President of the Royal Society

President of the Royal Society is in Royal Society.

In 1662 William Brouncker 2nd Viscount Brounckner 1620-1684 (42) was appointed President of the Royal Society.

John Evelyn's Diary 21 August 1662. 21 Aug 1662. I was admitted and then sworn one of the Council of the Royal Society, being nominated in his Majesty's (32) original grant to be of this Council for the regulation of the Society, and making laws and statutes conducible to its establishment and progress, for which we now set apart every Wednesday morning till they were all finished. Lord Viscount Brouncker (51) (that excellent mathematician) was also by his Majesty (32), our founder, nominated our first President. The King (32) gave us the arms of England to be borne in a canton in our arms, and sent us a mace of silver gilt, of the same fashion and size as those carried before his Majesty (32), to be borne before our president on meeting days. It was brought by Sir Gilbert Talbot (56), master of his Majesty's jewel house.

John Evelyn's Diary 29 August 1662. 29 Aug 1662. The Council and Fellows of the Royal Society went in a body to Whitehall, to acknowledge his Majesty's (32) royal grace in granting our Charter, and vouchsafing to be himself our founder; when the President made an eloquent speech, to which his Majesty (32) gave a gracious reply and we all kissed his hand. Next day we went in like manner with our address to my Lord Chancellor (53), who had much promoted our patent: he received us with extraordinary favor. In the evening I went to the Queen-Mother's (52) Court, and had much discourse with her.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 March 1664. 04 Mar 1664. Came to dine with me the Earl of Lauderdale (47), his Majesty's (33) great favorite, and Secretary of Scotland; the Earl of Teviot (38); my Lord Viscount Brouncker (53), President of the Royal Society; Dr. Wilkins (50), Dean of Ripon; Sir Robert Murray (56), and Mr. Hooke (28), Curator to the Society.
This spring I planted the Home field and West field about Sayes Court with elms, being the same year that the elms were planted by his Majesty (33) in Greenwich Park.

In 1677 Joseph Williamson Secretary of State 1633-1701 (43) was appointed President of the Royal Society.

John Evelyn's Diary 30 November 1677. 30 Nov 1677. Sir Joseph Williamson (44), Principal Secretary of State, was chosen President of the Royal Society, after my Lord Viscount Brouncker (57) had possessed the chair now sixteen years successively, and therefore now thought fit to CHANGE, that prescription might not prejudice.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 December 1677. 04 Dec 1677. Being the first day of his (44) taking the chair, he gave us a magnificent supper.

Trial and Execution of William Howard 1st Viscount Stafford

John Evelyn's Diary 30 November 1680. 30 Nov 1680. The anniversary election at the Royal Society brought me to London, where was chosen President that excellent person and great philosopher, Mr. Robert Boyle (53), who indeed ought to have been the very first; but neither his infirmity nor his modesty could now any longer excuse him. I desired I might for this year be left out of the Council, by reason my dwelling was in the country. The Society according to custom dined together.
The signal day begun the trial (at which I was present) of my Lord Viscount Stafford (66), (for conspiring the death of the King (50), second son to my Lord Thomas Howard (95), Earl of Arundel and Surrey, Earl Marshal of England, and grandfather to the present Duke of Norfolk (52), whom I so well knew, and from which excellent person I received so many favors. It was likewise his birthday, The trial was in Westminster Hall, before the King (50), Lords, and Commons, just in the same manner as, forty years past, the great and wise Earl of Strafford (87) (there being but one letter differing their names) received his trial for pretended ill government in Ireland, in the very same place, this Lord Stafford's father being then High Steward. The place of sitting was now exalted some considerable height from the paved floor of the hall, with a stage of boards. The throne, woolsacks for the Judges, long forms for the Peers, chair for the Lord Steward, exactly ranged, as in the House of Lords. The sides on both hands scaffolded to the very roof for the members of the House of Commons. At the upper end, and on the right side of the King's (50) state, was a box for his Majesty (50), and on the left others for the great ladies, and over head a gallery for ambassadors and public ministers. At the lower end, or entrance, was a bar, and place for the prisoner (66), the Lieutenant of the Tower of London, the ax-bearer and guards, my Lord Stafford's two daughters, the Marchioness of Winchester being one; there was likewise a box for my Lord to retire into. At the right hand, in another box, somewhat higher, stood the witnesses; at the left, the managers, in the name of the Commons of England, namely, Serjeant Maynard (76) (the great lawyer, the same who prosecuted the cause against the Earl of Strafford (87) forty years before, being now near eighty years of age), Sir William Jones (49), late Attorney-General, Sir Francis Winnington (46), a famous pleader, and Mr. Treby, now Recorder of London, not appearing in their gowns as lawyers, but in their cloaks and swords, as representing the Commons of England: to these were joined Mr. Hampden, Dr. Sacheverell, Mr. Poule, Colonel Titus (57), Sir Thomas Lee (45), all gentlemen of quality, and noted parliamentary men. The first two days, in which were read the commission and impeachment, were but a tedious entrance into matter of fact, at which I was but little present. But, on Thursday, I was commodiously seated among the Commons, when the witnesses were sworn and examined. The principal witnesses were Mr. Oates (31) (who called himself Dr.), Mr. Dugdale (40), and Turberville (32). Oates (31) swore that he delivered a commission to Viscount Stafford (66) from the Pope, to be Paymaster-General to an army intended to be raised; Dugdale (40), that being at Lord Aston's, the prisoner dealt with him plainly to murder his Majesty (50); and Turberville (32), that at Paris he also proposed the same to him.

