History of Windsor Castle

1121 Marriage of King Henry I and Adeliza of Louvain

1361 Marriage of Edward "The Black Prince" and Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent"

1529 Oct Wolsey surrenders the Great Seal

1532 Anne Boleyn's Investiture as Marchioness of Pembroke

1560 Death of Amy Robsart wife of Robert Dudley

1561 Creation of Garter Knights

1665 Great Plague of London

1820 Death of King George III

1837 Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria

1861 Death of Prince Albert

Windsor Castle is in Windsor.

Around 1075 Gerald Fitzwalter 1075-1135 was born at Windsor Castle.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Henry I Beauclerc 1105. 1105. In this year, on the Nativity, held the King Henry (37) his court at Windsor Castle; and afterwards in Lent he went over sea into Normandy against his brother Earl Robert (54). And whilst he remained there he won of his brother Caen and Baieux; and almost all the castles and the chief men in that land were subdued. And afterwards by harvest he returned hither again; and that which he had won in Normandy remained afterwards in peace and subjection to him; except that which was anywhere near the Earl William of Moretaine (21). This he often demanded as strongly as he could for the loss of his land in this country.

In 1105 Maurice Fitzgerald 1105-1176 was born to Gerald Fitzwalter 1075-1135 (30) and Nest ferch Rhys Dinefwr 1085-1135 (20) at Windsor Castle.

Marriage of King Henry I and Adeliza of Louvain

On 24 Jan 1121, three months after the disaster that was the Sinking of The White Ship in which Henry's only legitimate son was drowned, with King Henry (53) needing an heir quickly, he and Adeliza_of_Louvain (18) were married at Windsor Castle. He a son of William "Conqueror" I King England 1028-1087. She by marriage Queen Consort England. Despite fourteen years of marriage they didn't have any children. Following Henry's death she married William D'Aubigny 1st Earl Lincoln 1st Earl Arundel 1109-1176 (12) with whom she had seven children.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Henry I Beauclerc 1126. 1126. All this year was the King Henry (58) in Normandy—all till after harvest. Then came he to this land, betwixt the Nativity of St. Mary and Michaelmas. With him came the queen (46), and his daughter (23), whom he had formerly given to the Emperor Henry of Lorrain (44) to wife. And he brought with him the Earl Waleram (22), and Hugh, the son of Gervase (28). And the earl (22) he sent to Bridgenorth in captivity: and thence he sent him afterwards to Wallingford; and Hugh (28) to Windsor Castle, whom he ordered to be kept in strong bonds.

On 06 Jan 1156 Matilda Plantagenet Duchess Saxony 1156-1189 was born to Henry "Curtmantle" II King England 1133-1189 (22) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (34) at Windsor Castle (probably) and named after her paternal grandmother Empress Matilda (53).

Before 1202 Hubert Burgh Count Mortain 1st Earl Kent 1170-1243 was appointed Count Mortain Mortagne, and as Constable Dover Castle, Constable Windsor Castle, Constable Chinon Castle.

In 1210 Maud "Lady of Hay" St Valery Baroness Bramber 1155-1210 (55) was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

In 1210 William Braose -1210 was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

On 29 Sep 1240 Margaret Queen of Scotland 1240-1275 was born to Henry III King England 1207-1272 (32) and Eleanor of Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (17) at Windsor Castle.

13 Feb 1254. Letter XII. Eleanor of Provence Queen Consort England 1223 1291 and Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209 1272 to Henry III King England 1207 1272. 13 Feb 1254. Letter XII. Eleanor of Provence Queen Consort England 1223-1291 (31) and Richard Cornwall 1st Earl Cornwall 1209-1272 (45) to Henry III King England 1207-1272 (46).
To their most excellent lord, the lord Henry, by God's grace the illustrious king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, his most devoted consort Eleanora, by the same grace queen of England, and his devoted and faithful Richard earl of Cornwall, send health with all reverence and honour.
Be it known to your revered lordship that the lords the earl marshall (45) and John de Bailiol (46), being hindered at sea by a contrary wind during twelve days, came to us in England on the Wednesday after the Purification of Blessed Mary last past.
We had been treating with your prelates and the magnates of your kingdom of England before the advent of the said Earl and John, on the quinzaines of St. Hilary last past about your subsidy, and after the arrival of the said Earl and John, with certain of the aforesaid prelates and magnates, the archbishops and bishops answered us that if the King of Castile (32) should come against you in Gascony each of them would assist you from his own property, so that you would be under perpetual obli gations to them; but with regard to granting you an aid from their clergy, they could do nothing without the assent of the said clergy; nor do they believe that their clergy can be induced to give you any help, unless the tenth of clerical goods granted to you for the first year of the crusade, which should begin in the present year, might be relaxed at once by your letters patent, and the collection of the said tenth for the said crusade, for the two following years, might be put in respite up to the term of two years before your passage to the Holy Land; and they will give diligence and treat with the clergy submitted to them, to induce them to assist you according to that form with a tenth of their benefices, in case the King of Castile should attack you in Gascony; but at the departure of the bearer of these presents no subsidy had as yet been granted by the aforesaid clergy. Moreover, as we have elsewhere signified to you, if the King of Castile should come against you in Gascony, all the earls and barons of your kingdom, who are able to cross the sea, will come to you in Gascony, with all their power; but from the other laymen who do not sail over to you we do not think that we can obtain any help for your use, unless you write to your lieutenants in England firmly to maintain your great charters of liberties, and to let this be distinctly perceived by your letters to each Sheriff of your kingdom, and publicly proclaimed through each county of the said kingdom; since, by this means, they would be more strongly animated cheerfully to grant you aid; for many persons complain that the aforesaid charters are not kept by your sheriffs and other bailiffs as they ought to be kept. Be it known, therefore, to your lordship, that we shall hold a conference with the aforesaid clergy and laity at Westminster, in the quinzaines of Passover next, about the aforesaid aid, and we supplicate your lordship that you will write us your good pleasure concerning these affairs with the utmost possible haste. For you will find us prepared and devoted, according to our power, to solicit the aforesaid aid for your use, and to do and procure all other things ....* which can contribute to your convenience and the increase of your honour. Given at Windsor, the 13th of February, in the thirty-eighth year of your reign.

