History of Wiltshire

652 Battle of Bradford on Avon

715 Second Battle of Woden's Barrow

825 Battle of Ellendun

871 Battle of Marton

878 Battle of Edington

978 Murder of King Edward Martyr

1450 Jack Cade's Rebellion

1521 Trial and Execution of the Duke of Buckingham

1643 Battle of Roundway Down

Wiltshire is in Wessex.

All Cannings, Wiltshire

The River Avon West rises around All Cannings in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, around Marden Henge and Wilsford Henge, Rushall where it joins the River Avon East to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Allington, Wiltshire

Alvediston, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Amesbury

Avebury, Wiltshire

Henge. A Henge is a prehistoric monument with a ditch enclosed by a bank. Some have entrances: one, two or four. Some have stone circles inside them. Confusingly Stonehenge is not a Henge. Henges are usually dated around 2400BC typically known as Late Neolithic Early Bronze Age. Examples of Henges include Avebury in Wiltshire, Arbor Low Henge in Derbyshire. Henges appear to be a peculiarly British monument.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 15 June 1668. 15 Jun 1668. Monday. Up, and with Mr. Butts to look into the baths, and find the King and Queen's full of a mixed sort, of good and bad, and the Cross only almost for the gentry.

So home and did the like with my wife, and did pay my guides, two women, 5s.; one man, 2s. 6d.; poor, 6d.; woman to lay my foot-cloth, 1s.

So to our inne, and there eat and paid reckoning, £1 8s. 6d.; servants, 3s.; poor, 1s.; lent the coach man, 10s. Before I took coach, I went to make a boy dive in the King's bath, 1s. I paid also for my coach and a horse to Bristol, £1 1s. 6d. Took coach, and away, without any of the company of the other stage-coaches, that go out of this town to-day; and rode all day with some trouble, for fear of being out of our way, over the Downes, where the life of the shepherds is, in fair weather only, pretty. In the afternoon come to Abebury, where, seeing great stones like those of Stonage standing up, I stopped, and took a countryman of that town, and he carried me and shewed me a place trenched in, like Old Sarum almost, with great stones pitched in it, some bigger than those at Stonage in figure, to my great admiration: and he told me that most people of learning, coming by, do come and view them, and that the King (38) did so: and that the Mount cast hard by is called Selbury, from one King Seall buried there, as tradition says. I did give this man 1s.

So took coach again, seeing one place with great high stones pitched round, which, I believe, was once some particular building, in some measure like that of Stonage. But, about a mile off, it was prodigious to see how full the Downes are of great stones; and all along the vallies, stones of considerable bigness, most of them growing certainly out of the ground so thick as to cover the ground, which makes me think the less of the wonder of Stonage, for hence they might undoubtedly supply themselves with stones, as well as those at Abebury. In my way did give to the poor and menders of the highway 3s. Before night, come to Marlborough, and lay at the Hart; a good house, and a pretty fair town for a street or two; and what is most singular is, their houses on one side having their pent-houses supported with pillars, which makes it a good walk. My wife pleased with all, this evening reading of "Mustapha" to me till supper, and then to supper, and had musique whose innocence pleased me, and I did give them 3s.

So to bed, and lay well all night, and long, so as all the five coaches that come this day from Bath, as well as we, were gone out of the town before six.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Barford St Martin, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Berwick St James, Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Bickton, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Bishopstone, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Bishopstrow, Wiltshire

Blackland, Wiltshire

On 16 May 1675 Thomas Hungerford 1602-1675 (73) died at Blackland.

Blunsdon St Andrew, Wiltshire

St Leonards Church Blunsdon, Blunsdon St Andrew, Wiltshire

On 30 Nov 1347 Ivo Fitzwarin 1347-1414 was born to William Fitzwarin 1310-1361 (37). He was baptised at St Leonards Church Blunsdon. His wardship was originally granted to Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 1314-1369 (33) but she sold it in the following year for 1100 marks.

Boscombe, Wiltshire

Bourton, Wiltshire

The Dorset River Stour rises at Stourhead from where it flows through Bourton, past Milton-on-Stour, Gillingham, where it is joined by Shreen Water. From Gillingham it flows south where it is joined by the Wiltshire River Lodden before Ecliffe. The river continues past West Stour, Stour Provost, Marnhull, Henstridge Marsh, where it is joined by the River Cale.

The Dorset River Stour continues south to Sturminster where it heads south-east to Shillingstone then Durweston, around Blandford Forum, Charlton Marshall, Spetisbury, Sturminster Marshall, Wimborne Minster, Canford Magna, Knighton, West Parley, Parley Green, Holdenhurst before passing through Christchurch into Christchurch Harbour.

Boyton

Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire

Anglo Saxon Chronicle 650 699. 652. This year Kenwal fought at Bradford by the Avon.

Bremhill, Wiltshire

On 03 May 1602 Thomas Hungerford 1602-1675 was born to John Hungerford 1558-1636 (44) at Bremhill.

On 31 Mar 1636 John Hungerford 1558-1636 (78) died at Bremhill.

On 31 Mar 1636 John Hungerford 1620-1636 (16) died at Bremhill.

In 1637 George Hungerford 1637-1712 was born to Edward Hungerford -1667 at Bremhill.

In May 1712 George Hungerford 1637-1712 (75) died at Bremhill.

Brimslade, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Britford, Wiltshire

On 16 Nov 1739 Mary Clarke -1739 died. She was buried at Britford.

St Peter's Church Britford, Wiltshire

On 17 May 1521 Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (43) was executed at Tower Hill for no specific reason other than his having a significant amount of Plantagenet blood and was, therefore, considered a threat by Henry VIII (29). He was posthumously attainted by Act of Parliament on 31 July 1523, disinheriting his children. He was buried at St Peter's Church Britford. Duke of Buckingham 1C 1444 extinct.

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. 1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547. Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of King Henry VIII of England and Ireland 1491-1547.

Broad Chalke, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Broad Hinton, Wiltshire

In 1525 Dorothy Wroughton 1525-1616 was born to William Wroughton of Broad Hinton 1510-1559 (15) at Broad Hinton.

Bronham, Wiltshire

Around 1492 Edward Baynton 1492-1544 was born at Bronham.

Burbage, Wiltshire

In 1568 Margaret Butler 1568-1652 was born to William Butler 1530-1608 (38) at Burbage.

Burcombe, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Calne, Wiltshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 950-999. 978. This year all the oldest counsellors of England fell at Calne from an upper floor; but the holy Archbishop Dunstan (69) stood alone upon a beam. Some were dreadfully bruised: and some did not escape with life. This year was King Edward (16) slain, at eventide, at Corfe-gate, on the fifteenth day before the calends of April. And he was buried at Wareham without any royal honour. No worse deed than this was ever done by the English nation since they first sought the land of Britain. Men murdered him but God has magnified him. He was in life an earthly king—he is now after death a heavenly saint. Him would not his earthly relatives avenge—but his heavenly father has avenged him amply. The earthly homicides would wipe out his memory from the earth—but the avenger above has spread his memory abroad in heaven and in earth. Those, Who would not before bow to his living body, now bow on their knees to His dead bones. Now we may conclude, that the wisdom of men, and their meditations, and their counsels, are as nought against the appointment of God. In this same year succeeded Ethelred Etheling (12), his brother, to the government; and he was afterwards very readily, and with great joy to the counsellors of England, consecrated king at Kingston. In the same year also died Alfwold, who was Bishop of Dorsetshire, and whose body lieth in the minster at Sherborn.

Castle Combe, Wiltshire

Around 1054 Reginald Dunstanville 1054-1129 was born at Castle Combe.

Around 1080 Alan Dunstanville 1080-1130 was born to Reginald Dunstanville 1054-1129 (26) at Castle Combe.

In 1130 Adeliza Dunstanville 1130-1186 was born to Alan Dunstanville 1080-1130 (50) at Castle Combe.

