1610-1620 Death of Frederick Prince of Wales

1610 Prince Henry invested as Prince of Wales and Earl Chester

1610 Tethy's Festival Masque

May 1611 Creation of Baronets

1611 Jun Creation of Baronets

Nov 1611 Creation of Baronets

1612 Death of Prince Frederick

1612 Funeral of Prince Frederick

1612 Discovery of Neptune by Galileo

1613 Marriage of Elizabeth Stewart and Frederick V Elector Palatine

1613 Thomas Overbury Murder and Trial of his Murderers

1613 The Globe Theatre Burns Down

1613 Marriage of Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset and Frances Howard

1614 Addled Parliament

1616 Creation of Garter Knights

1616 Investiture of Charles as Prince of Wales

1617 Masque of Cupid's Banishment

1618 Great Comet

1619 Funeral of Anne of Denmark

Jun 1620 Creation of Baronets

1614 Spanish Match

1610-1620 Death of Frederick Prince of Wales is in 17th Century Events.

Prince Henry invested as Prince of Wales and Earl Chester

On 01 Jun 1610 Prince Frederick (16) was created Prince of Wales and Earl Chester 10C 1610. Peregrine Bertie 1584-1639 (26) was appointed Knight of the Bath.

Before 1619 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Henry Frederick Stewart Prince of Wales 1594-1612 in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.After 07 Feb 1612 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662. Elizabeth's standing collar of reticella is worked with the Royal coat of arms with its lion and unicorn supporters. She wears a gown of Italian silk brocade. The black armband is thought to be a sign of mourning for her brother Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales who died on 07 Feb 1612.

On 03 Jun 1610 Oliver St John 1st Earl Bolingbroke 1580-1646 (30) was created Knight of the Bath.

On 07 Dec 1612 Henry Frederick Stewart Prince of Wales 1594-1612 (18) was buried at Westminster Abbey. His body had lain in state for a month at St James's Palace. Two thousand mourners attended in the procession and people of all ages lined the streets. Archbishop Abbott (50) gave the funeral sermon. A magnificent hearse was erected on which was placed his richly clothed funeral effigy. The robes were those worn by the Prince at his creation as Princes of Wales in 1610. This effigy was made by Richard Norris with the plaster face modelled by Abraham Van der Doort.
Francis Manners 6th Earl Rutland 1578-1632 (34) carried the shield.

Tethy's Festival Masque

On 05 Jun 1610 the Tethy's Festival Masque was performed at Whitehall Palace to celebrate the the investiture of Prince Frederick (16) as Prince of Wales. The script was written by Samuel Daniel at the request of the Queen (35), who appeared in person as Tethys a goddess of the sea. Inigo Jones Architect 1573-1652 (36) designed the staging and scenery.
Prince Charles (9) took the part of Zephyrus,.
Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662 (13) appeared as the companion or daughter of Tethys, the "Nymph of Thames",.
Arbella Stewart 1575-1615 (35) took the part of the "Nymph of Trent",.
Alethea Talbot Countess Arundel, Surrey and Norfolk 1585-1654 (25) as "Nymph of Arun".
Elizabeth Vere Countess Derby 1575-1627 (34) as "Nymph of Derwent",.
Frances Howard Countess Essex and Somerset 1590-1632 (20) as "Nymph of Lee",.
Anne Clifford Countess Dorset and Pembroke 1590-1676 (20) as "Nymph of Air",.
Susan Vere Countess Montgomery 1587-1628 (23) as "Nymph of Severn",.
Elizabeth Radclyffe Viscountess Haddington -1618 as "Nymph of Rother",.
Elizabeth Talbot Countess Kent 1582-1651 (28) as "Nymph of Medway",.
Four sisters, daughters of Edward Somerset 4th Earl Worcester 1550-1628 (60) and Elizabeth Hastings Countess Worcester 1546-1621 (64), danced as the rivers of Monmouthshire:
Catherine Somerset Baroness Windsor 1575-1654 (35) the "Nymph of Usk".
Katherine Somerset Baroness Petre 1575-1625 (35) the "Nymph of Olwy".
Elizabeth Somerset 1590-1625 (20) the "Nymph of Dulesse" (Dulas), and.
Mary Wintour the "Nymph of Wye".

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Around 1605 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of Anne of Denmark.Around 1644. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Inigo Jones Architect 1573-1652.Around 1757 William Hogarth Painter 1697-1764. Portrait of Inigo Jones Architect 1573-1652. The portrait was commissioned by Edward Littleton MP 4th Baronet Pillaton Hall 1727-1812 when he was refurbishing his house Teddesley Hall.In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.In 1610 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662.In 1642 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662.In 1605 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Arbella Stewart 1575-1615.Around 1615 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of Frances Howard Countess Essex and Somerset 1590-1632.Around 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of Anne Clifford Countess Dorset and Pembroke 1590-1676.In 1621 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of Edward Somerset 4th Earl Worcester 1550-1628.

May 1611 Creation of Baronets

On 22 May 1611 the first Baronets were created by James I (44) who granted letters patent to two hundred gentlemen of good birth with an income of at least £1,000 a year in return for which each was required to pay for the upkeep of thirty soldiers for three years. The first Baronets were:
Nicolas Bacon (71) was created 1st Baronet Bacon of Redgrave. The Premier Baronet being the first creation.
Lionel Tollemache 1st Baronet Talmash 1562-1621 (48) was created 1st Baronet Talmash of Helmingham in Suffolk.
George Booth (54) was created 1st Baronet Dunham Massey. Katherine Anderson Lady Dunham Massey 1568-1639 (43) by marriage Lady Dunham Massey.
Phillip Knyvet (41) was created 1st Baronet Knyvet of Buckenham in Norfolk.
Edward Carr (68) was created 1st Baronet Carr of Sleaford in Lincolnshire. Anne Dyer Lady Carr -1639 by marriage Lady Carr of Sleaford in Lincolnshire.
John St John (25) was created 1st Baronet St John Lydiard Tregoze in Wiltshire 1611.
Thomas Gerard 1st Baronet Bryn 1560-1621 (51) was created 1st Baronet Gerard of Bryn.
Thomas 1st Baronet Mansel 1556-1631 (55) was created 1st Baronet Mansel of Margam.
George Savile 1st Baronet Thornhill 1550-1622 (61) was created 1st Baronet Savile of Thornhill.
Thomas Temple 1st Baronet Temple 1567-1637 (44) was created 1st Baronet Temple of Stowe.
Henry Belasyse 1st Baronet 1555-1624 (55) was created 1st Baronet Belasyse of Newborough.
George Shirley 1st Baronet Staunton Harold 1559-1622 (52) was created 1st Baronet Staunton Harold in Leicestershire.
Henry Hobart 1st Baronet Hobart 1560-1625 (51) was created 1st Baronet Hobart of Intwood in Norfolk. Dorothy Bell Lady Hobart by marriage Lady Hobart of Intwood in Norfolk.
The next creations may have been in the later creations on 29 Jun and 25 Nov ...
Henry Lee 1st Baronet Lee 1571-1631 (40) was created 1st Baronet Lee of Quarrendon in Buckinghamshire.
Moyle Finch 1st Baronet Eastwell 1550-1614 (61) was created 1st Baronet Eastwell in Kent. Elizabeth Heneage 1st Countess Winchelsea 1556-1634 (54) by marriage Lady Eastwell in Kent.
James Harrington 1st Baronet Ridlington 1542-1614 (69) was created 1st Baronet Ridlington.
Gervase Clifton 1st Baronet Clifton 1587-1666 (23) was created 1st Baronet Clifton of Clifton in Nottinghamshire.
Thomas Pelham 1st Baronet Pelham of Laughton 1540-1624 (71) was created 1st Baronet Pelham of Laughton. Mary Walsingham Baroness Pelham Laughton 1564-1624 (47) by marriage Lady Pelham of Laughton.
Thomas Penyston 1st Baronet Penyston 1591-1644 (20) was created 1st Baronet Penyston. Martha Temple Lady Penyston 1595-1620 (16) by marriage Lady Penyston.
George St Paul Baronet St Paul 1562-1613 (49) was created as Baronet St Paul in Snarford in Lincolnshire. Frances Wray Countess Warwick -1634 by marriage Lady St Paul in Snarford in Lincolnshire.
Philip Wodehouse 3rd Baronet Woodhouse 1608-1681 (2) was created 1st Baronet Woodhouse of Wilberhall.