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In Apr 1266 Guy Montfort Count Nola 1244-1288 (22) escaped at Windsor Castle.

After 15 May 1266 Robert Ferrers 6th Earl Derby 1239-1279 was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

On 06 May 1268 Henry Plantagenet 1268-1274 was born to Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (28) and Eleanor of Castile (27) at Windsor Castle.

On 05 May 1269 Henry "Almain" Cornwall 1235-1271 (33) and Constance Béarn -1310 were married at Windsor Castle. He a grandson of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

On 18 Jun 1269 Eleanor Plantagenet 1269-1298 was born to Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (30) and Eleanor of Castile (28) at Windsor Castle.

On 15 Mar 1275 Margaret Plantagenet Duchess Brabant 1275-1333 was born to Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307 (35) and Eleanor of Castile (34) at Windsor Castle.

On 13 Nov 1312 King Edward III England was born to King Edward II of England (28) and Isabella of France Queen Consort England 1295-1358 (17) at Windsor Castle.

In 1328 Thomas Foxley 1305-1360 (23) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle which position he held for life.

In 1330 Bernard Brocas 1330-1395 was born to John Brocas of Clewer in Berkshire. He grew up with the Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince of Wales 1330-1376 at Windsor Castle.

On 20 Jul 1346 Margaret Plantagenet Countess of Pembroke 1346-1361 was born to King Edward III England (33) and Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 1314-1369 (32) at Windsor Castle.

Marriage of Edward "The Black Prince" and Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent"

On 10 Oct 1361 Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince of Wales 1330-1376 (31) and Joan "Fair Maid of Kent" Princess Wales 1328-1385 (33) were married at Windsor Castle. They were half first cousins once removed. He a son of King Edward III England. She a granddaughter of Edward "Longshanks" I King England 1239-1307. She by marriage Princess of Wales. His first wife, her second (or third depending on how you count them) husband. She had four children already. They had known each other since childhood. Thirty-one and thirty-three respectively. A curious choice for the heir to the throne; foreign princesses were usual. They were married nearly fifteen years and had two children.

On 27 Jul 1365 Enguerrand de Coucy 1st Earl Bedford 1st Count Soissons 1340-1397 (25) and Isabella Plantagenet Countess Bedford and Soissons 1332-1382 (33) were married at Windsor Castle. She a daughter of King Edward III England.

On 15 Aug 1369 Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England 1314-1369 (55) died at Windsor Castle. She was given a state funeral six months later on 09 Jan 1370 at which she was interred at on the northeast side of the Chapel of St Edward the Confessor at Westminster Abbey. Her alabaster effigy was executed by sculptor Jean de Liège.

In 1377 Simon Burley 1340-1388 (37) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

On 06 Dec 1421 Henry VI King England II King France 1421-1471 was born to Henry V King England 1386-1422 (35) and Catherine of Valois (20) at Windsor Castle.

In 1454 Edward of Westinster Prince of Wales 1453-1471 was created Prince of Wales at Windsor Castle.

In 1461 John Bourchier 1st Baron Berners 1416-1474 (45) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

On 11 Aug 1467 Mary York 1467-1482 was born to Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (25) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (30) at Windsor Castle.

In Mar 1477 George York 1st Duke Bedford 1477-1479 was born to Edward IV King England 1442-1483 (34) and Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (40) at Windsor Castle.

In Mar 1479 George York 1st Duke Bedford 1477-1479 (2) died of plague at Windsor Castle. Duke Bedford 4C 1478 extinct.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1486. This yeare Prince Arthure was borne at Windsore.

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1507. This yeare, about the latter ende of Januarye, the Kinge of Castell (28) and his wife (28) were driven into Englande, and had here great cheare. The King was made Knight of the Garter at Windsore. Note. possibly 1506 rather tan 1507?.

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon or Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555.Around 1500. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555.

1529 Oct Wolsey surrenders the Great Seal

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII August 1527. 25 Oct 1529. Rym. XIV. 349. 6025. Card. Wolsey (56).
Memorandum of the surrender of the Great Seal by Cardinal Wolsey, on 17 Oct., to the dukes of Norfolk (56) and Suffolk (45), in his gallery at his house at Westminster, at 6 o'clock p.m., in the presence of Sir Wm. Fitzwilliam (39), John Tayler, and Stephen Gardiner (46). The same was delivered by Tayler to the King (38) at Windsor, on the 20 Oct., by whom it was taken out and attached to certain documents, in the presence of Tayler and Gardiner, Hen. Norris (47), Thos. Heneage (49), Ralph Pexsall, clerk of the Crown, John Croke, John Judd, and Thos. Hall, of the Hanaper.
On the 25th Oct. the seal was delivered by the King at East Greenwich to Sir Thos. More (51), in the presence of Hen. Norres (47) and Chr. Hales, Attorney General, in the King's privy chamber; and on the next day, Tuesday, 26 Oct., More took his oath as Chancellor in the Great Hall at Westminster, in presence of the dukes of Norfolk (56) and Suffolk (45), Th. marquis of Dorset (52), Hen. marquis of Exeter (33), John earl of Oxford (58), Hen. earl of Northumberland (27), Geo. earl of Shrewsbury (61), Ralph earl of Westmoreland (31), John bishop of Lincoln, Cuthbert bishop of London (55), John bishop of Bath and Wells, Sir Rob. Radclyf, viscount Fitzwater (46), Sir Tho. Boleyn, viscount Rocheforde (52), Sir Wm.Sandys, Lord (52) and others.
Close Roll, 21 Hen. VIII. m. 19d.

