History of Westminster

1051 Banishment of the Godwins

1153 Treaty of Wallingford aka Winchester aka Westminster

1272 Death of Henry III

1308 King Edward II and Isabella of France arrive in England

1397 Arrest and Execution of Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey 11th Earl Arundel

1474 Anne Beauchamp declared Legally Dead

1483 Death of Edward IV

1511 Birth and Death of Prince Henry

1540 May Day Jousting

1552 Trial and Execution of Edward Seymour Duke of Somerset and his Supporters

1665 Great Plague of London

1962 London Premiere of Lawrence of Arabia

Westminster is in London.

Treaty of Wallingford aka Winchester aka Westminster

Around Aug 1153 Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (20) and Stephen I King England 1094-1154 (59) agreed the Treaty of Wallingford aka Winchester aka Westminster by which Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (20) would inherit the throne on the death of Stephen I King England 1094-1154 (59). The Treaty was ratified by Theobald of Bec (63) at Westminster in Christmas 1153.

Death of Henry III

On 16 Nov 1272 Henry III King England 1207-1272 (65) died at Westminster. His son Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (33) succeeded I King England. Eleanor of Castile (31) by marriage Queen Consort England.

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 24 Jan 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Canterbury. To the Sheriffs of London. Order to deliver John de la Dune, Roger de Hopton, Richard le Harpour, Roger de Soppewalle, Roger le Keu, Rober le Hunt, Thomas de Sydenham, Henry le Gardener, Thomas de la More, Philip Kemp, John le Wayt, and John le Wodeward, the men and servants of Adam de Kyngeshemede, in the King's prison of Newgate for a trespass committed by them upon the King's men at Westminster, from prison upon their finding sufficient mainpernors to have them before the King (23) or his Lieutenant in the quinzaine of the Purification of St Mary to stand to right concerning the said trespass. Witness: Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).

King Edward II and Isabella of France arrive in England

Close Rolls Edward II 1307-1313. 09 Feb 1308 King Edward II of England (23). Dover. To Alice, late wife of Roger Bigod (63), earl of Norfolk and Marshall of England. Order to meet the king at Dover on his return from France with his consort about Sunday next after the Feast of the Purification of St Mary. Witnessed by Piers Gaveston 1st Earl Cornwall 1284-1312 (24).
The like to:
Elizabeth, countess of Hereford and Essex (25).
Henry de Lancastre (27).
Robert de Monte Alto.
Almaric de Sancto Amando[Ibid].
To R Archbishop of Canterbury (63). Order to attend the king's coronaion on Sunday next after the feast of St Valentine [14 Feb] at Westminster, to execute what pertains to his office.
To the Sheriff of Surrey. Order to proclaim in market towns, etc., that no knight, esquire, or other shall, under pain of forfeiture, pressure to tourney or make jousts or bordices (torneare, justos seu burdseicas facere), or otherwise go armed at Croydon or elsewhere before the king's coronation.

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On 04 Jul 1392 Thomas Stafford 3rd Earl Stafford 1368-1392 (24) died at Westminster. His brother William Stafford 4th Earl Stafford 1375-1395 (16) succeeded Earl Stafford 1C 1351, 5th Baron Stafford 1C 1299.

Arrest and Execution of Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey 11th Earl Arundel

On 21 Sep 1397 Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey 11th Earl Arundel 1346-1397 (51) was tried at Westminster.
He was beheaded at Tower Hill immediately thereafter. His son Thomas Fitzalan 10th Earl Surrey 12th Earl Arundel 1381-1415 (15) succeeded 10th Earl Surrey 1C 1088, 12th Earl Arundel Sussex.

Anne Beauchamp declared Legally Dead

Parliament Rolls.Edward IV Oct 1472.Second Roll. 06 Jun 1474. Westminster Palace. Exemplification at the request of Richard Duke of Gloucester (21), of the tenour of an act (English) in the Parliament summoned at Westminster, 6 October, 12 Edward IV, and continued to 9 May, 14 Edward IV, ordaining that George Duke Clarence (24), and Isabel (22) his wife and Richard Duke of Gloucester, and Anne (17) his wife, daughters and heirs to Richard Nevyle (45), late Earl of Warwick, and daughters and heirs apparent to Anne Beauchamp (47), his wife should possess and enjoy as in the right of the said wives all possessions belonging to the said Countess as though she were naturally dead and that she should be barred and excluded therefrom, that they should make partition of the premises and the same partition should be good in law, that the said Dukes should enjoy for life all the possessions of their wives if they should outlive the latter, that the said George (24) and Isabel (22) should not make any alienation, grant, fine or recovery of any of the premises to the hurt of the said Richard (21) and Anne (17) or the latter to the hurt of the former, that if the said Richard and Anne be divorced and afterwards married this Act should hold good, that if they be divorced and he do his effectual diligence to be married to her and during her life be not wedded to any other woman he should enjoy as much of the premises as should appertain to her during his life, and that notwithstanding the restraint of alienation or recovery above specified the lordship, manor and wappentake of Chesterfield and Scarvesdale with the appurtenances and all the lands and tenements in Chesterfield and Scarvesdale sometime of Ales (67), late Countess of Salisbury, might be given to the King and his heirs in exchange for other lands and tenements, which shall however be subject of this Act.Anne Beauchamp declared Legally Dead.

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Death of Edward IV

On 25 Mar 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) returned to Westminster from Windsor. A few days later he became sufficiently unwell to add codicils to his will, and to have urged reconciliation between William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28); it isn't clear what the cause of the friction between the two men was although it appears well known that Hastings resented the Woodville family.

On 09 Apr 1483 Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (40) died at Westminster. His son Edward V King England 1470- (12) succeeded V King England. Those present included Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (46), William Hastings 1st Baron Hastings 1431-1483 (52) and Thomas Grey 1st Marquess Dorset 1455-1501 (28).