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Around 1600 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted the portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.Around 1605 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 with Garter Collar and Leg Garter.In 1621 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter.Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.In 1583 Pieter Bronckhorst Painter -1583. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.In 1631 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of John St John 1st Baronet St John Lydiard Tregoze 1585-1648. Lydiard House.Before 1631. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas 1st Baronet Mansel 1556-1631 and Jane Pole. Unusual for showing the couple holding hands. Sir Thomas was one of the richest and most influential people in south Wales. Not only had he acted as MP and Sheriff of Glamorgan on several occasions, he had been knighted, and in 1611 became one of the first ever to be given the title Baronet - see May 1611 Creation of Baronets. Sir Thomas wears a white doublet with delicate lace collars and cuff, and a dark tunic intricately embroidered with gold. These were not his everyday clothes, but would have been chosen especially for the portrait, to demonstrate his wealth and taste. Beards were considered a sign of virility, and were important fashion statements for men. Thomas Mansel wears his long and squared. Lady Jane wears a dark dress embroidered with gold and an elaborate lace collar and headdress, offset by a lavish triple-string of pearls. This was an age when new fashions and luxury materials like lace were being imported from abroad. Her costume was not of the latest fashion, and suggests the taste of an older generation.  Lady Jane holds a marigold, also called Mary's Gold. This may be a reference to their daughter Mary, who appears with her parents in another, almost identical portrait. Marigolds were often used to symbolise grief and comfort, so it may also refer to the death of Jane's second husband.In 1611 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. Portrait of George Savile 1st Baronet Thornhill 1550-1622.In 1624 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Henry Hobart 1st Baronet Hobart 1560-1625.Around 1620 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of Martha Temple Lady Penyston 1595-1620.

Before 1631. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas 1st Baronet Mansel 1556-1631 and Jane Pole. Unusual for showing the couple holding hands. Sir Thomas was one of the richest and most influential people in south Wales. Not only had he acted as MP and Sheriff of Glamorgan on several occasions, he had been knighted, and in 1611 became one of the first ever to be given the title Baronet - see May 1611 Creation of Baronets. Sir Thomas wears a white doublet with delicate lace collars and cuff, and a dark tunic intricately embroidered with gold. These were not his everyday clothes, but would have been chosen especially for the portrait, to demonstrate his wealth and taste. Beards were considered a sign of virility, and were important fashion statements for men. Thomas Mansel wears his long and squared. Lady Jane wears a dark dress embroidered with gold and an elaborate lace collar and headdress, offset by a lavish triple-string of pearls. This was an age when new fashions and luxury materials like lace were being imported from abroad. Her costume was not of the latest fashion, and suggests the taste of an older generation. Lady Jane holds a marigold, also called Mary's Gold. This may be a reference to their daughter Mary, who appears with her parents in another, almost identical portrait. Marigolds were often used to symbolise grief and comfort, so it may also refer to the death of Jane's second husband.

Before 1631. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas 1st Baronet Mansel 1556-1631 and Jane Pole. Unusual for showing the couple holding hands. Sir Thomas was one of the richest and most influential people in south Wales. Not only had he acted as MP and Sheriff of Glamorgan on several occasions, he had been knighted, and in 1611 became one of the first ever to be given the title Baronet - see May 1611 Creation of Baronets. Sir Thomas wears a white doublet with delicate lace collars and cuff, and a dark tunic intricately embroidered with gold. These were not his everyday clothes, but would have been chosen especially for the portrait, to demonstrate his wealth and taste. Beards were considered a sign of virility, and were important fashion statements for men. Thomas Mansel wears his long and squared. Lady Jane wears a dark dress embroidered with gold and an elaborate lace collar and headdress, offset by a lavish triple-string of pearls. This was an age when new fashions and luxury materials like lace were being imported from abroad. Her costume was not of the latest fashion, and suggests the taste of an older generation.  Lady Jane holds a marigold, also called Mary's Gold. This may be a reference to their daughter Mary, who appears with her parents in another, almost identical portrait. Marigolds were often used to symbolise grief and comfort, so it may also refer to the death of Jane's second husband.

1611 Jun Creation of Baronets

On 29 Jun 1611 another tranche of Baronets were created by James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (45) as a means of generating revenue ...
William Wentworth 1st Baronet Wentworth Woodhouse 1562-1612 (49) was created 1st Baronet Wentworth Woodhouse.
John Molyneux 1st Baronet Molyneux Teversall 1581-1618 (30) was created 1st Baronet Molyneux of Teversall in Nottinghamshire.
Robert Cholmondeley 1st Earl Leinster 1584-1659 (27) was created 1st Baronet Cholmondley of Cholmondeley. Catherine Stanhope Countess Leinster by marriage Lady Cholmondley of Cholmondeley.
Estrange Mordaunt 1st Baronet Mordaunt of Massingham Parva 1572-1627 (39) was created 1st Baronet Mordaunt of Massingham Parva.
John Savage 1st Baronet Savage 1550-1615 (61) was created 1st Baronet Savage.
Edward Seymour 1st Baronet Seymour 1563-1613 (48) was created 1st Baronet Seymour of Berry Pomeroy. Elizabeth Champernowne Baroness Seymour by marriage Lady Seymour of Berry Pomeroy.
John Tufton 1st Baronet Tufton 1544-1624 (67) was created 1st Baronet Tufton of Hothfield. Christian Browne Lady Tufton 1554-1589 (57) by marriage Lady Tufton of Hothfield.
Anthony Cope 1st Baronet Hanwell 1548-1614 (63) was created 1st Baronet Hanwell. Anne Paston Lady Hanwell 1553-1637 (58) by marriage Lady Hanwell.
William Twysden 1st Baronet Roydon in Kent 1566-1628 (45) was created 1st Baronet Twysden of Roydon in Kent. Anne Finch Lady Twysden 1574-1638 (37) by marriage Lady Twysden of Roydon in Kent.
Richard Worsley 1st Baronet 1589-1621 (22) was created 1st Baronet Worsley of Appuldurcombe.
Richard Molyneux 1st Baronet Molyneux 1560-1622 (51) was created 1st Baronet Molyneux of Sefton. Frances Gerard Lady Molyneux 1569-1620 (42) by marriage Lady Molyneux of Sefton.
William Twysden 1st Baronet Roydon in Kent 1566-1628 (45) was created 1st Baronet Twysden of Roydon in Kent.
Henry Savile 1st Baronet 1579-1632 (32) was created 1st Baronet Savile of Methley.
Thomas Mildmay 1st Baronet 1573-1626 (38) was created 1st Baronet Mildmay of Moulsham.