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Around 1590 based on a work of around 1520.Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey 1473-1530.Around 1543 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545.Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton 1490-1542.1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.1527 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas More Chancellor Speaker 1478-1535 wearing a Lancastrian Esses Collar with Beaufort Portcullis and Tudor Rose Pendant.Before 1537 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539.

Anne Boleyn's Investiture as Marchioness of Pembroke

On 01 Sep 1532 Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England (31) was created 1st Marquess Pembroke with Henry VIII (41) performing the investiture at Windsor Castle. Note she was created Marquess rather than the female form Marchioness alhough Marchioness if a modern form that possibly didn't exist at the time.
Thomas Boleyn 1st Earl Wiltshire and Ormonde 1477-1539 (55), Charles Brandon 1st Duke Suffolk 1484-1545 (48), Thomas Howard 3rd Duke Norfolk 1473-1554 (59), Eleanor Paston Countess Rutland 1495-1551 (37), Jean Dinteville, Edward Lee Archbishop of York 1482-1544 (50), John Stokesley Bishop of London 1475-1539 (57) were present.
Stephen Gardiner Bishop of Winchester 1483-1555 (49) read the Patent of Creation.
Mary Howard Duchess Richmond and Somerset 1519-1557 (13) carried Anne's (31) train replacing her mother Elizabeth Stafford Duchess Norfolk 1497-1558 (35) who had been banished from Court. Anne (31) and Mary (13) were cousins.
Charles Wriotheley Officer of Arms 1508-1562 (24) attended.

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Around 1580 based on a work of around 1534.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England.

Diary of Henry Machyn August 1551. 23 Aug 1551. The xxiij day [of] August the Kynges grace went from Amton courte unto Wyndsore, and ther was stallyd the Frenche Kyng (32) of the nobull order of the garter, with a grett baner of armes inbrodered with flowrs delusys of gold bosted, the mantylls of tysshuw, and the elmett clene gylt and ys sword; and the goodly gere was.

Death of Amy Robsart wife of Robert Dudley

On 08 Sep 1560, the day of the Abingdon Fair, Amy Robsart 1532-1560 (28) died from falling down stairs at Cumnor Place Abingdon. She was married to Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588 (28), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27), who was with Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (27) at Windsor Castle at the time. Foul play was suspected but not proven. The event was regarded as suspicious by many. The Queen's reputation being tarnished she could not risk a marriage with Dudley.
The inquest into her death concluded ...
Inquisition as indenture held at Cumnor in the aforesaid county [Oxfordshire] on 9 September in the second year of the reign of the most dread Lady Elizabeth, by the grace of God queen of England, France, and Ireland, defend of the faith, etc., before John Pudsey, gent, a coroner of the said lady queen in the aforesaid county, on inspection of the body of Lady Amy Dudley, late wife of Robert Dudley, knight of the most noble order of the garter, there lying dead: by oath of Richard Smith, gent., Humphrey Lewis, gent., Thomas Moulder, gent., Richard Knight, Thomas Spyre, Edward Stevenson, John Stevenson, Richard Hughes, William Cantrell, William Noble, John Buck, John Keene, Henry Lanlgey, Stephen Ruffyn, and John Sire: which certain jurors, sworn to tell the truth at our request, were adjourned from the aforesaid ninth day onwards day by day very often; and finally various several days were given to them by the selfsame coroner to appear both before the justices of the aforesaid lady queen at the assizes assigned to be held in the aforesaid county and before the same coroner in order there to return their verdict truthfully and speedily, until 1 August in the third year of the reign of the said lady queen; on which day the same jurors say under oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy on 8 September in the aforesaid second year of the reign of the said lady queen, being alone in a certain chamber within the home of a certain Anthony Forster, esq., in the aforesaid Cumnor, and intending to descend the aforesaid chamber by way of certain steps (in English called 'steyres') of the aforesaid chamber there and then accidentally fell precipitously down the aforesaid steps to the very bottom of the same steps, through which the same Lady Amy there and then sustained not only two injuries to her head (in English called 'dyntes') – one of which was a quarter of an inch deep and the other two inches deep – but truly also, by reason of the accidental injury or of that fall and of Lady Amy's own body weight falling down the aforesaid stairs, the same Lady Amy there and then broke her own neck, on account of which certain fracture of the neck the same Lady Amy there and then died instantly; and the aforesaid Lady Amy was found there and then without any other mark or wound on her body; and thus the jurors say on their oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy in the manner and form aforesaid by misfortune came to her death and not otherwise, as they are able to agree at present; in testimony of which fact for this inquest both the aforesaid coroner and also the aforesaid jurors have in turn affixed their seals on the day.