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms 1488-1534 was born to John Writhe Garter King of Arms -1504 in Colatford. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe or Cricklade.

Charlton

Charlton-All-Saints, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Chicksgrove, Wiltshire

Lower Chicksgrove, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Upper Chicksgrove, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Chilton Foliat, Wiltshire

St Mary's Church, Chilton Foliat, Wiltshire

In 1772 Edward Popham 1704-1772 (68) died. She was buried at St Mary's Church.

In 1836 Elizabeth Andrew 1783-1836 (53) died. She was buried at St Mary's Church.

On 16 Jun 1843 General Edward William Leyborne Popham 1764-1843 (78) died. He was buried at St Mary's Church.

Around 1778. Arthur William Devis Painter 1762-1822. Portrait of General Edward William Leyborne Popham 1764-1843.

Chippenham, Wiltshire

Around May 853 Burgred King Mercia -875 and Æthelswith Wessex Queen Consort Mercia 838-888 (15) were married at Chippenham. She by marriage Queen Consort Mercia.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 878. This year about mid-winter, after twelfth-night, the Danish army stole out to Chippenham, and rode over the land of the West-Saxons; where they settled, and drove many of the people over sea; and of the rest the greatest part they rode down, and subdued to their will;—ALL BUT ALFRED THE KING (29). He, with a little band, uneasily sought the woods and fastnesses of the moors. And in the winter of this same year the brother of Ingwar and Healfden landed in Wessex, in Devonshire, with three and twenty ships, and there was he slain, and eight hundred men with him, and forty of his army. There also was taken the war-flag, which they called the RAVEN. In the Easter of this year King Alfred (29) with his little force raised a work at Athelney; from which he assailed the army, assisted by that part of Somersetshire which was nighest to it.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. 879. This year went the army from Chippenham to Cirencester, and sat there a year. The same year assembled a band of pirates, and sat at Fulham by the Thames. The same year also the sun was eclipsed one hour of the day.

On 15 Jan 1919 Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 (53) died at Chippenham. His son Christian Arthur Wellesley 4th Earl Cowley 1890-1962 (28) succeeded 4th Earl Cowley 1C 1857, 4th Viscount Dangan of Meath 1C 1857, 5th Baron Cowley 1C 1828.

On 18 Jan 1919 Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 (53) was buried at Chippenham.

The Gloucester Gloucestershire River Avon rises near Acton Turville after which it flows past Luckington, Sherston, Easton Grey, Malmesbury, Great Somerford, Christian Malford, Chippenham, Melksham, Bradford on Avon, under the Dundas Aquaduct, through Bath, past Keynsham, through Bristol under the Clifton Suspension Bridge to Avonmouth where it joins the Severn Estuary.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. 9. Eodem quoque anno Ealhere comes, cum Cantuariis, et Huda, cum Suthriis, contra paganorum exercitum in insula, quae dicitur in Saxonica lingua Tenet, Britannico autem sermone Ruim, animose et acriter belligeraverunt, et primitus Christiani victoriam habuerunt, prolongatoque diu proelio ibidem ex utraque parte plurimi ceciderunt et in aqua mersi suffocati sunt, et comites illi ambo ibidem occubuerunt. Necnon et eodem anno Æthelwulfus, Occidentalium Saxonum rex, post Pascha filiam suam Burgredo Merciorum regi in villa regia, quae dicitur Cippanhamme, nuptiis regaliter factis, ad reginam dedit.

9 The same year also, earl Ealhere, with the men of Kent, and Iluda with the men of Surrey, fought bravely and resolutely against an army of the pagans, in the island, which is called in the Saxon tongue, Tenet, but Ruim in the British language. The battle lasted a long time, and many fell on both sides, and also were drowned in the water; and both the earls were there slain. In the same year also, after Easter, Ethelwulf, king of the West-Saxons, gave His daughter to Burhred, king of the Mercians, and the marriage was celebrated royally at the royal villa of Chippenham.

Draycott Cerne Chippenham, Wiltshire

Cholderton, Wiltshire

Christian Malford, Wiltshire

Clarendon Palace, Wiltshire

Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 July 1664. 14 Jul 1664. My mind being doubtful what the business should be, I rose a little after four o'clock, and abroad. Walked to my Lord's, and nobody up, but the porter rose out of bed to me so I back again to Fleete Streete, and there bought a little book of law; and thence, hearing a psalm sung, I went into St. Dunstan's, and there heard prayers read, which, it seems, is done there every morning at six o'clock; a thing I never did do at a chappell, but the College Chappell, in all my life.

Thence to my Lord's again, and my Lord being up, was sent for up, and he and I alone. He did begin with a most solemn profession of the same confidence in and love for me that he ever had, and then told me what a misfortune was fallen upon me and him: in me, by a displeasure which my Chancellor (55) did show to him last night against me, in the highest and most passionate manner that ever any man did speak, even to the not hearing of any thing to be said to him: but he told me, that he did say all that could be said for a man as to my faithfullnesse and duty to his Lordship, and did me the greatest right imaginable. And what should the business be, but that I should be forward to have the trees in Clarendon Park marked and cut down, which he, it seems, hath bought of my Lord Albemarle (55); when, God knows! I am the most innocent man in the world in it, and did nothing of myself, nor knew of his concernment therein, but barely obeyed my Lord Treasurer's (57) warrant for the doing thereof. And said that I did most ungentlemanlike with him, and had justified the rogues in cutting down a tree of his; and that I had sent the veriest Fanatique [Deane (30)] that is in England to mark them, on purpose to nose [provoke] him. All which, I did assure my Lord, was most properly false, and nothing like it true; and told my Lord the whole passage. My Lord do seem most nearly affected; he is partly, I believe, for me, and partly for himself. So he advised me to wait presently upon my Lord, and clear myself in the most perfect manner I could, with all submission and assurance that I am his creature both in this and all other things; and that I do owne that all I have, is derived through my Lord Sandwich (38) from his Lordship. So, full of horror, I went, and found him busy in tryals of law in his great room; and it being Sitting-day, durst not stay, but went to my Lord and told him so: whereupon he directed me to take him after dinner; and so away I home, leaving my Lord mightily concerned for me. I to the office, and there sat busy all the morning.

At noon to the 'Change, and from the 'Change over with Alsopp and the others to the Pope's Head tavern, and there staid a quarter of an hour, and concluded upon this, that in case I got them no more than 3s. per week per man I should have of them but £150 per ann., but to have it without any adventure or charge, but if I got them 3s. 2d., then they would give me £300 in the like manner. So I directed them to draw up their tender in a line or two against the afternoon, and to meet me at White Hall.

So I left them, and I to my Chancellor's (55); and there coming out after dinner I accosted him, telling him that I was the unhappy Pepys that had fallen into his high displeasure, and come to desire him to give me leave to make myself better understood to his Lordship, assuring him of my duty and service. He answered me very pleasingly, that he was confident upon the score of my Lord Sandwich's (38) character of me, but that he had reason to think what he did, and desired me to call upon him some evening: I named to-night, and he accepted of it. So with my heart light I to White Hall, and there after understanding by a stratagem, and yet appearing wholly desirous not to understand Mr. Gauden's price when he desired to show it me, I went down and ordered matters in our tender so well that at the meeting by and by I was ready with Mr. Gauden's and his, both directed him a letter to me to give the board their two tenders, but there being none but the Generall Monk (55) and Mr. Coventry (36) and Povy (50) and I, I did not think fit to expose them to view now, but put it off till Saturday, and so with good content rose.