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Nov 1611 Creation of Baronets

On 25 Nov 1611 a further tranche of Baronets was created by James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (45) ...
Edward Devereux 1st Baronet Devereux 1544-1622 (67) was created 1st Baronet Devereux of Castle Bromwich. Catherine Arden Baroness Devereux 1558-1627 (53) by marriage Lady Devereux of Castle Bromwich.
Francis Englefield 1st Baronet Englefield 1561-1631 (50) was created 1st Baronet Englefield of Wootton Bassett in Wiltshire.
Harbottle Grimston 1st Baronet of Bradfield 1569-1648 (42) was created 1st Baronet Grimston of Bradfield.
John Portman 1st Baronet Portman 1575-1612 (36) was created 1st Baronet Portman of Orchard Portman in Somerset.
William Wray 1st Baronet Glentworth 1555-1617 (56) was created 1st Baronet Glentworth. Frances Drury Lady Glentworth 1576-1637 (35) by marriage Lady Glentworth.
Thomas Puckering 1st Baronet 1592-1637 (19) was created 1st Baronet Puckering of Weston.

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Discovery of Neptune by Galileo

On 28 Dec 1612 Galileo discovered Neptune although he thought it a star rather than a Planet and is not, therefore, credited with the discovery of Neptune which eventually occurred some two-hundred and fifty years later.

Jun 1620 Creation of Baronets

In Jun 1620 two further baronetcies were created ....
Thomas Gower 1st Baronet Gower 1584-1651 (36) was created 1st Baronet Gower of Stittenham in Yorkshire. Anne Doyley Baroness Gower -1633 by marriage Lady Gower of Stittenham in Yorkshire.
John Pakington 1st Baronet Pakington 1600-1624 (20) was created 1st Baronet Pakington.

Death of Prince Frederick

On 06 Nov 1612 Henry Frederick Stewart Prince of Wales 1594-1612 (18) died. The death of the heir to the throne significant; compare William Adelin Normandy Duke Normandy 1103-1120, Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince of Wales 1330-1376, Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502, Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751, perhaps Edward York Prince of Wales 1473-1484.

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502.In 1750 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.

Funeral of Prince Frederick

On 07 Dec 1612 Henry Frederick Stewart Prince of Wales 1594-1612 (18) was buried at Westminster Abbey. His body had lain in state for a month at St James's Palace. Two thousand mourners attended in the procession and people of all ages lined the streets. Archbishop Abbott (50) gave the funeral sermon. A magnificent hearse was erected on which was placed his richly clothed funeral effigy. The robes were those worn by the Prince at his creation as Princes of Wales in 1610. This effigy was made by Richard Norris with the plaster face modelled by Abraham Van der Doort.
Francis Manners 6th Earl Rutland 1578-1632 (34) carried the shield.

Marriage of Elizabeth Stewart and Frederick V Elector Palatine

Before 14 Feb 1613 Frederick Palatinate Simmern V Elector Palatine Rhine 1596-1632 was appointed 408th Knight of the Garter by his fourth cousin James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

Around 1630 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Frederick Palatinate Simmern V Elector Palatine Rhine 1596-1632.In 1635 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Frederick Palatinate Simmern V Elector Palatine Rhine 1596-1632.

On 14 Feb 1613 Frederick Palatinate Simmern V Elector Palatine Rhine 1596-1632 (16) and Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662 (16) were married at Chapel Royal Whitehall Palace. She a daughter of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.
A grand occasion that saw more royalty than ever visit the court of England. The marriage was an enormously popular match and was the occasion for an outpouring of public affection with the ceremony described as "a wonder of ceremonial and magnificence even for that extravagant age".
It was celebrated with lavish and sophisticated festivities both in London and Heidelberg, including mass feasts and lavish furnishings that cost nearly £50,000, and nearly bankrupted King James. Among many celebratory writings of the events was John Donne's (41) "Epithalamion, Or Marriage Song on the Lady Elizabeth, and Count Palatine being married on St Valentine's Day". Marriage of Elizabeth Stewart and Frederick V Elector Palatine

On 15 Feb 1613 The Memorable Masque of the Middle Temple and Lincoln's Inn was a masque performed at the Great Hall of Whitehall Palace as part of the wedding festivities.

On 20 Feb 1613 The Masque of the Inner Temple and Gray's Inn was performed at the Banqueting House as part of the wedding festivities. The masque was sponsored by the Inner Temple and Gray's Inn both of whom spent around £1200.

After 20 Feb 1613 Frederick Palatinate Simmern V Elector Palatine Rhine 1596-1632 and Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662 commenced their journey to his home at Heidelburg. They visited Prince Maurice I of Orange 1567-1625. They arrived in Heidelburg on 12 Jun 1613 amidst widespread celebration.
John Harington 1st Baron Harington 1540-1613 and Anne Keilway Baroness Harington 1554-1620
Sisters Elizabeth Apsley -1626 and Alice Apsley travelled as Maids of Honour to Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662.

Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Prince Maurice I of Orange 1567-1625.Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of John Harington 1st Baron Harington 1540-1613.

Thomas Overbury Murder and Trial of his Murderers

On 06 May 1613 Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 (51) was appointed Lieutenant of the Tower of London by James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (46) having been recommended by Henry Howard 1st Earl of Northampton 1540-1614 (73). Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 (51) paid £2000 for the appointment of which £1400 went to Henry Howard 1st Earl of Northampton 1540-1614 (73) and £300 to Thomas Monson 1st Baronet 1565-1641 (48), Master of the Armory in the Tower, and a friend of Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 (51).

1624. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Howard 1st Earl of Northampton 1540-1614.