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On 08 Sep 1560, the day of the Abingdon Fair, Amy Robsart 1532-1560 died from falling down stairs at Cumnor Place Abingdon. She was married to Robert Dudley 1st Earl of Leicester 1532-1588, favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland, who was with Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland at Windsor Castle at the time. Foul play was suspected but not proven. The event was regarded as suspicious by many. The Queen's reputation being tarnished she could not risk a marriage with Dudley.<BR>The inquest into her death concluded ...<BR>Inquisition as indenture held at Cumnor in the aforesaid county [Oxfordshire] on 9 September in the second year of the reign of the most dread Lady Elizabeth, by the grace of God queen of England, France, and Ireland, defend of the faith, etc., before John Pudsey, gent, a coroner of the said lady queen in the aforesaid county, on inspection of the body of Lady Amy Dudley, late wife of Robert Dudley, knight of the most noble order of the garter, there lying dead: by oath of Richard Smith, gent., Humphrey Lewis, gent., Thomas Moulder, gent., Richard Knight, Thomas Spyre, Edward Stevenson, John Stevenson, Richard Hughes, William Cantrell, William Noble, John Buck, John Keene, Henry Lanlgey, Stephen Ruffyn, and John Sire: which certain jurors, sworn to tell the truth at our request, were adjourned from the aforesaid ninth day onwards day by day very often; and finally various several days were given to them by the selfsame coroner to appear both before the justices of the aforesaid lady queen at the assizes assigned to be held in the aforesaid county and before the same coroner in order there to return their verdict truthfully and speedily, until 1 August in the third year of the reign of the said lady queen; on which day the same jurors say under oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy on 8 September in the aforesaid second year of the reign of the said lady queen, being alone in a certain chamber within the home of a certain Anthony Forster, esq., in the aforesaid Cumnor, and intending to descend the aforesaid chamber by way of certain steps (in English called 'steyres') of the aforesaid chamber there and then accidentally fell precipitously down the aforesaid steps to the very bottom of the same steps, through which the same Lady Amy there and then sustained not only two injuries to her head (in English called 'dyntes') – one of which was a quarter of an inch deep and the other two inches deep – but truly also, by reason of the accidental injury or of that fall and of Lady Amy's own body weight falling down the aforesaid stairs, the same Lady Amy there and then broke her own neck, on account of which certain fracture of the neck the same Lady Amy there and then died instantly; and the aforesaid Lady Amy was found there and then without any other mark or wound on her body; and thus the jurors say on their oath that the aforesaid Lady Amy in the manner and form aforesaid by misfortune came to her death and not otherwise, as they are able to agree at present; in testimony of which fact for this inquest both the aforesaid coroner and also the aforesaid jurors have in turn affixed their seals on the day.

1561 Creation of Garter Knights

Diary of Henry Machyn May 1561. 18 May 1561. The xviij day of May was sant Gorge fest keptt at Wyndsor, and ther was stallyd ther the yerle of Shrowsbere (33) and my lord of Hunsdon (35), and the yerle of Arundell (49) was the quens deputte, and the way my lord Monteguw (32) and my lord Pagett (55), and so they came to cherche ; and after matens done, they whent a prosessyon rond about the cherche, so done the mydes and so rond a-bowt, and a X almes-knyghtes in red kyrtylles, and a-loft a robe of purpull cloth syd with a crosse of sant Gorge, and after the verger, and then the clarkes and prestes a xxiiij syngyng the Englys prossessyon in chopes [copes] xxxiiij, and sum of them in gray ames [amices] and in calabur, and then cam my lord of Hunsdun (35), and after my lord Montyguw (32), and after the yerle of Shrowsbere (33), and after my lord Pagett (55), and after the yerle of Arundell (49), all they in their robes, and master Garter (51) and master Norres (51) and master dene in cremesun saten robes, with red crosses on ther shuldurs, and after rod up to the castylle to dener.

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On 16 May 1605 Prince Ulrik Oldenburg 1578-1624 (26) was appointed 399th Knight of the Garter by his third cousin once removed James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (38). at Windsor Castle.

In 1628 Henry Rich 1st Earl Holland 1590-1649 (37) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

In 1634 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Henry Rich 1st Earl Holland 1590-1649.1639. Follower of Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Rich 1st Earl Holland 1590-1649.

In 1658 Robert Howard Playwright Politician 1626-1698 (31) was imprisoned at Windsor Castle.

Great Plague of London

Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 August 1665. 20 Aug 1665. Lord's Day. Sir G. Carteret (55) come and walked by my bedside half an houre, talking and telling me how my Lord is in this unblameable in all this ill-successe, he having followed orders; and that all ought to be imputed to the falsenesse of the King (35) of Denmarke, who, he told me as a secret, had promised to deliver up the Dutch ships to us, and we expected no less; and swears it will, and will easily, be the ruine of him and his kingdom, if we fall out with him, as we must in honour do; but that all that can be, must be to get the fleete out again to intercept De Witt, who certainly will be coming home with the East India ships, he being gone thither. He being gone, I up and with Fenn, being ready to walk forth to see the place; and I find it to be a very noble seat in a noble forest, with the noblest prospect towards Windsor, and round about over many countys, that can be desired; but otherwise a very melancholy place, and little variety save only trees. I had thoughts of going home by water, and of seeing Windsor Chappell and Castle, but finding at my coming in that Sir G. Carteret (55) did prevent me in speaking for my sudden return to look after business, I did presently eat a bit off the spit about 10 o'clock, and so took horse for Stanes, and thence to Brainford to Mr. Povy's (51), the weather being very pleasant to ride in. Mr. Povy (51) not being at home I lost my labour, only eat and drank there with his lady, and told my bad newes, and hear the plague is round about them there. So away to Brainford; and there at the inn that goes down to the water-side, I 'light and paid off my post-horses, and so slipped on my shoes, and laid my things by, the tide not serving, and to church, where a dull sermon, and many Londoners. After church to my inn, and eat and drank, and so about seven o'clock by water, and got between nine and ten to Queenhive, very dark. And I could not get my waterman to go elsewhere for fear of the plague.
Thence with a lanthorn, in great fear of meeting of dead corpses, carried to be buried; but, blessed be God, met none, but did see now and then a linke (which is the mark of them) at a distance. So got safe home about 10 o'clock, my people not all abed, and after supper I weary to bed.

