River Ouse

River Ouse is in Humber Estuary.

Battle of Marston Moor

John Evelyn's Diary 17 August 1654. 17 Aug 1654. To York, the second city of England, fairly walled, of a circular form, watered by the brave River Ouse, bearing vessels of considerable burden on it; over it is a stone bridge emulating that of London, and built on; the middle arch is larger than any I have seen in England, with a wharf of hewn stone, which makes the river appear very neat. But most remarkable and worth seeing is St. Peter's Cathedral, which of all the great churches in England had been best preserved from the fury of the sacrilegious, by composition with the Rebels when they took the city, during the many incursions of Scotch and others. It is a most entire magnificent piece of Gothic architecture. The screen before the choir is of stone carved with flowers, running work and statues of the old kings. Many of the. Monuments are very ancient. Here, as a great rarity in these days and at this time, they showed me a Bible and Common Prayer Book covered with crimson velvet, and richly embossed with silver gilt; also a service for the altar of gilt wrought plate, flagons, basin, ewer, plates, chalices, patins, etc., with a gorgeous covering for the altar and pulpit, carefully preserved in the vestry, in the hollow wall whereof rises a plentiful spring of excellent water. I got up to the tower, whence we had a prospect toward Durham, and could see Ripon, part of Lancashire, the famous and fatal Marston Moor, the Spas of Knaresborough, and all the environs of that admirable country. Sir —— Ingoldsby has here a large house, gardens, and tennis court; also the King's (24) house and church near the castle, which was modernly fortified with a palisade and bastions. The streets are narrow and ill-paved, the shops like London.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

The River Ouse is formed by the confluence of the River Ure and River Swale around 900m south-west of Myton-on-Swale; there are other theories as to where it starts. Thereafter it flows broadly south-east through York, past Cawood, Selby, joining the Humber Estuary at Trent Falls.

The River Don rises at Dunford Bridge after which it flows broadly east through Penistone then south through Oughtibridge, Sheffield then east through Rotherham, past Conisburgh Castle, Doncaster and Stainforth before joining the River Ouse at Goole. Originally the River Don was a tributary of the River Trent forming the northern boundary of the Isle of Axholme but was re-engineered by Cornelius Vermuyden as the Dutch River in the 1620s.

The River Ure rises at Ure Head after which it over Aysgarth Falls, past Middleham Castle, Jervaulx Abbey, St Nicholas Church West Tanfield, east of Ripon, under the bridge at Boroughbridge after which it is joined by the River Swale to form the River Ouse.

The River Aire rises around Malham Tarn after which it travels broadley south-west past Skipton Castle, Kirkstall Abbey, Leeds, Methley, Castleford, where it is joined by the River Calder, within 2km of All Saints Church Ledsham then Brotherton before joining the River Ouse just north of Airmyn.

The River Wharfe rises on the moors above High Birkwith after which it travels broadly south past Kettlewell, Bolton Priory and Bolton Bridge, then Ilkley, Harewood House, Wetherby and Tadcaster before joining the River Ouse at Cawood.

The River Nidd rises at Nidd Head Spring after which it travels under Pateley Bridge, then past Knaresborough Castle before joining the River Ouse at Nun Monkton.

River Don

The River Don rises at Dunford Bridge after which it flows broadly east through Penistone then south through Oughtibridge, Sheffield then east through Rotherham, past Conisburgh Castle, Doncaster and Stainforth before joining the River Ouse at Goole. Originally the River Don was a tributary of the River Trent forming the northern boundary of the Isle of Axholme but was re-engineered by Cornelius Vermuyden as the Dutch River in the 1620s.

Between 43AD and 68AD an earth and wood Roman fort was first built at Templeborough. It was later rebuilt in stone. It is thought to have been occupied until the Roman withdrawal from Britain c. 410. Icknield Street crossed the River Don near the fort.

The River Rother rises at Clay Cross then flows through Chesterfield and Sheffield after which it joins the River Don which then flows through Rotherham to which the River Rother gives its name.

