History of Westminster School

Westminster School is in Westminster Abbey Area.

Around 1612 John Glynne Judge 1602-1666 (10) educated at Westminster School.

On 23 Dec 1621 Heneage Finch 1st Earl Nottingham 1621-1682 was born to Heneage Finch Speaker of the House of Commons 1580-1631 (41) and Frances Bell -1627. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church College.

In 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Heneage Finch 1st Earl Nottingham 1621-1682. Before 1631. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Heneage Finch Speaker of the House of Commons 1580-1631 in the robes of Serjeant at Law.

Around 1625 Henry Vane "The Younger" 1613-1662 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1658 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of Henry Vane

Around 1628 Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 (10) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685 wearing his Garter Robes. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henry Bennet 1st Earl Arlington 1618-1685.

On or before 02 Feb 1635 William Godolphin 1635-1696 was born to William Godolphin 1605-1663 (30). He was baptised on 02 Feb 1635. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church College.

On 10 Mar 1638 Archbishop John Vesey 1638-1716 was born to Rector Thomas Vesey. He was educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Dublin.

Around 1661 Heneage Finch 1st Earl Aylesford 1649-1719 (12) educated at Westminster School.

After 1661 Orlando Bridgeman 1st Baronet Bridgeman 1649-1701 educated at Westminster School.

John Evelyn's Diary 13 May 1661. 13 May 1661. I heard and saw such exercises at the election of scholars at Westminster School to be sent to the University in Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Arabic, in themes and extemporary verses, as wonderfully astonished me in such youths, with such readiness and wit, some of them not above twelve or thirteen years of age. Pity it is, that what they attain here so ripely, they either do not retain, or do not improve more considerably when they come to be men, though many of them do; and no less is to be blamed their odd pronouncing of Latin, so that out of England none were able to understand, or endure it. The examinants, or posers, were, Dr. Duport, Greek Professor at Cambridge; Dr. Fell, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford; Dr. Pierson; Dr. Allestree (39), Dean Westminster Abbey, and any that would.

On 12 Jul 1669 Henry Boyle 1st Baron Carleton 1669-1725 was born to Charles Boyle 3rd Baron Clifford 1639-1694 (29) and Jane Seymour Baroness Clifford 1637-1679 (32). He was educated at Westminster School.

1703. Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Henry Boyle 1st Baron Carleton 1669-1725.

Around 1671 John Brownlow 3rd Baronet Brownlow 1659-1697 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1685 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711 and John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of John Brownlow 3rd Baronet Brownlow 1659-1697.

Around 1677 James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 (3) educated at Westminster School.

Before 1690. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Mary Lake 1668-1712. Frequently described as 'Mary Lake Duchess of Chandos' Mary died two years before her husband James Brydges 1st Duke Chandos 1673-1744 was created Duke on 19 Oct 1714.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 September 1677. 10 Sep 1677. To divert me, my Lord (59) would needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with one Mr. Mann by the way, who was Recorder of the town. There were in our company my Lord Huntingtower (28), son to the Duchess of Lauderdale (50), Sir Edward Bacon, a learned gentleman of the family of the great Chancellor Verulam, and Sir John Felton, with some other knights and gentlemen. After dinner came the bailiff and magistrates in their formalities with their maces to compliment my Lord (59), and invite him to the town-house, where they presented us a collation of dried sweetmeats and wine, the bells ringing, etc. Then, we went to see the town, and first, the Lord Viscount Hereford's (3) house, which stands in a park near the town, like that at Brussels, in Flanders; the house not great, yet pretty, especially the hall. The stews for fish succeeded one another, and feed one the other, all paved at bottom. There is a good picture of the blessed virgin in one of the parlors, seeming to be of Holbein, or some good master. Then we saw the Haven, seven miles from Harwich. The tide runs out every day, but the bedding being soft mud, it is safe for shipping and a station. The trade of Ipswich is for the most part Newcastle upon Tyne coals, with which they supply London; but it was formerly a clothing town. There is not any beggar asks alms in the whole place, a thing very extraordinary, so ordered by the prudence of the magistrates. It has in it fourteen or fifteen beautiful churches: in a word, it is for building, cleanness, and good order, one of the best towns in England. Cardinal Wolsey was a butcher's son of Ipswich, but there is little of that magnificent Prelate's foundation here, besides a school and I think a library, which I did not see. His intentions were to build some great thing. We returned late to Euston, having traveled about fifty miles this day.

Since first I was at this place, I found things exceedingly improved. It is seated in a bottom between two graceful swellings, the main building being now in the figure of a Greek II with four pavilions, two at each corner, and a break in the front, railed and balustered at the top, where I caused huge jars to be placed full of earth to keep them steady upon their pedestals between the statues, which make as good a show as if they were of stone, and, though the building be of brick, and but two stories besides cellars and garrets covered with blue slate, yet there is room enough for a full court, the offices and outhouses being so ample and well disposed. the King's (47) apartment is painted à fresco, and magnificently furnished. There are many excellent pictures of the great masters. The gallery is a pleasant, noble room; in the break, or middle, is a billiard table, but the wainscot, being of fir, and painted, does not please me so well as Spanish oak without paint. The chapel is pretty, the porch descending to the gardens. The orange garden is very fine, and leads into the greenhouse, at the end of which is a hall to eat in, and the conservatory some hundred feet long, adorned with maps, as the other side is with the heads of the Cæsars, ill cut in alabaster; above are several apartments for my Lord, Lady, and Duchess, with kitchens and other offices below, in a lesser form; lodgings for servants, all distinct for them to retire to when they please and would be in private, and have no communication with the palace, which he tells me he will wholly resign to his son-in-law and daughter, that charming young creature.