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John Evelyn's Diary 23 November 1666. 23 Nov 1666. At London, I heard an extraordinary case before a Committee of the whole House of Commons, in the Commons' House of Parliament, between one Captain Taylor and my Lord Viscount Mordaunt (40), where, after the lawyers had pleaded and the witnesses been examined, such foul and dishonorable things were produced against his Lordship (40), of tyranny during his government of Windsor Castle, of which he was Constable, incontinence, and suborning witnesses (of which last, one Sir Richard Breames was most concerned), that I was exceedingly interested for his Lordship (40), who was my special friend, and husband of the most virtuous lady (34) in the world. We sat till near ten at night, and yet but half the counsel had done on behalf of the plaintiff. The question then was put for bringing in of lights to sit longer. This lasted so long before it was determined, and raised such a confused noise among the members, that a stranger would have been astonished at it. I admire that there is not a rationale to regulate such trifling accidents, which consume much time, and is a reproach to the gravity of so great an assembly of sober men.
Note. John Mordaunt 1st Viscount Mordaunt 1626-1675 (40) was accused by William Taylor, Surveyor of Windsor Castle, of having imprisoned him and raped his daughter. He was subsequently pardoned by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (36) and left the country.

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John Evelyn's Diary 28 August 1670. 28 Aug 1670. One of the Canons preached; then followed the offering of the Knights of the Order, according to custom; first the poor Knights, in procession, then, the Canons in their formalities, the Dean and Chancellor, then his Majesty (40) (the Sovereign), the Duke of York (36), Prince Rupert (50); and, lastly, the Earl of Oxford (43), being all the Knights that were then at Court.
I dined with the Treasurer (40), and consulted with him what pieces I was to add; in the afternoon the King (40) took me aside into the balcony over the terrace, extremely pleased with what had been told him I had begun, in order to his commands, and enjoining me to proceed vigorously in it. He told me he had ordered the Secretaries of State to give me all necessary assistance of papers and particulars relating to it and enjoining me to make it a LITTLE KEEN, for that the Hollanders had very unhandsomely abused him in their pictures, books, and libels.
Windsor was now going to be repaired, being exceedingly ragged and ruinous. Prince Rupert (50), the Constable, had begun to trim up the keep or high round Tower, and handsomely adorned his hall with furniture of arms, which was very singular, by so disposing the pikes, muskets, pistols, bandoleers, holsters, drums, back, breast, and headpieces, as was very extraordinary. Thus, those huge steep stairs ascending to it had the walls invested with this martial furniture, all new and bright, so disposing the bandoleers, holsters, and drums, as to represent festoons, and that without any confusion, trophy-like. From the hall we went into his bedchamber, and ample rooms hung with tapestry, curious and effeminate pictures, so extremely different from the other, which presented nothing but war and horror.
The King (40) passed most of his time in hunting the stag, and walking in the park, which he was now planting with rows of trees.

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John Evelyn's Diary 01 March 1671. 01 Mar 1671. I caused Mr. Gibbon (22) to bring to Whitehall his excellent piece of carving, where being come, I advertised his Majesty (40), who asked me where it was; I told him in Sir Richard Browne's (66) (my father-in-law) chamber, and that if it pleased his Majesty (40) to appoint whither it should be brought, being large and though of wood, heavy, I would take care for it. "No", says the King (40), "show me the way, I'll go to Sir Richard's (66) chamber", which he immediately did, walking along the entries after me; as far as the ewry, till he came up into the room, where I also lay. No sooner was he entered and cast his eyes on the work, but he was astonished at the curiosity of it; and having considered it a long time, and discoursed with Mr. Gibbon (22), whom I brought to kiss his hand, he commanded it should be immediately carried to the Queen's (32) side to show her. It was carried up into her bedchamber, where she and the King (40) looked on and admired it again; the King (40), being called away, left us with the Queen (32), believing she would have bought it, it being a crucifix; but, when his Majesty (40) was gone, a French peddling woman, one Madame de Boord, who used to bring petticoats and fans, and baubles, out of France to the ladies, began to find fault with several things in the work, which she understood no more than an ass, or a monkey, so as in a kind of indignation, I caused the person who brought it to carry it back to the chamber, finding the Queen (32) so much governed by an ignorant Frenchwoman, and this incomparable artist had his labor only for his pains, which not a little displeased me; and he was fain to send it down to his cottage again; he not long after sold it for £80, though well worth £100, without the frame, to Sir George Viner (32).
His Majesty's (40) Surveyor, Mr. Wren (47), faithfully promised me to employ him (22). I having also bespoke his Majesty (40) for his work at Windsor Castle, which my friend, Mr. May (49), the architect there, was going to alter, and repair universally; for, on the next day, I had a fair opportunity of talking to his Majesty (40) about it, in the lobby next the Queen's (32) side, where I presented him with some sheets of my history. I thence walked with him through St James' Park to the garden, where I both saw and heard a very familiar discourse between ... and Mrs. Nelly (21), as they called an impudent comedian, she looking out of her garden on a terrace at the top of the wall, and ... [Note. the elipsis here is John Evelyn being coy about the King's (40) conversation with Nell Gwyn.] standing on the green walk under it. I was heartily sorry at this scene. Thence the King (40) walked to the Duchess of Cleveland (30), another lady of pleasure, and curse of our nation.

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John Evelyn's Diary 01 June 1671. 01 Jun 1671. An installation at Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 21 August 1674. 21 Aug 1674. In one of the meadows at the foot of the long Terrace below the Windsor Castle, works were thrown up to show the King (44) a representation of the city of Maestricht, newly taken by the French. Bastians, bulwarks, ramparts, palisadoes, graffs, horn-works, counter-scarps, etc., were constructed. It was attacked by the Duke of Monmouth (25) (newly come from the real siege) and the Duke of York (40), with a little army, to show their skill in tactics. On Saturday night they made their approaches, opened trenches, raised batteries, took the counter-scarp and ravelin, after a stout defense; great guns fired on both sides, grenadoes shot, mines sprung, parties sent out, attempts of raising the siege, prisoners taken, parleys; and, in short, all the circumstances of a formal siege, to appearance, and, what is most strange all without disorder, or ill accident, to the great satisfaction of a thousand spectators. Being night, it made a formidable show. The siege being over, I went with Mr. Pepys (41) back to London, where we arrived about three in the morning.