River Rother

The River Rother rises at Clay Cross then flows through Chesterfield and Sheffield after which it joins the River Don which then flows through Rotherham to which the River Rother gives its name.

River Ure

The River Ure rises at Ure Head after which it over Aysgarth Falls, past Middleham Castle, Jervaulx Abbey, St Nicholas Church West Tanfield, east of Ripon, under the bridge at Boroughbridge after which it is joined by the River Swale to form the River Ouse.

Middleham Castle. A Norman keep surrounded by a curtain wall around half a mile from the River Ure.

1145. Jervaulx Abbey was the constructed after the monks moved to a location next to the River Ure from the less attractive location around ten miles away at of Fors upstream in the Ure Valley. Jervaulx is a version of "Ure Valley".

The River Ouse is formed by the confluence of the River Ure and River Swale around 900m south-west of Myton-on-Swale; there are other theories as to where it starts. Thereafter it flows broadly south-east through York, past Cawood, Selby, joining the Humber Estuary at Trent Falls.

The River Skell rises around 3km north Pateley Bridge after which it travels broadly east past Fountains Abbey, through Studley Royal Park and just south of Ripon before joining the River Ure 1.2 km east of Ripon.

The River Swale rises on the moors at the top of the Birkdale after which it flows broadly east past Marrick Priory, Ellerton Priory, Richmond Castle, then broadly south past Topcliffe Castle to its confluence with the River Ure near Myton-on-Swale.

River Skell

The River Skell rises around 3km north Pateley Bridge after which it travels broadly east past Fountains Abbey, through Studley Royal Park and just south of Ripon before joining the River Ure 1.2 km east of Ripon.

River Swale

The River Swale rises on the moors at the top of the Birkdale after which it flows broadly east past Marrick Priory, Ellerton Priory, Richmond Castle, then broadly south past Topcliffe Castle to its confluence with the River Ure near Myton-on-Swale.

The River Ouse is formed by the confluence of the River Ure and River Swale around 900m south-west of Myton-on-Swale; there are other theories as to where it starts. Thereafter it flows broadly south-east through York, past Cawood, Selby, joining the Humber Estuary at Trent Falls.

The River Ure rises at Ure Head after which it over Aysgarth Falls, past Middleham Castle, Jervaulx Abbey, St Nicholas Church West Tanfield, east of Ripon, under the bridge at Boroughbridge after which it is joined by the River Swale to form the River Ouse.

River Aire

The River Aire rises around Malham Tarn after which it travels broadley south-west past Skipton Castle, Kirkstall Abbey, Leeds, Methley, Castleford, where it is joined by the River Calder, within 2km of All Saints Church Ledsham then Brotherton before joining the River Ouse just north of Airmyn.

The River Calder rises on Heald Moor near Todmorden after which it passes Hebden Bridge, Mytholmroyd, Sowerby Bridge, Dewsbury, Sandal Castle, under Wakefield Bridge before joining the River Aire at Castleford.

River Calder

The River Calder rises on Heald Moor near Todmorden after which it passes Hebden Bridge, Mytholmroyd, Sowerby Bridge, Dewsbury, Sandal Castle, under Wakefield Bridge before joining the River Aire at Castleford.

The River Aire rises around Malham Tarn after which it travels broadley south-west past Skipton Castle, Kirkstall Abbey, Leeds, Methley, Castleford, where it is joined by the River Calder, within 2km of All Saints Church Ledsham then Brotherton before joining the River Ouse just north of Airmyn.

River Wharfe

The River Wharfe rises on the moors above High Birkwith after which it travels broadly south past Kettlewell, Bolton Priory and Bolton Bridge, then Ilkley, Harewood House, Wetherby and Tadcaster before joining the River Ouse at Cawood.

River Nidd

The River Nidd rises at Nidd Head Spring after which it travels under Pateley Bridge, then past Knaresborough Castle before joining the River Ouse at Nun Monkton.