1876. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896. "The Two Princes". An imagined portrait of the Princes in the Tower Edward V King England 1470- and Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473-.

Birth and Death of Prince Henry

In Feb 1511 Henry VIII (19) celebrated the birth of his son by holding a magnificent tournament at Westminster. The challengers included Henry VIII (19) who fought as Cuere Loyall, Henry Courtenay 1st Marquess Exeter 1496-1538 (15) as Bon Vouloir, Edward Neville 1471-1538 (40) as Joyeulx Penser, Thomas Knyvet 1485-1512 (26) as Valiant Desyr and Thomas Tyrrell -1551.
On Day 1 of the tournament the Answerers included: William Parr 1st Baron Parr Horton 1483-1547 (28), Henry Grey 4th Earl Kent 1495-1562 (16), Thomas Cheney Treasurer 1485-1558 (26), Richard Blount and Robert Morton.
On Day 2 of the tournament the Answerers included: Richard Tempest of Bracewell 1480-1537 (31), Thomas Lucy, Henry Guildford 1489-1532 (22), Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (27), Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539 (34), Richard Grey, Leonard Grey 1st Viscount Grane 1479-1541 (32), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (38), Edmund Howard 1478-1539 (33) and Henry Stafford 1st Earl Wiltshire 1479-1523 (32).

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1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Henry Guildford 1489-1532 wearing the Garter and Inter twined Knots Collar with St George Pendant. Standing three-quarter length, richly dressed in velvet, fur and cloth-of-gold. Holbein has meticulously shown the varied texture of his cloth-of-gold double which is woven into a pomegranate pattern with a variety of different weaves including loops of gold thread. Similarly, he has carefully articulated the band of black satin running down Guildford's arm against the richer black of the velvet of his sleeve. A lavish use of both shell-gold paint and gold leaf (which has been used to emulate the highlights of the gold thread in the material) emphasises the luxuriousness of the sitter's dress and his high status. In his right-hand he holds the Comptroller of the Household Staff of Office.In 1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Mary Wotton 1499-1535 when she was thirty-two commissioned with that of her husband Henry Guildford 1489-1532 possibly to celebrate their marriage. Hung with gold chains and embellished with pearls, Baroness Guildford embodies worldly prosperity, and with her prayer book she is also the very image of propriety.Around 1543 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545.Before 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539.

May Day Jousting

On 01 May 1540 a tournament was held at Westminster. Gregory Cromwell 1st Baron Cromwell Oakham 1520-1551 (20), Thomas Poynings 1st Baron Poynings 1512-1545 (28), Thomas Seymour 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley 1508-1549 (32), John Dudley 1st Duke Northumberland 1504-1553 (36), Richard Cromwell 1495-1544 (45) and George Carew 1503-1545 (36) were challengers.

On 12 Nov 1555 Stephen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester 1483-1555 (72) died at Westminster.

On 13 Jul 1612 Edward Herbert 1561-1612 (50) died at Westminster.

On 25 Feb 1661 Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 was born illegitimately to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30) and Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 (20) at Westminster.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes.Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes.Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles IIBefore 07 Nov 1666. William Faithorne "The Elder" Engraver 1616-1691. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 07 November 1666.Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child.Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. One of the Windsor Beauties.Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.Around 1690 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.

On 29 Nov 1682 Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (62) died without legitimate issue at Westminster. Duke Cumberland 1C 1644 extinct. He was buried in the Crypt Westminster Abbey.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray.Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.Around 1672 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.

On 12 Nov 1684 Admiral Edward Vernon 1684-1757 was born to James Vernon 1646-1727 (38) in Westminster.

In 1739 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Admiral Edward Vernon 1684-1757.

On 28 Aug 1731 Charles Boyle 4th Earl Cork 4th Earl Orrery 1674-1731 (57) died at Westminster. He was buried at Westminster Abbey. His son John Boyle 5th Earl Cork 1707-1762 (24) succeeded 5th Earl Cork. Henrietta Hamilton Countess Cork by marriage Countess Cork.

On 04 Mar 1750 Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 2nd Earl Radnor 1750-1828 was born to William Pleydell-Bouverie 1st Earl Radnor 1725-1776 (25) and Harriet Pleydell at Westminster.

In 1806. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 2nd Earl Radnor 1750-1828.Before 23 Jan 1810 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 2nd Earl Radnor 1750-1828.Before 23 Jan 1810 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Jacob Pleydell-Bouverie 2nd Earl Radnor 1750-1828.

On 10 Apr 1766 Lawrence Dundas 1st Earl Zetland 1766-1839 was born to Thomas Dundas 1st Baron Dundas 1741-1820 (25) and Charlotte Fitzwilliam Countess Feversham 1746-1833 (19) in Westminster.

On 25 Apr 1769 Robert Brudenell 6th Earl Cardigan 1769-1837 was born to Robert Brudenell 1726-1768 (42) and Anne Bisshop 1728-1803 (41) at Westminster.

On 08 Jan 1797 Arthur Chichester 1st Baron Templemore 1797-1837 was born to Spencer Stanley Chichester 1775-1819 (21) and Anne Harriet Stewart 1769-1850 (28) at Westminster.

On 16 Jul 1887 Alexander Dalton Cockburn 1846-1887 (41) died at Westminster.

On 11 Jul 1904 Daphne Vivian Marchioness Bath 1904-1997 was born to George Vivian 4th Baron Vivian 1878-1940 (26) at Westminster.

Bayswater, Westminster

Connaught Place Bayswater, Westminster

On 12 Mar 1845 William Douglas Hamilton 12th Duke Hamilton 9th Duke Brandon 1845-1895 was born to William Alexander Archibald Hamilton 11th Duke Hamilton 8th Duke Brandon 1811-1863 (34) at Connaught Place Bayswater.