Thence I to the Half Moone, against the 'Change, to acquaint Lanyon and his friends of our proceedings, and thence to my Chancellor's (55), and there heard several tryals, wherein I perceive my Lord is a most able and ready man. After all done, he himself called, "Come, Mr. Pepys, you and I will take a turn in the garden". So he was led down stairs, having the goute, and there walked with me, I think, above an houre, talking most friendly, yet cunningly. I told him clearly how things were; how ignorant I was of his Lordship's concernment in it; how I did not do nor say one word singly, but what was done was the act of the whole Board. He told me by name that he was more angry with Sir G. Carteret (54) than with me, and also with the whole body of the Board. But thinking who it was of the Board that knew him least, he did place his fear upon me; but he finds that he is indebted to none of his friends there. I think I did thoroughly appease him, till he thanked me for my desire and pains to satisfy him; and upon my desiring to be directed who I should of his servants advise with about this business, he told me nobody, but would be glad to hear from me himself. He told me he would not direct me in any thing, that it might not be said that the Chancellor (55) did labour to abuse the King (34); or (as I offered) direct the suspending the Report of the Purveyors but I see what he means, and I will make it my worke to do him service in it. But, Lord! to see how he is incensed against poor Deane (30), as a fanatique rogue, and I know not what: and what he did was done in spite to his Lordship, among all his friends and tenants. He did plainly say that he would not direct me in any thing, for he would not put himself into the power of any man to say that he did so and so; but plainly told me as if he would be glad I did something. Lord! to see how we poor wretches dare not do the King (34) good service for fear of the greatness of these men. He named Sir G. Carteret (54), and Sir J. Minnes (65), and the rest; and that he was as angry with them all as me. But it was pleasant to think that, while he was talking to me, comes into the garden Sir G. Carteret (54); and my Lord avoided speaking with him, and made him and many others stay expecting him, while I walked up and down above an houre, I think; and would have me walk with my hat on. And yet, after all this, there has been so little ground for this his jealousy of me, that I am sometimes afeard that he do this only in policy to bring me to his side by scaring me; or else, which is worse, to try how faithfull I would be to the King (34); but I rather think the former of the two. I parted with great assurance how I acknowledged all I had to come from his Lordship; which he did not seem to refuse, but with great kindness and respect parted. So I by coach home, calling at my Lord's, but he not within.

At my office late, and so home to eat something, being almost starved for want of eating my dinner to-day, and so to bed, my head being full of great and many businesses of import to me.

Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670. Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes. Around 1660 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Thomas Wriothesley 4th Earl of Southampton 1607-1667 holding his Lord Treasurer Staff of Office. Around 1650 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 1st Earl Sandwich 1625-1672. Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686. Around 1657 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Thomas Povey Master of Requests 1614-1705. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 July 1664. 20 Jul 1664. Up, and a while to my office, and then home with Deane (30) till dinner, discoursing upon the business of my Chancellor's (55) timber in Clarendon Parke, and how to make a report therein without offending him; which at last I drew up, and hope it will please him. But I would to God neither I nor he ever had had any thing to have done with it! Dined together with a good pig, and then out by coach to White Hall, to the Committee for Fishing; but nothing done, it being a great day to-day there upon drawing at the Lottery of Sir Arthur Slingsby (41). I got in and stood by the two Queenes [Note. Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705 (25) and Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (54) ] and the Duchesse of Yorke (27), and just behind my Baroness Castlemayne (23), whom I do heartily adore; and good sport it was to see how most that did give their ten pounds did go away with a pair of globes only for their lot, and one gentlewoman, one Mrs. Fish, with the only blanke. And one I staid to see drew a suit of hangings valued at £430, and they say are well worth the money, or near it. One other suit there is better than that; but very many lots of three and fourscore pounds. I observed the King (34) and Queenes (54) did get but as poor lots as any else. But the wisest man I met with was Mr. Cholmley (31), who insured as many as would, from drawing of the one blank for 12d.; in which case there was the whole number of persons to one, which I think was three or four hundred. And so he insured about 200 for 200 shillings, so that he could not have lost if one of them had drawn it, for there was enough to pay the £10; but it happened another drew it, and so he got all the money he took.

I left the lottery, and went to a play, only a piece of it, which was the Duke's house, "Worse and Worse"; just the same manner of play, and writ, I believe, by the same man as "The Adventures of Five Hours" very pleasant it was, and I begin to admire Harris (30) more than ever.

Thence to Westminster to see Creed, and he and I took a walk in the Parke. He is ill, and not able yet to set out after my Lord, but will do to-morrow.

So home, and late at my office, and so home to bed. This evening being moonshine I played a little late upon my flageolette in the garden. But being at Westminster Hall I met with great news that Mrs. Lane is married to one Martin, one that serves Captain Marsh. She is gone abroad with him to-day, very fine. I must have a bout with her very shortly to see how she finds marriage.

Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1663 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Eleanor Needham Baroness Byron 1627-1664 depicted as Saint Catherine of Alexandria in a guise probably intended to flatter Charles II's Queen, Catherine of Braganza. Accordingly she carries the martyr's palm branch and leans upon a wheel. The sitter looks to two putti in the upper left, one of whom holds a wreath of bay leaves above her head. She is wearing a copper-red dress with a richly decorated blue mantle about her arms. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Before 1696 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Catherine of Braganza Queen Consort England 1638-1705. Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669. Around 1661 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. One of the Windsor Beauties. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 07 Nov 1666. William Faithorne Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. One of the Windsor Beauties. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1690 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709.

Clench, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Clyffe Pypard, Wiltshire

St Peter's Church, Clyffe Pypard, Wiltshire

St Peter's Church, Clyffe Pypard. Monument to Thomas Spackman by John Devall who was the Royal Master Mason. And Pevsner and his wife are buried there.

Codford St Mary, Wiltshire

Colatford, Wiltshire

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms 1488-1534 was born to John Writhe Garter King of Arms -1504 in Colatford. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe or Cricklade.

Collingbourne Kingston, Wiltshire

Collingbourne Ducis, Wiltshire

Coombe Bissett, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Corsham, Wiltshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1015. This year was the great council at Oxford; where Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017 betrayed Sigferth and Morcar, the eldest thanes belonging to the Seven Towns. He allured them into his bower, where they were shamefully slain. Then the king took all their possessions, and ordered the widow of Sigferth to be secured, and brought within Malmsbury. After a little interval, Edmund Etheling (25) went and seized her, against the king's (49) will, and had her to wife. Then, before the Nativity of St. Mary, went the etheling west-north into the Five Towns, (58) and soon plundered all the property of Sigferth and Morcar; and all the people submitted to him. At the same time came King Knute (20) to Sandwich, and went soon all about Kent into Wessex, until he came to the mouth of the Frome; and then plundered in Dorset, and in Wiltshire, and in Somerset. King Ethelred (49), meanwhile, lay sick at Corsham; and Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017 collected an army there, and Edmund the etheling (25) in the north. When they came together, the alderman designed to betray Edmund the etheling (25), but he could not; whereupon they separated without an engagement, and sheered off from their enemies. Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017 then seduced forty ships from the king, and submitted to Knute (20). The West-Saxons also submitted, and gave hostages, and horsed the army. And he continued there until midwinter.

58. The "seven" towns mentioned above are reduced here to "five"; probably because two had already submitted to the king on the death of the two thanes, Sigferth and Morcar. These five were, as originally, Leicester, Lincoln, Stamford, Nottingham, and Derby. Vid. an. 942, 1013.

Coulston, Wiltshire

On 07 Mar 1685 Giles Hungerford 1614-1685 (70) died at Coulston. He was buried in Salisbury.

