with his successor Aldhelm (66), was wont to relate that many miracles of healing have been wrought in the place where he died, through the merit of his sanctity; and that the men of that province used to carry the dust thence for the sick, and put it into water, and the drinking thereof, or sprinkling with it, brought health to many sick men and beasts; so that the holy dust being frequently carried away, a great hole was made there.
Upon his death, the bishopric of that province was divided into two dioceses. One of them was given to Daniel, which he governs to this day; the other to Aldhelm (66), wherein he presided most vigorously four years; both of them were fully instructed, as well in matters touching the Church as in the knowledge of the Scriptures. Aldhelm (66), when he was as yet only a priest and abbot of the monastery which is called the city of Maildufus, by order of a synod of his own nation, wrote a notable book against the error of the Britons, in not celebrating Easter at the due time, and in doing divers other things contrary to the purity of doctrine and the peace of the church; and through the reading of this book many of the Britons, who were subject to the West Saxons, were led by him to adopt the Catholic celebration of our Lord's Paschal Feast. He likewise wrote a famous book on Virginity, which, after the example of Sedulius, he composed in twofold form, in hexameters and in prose. He wrote some other books, being a man most instructed in all respects, for he had a polished style, and was, as I have said, of marvellous learning both in liberal and ecclesiastical studies. On his death, Forthere was made bishop in his stead, and is living at this time, being likewise a man very learned in the Holy Scriptures.
Whilst they administered the bishopric, it was determined by a synodal decree, that the province of the South Saxons, which till that time belonged to the diocese of the city of Winchester, where Daniel then presided, should itself have an episcopal see, and a bishop of its own. Eadbert, at that time abbot of the monastery of Bishop Wilfrid, of blessed memory, called Selaeseu, was consecrated their first bishop. On his death, Eolla succeeded to the office of bishop. He also died some years ago, and the bishopric has been vacant to this day.

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Before 716 Bishop Eadberht of Selsey -716 was appointed Bishop of Selsey.

Around 717 Bishop Eolla was appointed Bishop of Selsey.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 980. In this year was Ethelgarconsecrated bishop, on the sixth day before the nones of May, to the bishopric of Selsey; and in the same year was Southampton plundered by a pirate-army, and most of the population slain or imprisoned. And the same year was the Isle of Thanet overrun, and the county of Chester was plundered by the pirate-army of the North. In this year Alderman Alfere fetched the body of the holy King Edward (18) at Wareham, and carried him with great solemnity to Shaftsbury

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1058. This year was Earl Elgar banished: but he soon came in again by force, through Griffin's assistance: and a naval armament came from Norway. It is tedious to tell how it all fell out. In this same year Bishop Aldred consecrated the minster church at Gloucester, which he himself had raised (82) to the honour of God and St. Peter; and then went to Jerusalem (83) with such dignity as no other man did before him, and betook himself there to God. A worthy gift he also offered to our Lord's sepulchre; which was a golden chalice of the value of five marks, of very wonderful workmanship. In the same year died Pope Stephen; and Benedict was appointed pope. He sent hither the pall to Bishop Stigand; who as archbishop consecrated Egelric a monk at Christ church, Bishop of Sussex; and Abbot Siward Bishop of Rochester.
82 He built a new church from the foundation, on a larger plan. The monastery existed from the earliest times.
83 Florence of Worcester says, that he went through Hungary to Jerusalem.

In 1058 Æthelric Bishop of Selsey -1076 was consecrated Bishop of Selsey.

In 1058 Bishop Egelric -1076 was elected Bishop of Selsey.

Shipley West Sussex

Bentons Shipley West Sussex

Around 1572 Thomas Caryll of Bentons was born in Bentons Shipley West Sussex.

Around 12 Aug 1596 Mary Caryll Viscountess Molyneux 1596-1639 was born to Thomas Caryll of Bentons (24) in Bentons Shipley West Sussex.

Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex

Mill Lane Cemetery, Shoreham-by-Sea, West Sussex

In 1925 Annie Miller Model 1835-1925 (90) died. She was buried at Mill Lane Cemetery.

Around 1860. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882. Portrait of Annie Miller Model 1835-1925.1855. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896. Portrait of Annie Miller Model 1835-1925.

Slindon West Sussex

In 1536 George St Leger 1484-1536 (51) died at Slindon West Sussex.

Slinfold West Sussex

Diary of Henry Machyn September 1557. 03 Sep 1557. The iij day of September was bered ser Hare Husse (38) knyght, in the towne callyd Slynford in Sussex.

Diary of Henry Machyn October 1557. After 05 Oct 1557. The (blank) day of October was bered my [lade] Husse in Sussex, at Slynkford, by ser Hare Husse her husband. [Note. This is possibly Bridget Spring -1557 although her husband Henry Hussey 1519-1557 (38) had died two months previously?]

On 19 Aug 1857 Edgar Vincent 1st Viscount D'Abernon 1857-1941 was born at Slinfold West Sussex.

1906. John Singer Sargent Painter 1856-1925. Portrait of Edgar Vincent 1st Viscount D'Abernon 1857-1941.