Around 1863. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of William Douglas Hamilton 12th Duke Hamilton 9th Duke Brandon 1845-1895.Before 08 Jul 1863. Richard Buckner Painter 1812-1883. Portrait of William Alexander Archibald Hamilton 11th Duke Hamilton 8th Duke Brandon 1811-1863.

Orme Square Baywater, Bayswater, Westminster

2 Orme Square Baywater, Bayswater, Westminster

On 21 Oct 1950 David Lascelles 8th Earl of Harewood 1950- was born to George Henry Hubert Lascelles 7th Earl Harewood 1923-2011 (27) and Marion Stein Countess Harewood 1926-2014 (24) at 2 Orme Square Baywater. He a great grandson of George V King United Kingdom 1865-1936. He was baptised at All Saints Church Harewood. His godparents included Elizabeth II Queen United Kingdom 1926- (24), Victoria Mary Teck Queen Consort England 1867-1953 (83), Margaret Selina Lascelles Viscountess Boyne 1883-1978 (67) and his uncle Gerald David Lascelles 1924-1998 (26).

1933. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Elizabeth II Queen United Kingdom 1926-.1938 to 1939. Simon Elwes Painter 1902-1975. Portrait of Victoria Mary Teck Queen Consort England 1867-1953.

Belgravia

Buckingham Palace Location

Covent Garden

Charing Cross

Fitzrovia, Westminster

Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, Westminster

37 Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, Westminster

02 Apr 1871. Census. 37 Fitzroy Square.
Ford Madox Brown Painter 1821-1893 (49). Head. 49.
Emma Matilda Hill 1829-1890 (41). Wife. 36.
Emma Lucy Madox Brown Painter 1843-1894 (27). Daughter. 26.
Catherine Emily Brown Painter 1850-1927 (20). Daughter. 20.
Oliver Madox Brown 1855-1874 (16). Son. 16.
Charloote Kirkby. Servant. 29.
Mary Ann Edwards. Servant. 19.

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Buckingham Street Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, Westminster

7 Buckingham Street Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, Westminster

In 1787 John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826 (31) and Anne Denman 1760-1820 (27) moved to Rome where they lived until 1794 when they re-settled at 7 Buckingham Street Fitzroy Square.

Before 1826 . John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826.Around 1797. Henry Howard Painter 1769-1847. Portrait of John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826.Before 07 Dec 1826. Henry Howard Painter 1769-1847. Portrait of John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826.

In 1810 Maria Flaxman 1768-1833 (42) moved into the home of her brother John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826 (54) at 7 Buckingham Street Fitzroy Square.

Fitzroy House, Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, Westminster

On 12 Aug 1909 Algernon Charles Fountaine 1851-1909 (57) died at Fitzroy House.

New Road Fitzroy Square, Fitzrovia, Westminster

After 1827. St Margaret's Church Wrenbury. Monument to Thomas and Maria Hewitt made by JJ Sanders of New Road Fitzroy Square.

Fitzroy Street, Fitzrovia, Westminster

Fitzroy Street was formerly known as Russell Place South and Upper Fitzroy Street North.

Russell Place, Fitzroy Street, Fitzrovia, Westminster

7 Russell Place, Fitzroy Street, Fitzrovia, Westminster

Memorials of Edward Burne-Jones 1860. After 09 Jun 1860. Our own home-coming was informal, for Russell Place had not expected us so soon and was unprepared to receive us; there were no chairs in our dining-room, nor any other furniture that had been ordered except a table. But what did that matter? if there were no chairs there was the table, a good, firm one of oak, sitting upon which the bride received her first visitors, and as the studio was in its usual condition there was a home at once. The boys at the Boys Home in Euston Road had made the table from the design of Philip Webb (29), and were busy with chairs and a sofa, which presently arrived. The chairs were high-backed black ones with rush seats, and the companion sofa was of panelled wood painted black. The chairs have disappeared, for they were smaller articles, vigorously used and much moved about, but the table and sofa have always shared the fortunes of their owners and were never superseded: we ate our last meal together at that table and our grandchildren laugh round it now. How modest the scale of our housekeeping was it would be hard to say, and also how rich we felt: "we live in great happiness and thankfulness"was the clue given my friend Charlotte as to our estate.

Mortimer Street Fitzrovia, Westminster

9 Mortimer Street Mortimer Street Fitzrovia, Westminster

In 1770 Joseph Nollekens Sculptor 1737-1823 (32) set up as a maker of busts and. Monuments in 9 Mortimer Street, Fitzrovia.

Green Park, Westminster

On 07 May 1771 Edward Ligonier 1st Earl Ligonier 1740-1782 (31) duelled at Green Park with Vittorio Amadeo, Count Alfieri, with whom his wife was possibly conducting an affair.

Constitution Hill, Green Park, Westminster

In Jul 1835 Edward Harbord 3rd Baron Suffield 1781-1835 (53) died at Vernon House Park Place after a fall from his horse on Constitution Hill. His son Edward Harbord 4th Baron Suffield 1813-1853 (22) succeeded 4th Baron Suffield, 5th Baronet Harbord.

Spencer House, Green Park, Westminster

On 30 Apr 1837 William Henry Lyttelton 3rd Baron Lyttelton 1782-1837 (55) died at Spencer House. His son George William Lyttelton 4th Baron Lyttelton 1817-1876 (20) succeeded 4th Baron Lyttelton of Frankley in Worcestershire.

Leicester Square, Westminster

On 15 Nov 1698 Henriette Louise Jeffreys Countess Pomfret 1698-1761 was born to John Jeffreys 2nd Baron Jeffreys 1673-1703 (25) and Charlotte Herbert Viscountess Windsor 1676-1733 (22) at Leicester Square.