Letters of the Court of James I 1613 Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering Baronet 12 Aug 1613. 12 Aug 1613. London. Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Thomas Puckering 1st Baronet 1592-1637 (21).
First, touching the business which you so particularly commended unto me at our last being together at Florence, I have had hitherto very small opportunity of dealing farther in it than pressing Mr. Newton for his advice and furtherance. For in this general absence of the court, when king, queen, and prince are all in several progresses, little or no means hath been yet offered. Sir Robert Cary (53)1, as your brother telleth me, is the fittest man to be dealt with in that kind, to whom I shall most willingly likewise address myself, as having best means to him. Only I attend some further directions from Mr. Newton both for the nature of the place I should sue for, and how I should govern myself in my offers for the accomplishment of it.
For news, that which is of chiefest moment is this. There hath lately happened in the Palatine's court a strange quarrel between the English and Scots, and that in this manner and upon this occasion. Sir Andrew Keigh, a Scotsman, that is in some office about the Palatine, happening one day to contest with my Lady Harrington (59)2 upon some point in her grace's presence, [he proceeded] to that insolency at the length, as he gave her the lie; and not content therewith (to verify that of the orator, "qui vere cundiæ fines semel transierit, eum benè et gnavitèr oportet esse impudentem," [Note. she who truly has once crossed the bounds of grace must be shameless]) fell to debase my lord (73) likewise with very base and opprobrious speeches. Mr. Bushell, who, as I understand, was the only man of all my lord's followers that was then present, finding Keigh not long after in a fit place for that purpose, offered him the combat in defence of his lord's (73) and lady's (59) honour; and as both were ready to draw, another Scotsman, who was in Keigh's company, interposed himself, and suffered not them to proceed then any farther. Being thus parted, my Lord Harrington (73) sent for Mr. Bushell to his chamber (whether to wish him to be quiet, or for what other occasion I know not). In the mean time, this Keigh [at the] head of four or five Scotsmen more, himself being provided, besides his sword, with a square bastinado and a dagger, the rest with the [sword] only, lies in wait to set apon Mr. Bashell at his return: [who, as he was] coming from my lord, and not dreaming of any such enterprise, and going to put his foot in his stirrup to mount up upon his horse, (for my lord's [lodging and his] were far asunder), lo! Keigh steps forth, striking him, [and with the] bastinado fells him: yet presently he recovered himself, and, offering to rise, received a second blow upon the head, and was felled a second time. Notwithstanding all this, he recovered himself again, and drew out his sword in his own defence, being all idone; when all the rest laid about him with their swords, and, being five to one, wounded him very grievously, as having run him through the body, and into divers parts no less than twelve times. During this conflict, Mr. Gray, another of my lord's gentlemen, coming forth, received a thrust in the hand, but not without leaving some of the marks likewise upon them. After that came her grace's coachman, and took part with Mr. Gray (for Mr. Bushell was now left for dead) and hurt two or three of the Scots; who, not daring to abide to fight any longer, partly for fear of others that might come in, and partly for that they supposed their chief enemy either dead or not likely to live, presently quitted the place, and betook themselves to flight. But there was suddenly way made after them, and they all brought back again. Sir Andrew Keigh was confined to his chamber under a sure guard, the rest committed to the ordinary prison; and a messenger presently despatched over into England to understand his majesty's pleasure touching this subject; who has scarcely as yet received the news thereof. Mr. Bushell nevertheless is yet living, and not without hope of recovery. My Lord (73) and Lady Harrington (59) purpose to return for England this month, and to bring him along with them, (which they may well do by water) if they find him any way able to endure it.
Upon their arrival. Sir John Harrington (21)3 purposeth to go and take possession of his government in Guernsey, which he hath lately obtained by an exchange which he hath made between it and a reversion of an office formerly granted him of being master in the King's Bench.
My Lord of Essex's (22) cause hath had no hearings of late, and is remitted over to the 18th day of this next new month. Two new commissioners are adjoined to the former, viz., the Bishops of Winchester (66)4 and Rochester (51)5 that their voice in favour of the nullity may be able to counterpoise the contrary opposition of Canterbury and London.
The Lord Chief Justice Fleming (69) is lately dead, and Hobart and Montagu suitors for the place.
In my last letters I acquainted you with the stirs that were at Nismes upon occasion of M. Ferrier, some time their minister. M. le Conestable, who resides in those parts, hath made such a grievous complaint thereof unto the queen (11)6, as she hath taken a resolution thereupon to translate, by way of punishment, the presidial seat of justice, which is there, to Beaucaire, a neighbour Catholic town, hard by; which, if it once come to be put in execution, is like to occasion far greater stirs in those quarters.
Note 1. Fourth son of Henry Cary Lord Hunsdon (87), and grandson of William Cary, Esq., who married Mary Boleyn, sister to Queen Anne Boleyn. Sir Robert Cary (53) was created by King James I (47), Lord Gary of Lepingdon, in Yorkshire, and by King Charles I (12), Earl of Monmooth.
Note 2. Anne (59), daughter and sole heir of Robert Kelway, Esq, surveyor of the Court of Wards, and wife of Sir John Harrington (73), created 21st July, 1603, by King James the First (47), Lord Harrington of Exton in Rutland. He had the tuition of the Lady Elizabeth (16), whom he attended, in April, 1613, to the Palatinate; and died in the same year.
Note 3. Son (21) of Lord Harrington (73). He died in February, 1613-14.
Note 4. Dr. Bilson (66).
Note 5. Dr. John Buckridge (51).
Note 6. Queen of France (11).

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Around 1625. Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of Anne of Austria Spain Queen Consort France 1601-1666. Around 1625. Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of Anne of Austria Spain Queen Consort France 1601-1666 in her coronation robes. 1616. Frans Pourbus the Younger Painter 1569-1622. Portrait of Anne of Austria Spain Queen Consort France 1601-1666. Around 1580 based on a work of around 1534.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Anne Boleyn Queen Consort England.

Letters of the Court of James I 1613 Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering Baronet 29 Aug 1613. 29 Aug 1613. London. Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Thomas Puckering 1st Baronet 1592-1637 (21).
Yoa may please to remember how, in some of my former letters, I made mention of my Lord of Essex's (22) case, which was to rest in dependance till next term. But the king showed himself so affectionate in it, as the commissioners have been forced (to give his majesty satisfaction) to yield a more speedy hearing of it, which was done (though with little effect) upon last Wednesday. But it is believed generally that unless the commission be changed, the nullities which his majesty desireth will never be pronounced. For the Archbishop of Canterbury (50) and the Bishop of London (54), together with Dr. Bennet, and Dr. Edwards, who are like to have the greatest sway in deciding this controversy, are directly against it; insomuch as my Lord of Canterbury (50), being with his majesty at Windsor for some three or four days before the hearing, fell down upon his knees twice or thrice, to entreat his majesty that he might be dispensed with from being on the commission; which he would esteem a greater favour that all that he had received from him in being raised from a private condition, and in so short a space, to the highest dignity ecclesiastical. At the last hearing, my Lord of Rochester (26) stayed here in town, as is supposed, to hear the success, and rode presently past unto the king, [to acquaint] his majesty thereof, and showeth himself so passionate in this business only in favour [of the countess (23),] with whom a new match would be presently concluded, if the old one were now abolished.
Sir Thomas Overbury (32) is like to run a short course, being sick unto death1. The lieutenant of the Tower, and the physicians that were there about him, have subscribed their hands, that they hold him a man past all recovery.
Mr. Albert Morton (29), secretary of Sir Henry Wotton, is to be sent presently ambassador to the Duke of Savoy (51), and there [remain], which gives occasion of conjecture here that the old treaty of marriage is now [on foot] again; and that that other of France is like to fall to the ground. But in these [conjectures] haply it would be fit to be more sparing.
I received news lately from a gentleman, that heard it from Sir Ralph Winwood's (50) own mouth, that the States are resolved to make war upon the King of Denmark, if either our king will join them, or otherwise be [persuaded] to stand by a neuter. Their quarrel is, for that the King of Denmark hath imposed a grievous tax upon all merchandize that pass the Sound, and he hath in effect blocked up that passage: for it is held that of every three ships that pass, one falls by this means to his share, which is a thing intolerable.
The differences between them of the Religion in France are grown so violent as the deputies'-general have petitioned the queen, in the name of all the provinces, for liberty to hold a general assembly for [consideration] and pacification of them. But they find this request to be nothing pleasing, nor without great difficulty to be ob- tained, out of a jealousy the States hath that they may grow to new complaints and demands, after the example of the last assembly.
There hath been lately a proposition of marriage between the daughter of M. D'Ancre, and M. De Villeroy's grand-child, who is the heir of his house; there having been a former intention of matching her with the young Duke D'Elboeuf, which gives occasion of great jealousy and suspicion to M. De Guise and his faction, fearing by this news that M. De Yilleroy will be disjoined from them.
Note 1. He died on the 15th of September following, from poison, which Rochester and his countess had caused to be administered in his food.