Cricklade, Wiltshire

Cricklade is on the River Thames.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 900-949. 905. This year Ethelwald enticed the army in East-Anglia to rebellion; so that they overran all the land of Mercia, until they came to Cricklade, where they forded the Thames; and having seized, either in Bradon or thereabout, all that they could lay their hands upon, they went homeward again. King Edward (31) went after, as soon as he could gather his army, and overran all their land between the foss and the Ouse quite to the fens northward. Then being desirous of returning thence, he issued an order through the whole army, that they should all go out at once. But the Kentish men remained behind, contrary to his order, though he had sent seven messengers to them. Whereupon the army surrounded them, and there they fought. There fell Aldermen Siwulf and Sigelm; Eadwold, the king's thane; Abbot Kenwulf; Sigebriht, the son of Siwulf; Eadwald, the son of Acca; and many also with them; though I have named the most considerable. On the Danish side were slain Eohric their king, and Prince Ethelwald, who had enticed them to the war. Byrtsige, the son of Prince Brihtnoth; Governor Ysop; Governor Oskytel; and very many also with them that we now cannot name. And there was on either hand much slaughter made; but of the Danes there were more slain, though they remained masters of the field. Ealswitha died this same year; and a comet appeared on the thirteenth day before the calends of November.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1000-1049. 1016. This year came King Knute (21) with a marine force of one hundred and sixty ships, and Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017 with him, over the Thames into Mercia at Cricklade; whence they proceeded to Warwickshire, during the middle of the winter, and plundered therein, and burned, and slew all they met. Then began Edmund the etheling (26) to gather an army, which, when it was collected, could avail him nothing, unless the king (50) were there and they had the assistance of the citizens of London. The expedition therefore was frustrated, and each man betook himself home. After this, an army was again ordered, under full penalties, that every person, however distant, should go forth; and they sent to the king (50) in London, and besought him to come to meet the army with the aid that he could collect. When they were all assembled, it succeeded nothing better than it often did before; and, when it was told the king, that those persons would betray him who ought to assist him, then forsook he the army, and returned again to London. Then rode Edmund the etheling (26) to Earl Utred in Northumbria; and every man supposed that they would collect an army King Knute (21); but they went into Stafforddhire, and to Shrewsbury, and to Chester; and they plundered on their parts, and Knute (21) on his. He went out through Buckinghamshire to Bedfordshire; thence to Huntingdonshire, and so into Northamptonshire along the fens to Stamford. Thence into Lincolnshire. Thence to Nottinghamshire; and so into Northumbria toward York. When Utred understood this, he ceased from plundering, and hastened northward, and submitted for need, and all the Northumbrians with him; but, though he gave hostages, he was nevertheless slain by the advice of Earldorman Eadric "Streona aka Acquisitive" Mercia -1017, and Thurkytel, the son of Nafan, with him. After this, King Knute (21) appointed Eric earl over Northumbria, as Utred was; and then went southward another way, all by west, till the whole army came, before Easter, to the ships. Meantime Edmund Etheling (26) went to London to his father (50): and after Easter went King Knute (21) with all his ships toward London; but it happened that King Ethelred (50) died ere the ships came. He ended his days on St. George's day; having held his kingdom in much tribulation and difficulty as long as his life continued.

Before 1488 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms 1488-1534 was born to John Writhe Garter King of Arms -1504 in Colatford. The location of Colatford is unclear; either near Castle Combe or Cricklade.

Crudwell, Wiltshire

On 12 Aug 1877 Ambrose McEvoy Painter 1877-1927 was born at Crudwell.

Dauntsey, Wiltshire

Around 1488 Thomas Danvers 1488-1532 was born to John Danvers 1452-1514 (36) at Dauntsey.

On 09 Oct 1532 Thomas Danvers 1488-1532 (44) died at Dauntsey.

On 28 Jun 1573 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 was born to John Danvers 1540-1594 (33) and Elizabeth Neville 1550-1630 (23) at Dauntsey.

Around 1639 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 in his Garter Robes.

St James' the Great Church Dauntsey, Wiltshire

On 20 Jan 1644 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 (70) died at Earl of Danby's House Cornbury Park Charlbury. After 20 Jan 1644 Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 (70) was reburied at St James' the Great Church Dauntsey.

Around 1639 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 in his Garter Robes.

Deverills, Wiltshire

Brixton Deverill, Deverills, Wiltshire

Hill Deverill, Deverills, Wiltshire

Kingston Deverill, Deverills, Wiltshire

Longbridge, Deverills, Wiltshire

Monkton Deverill, Deverills, Wiltshire

Devizes, Wiltshire

Around May 1144 Roger Fitzmiles 2nd Earl Hereford 1124-1155 (19) and Empress Matilda (42) were in Devizes.

John Evelyn's Diary 22 July 1654. 22 Jul 1654. We departed and dined at a farm of my Uncle Hungerford's, called Darnford Magna, situated in a valley under the plain, most sweetly watered, abounding in trouts caught by spear in the night, when they come attracted by a light set in the stern of a boat.

After dinner, continuing our return, we passed over the goodly plain, or rather sea of carpet, which I think for evenness, extent, verdure, and innumerable flocks, to be one of the most delightful prospects in nature, and reminded me of the pleasant lives of shepherds we read of in romances.

Now we arrived at Stonehenge, indeed a stupendous. Monument, appearing at a distance like a castle; how so many and huge Pillars of stone should have been brought together, some erect, others transverse on the tops of them, in a circular area as rudely representing a cloister or heathen and more natural temple, is wonderful. The stone is so exceedingly hard, that all my strength with a hammer could not break a fragment; which hardness I impute to their so long exposure. To number them exactly is very difficult, they lie in such variety of postures and confusion, though they seemed not to exceed 100; we counted only 95. As to their being brought thither, there being no navigable river near, is by some admired; but for the stone, there seems to be the same kind about 20 miles distant, some of which appear above ground. About the same hills, are divers mounts raised, conceived to be ancient intrenchments, or places of burial, after bloody fights. We now went by Devizes, a reasonable large town, and came late to Cadenham.

Devizes Castle, Wiltshire

After 28 Sep 1106 Robert Curthose Normandy III Duke Normandy 1051-1134 was imprisoned at Devizes Castle.

In 1232 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 (62) was imprisoned at Devizes Castle.

Richard Grey 1202-1271 was appointed Constable Devizes Castle.

Devizes Museum, Wiltshire

Knap Hill. Historic England 1005704.

Summary: The site of Knap Hill, a causewayed enclosure. It encompasses an area of circa 2.4 hectares and consists of a single circuit of sub-triangular plan, conforming to the contours of the hill and possibly incomplete on the steepest, southern side. Exceptionally compared to other enclosures, the causeways seem to correspond precisely to gaps in the bank. It is unclear if the earthworks ever formed a complete enclosure. Excavations by the Cunningtons in 1908-9 first demonstrated the causewayed nature of the earthworks, as well as recovering pottery which they felt to be Neolithic in date. Further excavations in 1961 confirmed the Cunningtons' observations. Romano British pottery and an extended inhumation probably relates to the adjacent, later earthwork enclosure. The site and its archaeological history were re-investigated as part of the RCHME project focusing on enclosure and industry in the Neolithic period in 1995. Knap Hill was also subsequently included in a research programme into the dating of the early Causewayed Enclosures of southern Britain and of Ireland. The results suggested that Knap Hill was probably constructed in the 35th century cal BC, (that is to say between 3500-4001cal BC) probably more than a century later than Windmill Hill and the West Kennet long barrow. It is unclear, however, for how long activity continued. On the basis that the ditch was left to infill naturally, that there is no sign of recutting, and because there is a scarcity of sherds and bones, a short duration, probably of well under a century and perhaps only a generation or two, is possible.

More information: (SU 12106368) Neolithic Camp (NR) Knap Hill (NAT).

A causewayed camp on Knap Hill (see plan), excavated by BH and ME Cunnington in 1908-9 and G Connah in 1961. The excavations revealed Windmill Hill sherds in the silting of the ditches, Beaker sherds on the surface of the ditches and Romano-British sherds, probably associated with the plateau enclosure (see SU 16 SW 13). Other finds nearly all from within a few feet of the bottom of the ditch include fragments of red deer antlers, a human jawbone, flint flakes and a few sarsen chips. The finds are now in Devizes Museum. Connah concludes from his excavations that the causewayed ditches undoubtedly belong to the Windmill Hill culture and that the scarcity of the pottery and occupation material may suggest that the camp was of a defensive character and abandoned at an early stage - perhaps before completion.

Radiocarbon dating of antler fragments from the primary rubble of the ditch - 4710+- 115 BP or 2760BC. Charcoal from the upper silting of the ditch - 3790+- 130BP or 1840BC.