In 1699 Edward Rich 6th Earl Warwick 1673-1710 (26) and Charles Mohun 4th Baron Mohun Okehampton 1675-1712 (24) were tried for the murder of Richard Coote following a duel on Leicester Square and found guilty of manslaughter. He escaped punishment by pleading privilege of peerage. He and Mohun had killed Coote in a duel and it was common for a seventeenth-century jury in such cases to take a lenient view of such matters.

Leicester Fields Leicester Square, Westminster

On 12 Apr 1696 Henry Bourchier Fane -1696 was killed in a duel with Elizeus Burges at Leicester Fields Leicester Square.

Leicester House, Leicester Square, Westminster

Diary of Samuel Pepys 21 October 1668. 21 Oct 1668. Lay pretty long talking with content with my wife about our coach and things, and so to the office, where Sir Prince was to do something in his accounts.
At noon to dinner to Mr. Batelier's, his mother coming this day a-housewarming to him, and several friends of his, to which he invited us. Here mighty merry, and his mother the same; I heretofore took her for a gentlewoman, and understanding. I rose from table before the rest, because under an obligation to go to my Lord Brouncker's (48), where to meet several gentlemen of the Royal Society, to go and make a visit to the French Embassador Colbert (43), at Leicester House, he having endeavoured to make one or two to my Lord Brouncker (48), as our President, but he was not within, but I come too late, they being gone before: but I followed to Leicester House; but they are gore in and up before me; and so I away to the New Exchange, and there staid for my wife, and she come, we to Cow Lane, and there I shewed her the coach which I pitch on, and she is out of herself for joy almost. But the man not within, so did nothing more towards an agreement, but to Crow's (51) about a bed, to have his advice, and so home, and there had my wife to read to me, and so to supper and to bed. Memorandum: that from Crow's, we went back to Charing Cross, and there left my people at their tailor's, while I to my Lord Sandwich's (43) lodgings, who come to town the last night, and is come thither to lye: and met with him within: and among others my new cozen Creed, who looks mighty soberly; and he and I saluted one another with mighty gravity, till we come to a little more freedom of talk about it. But here I hear that Sir Gilbert Pickering is lately dead, about three days since, which makes some sorrow there, though not much, because of his being long expected to die, having been in a lethargy long. So waited on my Lord to Court, and there staid and saw the ladies awhile: and thence to my wife, and took them up; and so home, and to supper and bed.

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John Evelyn's Diary 08 October 1672. 08 Oct 1672. I took leave of my Lady Sunderland (26), who was going to Paris to my Lord, now ambassador there. She made me stay to dinner at Leicester House, and afterward sent for Richardson, the famous fire-eater. He devoured brimstone on glowing coals before us, chewing and swallowing them; he melted a beer-glass and ate it quite up; then, taking a live coal on his tongue, he put on it a raw oyster, the coal was blown on with bellows till it flamed and sparkled in his mouth, and so remained till the oyster gaped and was quite boiled. Then, he melted pitch and wax with sulphur, which he drank down as it flamed; I saw it flaming in his mouth a good while; he also took up a thick piece of iron, such as laundresses use to put in their smoothing boxes, when it was fiery hot, held it between his teeth, then in his hand, and threw it about like a stone; but this, I observed, he cared not to hold very long; then he stood on a small pot, and, bending his body, took a glowing iron with his mouth from between his feet, without touching the pot, or ground, with his hands; with divers other prodigious feats.

On 07 Nov 1745 Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 was born to Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751 (38) and Augusta Saxe Coburg Altenburg 1719-1772 (25) at Leicester House. He a grandson of King George II of Great Britain and Ireland 1683-1760.

Around 1784 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 and Anne Luttrell Duchess Cumberland and Strathearn 1743-1808.In 1777 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790.In 1777 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790.In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790.In 1750 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.Around 1750 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779 (attributed). Portrait of Augusta Saxe Coburg Altenburg 1719-1772.

On 30 Nov 1745 Henry Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Cumberland and Strathearn 1745-1790 was christened at Leicester House.

On 31 Mar 1751 Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751 (44) died at Leicester House.

Odeon Cinema Leicester Square, Westminster

London Premiere of Lawrence of Arabia

On 10 Dec 1962 Lawrence of Arabia received its premiere in London at the Odeon Cinema Leicester Square. The event was attended by Philip Mountbatten Duke Edinburgh 1921-2021 (41) and Elizabeth II Queen United Kingdom 1926- (36). Peter O'Toole, Omar Sharif, David Lean Director), Sam Spiegel (Producer) and Freddie Young (cameraman) attended. In the audience were Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Attenborough, his wife and son. Noël Coward attended the after-party.

Marylebone

Mayfair

Oxford Street, Westminster

240 Oxford Street, Westminster

Around 1861 to 1881 James Currie Sculptor 1836-1891 (45) lived at 240 Oxford Street.