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In 1622 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Bishop John King 1559-1621.Around 1628 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664 (copy from original). Portrait of Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645.

On 14 Sep 1613 Thomas Overbury 1581-1613 (32) died from poisoning at the Tower of London.

In Sep 1615 rumours about Thomas Overbury 1581-1613 (34)'s death began to gain traction. The Governor of the Tower of London sent James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (49) a letter that described how one of the warders had been bringing Thomas Overbury 1581-1613 (34) poisoned food and medicine. James' initial reluctance avoid further investigation were overcome when he was implicated. Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634 (63) and Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626 (54).

Before 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634.1593. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634.In 1576 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619, whilst in France, painted a portrait of Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626 who was attached to the English Embassy at the time.In 1731 (Copy of 1618 original).John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626.

On 01 Oct 1615 Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 (54) was arrested and imprisoned at the Tower of London.

After 01 Oct 1615 Gervase Helwys 1561-1615, Thomas Monson 1st Baronet 1565-1641, the gaoler Richard Weston, widow of a London doctor Mrs Anne Turner, and an apothecary James Franklin were tried for the murder of Thomas Overbury 1581-1613 at the Guildhall by Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634 and Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626. It was ruled that "poisons" had been "administered" in the form of "jellies" and "tarts" by Weston, Turner and Franklin at the direction of Frances Howard Countess Essex and Somerset 1590-1632. Frances Howard Countess Essex and Somerset 1590-1632 admitted her guilt. Her husband Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645 maintained his innocence despite James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 urging him to admit his guilt to avoid James being implicated. Frances Howard Countess Essex and Somerset 1590-1632 and Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645 were found guilty and sentenced to death. James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 commuted their sentence to life imprisonment. They, along with Monson, were subsequently pardoned.
The evidence for Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 appeared to indicated he had attempted to undermine the plot to poison Thomas Overbury 1581-1613.

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On 18 Nov 1615 Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 (54), the gaoler Richard Weston, widow of a London doctor Mrs Anne Turner, and an apothecary James Franklin were found guilty as "accessories before the fact done" and sentenced to death.