1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680 (50). View of Windsor Castle.

1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. View of Windsor Castle.

On 25 May 1682 Charles Lennard 1682-1684 was born to Thomas Lennard Earl of Sussex 1654-1715 (28) and Anne Fitzroy Countess Sussex 1661-1722 (21) at Windsor Castle. He a grandson of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

John Evelyn's Diary 16 June 1683. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

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John Evelyn's Diary 09 June 1692. 09 Jun 1692. I went to Windsor to carry my grandson (10) to Eton School, where I met my Lady Stonehouse and other of my daughter-in-law's relations, who came on purpose to see her before her journey into Ireland. We went to see the castle, which we found furnished and very neatly kept, as formerly, only that the arms in the guard chamber and keep were removed and carried away. An exceeding great storm of wind and rain, in some places stripping the trees of their fruit and leaves as if it had been winter; and an extraordinary wet season, with great floods.

On 21 May 1718 George Henry Lee 3rd Earl Lichfield 1718-1772 was born to George Henry Lee 2nd Earl Lichfield 1690-1743 (28) and Frances Hales Countess Lichfield 1697-1769 (21) at Windsor Castle. He a great grandson of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Frances Hales Countess Lichfield 1697-1769.

In 1730 Charles Beauclerk 2nd Duke St Albans 1696-1751 (33) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle and Warden of the Windsor Forest.

In 1791 James Brudenell 5th Earl Cardigan 1725-1811 (65) was appointed Constable Windsor Castle.

Death of King George III

On 29 Jan 1820 King George III (81) died at Windsor Castle. His reign the third longest after Victoria and Elizabeth II. His son George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 (57) succeeded IV King Great Britain and Ireland. Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821 (51) by marriage Queen Consort England.

In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III.In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III.In 1781 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III.In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of King George III.Around 1768. Nathaniel Dance Holland Painter 1735-1811. Portrait of King George III.In 1804. Samuel Woodford Painter 1763-1817. Portrait of King George III.Around 1800. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839. Portrait of King George III.Around 1762. Allan Ramsay Painter 1713-1784. Portrait of King George III.In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of King George III.Around 1792 Thomas Beach Painter 1738-1806. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.In 1782 Thomas Gainsborough Painter 1727-1788. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.Before 1830. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830.In 1792 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 when Prince of Wales.In 1807 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of George IV King Great Britain and Ireland 1762-1830 in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.In 1798. Thomas Lawrence Painter 1769-1830. Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.1819. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839. Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.1820. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839. Portrait of Caroline of Brunswick Queen Consort England 1768-1821.

Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria

On 20 Jun 1837 William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837 (71) died at Windsor Castle. His niece Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (18) succeeded I King Great Britain and Ireland. His brother Ernest Augustus King Hanover 1771-1851 (66) succeeded King Hanover. Frederica Mecklenburg Strelitz Queen Consort Hanover 1778-1841 (59) by marriage Queen Consort Hanover.
At 5am Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 (40) and Archbishop William Howley 1766-1848 (71) went to Kensington Palace to inform the Princess she was now Queen. Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 (40) was the first to address her as 'Your Majesty'.

Around 1830. William Beechey Painter 1753-1839. Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837.1830. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839. Portrait of William IV King United Kingdom 1765-1837.1845 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.1833. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.Around 28 Jun 1838. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871. Coronation Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.Around 1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901. Note the Garter worn on the Arm as worn by Ladies of the Garter.Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 and Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861 and their children.In 1840. Richard Rothwell Painter 1800-1868. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.1880. Henry Tanworth Wells Painter 1828-1903. Portrait of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 being informed she was Queen by Francis Nathaniel Conyngham 2nd Marquess Conyngham 1797-1876 and Archbishop William Howley 1766-1848.Death of King William IV Succession of Queen Victoria1828. Martin Archer Shee Painter 1769-1850. Portrait of Archbishop William Howley 1766-1848.

On 06 Aug 1844 Prince Alfred Windsor 1844-1900 was born to Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861 (24) and Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (25) at Windsor Castle.

Before 05 Oct 1878 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861.Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861.Around 1859. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861.

Death of Prince Albert

On 14 Dec 1861 Prince Albert Saxe Coburg Gotha 1819-1861 (42) died at Windsor Castle. His wife, Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901 (42) never recovered from his death spending, more or less, the remainder of her life in mourning.