Paddington, Westminster

Diary of Samuel Pepys 12 July 1666. 12 Jul 1666. But was up again by five o'clock, and was forced to rise, having much business, and so up and dressed myself (enquiring, was told that Mrs. Tooker was gone hence to live at London) and away with Poundy to the Tower, and thence, having shifted myself, but being mighty drowsy for want of sleep, I by coach to St. James's, to Goring House, there to wait on my Lord Arlington (48) to give him an account of my night's worke, but he was not up, being not long since married: so, after walking up and down the house below,—being the house I was once at Hartlib's (66) sister's wedding, and is a very fine house and finely furnished,—and then thinking it too much for me to lose time to wait my Lord's rising, I away to St. James's, and there to Sir W. Coventry (38), and wrote a letter to my Lord Arlington (48) giving him an account of what I have done, and so with Sir W. Coventry (38) into London, to the office. And all the way I observed him mightily to make mirth of the Duke of Albemarle (57) and his people about him, saying, that he was the happiest man in the world for doing of great things by sorry instruments. And so particularized in Sir W. Clerke (43), and Riggs, and Halsey, and others. And then again said that the only quality eminent in him was, that he did persevere; and indeed he is a very drudge, and stands by the King's business. And this he said, that one thing he was good at, that he never would receive an excuse if the thing was not done; listening to no reasoning for it, be it good or bad. But then I told him, what he confessed, that he would however give the man, that he employs, orders for removing of any obstruction that he thinks he shall meet with in the world, and instanced in several warrants that he issued for breaking open of houses and other outrages about the business of prizes, which people bore with either for affection or fear, which he believes would not have been borne with from the King (36), nor Duke (32), nor any man else in England, and I thinke he is in the right, but it is not from their love of him, but from something else I cannot presently say. Sir W. Coventry (38) did further say concerning Warcupp, his kinsman, that had the simplicity to tell Sir W. Coventry (38), that the Duke (32) did intend to go to sea and to leave him his agent on shore for all things that related to the sea. But, says Sir W. Coventry (38), I did believe but the Duke of Yorke (32) would expect to be his agent on shore for all sea matters. And then he begun to say what a great man Warcupp was, and something else, and what was that but a great lyer; and told me a story, how at table he did, they speaking about antipathys, say, that a rose touching his skin any where, would make it rise and pimple; and, by and by, the dessert coming, with roses upon it, the Duchesse (29) bid him try, and they did; but they rubbed and rubbed, but nothing would do in the world, by which his lie was found at then.
He spoke contemptibly of Holmes and his mermidons, that come to take down the ships from hence, and have carried them without any necessaries, or any thing almost, that they will certainly be longer getting ready than if they had staid here.
In fine, I do observe, he hath no esteem nor kindnesse for the Duke's matters, but, contrarily, do slight him and them; and I pray God the Kingdom do not pay too dear by this jarring; though this blockheaded Duke I did never expect better from.
At the office all the morning, at noon home and thought to have slept, my head all day being full of business and yet sleepy and out of order, and so I lay down on my bed in my gowne to sleep, but I could not, therefore about three o'clock up and to dinner and thence to the office, where. Mrs. Burroughs, my pretty widow, was and so I did her business and sent her away by agreement, and presently I by coach after and took her up in Fenchurch Streete and away through the City, hiding my face as much as I could, but she being mighty pretty and well enough clad, I was not afeard, but only lest somebody should see me and think me idle.
I quite through with her, and so into the fields Uxbridge way, a mile or two beyond Tyburne, and then back and then to Paddington, and then back to Lyssen green, a place the coachman led me to (I never knew in my life) and there we eat and drank and so back to Chasing Crosse, and there I set her down. All the way most excellent pretty company. I had her lips as much as I would, and a mighty pretty woman she is and very modest and yet kinde in all fair ways. All this time I passed with mighty pleasure, it being what I have for a long time wished for, and did pay this day 5s. forfeite for her company.
She being gone, I to White Hall and there to Lord Arlington's (48), and met Mr. Williamson (32), and find there is no more need of my trouble about the Galliott, so with content departed, and went straight home, where at the office did the most at the office in that wearied and sleepy state I could, and so home to supper, and after supper falling to singing with Mercer did however sit up with her, she pleasing me with her singing of "Helpe, helpe", 'till past midnight and I not a whit drowsy, and so to bed.

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In 1729 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764 (31) and Jane Thornhill 1709-1789 (20) were married in Paddington without the permission of her father James Thornhill Painter 1675-1734 (54).

After 1730 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764. Portrait of the artist's wife Jane Thornhill 1709-1789.

Great Western Hotel Paddington, Westminster

On 29 Jul 1861 Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861 (64) died at the Great Western Hotel Paddington. His son Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1823-1889 (37) succeeded 3rd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 3C 1703, 4th Marquess Buckingham 2C 1784, 6th Earl Temple of Stowe, 5th Earl Nugent, 7th Viscount Cobham

Before 01 Jun 1831. John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos 1797-1861.

Lancaster Gate, Paddington, Westminster

Christ Church Paddington, Lancaster Gate, Westminster

On 28 Dec 1865 William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910 (38) and Fanny Waugh 1833-1866 (32) were married at Christ Church Paddington. William Michael Rossetti Author 1829-1919 (36) and Emil Waugh were witnesses.

Maida Vale, Paddington, Westminster

Watling Street 1d Marble Arch to St Albans. From Marble Arch Watling Street continues north-west along the Edgeware Road, Maida Vale, Cricklewood, Sulloniacis, Radlett, Park Street to Verulamium aka St Albans.

Southwick Crescent Paddington, Westminster

On 21 Jul 1845 Charles Manners-Sutton 1st Viscount Canterbury 1780-1845 (65) died at Southwick Crescent Paddington. On 21 Jul 1845 His son Charles Manners-Sutton 2nd Viscount Canterbury 1812-1869 (33) succeeded 2nd Viscount Canterbury of Canterbury, 2nd Baron Bottesford of Bottesford in Leicestershire.

St Mary's Church Paddington, Westminster

Around 1860 John Goldsmith 1851-1912 (8) and Jane Dorsett 1861-1916 were married at St Mary's Church Paddington.

Piccadilly

Pimlico, Westminster

On 04 Jan 1927 Ambrose McEvoy Painter 1877-1927 (49) died at Pimlico.

Around 1970 Edward Fitzgerald 7th Duke Leinster 1892-1976 (77) lived in a small bedsit in Pimlico as a result of being unble to pay his gambling debts.

Chester Square, Pimlico, Westminster

St Michael's Church Pimlico, Chester Square, Westminster

On or before 22 Dec 1852 Elizabeth Calder Marshall 1852- was born to William Calder Marshall Sculptor 1813-1894 (39) and Margaret Calder 1816-1887 (36). She was baptised on 22 Dec 1852 at St Michael's Church Pimlico who were described as living at 47 Ebury Street.