SU 12106365 Knap Hill causewayed camp occupies a hill top position overlooking the Pewsey Vale to the S. The causewayed bank can be traced only on the N and W sides, but accepting the natural gradient of the hill for the eastern and southern extent, then the area enclosed would have been approximately 1.7 hectares. There is a bowl barrow (see SU 16 SW 23) and some flint digging disturbance within the camp, and in the E the perimeter of the IA/RB "plateau" enclosure obscures the terminal on the causewayed bank. Resurveyed in conjunction with RCHM manuscript plan at 1:2500.

The Neolithic causwayed enclosure and associated features described by the previous authorities have been mapped at 1:10,000 scale from aerial photographs and the 1:1000 plan produced as part of the industry and Enclosure in the Neolithic Project (Event UID 923509).

Surveyed by the RCHME as part of the above project.

Knap Hill encloses an area of 2.4 hectares and consists of a single circuit of sub-triangular plan, conforming to the contours of the hill and possibly incomplete on the steepest, southern side. Exceptionally to other enclosures, the causeways seem to correspond precisely to gaps in the bank.

Two radiocarbon dates were obtained by Connah following his 1961 excavations (Table 3.3: BM-205, -208; Connah 1969). They bracket the infilling of the ditch, the sample for BM-205 coming from near the base and that for BM-208 from the topmost fill. BM-205 was measured on an antler implement which had arguably been used to dig the ditch and would have been contemporary with that event. BM-208 was measured on an unidentified bulk charcoal sample which may have included material of diverse ages, and can hence provide only a terminus post quem for its context.

Knap Hill was included in a research programme into the dating of the early Causewayed Enclosures of southern Britain and of Ireland, using chronological estimates produced by Bayesian statistical analysis of radiocarbon dates. In addition to attempting to establish a construction date and duration for the monument, the proximity of the site to Windmill Hill and to a concentration of long barrows posed the question of its chronological relation to them. Six further radiocarbon measurements were therefore obtained. A model which incorporates this interpretation of the archaeological sequence with the radiocarbon dates was constructed. The model suggested that Knap Hill was probably constructed in the 35th century cal BC, probably rather more than a century later than both Windmill Hill and the West Kennet long barrow. It is unclear, however, for how long activity continued at this enclosure. On the basis that the ditch was left to infill naturally and there is no sign of recutting, and because there is a scarcity of sherds and bones, a short duration, probably of well under a century and perhaps only a generation or two, is plausible.

Long Stones Long Barrow. Historic England:

The monument includes a Neolithic long barrow aligned north east to south west and situated on a gentle east-facing slope, 300m south west of the South Street long barrow.The barrow mound has been slightly disturbed by cultivation in the past but survives as an impressive earthwork which measures 84m long and 35m wide. The mound stands up to 6m high and is flanked to the north and south by quarry ditches which provided material for the construction of the mound. These have become partially infilled over the years owing to cultivation but survive as slight earthworks c.24m wide and 84m long with a depth of c.0.6m. The barrow was partially excavated by Merewether between 1820 and 1850. He discovered evidence of a Bronze Age cremation burial contained in a 'Deverel Rimbury' style pottery urn and a piece of bronze which was probably part of a dagger. The urn is now located in the Devizes Museum.

Roundway Down Devizes, Wiltshire

On 13 Jul 1643 a Royalist cavalry force under Lord Wilmot (30) won a crushing victory over the Parliamentarian Army of the West under Sir William Waller (46) at Roundway Down Devizes.

Maurice Palatinate Simmern 1621-1652 (22) fought.

Donhead St Andrew, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Downton, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Draycott, Wiltshire

Before 21 Nov 1604 Francis Thynne 1562-1604 died. He was buried on 21 Nov 1604 at Draycott.

On 15 Jul 1884 Henry Richard Charles Wellesley 1st Earl Cowley 1804-1884 (80) died at 20 Albermarle Street. He was buried at Draycott. His son William Henry Wellesley 2nd Earl Cowley 1834-1895 (49) succeeded 2nd Earl Cowley 1C 1857, 2nd Viscount Dangan of Meath 1C 1857, 3rd Baron Cowley 1C 1828. Emily Gwendoline Williams Countess Cowley 1839-1932 (45) by marriage Countess Cowley.

Shute Manor Draycott, Wiltshire

On 28 Feb 1895 William Henry Wellesley 2nd Earl Cowley 1834-1895 (60) died at Shute Manor Draycott. His son Henry Arthur Mornington Wellesley 3rd Earl Cowley 1866-1919 (29) succeeded 3rd Earl Cowley 1C 1857, 3rd Viscount Dangan of Meath 1C 1857, 4th Baron Cowley 1C 1828. Violet Neville Countess Cowley 1866-1910 (28) by marriage Countess Cowley.

Dundas Aquaduct, Wiltshire

The Dundas Aquaduct carries the Kennet and Avon canal over the Gloucestershire River Avon. It was designed by John Rennie and chief engineer John Thomas between 1797 and 1801, and completed in 1805.

East Chisenbury, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Easton Grey, Wiltshire

Easton Grey House, Wiltshire

On 29 Apr 1908 Thomas Graham Smith -1908 died of his burn injuries when he fell while carrying a lighted candle and set his clothes on fire. Asquith (55) attended the inquest at Easton Grey.

Fosse Way River Avon Crossing, Easton Grey, Wiltshire

Fosse Way 5c Bath to Cirencester. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road where it curves around Solsbury Hill to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone, Fosse Gate, crossing the Gloucestershire River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey before reaching the Cotswold Airport after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester.

Easton Royal, Wiltshire

On 17 Jan 1695 Edward Seymour 8th Duke Somerset 1695-1757 was born to Edward Seymour 5th Baronet Seymour 1661-1740 (34) and Laetitia Popham Baroness Seymour -1738. He was christened the same day at Easton Royal.

Ebbesbourne Wake, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Edington, Wiltshire

Around 12 May 878 Alfred "The Great" King Wessex 849-899 (29) defeated the Viking army led by Guthrum Viking -890 at the Battle of Edington at Edington (the location is subject to dispute; possibly Heddington).

On 29 Jun 1450 Bishop William Ayscough 1395-1445 (55) was murdered at Edington by an angry mob during 1450 Jack Cade's Rebellion.

Elecumbe, Wiltshire

Around 1222 John Lovell 1222-1287 was born to John Lovell 1190-1252 (32) and Catherine Basset 1196-1253 (26) at Elecumbe. He a great x 3 grandson of King Henry I "Beauclerc" England 1068-1135.

Elston, Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Enford, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Everley, Wiltshire

In 1371 Thomas Astley 1371-1438 was born to Thomas Astley 1343-1383 (28) in Everley.

Fifield, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Figheldean, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Fisherton de la Mere, Wiltshire

Fittleton, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Fosse Gate, Wiltshire

Fosse Way 5c Bath to Cirencester. After Batheaston the Fosse Way continues along Bannerdown Road where it curves around Solsbury Hill to reach the high ground where the road straightens out passing Three Shires Stone, Fosse Gate, crossing the Gloucestershire River Avon 1.2km south-west of Easton Grey before reaching the Cotswold Airport after which it travels to Corinium Dobunnorum aka Cirencester.

Garesden, Wiltshire

Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire

On 29 Oct 1567 Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton was born to Anthony Hungerford 1540-1594 (27) at Great Bedwyn.

Around 25 Sep 1614 Giles Hungerford 1614-1685 was born to Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton (46) and Sarah Crouch 1574-1627 (40) at Great Bedwyn.

On 20 Jan 1836 Henrietta Louisa Elizabeth Danneskiold Samsøe Countess Strafford 1836-1880 was born to Christian Danneskiold Samsøe and Elizabeth Brudenell 1807-1847 (29) in Great Bedwyn.

The River Dun is a tributary of the River Kennet which it joins at Hungerford. The head of the River Dun is near Great Bedwyn.