The canal running under my Lady's (43) dressing room chamber window, is full of carps and fowl, which come and are fed there. The cascade at the end of the canal turns a cornmill that provides the family, and raises water for the fountains and offices. To pass this canal into the opposite meadows, Sir Samuel Morland (52) has invented a screw bridge, which, being turned with a key, lands you fifty feet distant at the entrance of an ascending walk of trees, a mile in length,—as it is also on the front into the park,—of four rows of ash trees, and reaches to the park pale, which is nine miles in compass, and the best for riding and meeting the game that I ever saw. There were now of red and fallow deer almost a thousand, with good covert, but the soil barren and flying sand, in which nothing will grow kindly. The tufts of fir, and much of the other wood, were planted by my direction some years before. This seat is admirably placed for field sports, hawking, hunting, or racing. The Mutton is small, but sweet. The stables hold thirty horses and four coaches. The out-offices make two large quadrangles, so as servants never lived with more ease and convenience; never master more civil. Strangers are attended and accommodated as at their home, in pretty apartments furnished with all manner of conveniences and privacy.

There is a library full of excellent books; bathing rooms, elaboratory, dispensary, a decoy, and places to keep and fat fowl in. He had now in his new church (near the garden) built a dormitory, or vault, with several repositories, in which to bury his family.

In the expense of this pious structure, the church is most laudable, most of the houses of God in this country resembling rather stables and thatched cottages than temples in which to serve the Most High. He has built a lodge in the park for the keeper, which is a neat dwelling, and might become any gentleman. The same has he done for the parson, little deserving it for murmuring that my Lord put him some time out of his wretched hovel, while it was building. He has also erected a fair inn at some distance from his palace, with a bridge of stone over a river near it, and repaired all the tenants' houses, so as there is nothing but neatness and accommodations about his estate, which I yet think is not above £1,500 a year. I believe he had now in his family one hundred domestic servants.

His lady (43) (being one of the Brederode's (75) daughters, grandchild to a natural son of Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange (93)) [Note. Evelyn confused here. Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (43) was the daughter of Louis Nassau Beverweert 1602-1665 (75) who was the illegitimate son of Prince Maurice I of Orange 1567-1625. Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (93) was the younger brother of Prince Maurice I of Orange 1567-1625.] is a good-natured and obliging woman. They love fine things, and to live easily, pompously, and hospitably; but, with so vast expense, as plunges my Lord (59) into debts exceedingly. My Lord (59) himself is given into no expensive vice but building, and to have all things rich, polite, and princely. He never plays, but reads much, having the Latin, French, and Spanish tongues in perfection. He has traveled much, and is the best bred and courtly person his Majesty (47) has about him, so as the public Ministers more frequent him than any of the rest of the nobility. While he was Secretary of State and Prime Minister, he had gotten vastly, but spent it as hastily, even before he had established a fund to maintain his greatness; and now beginning to decline in favor (the Duke being no great friend of his), he knows not how to retrench. He was son of a Doctor of Laws, whom I have seen, and, being sent from Westminster School to Oxford, with intention to be a divine, and parson of Arlington, a village near Brentford, when Master of Arts the Rebellion falling out, he followed the King's (47) Army, and receiving an HONORABLE WOUND IN THE FACE, grew into favor, and was advanced from a mean fortune, at his Majesty's (47) Restoration, to be an Earl and Knight of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and first favorite for a long time, during which the King (47) married his natural son, the Duke of Grafton (13), to his only daughter (22) and heiress, as before mentioned, worthy for her beauty and virtue of the greatest prince in Christendom. My Lord is, besides this, a prudent and understanding person in business, and speaks well; unfortunate yet in those he has advanced, most of them proving ungrateful. The many obligations and civilities I have received from this noble gentleman, extracts from me this character, and I am sorry he is in no better circumstances.

Having now passed near three weeks at Euston, to my great satisfaction, with much difficulty he suffered me to look homeward, being very earnest with me to stay longer; and, to engage me, would himself have carried me to Lynn-Regis, a town of important traffic, about twenty miles beyond, which I had never seen; as also the Traveling Sands, about ten miles wide of Euston, that have so damaged the country, rolling from place to place, and, like the Sands in the Deserts of Lybia, quite overwhelmed some gentlemen's whole estates, as the relation extant in print, and brought to our Society, describes at large.