Around 1884. Joseph Parkin Mayall Photographer 1839-1906. Portrait of William Calder Marshall Sculptor 1813-1894.1883. John Pettie Painter 1839-1893. Portrait of William Calder Marshall Sculptor 1813-1894.

Eaton Place Pimlico, Westminster

On 09 May 1858 Mary Whitbread Lady Grey 1770-1858 (88) died at Eaton Place Pimlico.

1783 Daniel Gardner Painter 1750-1805. Portrait of Mary Whitbread Lady Grey 1770-1858.

Ebury Street, Pimlico, Westminster

47 Ebury Street, Pimlico, Westminster

On or before 22 Dec 1852 Elizabeth Calder Marshall 1852- was born to William Calder Marshall Sculptor 1813-1894 (39) and Margaret Calder 1816-1887 (36). She was baptised on 22 Dec 1852 at St Michael's Church Pimlico who were described as living at 47 Ebury Street.

Eccleston Square Pimlico, Westminster

71 Eccleston Square Pimlico, Westminster

On 03 Feb 1903 Air Commodore Douglas Douglas-Hamilton 14th Duke of Hamilton 1903-1973 was born to Alfred Douglas-Hamilton 13th Duke of Hamilton 1862-1940 (40) at 71 Eccleston Square Pimlico.

Eccleston Street Pimlico, Westminster

13 Eccleston Street Pimlico, Westminster

On 25 Nov 1841 Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841 (60) died at his home 13 Eccleston Street Pimlico.

1831. Henry Pierce Bone Painter 1779-1855 after John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841 in black morning suit, blue waistcoat with gold fob-seal, standing beside the bust of William Hyde Wollaston, F.R.S. (1766-1828) on a plinth signed, dated and inscribed on the counter-enamel 'Francis Chantrey Sculptor. R.A. London 1831. Painted in EnamelAround 1834. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841.Around 1834. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841.1818. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Francis Leggatt Chantrey 1781-1841. Half-length aged 37, holding a modelling tool, his left arm on a marble head; bald head with dark hair at sides, hazel eyes, dark complexion; voluminous grey coat, white filled shirt open at neck and fastened with brooch; statuette of Lady Louisa Russell in left background.

Grosvenor Hotel Pimlico, Westminster

On 21 Feb 1874 John Greenwood 1821-1874 (53) died at Grosvenor Hotel Pimlico.

St Peter's Church Pimlico, Westminster

On 21 Aug 1861 George Henry Finch 1835-1907 (26) and Emily Eglantine Balfour 1841-1865 (20) were married at St Peter's Church Pimlico. They were half second cousins twice removed.

Soho

Smith Square, Westminster

St John's Church, Smith Square, Westminster

On or before 02 Jun 1754 Joseph Kendrick Sculptor 1754-1833 was born. He was baptised on 02 Jun 1754 at St John's Church.

St Clement Danes

St James'

St John's Wood, Westminster

Alpha Place, St John's Wood, Westminster

7 Alpha Place, St John's Wood, Westminster

1853. William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910 (25). "Awakening Conscience". A mistress realises the undesirability of her actions. Note the absence of a wedding ring on her finger. Hunt hired a room at 7 Alpha Place, a "maison de convenance" to complete the painting. The painting has many symbols: the cat toying with the broken-winged bird under the table symbolises the woman's plight, a man's discarded glove warns that the likely fate of a cast-off mistress was prostitution, a tangled skein of yarn on the floor symbolises the web in which the girl is entrapped. The frame, designed by Hunt, also contains various symbolic emblems; the bells and marigolds stand for warning and sorrow, the star is a sign of spiritual revelation. [Source. Tate]. The model is Annie Miller Model 1835-1925 (18).

1853. William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910. "Awakening Conscience". A mistress realises the undesirability of her actions. Note the absence of a wedding ring on her finger. Hunt hired a room at 7 Alpha Place, a "maison de convenance" to complete the painting. The painting has many symbols: the cat toying with the broken-winged bird under the table symbolises the woman's plight, a man's discarded glove warns that the likely fate of a cast-off mistress was prostitution, a tangled skein of yarn on the floor symbolises the web in which the girl is entrapped. The frame, designed by Hunt, also contains various symbolic emblems; the bells and marigolds stand for warning and sorrow, the star is a sign of spiritual revelation. [Source. <a href="https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/hunt-the-awakening-conscience-t02075">Tate</a>]. The model is Annie Miller Model 1835-1925.

Greville Place St John's Wood, Westminster

On 14 Sep 1846 John Murray 5th Duke Atholl 1778-1846 (68) died at Greville Place St John's Wood. His nephew George Augustus Frederick Murray 6th Duke Atholl 1814-1864 (31) succeeded 6th Duke Atholl.

Strand

Thorney Island, Westminster

Thorney Island was a small island, or group of islands where the River Tyburn met the Thames, perhaps forming a ford where Watling Street, the Roman Road from Kent to Wroxeter, crossed the Thames.

Banishment of the Godwins

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (36), who had the sister (47) of King Edward (48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover. For Eustace (36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (30), his son, over his; and Harold (29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (48), that they would seek Godwin's (50) army if the king (48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (48) held a council, and proclaimed him (50) an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (50) and his wife, and all his three sons — Sweyne (30) and Tosty (25) and Grith (19). And he went south to Thorney, (67) with his wife, and Sweyne (30) his son, and Tosty (25) and his wife (18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria 1033-1094 (18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders 1012-1067 (38)], and his son Grith (19). Earl Harold (29) with Leofwine (16) went to Bristol in the ship that Earl Sweyne (30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (50), and Earl Sweyne (30), and Earl Harold (29), together at Beverstone, and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (48). There was now assembled before the king (48) (68) Earl Siward (41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (50) and his sons, that the king (48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Harold (29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (50) and Earl Sweyne (30) to Bosham, and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (48) security. It was from Thorney (69) that Godwin (50) and those that were with him went to Bruges, to Baldwin's (38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (48) darlings; and his daughter (25) wedded and united to the king (48). Soon after this took place, the king (48) dismissed the lady (25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell. Soon after came Earl William (23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (29) before possessed.
67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.
68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

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Flowers of History by Matthew of Westminster Volume 2 Chapter 1 1066 1087 The English being expelled by the Normans, are injuriously and wickedly treated. 1071. This year also, the English being very injuriously treated by the Normans, fled to the fens of Ely, and to the island of Thorney, where they made themselves a camp of refuge, and elected Hereward (36), a warrior of great energy and bravery, as their general. But king William (43), alluring some by promises and terrifying others by threats, and corrupting others again by bribes, at last surrounded all the fugitives with a numerous army, and compelled them to return and to submit unto his authority.