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John Evelyn's Diary 30 November 1681. 30 Nov 1681. Sir Christopher Wren (58) chosen President [of the Royal Society], Mr. Austine, Secretary, with Dr. Plot, the ingenious author of the "History of Oxfordshire". There was a most illustrious appearance.

In 1682 John Hoskyns 2nd Baronet Harewood 1634-1705 (47) was elected President of the Royal Society.

John Evelyn's Diary 30 November 1683. 30 Nov 1683. At the anniversary dinner of the Royal Society the King (53) sent us two does. Sir Cyril Wych (51) was elected President.

On 30 Nov 1683 Cyril Wyche 1632-1707 (51) was elected President of the Royal Society.

In 1686 John Vaughan 3rd Earl Carbery 1639-1713 (46) was appointed President of the Royal Society.

Before 12 Jan 1713. Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of John Vaughan 3rd Earl Carbery 1639-1713.

In 1689 Thomas Herbert 8th Earl Pembroke 5th Earl Montgomery 1656-1733 (33) was appointed President of the Royal Society.

Around 1676 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Thomas Herbert 8th Earl Pembroke 5th Earl Montgomery 1656-1733.

John Evelyn's Diary 01 December 1690. 01 Dec 1690. Having been chosen President of the Royal Society, I desired to decline it, and with great difficulty devolved the election on Sir Robert Southwell (54), Secretary of State to King William in Ireland.

John Evelyn's Diary 30 November 1693. 30 Nov 1693. Much importuned to take the office of President of the Royal Society, but I again declined it. Sir Robert Southwell (57) was continued. We all dined at Pontac's as usual.

In 1698 John Somers 1st Baron Somers 1651-1716 (46) was elected President of the Royal Society.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of John Somers 1st Baron Somers 1651-1716.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 December 1698. 07 Dec 1698. Being one of the Council of the Royal Society, I was named to be of the committee to wait on our new President (47), the Lord Chancellor, our Secretary, Dr. Sloane, and Sir R. Southwell (62), last Vice-President, carrying our book of statutes; the office of the President being read, his Lordship (47) subscribed his name, and took the oaths according to our statutes as a Corporation for the improvement of natural knowledge. Then his Lordship (47) made a short compliment concerning the honor the Society had done him, and how ready he would be to promote so noble a design, and come himself among us, as often as the attendance on the public would permit; and so we took our leave.

John Evelyn's Diary 30 November 1700. 30 Nov 1700. At the Royal Society, Lord Somers (49), the late Chancellor, was continued President.

In 1705 Isaac Newton Scientist 1642-1727 (62) served as President of the Royal Society. He served until 1727.

In 1768 James West 1703-1772 (64) was elected President of the Royal Society.

On 30 Nov 1778 Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820 (35) was elected President of the Royal Society which position he held for forty-one years.

Around 1773 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820.1773. Benjamin West Painter 1738-1820. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820.1810. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820. 1810. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Joseph Banks Botanist 1743-1820.

In 1830 Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (56) was elected President of the Royal Society.

1817. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839. Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843.1837. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 sat in the chair of the President of the Royal Society.

1837. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845 (66). Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 (63) sat in the chair of the President of the Royal Society.

1837. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Prince Augustus Frederick Hanover 1st Duke Sussex 1773-1843 sat in the chair of the President of the Royal Society.