Around 1641 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1648 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 and Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1647 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II In 1651 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Elisabeth Nassau Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718. 1645 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Samuel Morland Polymath 1st Baronet 1625-1695. Around 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Louis Nassau Beverweert 1602-1665. In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647. Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647. Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Prince Maurice I of Orange 1567-1625. In 1756 Joshua Reynolds 1723-1788. Portrait of Henry Fitzroy 1st Duke Grafton 1663-1690 in his Garter Robes. Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Isabella Bennet Duchess Grafton 1655-1723. One of the Hampton Court Beauties. In 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Isabella Bennet Duchess Grafton 1655-1723.

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Around 1682 William Legge 1st Earl Dartmouth 1672-1750 (9) educated at Westminster School.

On or before 08 Mar 1688 John Conduit 1688-1737 was born. He was baptised on 08 Mar 1688 at St Paul's Church. In Jun 1701 he was admitted to Westminster School. In 1705 he was elected a Queen's scholar to Trinity College.

Around 1695 Henry Newport 3rd Earl Bradford 1683-1734 (12) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1721 John Mordaunt 1709-1767 (12) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1721 William Courtenay 6th Earl Devon 1709-1762 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1723 James Waldegrave 2nd Earl Waldegrave 1715-1763 (7) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1723 Thomas Thoroton 1723-1794 was born to Robert Thoroton of Screveton and Mary Levett. He was educated at Westminster School. He was admitted to Trinity Hall on 30 Dec 1741.

Around 1725 James "Wicked Earl" Cecil 1713-1780 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1725 Thomas Osborne 4th Duke Leeds 1713-1789 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1726 John Tylney 2nd Earl Tylney 1712-1784 (13) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1726 Henry Reginald Courtenay 1714-1763 (11) educated at Westminster School.

On 25 Apr 1726 Charles Gould aka Morgan 1st Baronet 1726-1806 was born. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church College reciving BA in 1747 and MA in 1750.

Around 1735 John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793 (11) educated at Westminster School.

1765. Francis Cotes 1726-1770. Portrait of John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793. Before 02 Aug 1788 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793. In 1780 Thomas Gainsborough 1727-1788. Portrait of John Hobart 2nd Earl Buckinghamshire 1723-1793.

Around 1737 William Keppel 1727-1782 (9) educated at Westminster School.

In 1743 Frederick Keppel Bishop of Exeter 1729-1777 (14) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1747 Augustus Henry Fitzroy 3rd Duke Grafton 1735-1811 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1762 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of Augustus Henry Fitzroy 3rd Duke Grafton 1735-1811. Around 1765. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811. Portrait of Augustus Henry Fitzroy 3rd Duke Grafton 1735-1811.

Around 1748 Edward Southwell 20th Baron Clifford 1738-1777 (9) educated at Westminster School.

On 17 Sep 1749 Thomas Brand Baron Dacre 1749-1794 was born to Thomas Brand 1717-1770 (32) and Caroline Pierrepoint 1716-1753 (33). He was educated at Westminster School.

In 1755 Reginald Courtenay Bishop of Bristol Bishop of Exeter 1741-1803 (13) admitted at Westminster School.

Around 1763 Francis Osborne 5th Duke Leeds 1751-1799 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1769 Benjamin West 1738-1820. Portrait of Francis Osborne 5th Duke Leeds 1751-1799.

In 1764 Thomas Egerton 1st Earl Wilton 1749-1814 (14) educated at Westminster School.

In 1765 Percy Charles Wyndham 1757-1833 (7) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1767 William Lowther 1st Earl Lonsdale 1757-1844 (9) educated at Westminster School.

In 1767 Charles William Wyndham 1760-1828 (6) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1768 Thomas Pelham 2nd Earl Chichester 1756-1826 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1774 Henry Charles Somerset 6th Duke Beaufort 1766-1835 (7) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1775 George Talbot Rice 3rd Baron Dynevor 1765-1852 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1777 Francis Russell 5th Duke Bedford 1765-1802 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1777 Robert Grosvenor 1st Marquess Westminster 1767-1845 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1789 William Courtenay 10th Earl Devon 1777-1859 (11) educated at Westminster School.

On 10 Apr 1792 Charles Morgan 1st Baron Tredegar 1792-1875 was born to Charles Gould aka Morgan 2nd Baronet 1760-1846 (32) and Mary Margaret or Magdalen Stoney. He was educated at Harrow School, Westminster School and Christ Church College.

1810 to 1811. William Owen 1769-1825. Portrait of Charles Gould aka Morgan 2nd Baronet 1760-1846.

On 30 Sep 1796 John "Mad Jack" Mytton 1796-1834 was born to John Mytton 1768-1798 (28). He was educated at Westminster School but expelled after one year for fighting with a Master. He was then sent to Harrow School from where he was expelled after three months.

Around 1797 Spencer Rodney 5th Baron Rodney 1785-1846 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1800 Francis Russell 7th Duke Bedford 1788-1861 (11) educated at Westminster School.

Around 1828 Henry Lowther 3rd Earl Lonsdale 1818-1876 (9) educated at Westminster School.

Henry Grey 4th Earl Stamford 1715-1768 educated at Westminster School.