Victoria, Westminster

Victoria Square, Westminster

On 24 Jan 1844 Harold Arthur Lee Dillon 17th Viscount Dillon 1844-1932 was born to Arthur Edmund Denis Dillon 16th Viscount Dillon 1812-1892 (32) at Victoria Square.

Victoria Street, Westminster

Albert Mansions Victoria Street, Westminster

On 30 Jan 1880 Henry Paget 3rd Marquess Anglesey 1821-1880 (58) died without issue at Albert Mansions Victoria Street. His brother Henry Paget 4th Marquess Anglesey 1835-1898 (44) succeeded 4th Marquess Anglesey, 5th Earl Uxbridge 2C 1784.

Wellington Barracks, Westminster

Royal Military Chapel, Wellington Barracks, Westminster

On 12 Nov 1923 Charles Alexander Carnegie 11th Earl of Southesk 1893-1992 (30) and Princess Maud Duff Countess Southesk 1893-1945 (30) were married at Royal Military Chapel. She a granddaughter of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910.

Westminster Palace

Victoria Station, Westminster

14 Jun 1913. Coffin of Emily Wilding Davison 1872-1913 (40) at Victoria Station.

Whitehall Palace

Westminster Abbey Area

Gatehouse Prison Westminster Abbey, Westminster Abbey Area

After 15 Feb 1627 John Wray 2nd Baronet Glentworth 1586-1655 was imprisoned for declining to act under the commission, to contribute to the loan, or to give security for his appearance before the council at Gatehouse Prison Westminster Abbey.

Tothill Street, Westminster Abbey Area

Before 28 Dec 1708 Thomas Culpepper 1637-1708 died at Tothill Street. On 28 Dec 1708 Thomas Culpepper 1637-1708 was buried at St Margaret's Church.

Swan with Two Necks Tavern, Tothill Street, Westminster Abbey Area

Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1664. 04 Apr 1664. Up, and walked to my Lord Sandwich's (38); and there spoke with him about W. Joyce, who told me he would do what was fit in so tender a point. I can yet discern a coldness in him to admit me to any discourse with him.
Thence to Westminster, to the Painted Chamber, and there met the two Joyces. Will in a very melancholy taking. After a little discourse I to the Lords' House before they sat; and stood within it a good while, while the Duke of York (30) came to me and spoke to me a good while about the new ship' at Woolwich.
Afterwards I spoke with my Lord Barkeley (62) and my Lord Peterborough (42) about it. And so staid without a good while, and saw my Lady Peters, an impudent jade, soliciting all the Lords on her behalf.
And at last W. Joyce was called in; and by the consequences, and what my Lord Peterborough (42) told me, I find that he did speak all he said to his disadvantage, and so was committed to the Black Rod: which is very hard, he doing what he did by the advice of my Lord Peters' (38) own steward. But the Sergeant of the Black Rod did direct one of his messengers to take him in custody, and so he was peaceably conducted to the Swan with two Necks, in Tuttle Street, to a handsome dining-room; and there was most civilly used, my uncle Fenner, and his brother Anthony, and some other friends being with him. But who would have thought that the fellow that I should have sworn could have spoken before all the world should in this be so daunted, as not to know what he said, and now to cry like a child. I protest, it is very strange to observe.
I left them providing for his stay there to-night and getting a petition against tomorrow, and so away to Westminster Hall, and meeting Mr. Coventry (36), he took me to his chamber, with Sir William Hickeman, a member of their House, and a very civill gentleman. Here we dined very plentifully, and thence to White Hall to the Duke's (30), where we all met, and after some discourse of the condition of the Fleete, in order to a Dutch warr, for that, I perceive, the Duke (30) hath a mind it should come to, we away to the office, where we sat, and I took care to rise betimes, and so by water to Halfway House, talking all the way good discourse with Mr. Wayth, and there found my wife, who was gone with her mayd Besse to have a walk. But, Lord! how my jealous mind did make me suspect that she might have some appointment to meet somebody. But I found the poor souls coming away thence, so I took them back, and eat and drank, and then home, and after at the office a while, I home to supper and to bed. It was a sad sight, me thought, to-day to see my Lord Peters (38) coming out of the House fall out with his lady (from whom he is parted) about this business; saying that she disgraced him. But she hath been a handsome woman, and is, it seems, not only a lewd woman, but very high-spirited.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 05 April 1664. 05 Apr 1664. Up very betimes, and walked to my cozen Anthony_Joyce_1668's, and thence with him to his brother Will, in Tuttle Street, where I find him pretty cheery over (what) he was yesterday (like a coxcomb), his wife being come to him, and having had his boy with him last night. Here I staid an hour or two and wrote over a fresh petition, that which was drawn by their solicitor not pleasing me, and thence to the Painted Chamber, and by and by away by coach to my Lord Peterborough's (42), and there delivered the petition into his hand, which he promised most readily to deliver to the House today.
Thence back, and there spoke to several Lords, and so did his solicitor (one that W. Joyce hath promised £5 to if he be released). Lord Peterborough (42) presented a petition to the House from W. Joyce: and a great dispute, we hear, there was in the House for and against it. At last it was carried that he should be bayled till the House meets again after Easter, he giving bond for his appearance. This was not so good as we hoped, but as good as we could well expect.
Anon comes the King (33) and passed the Bill for repealing the Triennial Act, and another about Writs of Errour. I crowded in and heard the King's speech to them; but he speaks the worst that ever I heard man in my life worse than if he read it all, and he had it in writing in his hand.
Thence, after the House was up, and I inquired what the order of the House was, I to W. Joyce,' with his brother, and told them all. Here was Kate come, and is a comely fat woman. I would not stay dinner, thinking to go home to dinner, and did go by water as far as the bridge, but thinking that they would take it kindly my being there, to be bayled for him if there was need, I returned, but finding them gone out to look after it, only Will and his wife and sister left and some friends that came to visit him, I to Westminster Hall, and by and by by agreement to Mrs. Lane's lodging, whither I sent for a lobster, and with Mr. Swayne and his wife eat it, and argued before them mightily for Hawly, but all would not do, although I made her angry by calling her old, and making her know what herself is. Her body was out of temper for any dalliance, and so after staying there 3 or 4 hours, but yet taking care to have my oath safe of not staying a quarter of an hour together with her, I went to W. Joyce, where I find the order come, and bayle (his father and brother) given; and he paying his fees, which come to above £2, besides £5 he is to give one man, and his charges of eating and drinking here, and 10s. a-day as many days as he stands under bayle: which, I hope, will teach him hereafter to hold his tongue better than he used to do.
Thence with Anth. Joyce's wife alone home talking of Will's folly, and having set her down, home myself, where I find my wife dressed as if she had been abroad, but I think she was not, but she answering me some way that I did not like I pulled her by the nose, indeed to offend her, though afterwards to appease her I denied it, but only it was done in haste. The poor wretch took it mighty ill, and I believe besides wringing her nose she did feel pain, and so cried a great while, but by and by I made her friends, and so after supper to my office a while, and then home to bed.
This day great numbers of merchants came to a Grand Committee of the House to bring in their claims against the Dutch. I pray God guide the issue to our good!