On 20 Nov 1616 Gervase Helwys 1561-1615 (55) was hanged at Tower Hill. He gave a speech to the crowd ...
... many others of seuerall dispositions. All you beeing thus assembled to see mee finish my dayes, the number of which is sum'd up, for the very minutes of my life may now be reckoned. Your expectation is to have mee say something, to give satisfaction to the World, and I will doe it so farre as I can, albeit in that speech of mine, I shall (as it was spoken unto me the last night) but chatter like a Crow. But whatsoeuer I deliuer, I beseech you to take from a wounded bosome, for my purpose is to rip up my very heart, and to leaue nothing there which may proue any clogge to my Conscience. Hither am I come to performe a worke which of all others is to Man the most easie and yet to Flesh and Blood is the hardest, and that is, To die. To hide therefore any thing, for any worldly respect, were to leaue a blot upon my owne Soule, which I trust shall be presented (through the mercies of my Maker, and merits of my Sauiour) acceptable before GODS high Tribunall. And first I will labour to satisfie some, who before my apprehension were well conceipted of mee, but since my Arraignment, as I vnderstand, carryed of mee but hard opinions, for that at the Barre I stood stiffly upon the Justice of my Innocence; and this they impute as a great fault, beeing afterwards that I was found guilty of the Crime. To which I answer, that I did it ignorantly: Nay I was so farre from thinking my selfe foule in the Fact, that untill these two Gentlemen, (Doctor Felton and Doctor Whiting, the Physitions for my Soule) told mee how deepely I had imbrewed my hands in the blood of that gentleman (35), making mee by GODS law as guilty in the Concealing, as if I had beene a personall Actor in it: till then I say, I held my selfe so ignorant of the deede, and my Conscience so cleere, that I did never aske GOD forgivenesse, nor once repent mee of the Fact, such was my blindnesse. So that it was not onely an error, or rather a horrible sinne, in mee to consent, but a worse, to deny it, so Bloody, so Treacherous, so Foule, so Filthy a Fact as that was; for which I must confesse the King, and the State have dealt honorably, roundly, and justly, with mee, in condemning mee unto this death. And thus have I laboured and done my best to cleere this point, being willing by all good meanes to reduce your first opinions of mee; that as formerly your conceipted well of mee, so you would now with a charitable affection performe the last duty of your Christian loues towards mee, praying to GOD, both with me, and for mee; to the intent that this Cup, whereof I am to drinke, may not be greiuous unto mee, but that it may be a ioyfull conueiance to a better and more blessed comfort.
Some perhaps will thinke it to be a Rigor of the State, or aggravation of my iudgement, that I should die in this place, but this doe I take as an honor unto me, & herein doe I acknowledge my selfe to stand much bound to the State, in that I have this favour vouchsafed me to suffer Death in sight of my Charge, even where I had sinned, on the Tower-hill, rather than in the place of common Execution, where every base Malefactor dyeth.
Many doe I see here whom I know well, and of whom I am likewise knowne: and now am I a Spectacle for them to be looked on, whom in former times (and in all mens accounts) they held never likely to come to such an end. But herein he hold the justice of God, who is so oppos'd against sinne, because that if we forget to seeke him whilst we may, he will finde us out when we would not be found of him.
It is expected I should say something of the fact which I have committed: And hither am I come resolued to cleare my conscience (before I depart this world) of all matters which I either knowe, or can now remember. And so much I have already delivered in writing to my Lo. Chiefe Justice (64) and to prove that which I wrote is true, I yesterday confirmed it with the receiuing of the blessed Sacrament, wishing unto you all as much comfort by those holy Mysteries, as I tooke by them: and I doe heere (though not with such a bloud) yet with mine own bloud, seale that which I have written. For my selfe, I will hide nothing to make my fault seeme lesse, but will rip open this very heart of mine, and confesse before God myne owne uncleannesse. I have sinned exceedingly against thee O my maker, and in this am I most faulty, that I did not reveale to the King (50), so soone as I my selfe had knowledge of the busines. But (alas) feare to loose these worldly pleasures, and the loue to promotion, made me forget my duty to my Soueraigne, and not to regard my God, who is a swift auenger of blood: and would to heaven I had trusted to his providence, and set the thinges of this world at nought, for heavens sake, and a good conscience. You see, Gentlemen, promotion cannot rescue us from the justice of God, which alwaies pursues after sinne: And therefore I exhort you not to trust in men (how great soeuer) for they cannot hide themselues when God is angry; neither can they protect you from shame, when God will consume you: he that sitteth in heaven, will deride and scorne their foolish Inventions. As for me, I will not spare to lay open my owne shame: Thinke you I care for the reputation of this world? No, I weigh it not. This my soule shall receiue more comfort from God in my upright dealing.
My sinne, in this foule fact, was great, for upon me lay all the blood, shed, and to be shed: I have made many children fatherles, many wives husbandles, many parents childelesse: and I my selfe leave a comfortlesse wife and eight children behinde me for it too: for if I had revealed it when I might, I had freed much blood from being spilt, in so much as I could wish (Gods Justice and charity reserved) I might hang in chaines, till I rotte away by peecemeale: nor cared I what tortures my body were put unto, so I might expaite or free the bloud of so many, (some in one place, and some in another) which is both like to bee shed, and is already shed, and the Lord knowes when it will have an end. Concerning my selfe, I will aggravate the crime, by speaking of every circumstance I can remember. And now it comes into my mind, what trust that gentleman put into me: hee reputed me to bee most faithfull unto him; (Oh the wildnesse of my heart!) I proved unfaithfull, and was his deadly deceitfull friend. And here (Gentlemen) I exhort you all that you would take notice of this, ever to bee faithfull to those who put you in trust. Sir Thomas O. (35) trusted me, and I was unfaithfull and treacherous to him, in drawing tickets for him to his disadvantage. I promised him secrecy, yet betrayed him, onely to satisfy greatnesse: But God, who sees the secret thoughts of mans heart, will disclose all unuist actions at last: nay, I am perswaded that whosoeuer they bee that commit sinne in their child-hood, at one time or other it will be revealed. In this place it commeth to my mind, that in my yonger dayes (as wel beyond the Seas as here) I was much addicted to that idle veyne of Gaming, I was bewitched with it indeed: And I played not for little for final sums neither, but for Great-ones, yet ever haunted with ill lucke: And upon a time, being much displeased at my losse, I sayd, not in a carelesse maner, Would I might be hanged; But seriously, and advisedly (betweene God and my selfe) clapping my hands upon my breast, I spake thus, If ever I play again, then let me be hangd. Now gentlemen here you may behold the justice of God, paying mee my wish and imprecation home. Bee carefull therefore I exhort you, that you vow nothing but that unto which you will give all diligence to performe: for the powerful God, before whom you make such vowes, will otherwise bee auegned: Jn this place Doctor VVhiting putting him in mind to satisfie the World touching his Religion thus he went on. THe matter you speake to mee of, faith hee, is well thought upon: for I heare that abroad hath beene some murmuring and questions made about mee for my Religion; Some giving out that I was infected with Anabaptisme: A fond, ridiculous, foolish and phantasticall opinion, which I never affected but rather despised. Many may thinke that the manner of my death doth much discourage mee, that I should dye in a halter: I would have you all to thinke that I scorne all such worldly thoughts: I care not for it, I value not any earthly shame at all, so as may have honour and glory anon in Heaven: and I make no doubt, but I shall sodainely be more happie then you all, and that I shall see GOD face to face: and if there be any point of innocency in mee at all, I doe utterly cast it from mee, and I doe commit it wholly to GOD.
And for any matter of Glory, I doe with the Saints of GOD expect it through the merits of Christ, at the Resurrection: yea it is my glorie to die thus. I might have died in my Bedde, or shooting the Bridge or else have fallen downe sodainly, in which death I should have wanted this space to repent, being the sweet comfort and assured hope of Gods favour which of his mercy he hath vouchsafed mee; So that it swalloweth up all feare of death or reproch of the World: wishing unto all you (Gentlemen) who now behold mee, that wheresoeuer you shall dye, (either in your Beddes or else-where howsoewer) you may feele such comfort and resolution as God in his mercy hath bestowed uppon mee and my wounded Soule for this and the rest of my grieuous Sinnes. But mee thinkes I heare some of you conjecture and say, that I expresse no great Arguments or signes of sorrow: You think my heart should rather dissolue and melt into teares, then to appeare so insensible of feare as I may seeme: but I must tell you, teares were never common in mee: I may therefore feare though I do not weepe. I have been couragious both beyond the Seas and heere in mine owne Country: but (Gentlemen) that was when there was no perill before mee. But now the stroke of death is upon mee. It affrights mee, and there is cause to feare: yet notwithstanding, my heart seemeth unto you to be rather of stone than of flesh. But I would have you understand, that this boldnes doth not proceed from any manly fortitude, for I am a man, fraile as you are, and dare as little look death in the face as any other: ther terors of death doe as much trouble my humane sense, as of any man whatsoeuer: but that which swalloweth up all manner of feare in me, & maketh me to glory and to reioyce in, is, the full assurance which I conceiue of the vnspeakable love of God to those who are his, of which number I perswade my selfe to bee one, and that I shall presently enioy it.
I confesse I have sinned exceedingly, against thee (oh God) many wayes, in prophaning thy holy Sabaoths, in taking thy glorious name in vaine, in my concupiscence in turning all thy graces into wantonnes, in my Riotous wasting so many of thy good Creatures, as would have belieued many poore people, whose prayers I might have had this day. I have sinned against thee in my Child-hood: but Childrens sinnes are childishly performed: but I confirmed them in my manhood, there was my sinne. I am perswaded, there is no sinne, that a man committeth in his life, knowing it to be a sin, and not repenting of it, but the Lord will iudge it. I admonish you therefore that are heere assembled, to take good notice of your sinnes, and let none escape you vnrepented. And yet when you have done the best you can, there will lie buried some one sinne or other sufficent to condemne you. O Lord clense mee from my secret sinnes, which are in me so rife. I abused the tender education of my Parents. You perhaps that knew mee will say no; I liued in an honest forme, and was not bad in my life. But I know best my selfe what I was: & if I who was so esteemed of amongst Men, shall scarcely be saued, what will become of those, whom you point at for notorious lievers? The last night God put into my mind the remembrance of one sinne of mine, which heere I will lay open, that others may take heed. I tooke a vaine pride in my pen, and some of my friendes would tell me I had some induments and speciall gift that way: (though I say nor so my selfe) but mark the iudgement of God in this; that Pen which I was so proud of, hatch struck mee dead, and like Absolons hayre hath hanged me: for there hath dropt a word or two from my Pen, in a letter of mine, which upon my Saluation I am not able to answer, or to give any good accompt of. At my Arraignment I pleaded hard for life, & protested my Innocency, but when my owne Pen came against mee, I was forthwith not able to speake anything for my selfe: for I stood as one amazed, or that had no Tongue. See (Gentlemen) the just Iudgement of GOD, who made that thing of which I was most proud, to be my bane: take notice how strangely sinne is punished, and learne every-one to striue against it.
I have heard the word of GOD, and often read it (but without vse) for I must tell you these two worthy, Gentlemen (to whom I am so much bounden, God reward them for their loue) even they begat mee very lately, for I am not ashamed to confesse that I was to be begotten unto Christ within these three daies: yea I have often prayed against sinne, and made many vowes to forsake it, but uppon the next occasion, my foule heart hath beene ready to runne with the wicked. Had I learned but this one lesson in the 119. Psalme, (Depart from mee ye wicked, I will keepe the Commandements of my God &c.) I had beene likely to have enioyed many dayes heere on eath: whereas now you all see mee ready to bee cut short by reason of my sinne. But (O LORD) albeit thou slayest mee, yet will I put my trust in thee: let the LORD doe to me what hee will, I will dye upon this hand (of trusting in him) if I faile many a soule hath miss'd, but I have sure hope of mercy in him; hee hath sufficed and succoured mee, I am sure, euer since the sentence of death hath passed uppon mee: such comfort flowing from the Godly indeauors of these Gentlemen (the Diuines) that neither the Reproach of this Death, nor the Torment of it hath any whit discouraged me; nay, let me tell you, the last night when I heard the time was appoynted, and saw the warrant in Master Sheriffs hand for my death, it no whit daunted me: But what put this courage into me? onely the hope which I had in GODS mercies. This Hope was a Seede, and this Seed must come from a Roote; I looked upon my selfe, and there was rather cause despaire; and just cause, that I should not approach GODS presence. Thus then I disputed with GOD: This Hope being a Seede must have a Roote, and this Roote is not any thing in Man, no, it is Praescientia (thy fore-knowledge,) O God, who hast elected me from eternity. I will tell you, I receiued more comfort this morning, comming along the streetes, than euer I did in all my life. I saw much people gathered together, all the way as I came, to see mee brought to this shamefull end: who with their hearty prayers and well wishings gladded and comforted my very soule: insomuch as I could wish that I had come from Westminster hither. I protest unto you, I thinke I could never have dyed so happily in my bed. But you will say, these are but speechees, and that I being so neere death, my heart cannot be so free, as I seeme in my speech: I confesse, there are in my brest frailties, which doe terrifie, and will still be busie with me, but I beseech you when I am at the stroake of death, that you would praie to GOD (with mee) that neither Sathans power, nor my weakenesse, may hinder my confidence. And I beseech God that amongst all who this daie heare mee, some may profit by my end: If I get but one Soule, I shall have much comfort in that; for that one soule my beget another, and that other another. I have held you too long, but I will draw to an end: intreating you all to ioyne in praier to God for me.
The summe of his Prayer.
O Lord God omnipotent, who sittest in Heaven, and seest all things which are done on earth: to whom are knowne all occasions of men; And who dost deride and laugh to scorne their Foolish inuentions: thou (Lord) who art powerfull to Saue at an instant, bow downe the heavens, and behold Mee (wretched sinner!) vnworthy to looke up, or lift up my hands unto thee. Remember not (O Lord) the sinnes which I have committed. Driue away this Mist which is before mee; and breake those thick Clowdes which my sinnes have made, and may let my request to come into thy presence. Strengthen mee in the middest of Death, in the assurance of thy.
Mercies; and give mee a ioyfull Passage into thy Heavenly Rest, now and for euer. Amen.
After hee had thus Prayed, hee tooke his leaue of all, with these words.
Gentlemen, I shall see your faces now no more: and pulling down his Cap in his eyes, said some privat prayer; in which time the Doctors prayed, and called to him, that hee would remember his assurance, and not be dismaied at the Cup, that hee was not drinke of: Hee answered, I will drinke it up, and never looke what is in it. And after a little time more spent in privat prayer, hee said, Lord receaue my Soule: And so yeelded up the Ghost. His Meditation and Vow. not long before his Death. When I considered Herods State, who though hee heard John Baptist gladly, yet was he intangled with Herodias: and how Agrippa liked so well of Paul as hee was perswaded almost to become a Christian, and how young mans will was good to follow Chirst yet was there one thing wanting: meethought the state of sinfull man was not vnlike. For also how the Angler though hauing caught a Fish but by the the chaps accounts it as his owne: the Bird taken but by the heele is a prey unto the Fowler: the Iayler also holds his prisoner by one ioint as safe, as cast in iron chaines: then did I think what do these motions good, if not effected to the full? what though not notoriously evill? one sinne sufficent to condemn: and is he guilty of all that guilty is of one? then said I vnto the Lord I will freely cleanse my waies and wash my hands in innocency: I will take heed that I offend not in my tongue. Lord let my thoughts be such as I may al-waies say, try and examine mee if there be any vnrighteousnes in mee. Sir Geruase Ellowis.