Times Newspaper Funerals. 24 Dec 1861. Yesterday, with little of the pomp and pageantry of a State ceremonial, but with every outward mark of respect, and with all the solemnity which befitted his high station and his public virties, the mortal remains of the husband (42) of our Queen (42) were interred in the last resting-place of England's Sovereigns-the Chapel Royal of St. George's, Windsor. By the express desire of his Royal Highness the funeral was of the plainest and most private character; but in the Chapel, to do honour to his obsequies, were assembled all the chiefest men of the State, and throughout England, by every sign of sorrow and imourning, the nation manifested its sense of the loss wlhich it has sustaiined. Windsor itself wore an aspect of the most profound gloom. Every shop was closed and every blind drawn down. The streets were silent and almost deserted, and all wvho appeared abroad were dressed in the deepest mourning. The great bell of Windsor Castle clanged out: its doleful sound at intervals from an early hour, and minute bells were tolled also at St. John's Church. At the parish church of Cleover and at St. John's there were services in the morning and: aternoon, and the day was observed throughout the Royal borough in the strictest manner. The weather was in character with the occasion, a chill, damp air, with a dull leaden sky above, increased the gloom which hung over all. There were but few visitors in the town, for the procession did not pass beyond the immediate precincts of the Chapel and Castle, and none were admitted except those connected with the Castle andi their friends. At 11 o'clock a strong force of the A division took possession of the avenues leading to the Chapel Royal, and from that time only the guests specially invited and those who were to take part in the ceremonial were allowed to pass. Shortly afterwards a of honour of the Grenadier Guards, of which regiment his Royal Highness was Colonel, with the colonrs of the regiment shrouded in crape, marched in and took up its position before the principal entrance to the Chapel Royal. Another guard of honour from the same regiment was also on duty in the Quadrangle at the entrance to the State apartments. They were speedily followed by a squadron of the 2nd Life Guards dismounted, and by two companies of the Fusileer Guards, who were drawn uip in single file along each side of the road by which the procession was to pass, from the Norman gateway to the Chapel door. The officers wore the deepest military mourning-scarves, sword-knots, and rosettes of crape. In the Rome Park was stationed a troop of Horse Artillery, which commenced firing minute guns at the end of the Long Walk, advancing slowly until it reached the Castle gates just at the close of the ceremony. The Ministers, the officers of the Queen's Household, and other distinguished personages who had been honoured with an invitation to attend the ceremonial, reached Windsor a special train from Paddington. They were met by carriages provided for them at the station, and began to arrive at the Chapel Royal soon after 11 o'clock. The Earl of Derby (62), the Archbishop of Canterbury (81), Earl Russell (69), and the Duke of Buccleuch were among the first to make their appearance, and as they alighted at the door of the Chapel they were received by the proper officials and conducted to the seats appointed for them in the Choir. In the Great Quadrangle were drawn up the hearse and the mourning coaches, and, all the preparations having been completed within the Castle, the procession began to be formed shortly before 12 o'clock. It had been originally intended that it should leave the Castle by the St. George's gate, and, proceeding down Castle-hill, approach the Chapel through Henry VII.'s gateway, but at a late hour this arrangement was changed, and the shorter route by the Norman gatewvay was chosen.
The crowd which had gradually collected at the foot of Castle-hill, owing to this change, saw nothing of the procession but the empty carriages as they returned to the Castle after setting down at the Chapel. The few spectators who were fortunate enough to gain admission to the Lower Ward stood in a narrow fringe along the edge of the flags in front of the houses of the Poor Knights, and their presence was the only exception to the strict privacy of the ceremonial. The Prince of Wales (20) and the other Royal mourners assembled in the Oak Room, but did not form part of the procession. They were conveyed to the Chapel in private carriages before the coffin was placed in the hearse, passing through St. George's gatewayinto the Lower Ward. In the first carriage were the Prince of Wales (20), Prince Arthur (11), and the Duke of Saxe Coburg (8). The Crown Prince of Prussia (30), the Duke of Brabant (26), and the Count of Flanders (24) followed in the next; and in the others were the Duke de Nemours (47), Prince Louis of Hesse (24), Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar (38), and the Maharajah Dhuleep Singh, with the gentlemen of their respective suites. Scarcely had they alighted at the door of Wolsey's Chapel, from which they were conducted through the Chapter Room to the door of the Chapel Royal to be in readiness to meet the coffin, when the first minute gun fired in tlhe distance, and the rattle of the troops reversing arms announced that the procession had started, and exactly at 12 o'clock the first mourning coach moved from under the Norman gateway. First came nine mourning coaches, each drawn by four horses, conveying the Physicians, Equerries, and other members of the household of the late Prince. In the last were the Lord Steward (63) (Earl St. Germans), the Lord Chamberlain (56) (Viscount Sidney), and the Master of the Horse (57) (the Marquis of Ailesbury). The carriages and trappings were of the plainest description; the horses had black velvet housings and feathers, but on the carriages there, were no feathers or ornaments of any kind. The mourning coaches were followed by one of the Queen's carriages, drawn by six horses, and attended by servants in State liveries, in which was the Groom of the Stole (26), Earl Spencer, carrying the crowvn, and a Lord of the Bedchamber, Lord George Lennox, carrying the baton, sword, and hat of his late Royal Highness. Next escorted by a troop of the 2nd Life Guards, came the hearse, drawn by six black horses, which, like the carriages, was quite plain and unornamented. On the housings of the horses and on the sides of theW hearse were emblazoned the scutcheons of Her Majesty and of the Prince, each surmounted by a, crown, the Prince's arms being in black and Her Majesty's in white. The procession was closed by four State carriages.

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Around 1851. George Frederick Watts Painter Sculptor 1817-1904. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878.1853 Francis Grant Painter 1803-1878. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878.Before 1840. George Hayter Painter 1792-1871. Portrait of John Russell 1st Earl Russell 1792-1878 and Henry Vassall Fox 3rd Baron Holland 1773-1840.Before 21 Apr 1875 Henry William Pickersgill Painter 1782-1875. Portrait of Walter Francis Montagu Douglas Scott 5th Duke Buccleuch 7th Duke Queensberry -1884.1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of Edward VII King United Kingdom 1841-1910.Around 1846. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales.1937. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942.In 1908 John Singer Sargent Painter 1856-1925. Portrait of Prince Arthur Windsor 1st Duke Connaught and Strathearn 1850-1942.1840. Franz Xaver Winterhalter Painter 1805-1873. Portrait of Princess Victoria Saxe Coburg Gotha 1822-1857 around the time of her marriage to Prince Louis Duke Nemours 1814-1896 on 26 Apr 1840.