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Tothill Fields, Tothill Street, Westminster Abbey Area

Trial and Execution of Edward Seymour Duke of Somerset and his Supporters

Chronicle of Greyfriars King Edward VI. 08 Dec 1551. Item the viij. day of that monyth was a gret muster at Totehylle of men of armes befor the kynge (14), of dyvers lordes.

Around 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553Around 1546 Unknown Painter. After William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553.Around 1547. Workshop of Master John Painter. Portrait of Edward VI King England and Ireland 1537-1553.

Chronicle of Greyfriars King Edward VI. 20 Dec 1551. Item the xxti day of December was sorne [Note. sworn] the byshoppe of Ely lorde [chancellor of Engla]nd.
Item that same day was the muster of the dewke of Somersettes servanttes before [the king at] Totylle also.
Item the same day was comytted unto the tower the byshopp [of Dur]hame Cudberte Tunstalle (77).

Diary of Samuel Pepys 01 June 1665. 01 Jun 1665. Up and to the office, where sat all the morning, at noon to the 'Change, and there did some business, and home to dinner, whither Creed comes, and after dinner I put on my new silke camelott sute; the best that ever I wore in my life, the sute costing me above £24. In this I went with Creed to Goldsmiths' Hall, to the burial of Sir Thomas Viner (76); which Hall, and Haberdashers also, was so full of people, that we were fain for ease and coolness to go forth to Pater Noster Row, to choose a silke to make me a plain ordinary suit.
That done, we walked to Cornehill, and there at Mr. Cade's' stood in the balcon and saw all the funeral, which was with the blue-coat boys and old men, all the Aldermen, and Lord Mayor, &c., and the number of the company very great; the greatest I ever did see for a taverne. Hither come up to us Dr. Allen, and then Mr. Povy (51) and Mr. Fox (38). The show being over, and my discourse with Mr. Povy (51), I took coach and to Westminster Hall, where I took the fairest flower, and by coach to Tothill Fields for the ayre till it was dark. I 'light, and in with the fairest flower to eat a cake, and there did do as much as was safe with my flower, and that was enough on my part.
Broke up, and away without any notice, and, after delivering the rose where it should be, I to the Temple and 'light, and come to the middle door, and there took another coach, and so home to write letters, but very few, God knows, being by my pleasure made to forget everything that is. The coachman that carried [us] cannot know me again, nor the people at the house where we were.
Home to bed, certain news being come that our fleete is in sight of the Dutch ships.

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Great Plague of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 July 1665. 18 Jul 1665. Up and to the office, where all the morning, and so to my house and eat a bit of victuals, and so to the 'Change, where a little business and a very thin Exchange; and so walked through London to the Temple, where I took water for Westminster to the Duke of Albemarle (56), to wait on him, and so to Westminster Hall, and there paid for my newes-books, and did give Mrs. Michell, who is going out of towne because of the sicknesse, and her husband, a pint of wine, and so Sir W. Warren coming to me by appointment we away by water home, by the way discoursing about the project I have of getting some money and doing the King (35) good service too about the mast docke at Woolwich, which I fear will never be done if I do not go about it.
After dispatching letters at the office, I by water down to Deptford, where I staid a little while, and by water to my wife, whom I have not seen 6 or 5 days, and there supped with her, and mighty pleasant, and saw with content her drawings, and so to bed mighty merry. I was much troubled this day to hear at Westminster how the officers do bury the dead in the open Tuttle-fields, pretending want of room elsewhere; whereas the New Chappell churchyard was walled-in at the publick charge in the last plague time, merely for want of room and now none, but such as are able to pay dear for it, can be buried there.

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