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The Globe Theatre Burns Down

On 28 Jun 1613 The Globe Theatre burned down. A second Globe Theatre was built on the same site by June 1614.

Letters of the Court of James I 1613 Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Sir Thomas Puckering Baronet 30 Jun 1613. 30 Jun 1613. London. Reverend Thomas Lorkin to Thomas Puckering 1st Baronet 1592-1637 (21).
My last letters advertised you of what had lately happened concerning Cotton, who yielding himself to the king's clemency, doth nevertheless utterly disavow the book, and constantly denieth to be the author of it. Hereupon, his study hath been searched, and there divers papers found, containing many several pieces of the said book, and (which renders the man more odious) certain relics of the late saints of the gunpowder treason, as one of Digby's (35) fingers, Percy's (53) toe, some other part either of Catesby (41) or Bookwood (whether I well remember not), with the addition of a piece of one of Peter Lambert's ribs, to make up the full mess of them. If the proofs which are against him will not extend to the touching of his life, at least they will serve to work him either misery and affliction enough.
Upon Saturday last, being the 26th of this present, there was found, in the stone gallery at Whitehall, a certain letter, bearing address unto the king, which advertiseth him of a treasonable practice against his majesty's own person, to be put in execution the 4th day of the next month, as he went a-hunting (if the commodity so served), or otherwise, as they should find their opportunity; affirming that divers Catholics had therein joined hands, as finding no other means to relieve themselves in the liberty of their conscience; and how there was one great nobleman about his majesty that could give him further instructions of the particulars. That himself was appointed to have been an actor in it; but, touched with a remorse of dyeing his hands in his prince's blood, moved likewise with the remembrance of some particular favours which his father (saith he) had formerly received from his majesty, he could do no less than give him a general notice and warning of it. But because he instanceth not in any one particular, neither subscribed his name, it is held to be a mere invention to intimidate the king, and to beget some strange jealousies in his head of such as are conversant about him.
The prince is as to-morrow to begin housekeeping at Richmond. Sir David Murray and Sir Robert Car (35) have newly procured to be sworn (with Sir James Fullerton (50)), gentlemen of the bedchamber. Sir Robert Carey (50) hath taken no oath, and remains in the same nature that Sir Thomas Chaloner (54) did to the late prince (19) deceased. Sir Arthur Mainwaring (33), Varnam, and Sir Edward Lewys (53), have at length, with much suit, obtained to be sworn gentlemen of his highness's privy chamber.
The great officers must rest still in a longer expectance, unless this occasion help them. The king (47) is desirous to relieve his wants by making estates out of the prince's lands; and having taken the opinion of the best lawyers what course is fittest to be followed, their judgment is, that no good assurance can be made unless the prince himself join likewise in the action. Now, this cannot be done without his council and officers for that purpose; so that it is supposed that some time in Michaelmas term next, before any conveyance be made, certain of these officers, if not all, shall be put again into the possession of their former places.
My Lord of Southampton (39) hath lately got licence to make a voyage over the Spa, whither he is either already gone, or means to go very shortly. He pretends to take remedy against I know not what malady; but his greatest sickness is supposed to be a discontentment conceived, that he cannot compass to be made one of the privy council; which, not able to brook here well at home, he will try if he can better digest it abroad.
No longer since than yesterday, while Burbage's company were acting at the Globe the play of Henry VIII, and there shooting off certain chambers in way of triumph, the fire catched and fastened upon the thatch of the house, and there burned so furiously, as it consumed the whole house, all in less than two hours, the people having enough to do to save themselves1.The Globe Theatre Burns Down
You have heretofore heard of Widdrington's book2, wherein he maintains against the usurpation of popes, the right of kings in matters temporal. This book hath been undertaken to be confuted by some in France; but the author hath proceeded so far in his confutation against kings' prerogatives, as the Court of Parliament at Paris have censured the book, and given order to have the sentence printed.
It is bruited abroad here, that Sir Thomas Puckering (21) is grown a very hot and zealous Catholic. Sir Thomas Badger reports to have heard it very confidently avouched at a great man's table; and I assure you, it is the general opinion, or rather fear, of the most that know you and honour you. How far this may prejudice you, I leave to your wise consideration. I myself rest fully assured to the contrary, and so endeavour to possess others. Your care will be in the mean time to avoid all occasions whereby to increase this suspicion and jealousy.
Note 1. Barbage was Shakspeare's associate. The play was Shakespeare's, and the theatre was the one in which he had achieved his brilliant reputation.
Note 2. Probably that printed at Frankfort in 1613, and entitled "Apologia Card. Bellarmini pro jare principam contra anas ipsins rationes pro Aactoritate Papali Principes deponendi."