On 05 Apr 1863 Victoria Hesse Darmstadt Marchioness Milford Haven 1863-1950 was born to Prince Louis Hesse Darmstadt IV Grand Duke 1837-1892 (25) and Alice Windsor 1843-1878 (19) at Windsor Castle. She a granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901..

On 25 Feb 1885 Princess Alice of Battenburg 1885-1969 was born to Prince Louis of Battenburg 1st Marquess Milford Haven 1854-1921 (30) and Victoria Hesse Darmstadt Marchioness Milford Haven 1863-1950 (21) at Windsor Castle. She a great granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom 1819-1901.

1907. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Princess Alice of Battenburg 1885-1969.1910. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Prince Louis of Battenburg 1st Marquess Milford Haven 1854-1921.

On 09 Apr 2021 Philip Mountbatten Duke Edinburgh 1921-2021 (99) died at Windsor Castle.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle William Rufus 1095. 1095. The king then went homeward; for he saw that he could do no more there this winter. When the king came home again, he gave orders to take the Earl Robert of Northumberland, and lead him to Bamborough, and put out both his eyes, unless they that were therein would give up the castle. His wife held it, and Morel who was steward, and also his relative. Through this was the castle then given up; and Morel was then in the king's court; and through him were many both of the clergy and laity surrendered, who with their counsels had conspired against the king. The king had before this time commanded some to be brought into prison, and afterwards had it very strictly proclaimed over all this country, "That all who held land of the king, as they wished to be considered worthy of protection, should come to court at the time appointed." And the king commanded that the Earl Robert should be led to Windsor, and there held in the castle.

Chapel Royal Windsor Castle, Berkshire

In 1375 Richard Mitford Bishop -1407 was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor which he held until 1390.

In 1677 Richard Meggot -1692 was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor.

Around 1683 Antonio Verrio Painter 1636-1707 (47). Chapel Royal Windsor Castle.

Around 1683 Antonio Verrio Painter 1636-1707. Chapel Royal Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 16 June 1683. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

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In 1813 Henry Cockayne Cust 1780-1861 (32) was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor.

In 1795 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of John Cust 1st Earl Brownlow 1779-1853 and Henry Cockayne Cust 1780-1861.In 1797 John Hoppner Painter 1758-1810. Portrait of Henry Cockayne Cust 1780-1861.

In 1822 Richard Bagot Bishop of Oxford Bishop of Bath and Wells 1782-1854 (39) was appointed Canon Chapel Royal Windsor.

St George's Chapel Windsor Castle

Royal Chapel Windsor Castle, Berkshire

In 1317 John Montagu -1317 and Joan Verdun Baroness Furnivall 1303-1334 (13) were married at Royal Chapel Windsor Castle. She a great x 4 granddaughter of John "Lackland" King England 1166-1216.

St George's Hall Windsor Castle, Berkshire

Around 1683 Antonio Verrio Painter 1636-1707 (47). St George's Hall Windsor Castle.

Around 1683 Antonio Verrio Painter 1636-1707. St George's Hall Windsor Castle.

John Evelyn's Diary 16 June 1683. 16 Jun 1683. I went to Windsor, dining by the way at Chiswick, at Sir Stephen Fox's (56), where I found Sir Robert Howard (that universal pretender), and Signor Verrio (47), who brought his draught and designs for the painting of the staircase of Sir Stephen's (56) new house.
That which was new at Windsor since I was last there, and was surprising to me, was the incomparable fresco painting in St. George's Hall, representing the legend of St. George, and triumph of the Black Prince, and his reception by Edward III.; the volto, or roof, not totally finished; then the Resurrection in the Chapel, where the figure of the Ascension is, in my opinion, comparable to any paintings of the most famous Roman masters; the Last Supper, also over the altar. I liked the contrivance of the unseen organ behind the altar, nor less the stupendous and beyond all description the incomparable carving of our Gibbons (35), who is, without controversy, the greatest master both for invention and rareness of work, that the world ever had in any age; nor doubt I at all that he will prove as great a master in the statuary art.
Verrio's invention is admirable, his ordnance full and flowing, antique and heroical; his figures move; and, if the walls hold (which is the only doubt by reason of the salts which in time and in this moist climate prejudice), the work will preserve his name to ages.
There was now the terrace brought almost round the old castle; the grass made clean, even, and curiously turfed; the avenues to the new park, and other walks, planted with elms and limes, and a pretty canal, and receptacle for fowl; nor less observable and famous is the throwing so huge a quantity of excellent water to the enormous height of the castle, for the use of the whole house, by an extraordinary invention of Sir Samuel Morland (58).

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Star and Garter Hotel Windsor, Windsor Castle, Berkshire

On 21 Jun 1963 the Rolling Stones played the Ricky Tick Club at the Star and Garter Hotel Windsor.

Windor Castle Keep, Windsor Castle, Berkshire

John Evelyn's Diary 23 October 1686. 23 Oct 1686. Went with the Countess of Sunderland (40) to Cranbourne, a lodge and walk of my Lord Godolphin's (41) in Windsor park. There was one room in the house spared in the pulling down the old one, because the late Duchess of York (49) was born in it; the rest was built and added to it by Sir George Carteret (76), Treasurer of the Navy; and since, the whole was purchased by my Lord Godolphin (41), who spoke to me to go see it, and advise what trees were fit to be cut down to improve the dwelling, being environed with old rotten pollards, which corrupt the air. It stands on a knoll which though insensibly rising, gives it a prospect over the Keep of Windsor, about three miles N. E. of it. The ground is clayey and moist; the water stark naught; the park is pretty; the house tolerable, and gardens convenient. After dinner, we came back to London, having two coaches both going and coming, of six horses apiece, which we changed at Hounslow.