Bedwyn Magna Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire

On 30 Mar 1654 Henry Seymour 1626-1654 (28) died. He was buried at Bedwyn Magna Great Bedwyn.

St Mary's Church Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire

After 21 Dec 1536. All Saints Church Maiden Bradley. Monument to John Seymour 1474-1536. Seymour differenced with a Crescent impaled with unknown arms quartered 1 Argent a fess between 3 martlets Gules in chief three fox heads erased 2 per pale Azure three fleur de lys Or 3 Or three talbots courant 4 Or a chevrom Limine between 3 stags heads caboshed. The note below states ... The above tablet (a copy of the original in Great Bedwyn) is placed here by Algernon 15th Duke of Somerset Sep 1899.

On 12 Jul 1664 Francis Seymour 1st Baron Seymour Trowbridge 1590-1664 (74) died. He was buried in the Chanel of St Mary's Church Great Bedwyn.

Great Chalfield, Wiltshire

On 24 Aug 1629 John Eyre 1580-1639 (49) inherited Great Chalfield from his father but sold it two years later to Richard Gurney 1st Baronet 1578-1647 (51).

Great Durnford, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Great Somerford, Wiltshire

Great Wishford, Wiltshire

Heddington, Wiltshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 850-899. Around 12 May 878. Then, in the seventh week after Easter, he rode to Brixton by the eastern side of Selwood; and there came out to meet him all the people of Somersersetshire, and Wiltshire, and that part of Hampshire which is on this side of the sea; and they rejoiced to see him. Then within one night he went from this retreat to Hey; and within one night after he proceeded to Heddington; and there fought with all the army, and put them to flight, riding after them as far as the fortress, where he remained a fortnight. Then the army gave him hostages with many oaths, that they would go out of his kingdom. They told him also, that their king would receive baptism. And they acted accordingly; for in the course of three weeks after, King Guthrum, attended by some thirty of the worthiest men that were in the army, came to him at Aller, which is near Athelney, and there the king became his sponsor in baptism; and his crisom-leasing was at Wedmor. He was there twelve nights with the king (29), who honoured him and his attendants with many presents.

Around 12 May 878 Alfred "The Great" King Wessex 849-899 (29) defeated the Viking army led by Guthrum Viking -890 at the Battle of Edington at Edington (the location is subject to dispute; possibly Heddington).

Heytesbury, Wiltshire

On 26 Jul 1518 John Cotell -1518 was strangled by his wife Agnes Cotell 1485-1523 (33) at Farleigh Hungreford Castle with the aid of William Mathewe and William Inges, yeomen of Heytesbury. He, John, was steward to Edward Hungerford -1522 who she subsequently married.

In Jun 1541 William Sharington 1495-1553 (46) leased the manor of Heytesbury.

Around 1542 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of William Sharington 1495-1553.

On 13 Feb 1809 William Eliot 2nd Earl St Germans 1767-1845 (41) and Letitia Acourt were married at Heytesbury.

Hill Deverell, Wiltshire

Around 1505 George Ludlow 1505-1580 was born to William Ludlow 1478-1533 (27) in Hill Deverell.

On 25 May 1580 George Ludlow 1505-1580 (75) died in Hill Deverell.

Hindon, Wiltshire

Around 1677 Henrietta Hyde Countess Dalkeith 1677-1730 was born to Lawrence Hyde 1st Earl Rochester 1642-1711 (34) and Henrietta Boyle Countess Rochester 1646-1687 (31) at Hindon.

In 1685 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Lawrence Hyde 1st Earl Rochester 1642-1711. Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Lawrence Hyde 1st Earl Rochester 1642-1711 wearing his Garter Robes including the Garter Collar and holding his white Lord Treasurer Staff of Office. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Henrietta Boyle Countess Rochester 1646-1687. One of the Windsor Beauties.

Homington, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Ibsley, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Kingston, Wiltshire

Around 1500 John St Lo 1500-1559 was born to Nicholas St Lo 1480-1508 (20) and Eleanor Arundell 1472-1516 (28) at Kingston.

On 01 Sep 1508 Nicholas St Lo 1480-1508 (28) died at Kingston.

Around 1519 Edward St Lo 1519-1578 was born to John St Lo 1500-1559 (19) and Margaret Kingston at Kingston.

Lacock, Wiltshire

Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire

In 1229 Ela Longespee 3rd Countess Salisbury 1187-1261 (42) founded Lacock Abbey as a nunnery of the Augustinian order.

In 1240 Ela Longespee 3rd Countess Salisbury 1187-1261 (53) was appointed Abbot Lacock.

In 1243 Ela Longespee 3rd Countess Salisbury 1187-1261 (56) resigned as Abbot Lacock due to ill health.

On 24 Aug 1261 Ela Longespee 3rd Countess Salisbury 1187-1261 (74) died. She was buried in Lacock Abbey. Her inscription reads ... Below lie buried the bones of the venerable Ela, who gave this sacred house as a home for the nuns. She also had lived here as holy abbess and Countess of Salisbury, full of good works. Her great granddaughter Margaret Longespée 4th Countess Salisbury Countess Lincoln -1310 succeeded 4th Earl Salisbury 1C 1149.

In 1540 William Sharington 1495-1553 (45) paid £783 for Lacock Abbey which had been dissolved.

Around 1542 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of William Sharington 1495-1553.

Before 06 Jul 1553 William Sharington 1495-1553 died. His brother Henry Sharington of Lacock in Wiltshire 1532-1581 inherited Lacock Abbey.

Before 20 Oct 1743 Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743 (84). Portrait of Mary Mansel. Lacock Abbey.

Laverstock, Wiltshire

Littlecote, Wiltshire

Littlecote House, Wiltshire

On 10 Jan 1419 George Darell of Littlecote 1419-1474 was born to William Darell 1384-1461 (35) at Littlecote House.

In 1429 Richard Darell 1429-1489 was born to William Darell 1384-1461 (45) at Littlecote House.

In 1605 Alexander Popham 1605-1669 was born to Francis Popham 1573-1644 (32) at Littlecote House.

On 21 Aug 1619 John Borlase 1st Baronet 1619-1672 was born to William Borlase 1589-1630 (30) and Jane Popham -1668 at Littlecote House.

On 15 Oct 1620 William Borlase 1620-1665 was born to William Borlase 1589-1630 (31) and Jane Popham -1668 at Littlecote House.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 June 1668. 16 Jun 1668. Tuesday. So paying the reckoning, 14s. 4d., and servants, 2s., poor 1s., set out; and overtook one coach and kept a while company with it, till one of our horses losing a shoe, we stopped and drank and spent 1s. So on, and passing through a good part of this county of Wiltshire, saw a good house of Alexander Popham's (63), and another of my Lord Craven's (60), I think in Barkeshire. Come to Newbery, and there dined, which cost me, and musick, which a song of the old courtier of Queen Elizabeth's, and how he was changed upon the coming in of the King (38), did please me mightily, and I did cause W. Hewer (26) to write it out, 3s. 6d. Then comes the reckoning, forced to change gold, 8s. 7d.; servants and poor, 1s. 6d. So out, and lost our way, which made me vexed, but come into it again; and in the evening betimes come to Reading, and there heard my wife read more of "Mustapha", and then to supper, and then I to walk about the town, which is a very great one, I think bigger than Salsbury: a river runs through it, in seven branches, and unite in one, in one part of the town, and runs into the Thames half-a-mile off one odd sign of the Broad Face. W. Hewer (26) troubled with the headake we had none of his company last night, nor all this day nor night to talk. Then to my inn, and so to bed.

Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of William Craven 1st Earl Craven 1608-1697. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715.

On 18 Mar 1686 John Sheffield 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normandby 1648-1721 (37) and Ursula Stawell Countess Mulgrave and Conway -1697 were married at the chapel of Littlecote House. She by marriage Countess Mulgrave.

Around 1704 Johnathan

Ann Borlase -1703 was born to William Borlase 1589-1630 and Jane Popham -1668 at Littlecote House.