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Around 1603 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of Henry Wriothesley 3rd Earl of Southampton 1573-1624. The Latin inscription 'In vinculis invictus' ("in chains unconquered")In 1618 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Henry Wriothesley 3rd Earl of Southampton 1573-1624.

Marriage of Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset and Frances Howard

On 26 Dec 1613 Robert Carr 1st Earl Somerset 1587-1645 (26) and Frances Howard Countess Essex and Somerset 1590-1632 (23) were married. She by marriage Countess Somerset.
Her marriage with her first husband Robert Devereux 3rd Earl Essex 1591-1646 (22) had been annulled on the grounds of his impotence three months before causing something of a scandal.

Addled Parliament

In 1614 Thomas 1st Baronet Mansel 1556-1631 (58) was elected MP Glamorganshire at the Addled Parliament.

In 1614 Samuel Backhouse 1554-1626 (59) was elected MP Ayslesbury in the Addled Parliament.

In 1614 Edward Littleton 1st Baron Lyttelton 1589-1645 (25) was elected MP Bishop's Castle in the Addled Parliament.

In 1614 Robert Bateman 1561-1644 (52) was elected MP Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in the Addled Parliament.

In 1614 during the Addled Parliament Charles Thynne 1568-1652 (46) was elected MP Lymington. John "Black Sir John" Egerton 1551-1614 (63) was elected MP Lichfield. Mervyn Tuchet 2nd Earl Castlehaven 1593-1631 (21) was elected MP Dorset. Richard Edgecumbe 1570-1639 (44) was elected MP Bodmin.

1616 Creation of Garter Knights

On 24 Apr 1616 Esmé Stewart 3rd Duke Lennox 1579-1624 (37) was appointed 416th Knight of the Garter by his second cousin James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (49)..

On 24 Apr 1616 Francis Manners 6th Earl Rutland 1578-1632 (38) was appointed 412th Knight of the Garter by his fifth cousin James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 (49).

Investiture of Charles as Prince of Wales

On 04 Nov 1616 Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (15) was created Prince of Wales. Robert Radclyffe 5th Earl of Sussex 1573-1629 (43) carried the Purple Ermined Robe.
James Wriothesley 1605-1624 (11), brothers Robert Howard 1584-1653 (32) and William Howard, George Berkeley 8th Baron Berkeley 1601-1658 (15), Henry Carey 1st Viscount Falkland 1575-1633 (41) and John Cavendish -1618 were appointed Knight of the Bath. Investiture of Charles as Prince of Wales

Around 1580 based on a work of 1565.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Robert Radclyffe 5th Earl of Sussex 1573-1629 wearing his Garter Collar and holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.Around 1600. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Carey 1st Viscount Falkland 1575-1633.

Masque of Cupid's Banishment

In 1617 the Masque of Cupid's Banishment by Robert White was performed for Anne of Denmark (42) at Deptford. Richard Browne 1st Baronet Deptford 1605-1683 (12) played the part of "Diana".

1618 Great Comet

Between 06 Sep 1618 and 25 Sep 1618 a comet was visible to the naked eye.

John Evelyn's Diary 1620 1636 Birth and Childhood. 1624. I was not initiated into any rudiments until near four years of age, and then one Frier taught us at the church-porch of Wotton; and I do perfectly remember the great talk and stir about Il Conde Gondomar (96), now Ambassador from Spain (for near about this time was the match of our Prince (23) with the Infanta (17) proposed); and the effects of that comet, 1618, still working in the prodigious revolutions now beginning in Europe, especially in Germany, whose sad commotions sprang from the Bohemians' defection from the Emperor Matthias; upon which quarrel the Swedes broke in, giving umbrage to the rest of the princes, and the whole Christian world cause to deplore it, as never since enjoying perfect tranquillity.

Funeral of Anne of Denmark

On 13 May 1619 Anne of Denmark (44) was buried in the north eastern area Henry VII Chapel in Westminster Abbey.
The principal mourner was Alethea Talbot Countess Arundel, Surrey and Norfolk 1585-1654 (34).
Anne Carey 1592-1627 (27) and Mary Woodhouse -1756 walked in the procession.
As Keeper of the Wardrobe Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645 (44) supervised the spending of £20,000 on the funeral.
Richard Young 1st Baronet 1580-1651 (39) carried the banner roll.
Her grave has the inscription: "ANNE OF DENMARK QUEEN OF KING JAMES 1st 1619". her coffin has the inscription: "Here lies buried the Most Serene Queen Anne, consort of James, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, daughter of Frederick II, King of Denmark and Norway and of the Vandals and Goths, sister of Christian IV and mother of many Princes. She died at Hampton Court, in the year of salvation 1618, on the 4th March, aged 43 years, 4 months and 18 days."

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In 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645.Before 11 Dec 1643 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645.

On 04 Nov 1619 Frederick Palatinate Simmern V Elector Palatine Rhine 1596-1632 (23) was crowned King Bohemia. Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662 (23) crowned Queen Consort Bohemia.