Little Durnford, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Longford, Wiltshire

In 1573 Thomas Gorges of Longford Castle 1536-1610 (37) acquired the manor of Longford which had been owned by the Servington aka Cervington family. In 1576 after his marriage to Helena Snakenbourg Marchioness Northampton 1549-1635 (24) they commissioned the building of a house on the triangular Swedish style on the banks of the Wiltshire River Avon with money from a shipwreck of the Spanish Armada.

Longford Castle, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Prodigy House. A large house built in the Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean periods defined by their use of glass. Prodigy houses include: Longford Castle, Wollaton Hall, Longleat House, Burghley House, Hatfield House and Hardwick Hall.

Longleat, Wiltshire

Longleat House, Wiltshire

In 1550 Anne Thynne 1550-1588 was born to John Thynne 1515-1580 (35) and Christian Gresham 1522-1567 (28) at Longleat House..

In 1565 Unknown Painter. Netherlandish. Portrait of Christian Gresham 1522-1567.

In 1551 Dorothy Thynne 1551-1592 was born to John Thynne 1515-1580 (36) and Christian Gresham 1522-1567 (29) at Longleat House..

Around 1560 Elizabeth Thynne 1560- was born to John Thynne 1515-1580 (45) and Christian Gresham 1522-1567 (38) at Longleat House.

In 1691 Thomas Ken Bishop 1637-1711 (53) was deprived of his See by King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (40) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (28). He was given lodgings at Longleat House by Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth 1640-1714 (51) with whom he was at Oxford. He resided at Longleat for some twenty years.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694. Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694. Before 1714 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth 1640-1714.

On 17 Oct 1710 John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763 (20) and Frances Worsley Countess Granville 1693-1743 (17) were married at Longleat House. She by marriage Countess Granville.

In 1739 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of John Carteret 2nd Earl Granville 1690-1763.

Prodigy House. A large house built in the Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean periods defined by their use of glass. Prodigy houses include: Longford Castle, Wollaton Hall, Longleat House, Burghley House, Hatfield House and Hardwick Hall.

Luckington, Wiltshire

Ludgershall, Wiltshire

On 29 Sep 1593 Jane Spencer 1519-1593 (74) died at Ludgershall.

Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire

Around 1428 Oliver St John 1428-1497 was born to Oliver St John 1400-1437 (27) and Margaret Beauchamp Duchess Somerset 1410-1482 (18) at Lydiard Tregoze.

Around 1473 John St John 1473-1512 was born to Oliver St John 1428-1497 (45) and Elizabeth Scrope 1439-1503 (34) at Lydiard Tregoze.

Around 1505 John St John 1505-1576 was born to John St John 1473-1512 (32) and Joan Iwardby 1485-1553 (20) at Lydiard Tregoze.

On 05 Apr 1576 John St John 1505-1576 (71) died at Lydiard Tregoze.

On 08 Nov 1589 Nicholas St John 1525-1589 (64) died at Lydiard Tregoze.

St Mary's Church Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire

St Mary's Church Lydiard Tregoze. Known as the Golden Cavalier, it is known to have been gilded by 1780. On the base is a relief of Edward leading a cavalry charge..

Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire

On 30 Sep 1551 Bishop John Harley -1558 was appointed Rector of Maiden Bradley.

On 22 Oct 1923 Algernon St Maur 15th Duke Somerset 1846-1923 (77) died at Maiden Bradley. He was buried at Brimble Hill Clump Bradley House. His third cousin once removed Edward Hamilton Seymour 16th Duke Somerset 1860-1931 (63) succeeded 16th Duke Somerset 4C 1547. Rowena Wall Duchess Somerset 1861-1950 (62) by marriage Duchess Somerset.

On 19 Apr 1962 Edith Mary Parker Duchess Somerset 1881-1962 (81) died at Maiden Bradley.

Bradley House, Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire

Brimble Hill Clump Bradley House, Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire

On 22 Oct 1923 Algernon St Maur 15th Duke Somerset 1846-1923 (77) died at Maiden Bradley. He was buried at Brimble Hill Clump Bradley House. His third cousin once removed Edward Hamilton Seymour 16th Duke Somerset 1860-1931 (63) succeeded 16th Duke Somerset 4C 1547. Rowena Wall Duchess Somerset 1861-1950 (62) by marriage Duchess Somerset.

White Sheet Downs, Maiden Bradley, Wiltshire

Malmesbury

Manningford Abbots, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Manningford Bruce, Wiltshire

In 1352 Beatrice Brewes Baroness Say 1352-1383 was born to Thomas Brewes 1301-1361 (50) at Manningford Bruce.

Marden, Wiltshire

Around 22 Mar 871 Halfdan Ragnarsson -877 defeated the Wessex army led by Æthelred King Wessex 847-871 (24) and Alfred "The Great" King Wessex 849-899 (22) at the Battle of Marton. The location of 'Marton' is not known; suggestions include Marden in Wiltshire and Winterborne St Martin in Dorset. Heahmund Wessex Bishop of Sherborne -871 was killed.

Marlborough

Melksham, Wiltshire

Seend Melksham, Wiltshire

Around 1697 Mary Webb Duchess Somerset 1697-1768 was born to Daniel Webb of Monkton Farleigh (35) in Seend Melksham.

Mere, Wiltshire

Shreen Water rises at Mere from where it flows south to join the Dorset River Stour at Gillingham.

St Mary's Church Mere, Wiltshire

Middle Woodford, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Monkton Farleigh, Wiltshire

On 23 Sep 1571 Bishop John Jewel 1522-1571 (49) died at Monkton Farleigh. He was buried at Salisbury Cathedral.

On 08 Mar 1716 Edward Seymour 8th Duke Somerset 1695-1757 (21) and Mary Webb Duchess Somerset 1697-1768 (19) were married at Monkton Farleigh.

On 20 May 1771 Edward Seymour 1771-1774 was christened at Monkton Farleigh.

On 08 Jun 1772 Webb Seymour 1772- was christened at Monkton Farleigh.

Netheravon, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Newton Tony, Wiltshire

North Newton, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Norton Bavant, Wiltshire

Odstock, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Orcheston, Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Patney, Wiltshire

The River Avon West rises around All Cannings in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, around Marden Henge and Wilsford Henge, Rushall where it joins the River Avon East to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Pewsey, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Quidhampton, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Rushall, Wiltshire

The River Avon West rises around All Cannings in the Vale of Pewsey being formed from many streams from where it flows past Patney, around Marden Henge and Wilsford Henge, Rushall where it joins the River Avon East to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Salisbury

Savernake, Wiltshire

Lockeridge House Savernake, Wiltshire

On 06 Jan 1878 George William Frederick Brudenell 2nd Marquess Ailesbury 1804-1878 (73) died at Lockeridge House Savernake. His brother Ernest Brudenell Bruce 3rd Marquess Ailesbury 1811-1886 (66) succeeded 3rd Marquess Ailesbury 1C. Louisa Elizabeth Horsley Beresford Marchioness Ailesbury 1814-1891 (63) by marriage Marchioness Ailesbury 1C.

Serrington, Wiltshire

The River Wylye rises on the White Sheet Downs from where it flows past Kingston Deverill, Monkton Deverill, Brixton Deverill, Hill Deverill, Longbridge, one kilometre south of Warminster, Bishopstrow, Norton Bavant, Heytesbury, Upton Lovell, Boyton, Sheerington, Codford St Mary, Fisherton de la Mere, Wylye, Steeple Langford after which it is joined by the River Till at Serrington.

Thereafter it flows around Great Wishford, South Newton to Wilton where it joins the River Nadder.

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Sharcott, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Sherston, Wiltshire

Sheerington, Wiltshire

Shipton Bellinger, Wiltshire

Shrewton, Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

South Newton, Wiltshire

Stapleford, Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Steeple Langford, Wiltshire

Stoke, Wiltshire

Ham Stoke, Wiltshire

On 04 Oct 1301 Thomas Monthermer 2nd Baron Monthermer 1301-1340 was born to Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (31) and Joan of Acre (29) at Ham Stoke. He a grandson of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307.

Stourhead, Wiltshire

The Dorset River Stour rises at Stourhead from where it flows through Bourton, past Milton-on-Stour, Gillingham, where it is joined by Shreen Water. From Gillingham it flows south where it is joined by the Wiltshire River Lodden before Ecliffe. The river continues past West Stour, Stour Provost, Marnhull, Henstridge Marsh, where it is joined by the River Cale.

The Dorset River Stour continues south to Sturminster where it heads south-east to Shillingstone then Durweston, around Blandford Forum, Charlton Marshall, Spetisbury, Sturminster Marshall, Wimborne Minster, Canford Magna, Knighton, West Parley, Parley Green, Holdenhurst before passing through Christchurch into Christchurch Harbour.

Stourton, Wiltshire

Church of St Peter Stourton, Wiltshire

On 17 Feb 1523 William Stourton 5th Baron Stourton 1457-1523 (66) died without issue. He was buried in the Church of St Peter Stourton. His brother Edward Stourton 6th Baron Stourton 1463-1535 (60) succeeded 6th Baron Stourton.

Stratford sub Castle, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Stratford Tony, Wiltshire

The River Eble rises around two kilometres west of Alvediston through which it then flows, then Ebbesbourne Wake, Broad Chalke, Bishopstone, Stratford Tony, Coombe Bissett, Homington, Odstock after which it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Swindon, Wiltshire

Lydiard Park Swindon, Wiltshire

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia -852 defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex (52), at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Lydiard Park Swindon and Wilton.

Teffont Evias, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Tidworth, Wiltshire

Tilshead Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Tisbury, Wiltshire

On 07 Jun 1590 Lawrence Hyde 1521-1590 (69) died at Tisbury.

On 24 Dec 1598 Matthew Arundell 1533-1598 (65) died. He was buried at Tisbury.

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

St John's Church Tisbury, Wiltshire

On 23 Jul 1649 Ann Arundell Baroness Baltimore 1616-1649 (33) died. She was buried at St John's Church Tisbury.

Trowbridge, Wiltshire

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury to Yarnbrook where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.

Trowbridge Grammar School, Wiltshire

Around 1602 Edward Rodney 1590-1657 (11) educated at Trowbridge Grammar School.

Upavon, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Upton Lovell, Wiltshire

Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury to Yarnbrook where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.

Wanborough, Wiltshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 700-749. 715. This year Ina (45) and Ceolred fought at Wanborough; [possibly Wednesbury, Wanborough or Woden's Barrow aka Adam's Grave] and King Dagobert (16) departed this life.

Wardour, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Wardour Castle, Wiltshire

On 20 Mar 1766 Eleanor Mary Arundell Baroness Clifford Chudleigh 1766-1835 was born to Henry Arundell 8th Baron Arundel Wardour 1740-1808 (26) and Mary Conquest Baroness Arundel Wardour 1743-1813 (23) at Wardour Castle.

In 1764 Joshua Reynolds 1723-1788. Portrait of Henry Arundell 8th Baron Arundel Wardour 1740-1808. Around 1790 George Romney Painter 1734-1802. Portrait of Mary Conquest Baroness Arundel Wardour 1743-1813.

Warminster

West Dean, Wiltshire

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (72) died at West Dean. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church West Dean.

St Mary's Church West Dean, Wiltshire

On 17 Apr 1627 John Evelyn of Godstone 1555-1627 (72) died at West Dean. On 21 May 1627 he was buried in the Chancel of St Mary's Church West Dean.

West Grafton, Wiltshire

Westbury, Wiltshire

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 15 Apr 1053. In this year was the king (50) at Winchester, at Easter; and Earl Godwin (52) with him, and Earl Harold (31) his son, and Tosty (27). On the day after Easter sat he with the king at table; when he suddenly sunk beneath against the foot-rail, deprived of speech and of all his strength. He was brought into the king's chamber; and they supposed that it would pass over: but it was not so. He continued thus speechless and helpless till the Thursday; when he resigned his life, on the seventeenth before the calends of May; and he was buried at Winchester in the old minster. Earl Harold (31), his son, took to the earldom that his father had before, and to all that his father possessed; whilst Earl Elgar took to the earldom that Harold (31) had before. The Welshmen this year slew a great many of the warders of the English people at Westbury. This year there was no archbishop in this land: but Bishop Stigand held the see of Canterbury at Christ church, and Kinsey that of York. Leofwine and Wulfwy went over sea, and had themselves consecrated bishops there. Wulfwy took to the bishopric which Ulf had whilst he was living and in exile.

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury to Yarnbrook where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.

Broke Westbury, Wiltshire

Around 1452 Robert Willoughby 1st Baron Willoughby Broke 1452-1502 was born to John Willoughby 1421-1477 (31) and Anne Cheney 1428-1470 (23) at Broke Westbury.

In 1491 Edward Willoughby 1491-1517 was born to Robert Willoughby 2nd Baron Willoughby Broke 10th Baron Latimer 1472-1521 (19) and Elizabeth Beauchamp Baroness Willoughby Broke 1468-1503 (23) at Broke Westbury.

West Gomeldon, Wiltshire

West Knoyle, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Lodden rises at West Knoyle from where it flows south-west to join the Dorset River Stour before Ecliffe.

Whaddon, Wiltshire

Winterbourne Stoke, Wiltshire

The River Till rises at Tilshead Wiltshire from where it flows through Orcheston, Elston, Shrewton, Winterbourne Stoke, Berwick St James, where its name appears to become the River Wylye, then Stapleford after which it joins the River Wylye at Serrington.

Wilsford, Wiltshire

The Wiltshire River Avon is formed from the confluence of the River Avon West and River Avon East one kilometre before Upavon after which it flows broadly south past East Chisenbury, Enford, Fifield, Fittleton, Netheravon, Figheldean, Durrington Walls, around Amesbury and past Amesbury Abbey, Wilsford, Great Durnford, Middle Woodford, Little Durnford, Old Sarum, Stratford sub Castle, through Salisbury where it is joined by the River Nadder

After Salisbury the Wiltshire River Avon flows south in multiple channels past Longford Castle, after which it is joined by the River Eble, then Charlton-All-Saints, Downton, Breamore, Burgate, Fordingbridge, Bickton, Ibsley, Ringwood, Bistern, Sopley, Avon and Christchurch before reaching Christchurch Harbour where it joins the English Channel.

Wilton

Wincombe Park, Wiltshire

The River Nadder rises at Wincombe Park from where it flows past Donhead St Andrew, Wardour, where it is joined by the River Sem, Tisbury, Upper and Lower Chicksgrove, Teffont Evias, Barford St Martin, Burcombe and Wilton, where it is joined by the River Wylye, past Quidhampton after which if joins the Wiltshire River Avon at Salisbury.

Wootton Bassett, Wiltshire

Wotton Rivers, Wiltshire

The River Avon East rises at Brimslade from where it flows past Wotton Rivers, Clench, Pewsey, Sharcott, Manningford Abbots, North Newton after which it joins the River Avon West to form the Wiltshire River Avon.

Wroughton, Wiltshire

In Sep 825 Beornwulf King Mercia -852 defeated Ecgberht, King of Wessex (52), at the Battle of Ellendun replacing Mercian with Wessex dominance over the Saxon Heptarchy. Sir Frank Stenton described it as 'one of the most decisive battles of English history'. The location of the battle is not known although a number of locations have been suggested: Wroughton, Lydiard Park Swindon and Wilton.

Wylye, Wiltshire

Yarnbrook, Wiltshire

The River Biss rises near Upton Scudamore as the Biss Brook after which it flows past Westbury to Yarnbrook where it becomes the River Biss. Thereafter it continues north through Trowbridge after which it joins the Gloucestershire River Avon.