Architectural Detail

Architectural Detail is in Architecture.

Acanthus

On 29 Aug 1582 Thomas St Paul -1582 died. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Monument to Thomas St Paul -1582 and Faith Grantham. Fine freestanding tomb chest with canopy. The sides of the tomb chest have acanthus Pilasters, the panels between contain wreathed shields. The full length recumbent albaster effigies show the man in full plate armour holding sword and prayerbook, head on helm, feet on a cushion with flowers. His wife is in a long dress with cloak and close fitting hat, holding a bible. The inscription runs round the top edge of the chest. The canopy is supported on six pillars, those at the angles being circular and bulbous, the others in the form of obelisks decorated with fishscale Paterae, with elaborate Ionic Capitals with roses in the necking. The entablature has an egg and dart frieze. Above the heads of the columns are five female and one male weepers. At the centre of the canopy is a raised altar bearing shields and surmounted by the kneeling figure of the heir clad in armour. In front kneels a larger figure of a girl. the monument is all painted and gilded.

After 1713. St Andrew's Church Denton. Monument to Richard Welby -1713. Sculpted by Thomas Green Sculptor 1659-1730. The fully wigged standing life sized figure of the deceased stands in an arched surround flanked by fluted Pilasters with acanthus scrolls and broken segmental pediment contaning a cherub and putti leaning down from heaven holding a metal coronet, surmounted by an achievement. Beneath is he inscription panel and to either side putti holding memento mori, and mourning, one with tears.
The inscription reads:
M.S.
Here are deposited the Remains of
RICHARD WELBY of Denton Esqr
Lord of the Mannours of Welby Streglethorp Saperton and
Swinsted and High Sheriff of the County of Lincoln 1705
A Gentleman of an ancient & Virtuous Family, a good Christian
a Loyal Subject, a true lover of the Church
a sincere Respector of its Clergy and
a daily Frequentor of its Worship
In His private Character, Modest, Humble and Courteous
of great Probity and universal Charity
The Poor lost in him a liberal and silent Benefactor
his Tenants, a forbearing Landlord;
his Servants, a kind and prudent master;
his Relations, an invaluable Friend;
his Children, a most indulgent Father and
his Mournfull Wife ye Best of Husbands.
He marry'd MARY Daughter & Sole Heiress of JOHN TOWERS of
the Isle of Ely Esqr, by whom he had Issue;
MARY Interred here, SELINA, WILLIAM and JOHN twins, ELEANOR & RICHARD
After a tedious Sickness, which he bore with exemplary patience
and resignation, he dyed on Easter day 1713
In hopes of a Joyfull Resurrection; & lament his loss
the Righteous shall be had in everlasting Remembrance
MARY his once happy Wife now Sorrowfull Relict
??????? her own Affection
Erected this Monument Dec 10 1714.

MARY WELBY
Ob June 8 1759
Ae 74

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Aedicule

After 21 Feb 1581. Church of St Peter and St Paul Exton. Monument to Robert Keilway 1497-1581. Elizabethan Period. This memorial is attributed by Pevsner to Nicholas Johnson and by others to Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647. Made of various marbles, a large standing wall monument of 1580, richly decorated and with a recumbant and kneeling figures of the whole family, in an aedicule, capped by obelisk, arms, etc.
The inscription reads "Here lies Robert Keylway a distinguished esquire among civilians (whilst he lived), renowned for talent, learning and virtue, who loved retirement, lived as a Christian and died in the Lord on the 21st of February 1581 in the year of our Salvation, 1580, and the 84th year of his age. He left Anne his sole heiress and only dearly loved daughter married to John Harrington of Exton, Knt, whom he had always affectionately loved as a son and friend, by which Anne the said John had during the life of the aforesaid Robert two children, a son, Kelwey, who died Dec. 2nd, 1570, 21 weeks old, and lies buried here with his grandfather, and also a daughter Lucy still surviving, and may God grant her a long life. To pay, therefore, a just tribute to so dear and affectionate a parent and to leave to posterity an evidence of their deep gratitude, the said John and Anne have raised this. Monument and dedicated to their father, Keylwey, and their son Keylwey (to their lasting memory if it so please God) and design it, if God will, as a sepulchre for themselves also".

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Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of John Harington 1st Baron Harington 1540-1613.Around 1606 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of Lucy Harrington Countess Bedford 1580-1627.Around 1615 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of Lucy Harrington Countess Bedford 1580-1627.Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Lucy Harrington Countess Bedford 1580-1627.1612. Studio of Isaac Oliver Painter 1565-1617. Miniature Portrait of (probably) Lucy Harrington Countess Bedford 1580-1627. Oliver painted the woman's pearl earrings using Nicholas Hilliard's jewelling technique, which involved laying a raised blob of white lead paint with some shadowing to one side. This form was then crowned with a rounded touch of real silver that was burnished with, to quote Hilliard, "a pretty little tooth of some ferret or stoat or other wild little beast." This technique brought the silver to a sparkling highlight, while actual gold is used to paint the pearl's gold setting. Silver tarnishes with age, therefore, the pearl earrings now appear black.

On 24 Jan 1592 James Harrington 1511-1592 (81) died. He was buried in the Church of St Peter and St Paul Exton. Monument to James Harrington 1511-1592 (81) and Lucy Sidney 1520-1591 (72). A large standing Elizabethan Period monument with 2 kneeling figures at a prie-dieu in a double aedicule. Wrought in various marbles and enriched with low-relief carving, strapwork etc. surmounted by obelisk, and arms. Stylistically similar to the monument to Robert Keilway. Possibly sculpted by Nicholas Johnson Sculptor -1624 or Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (5).

After 26 Jul 1723. Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. Monument to Robert Bertie 1st Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1660-1723 sculpted by Peter Scheemakers Sculptor 1691-1781 and Henry Cheere 1st Baronet Sculptor 1703-1781. A Classical Period with Corinthian Capitals supporting open dentilated pediment with garland, urns and putti. Before the Aedicule a rounded Pedestal supports a marble image of the deceased attired as a Roman General.

Gothic Aedicule

On 29 Dec 1828 Priscilla Barbara Elizabeth Bertie 21st Baroness Willoughby Eresby 1761-1828 (67) died. Her son Peter Drummond Burrell 2nd Baron Gwydyr 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1782-1865 (46) succeeded 22nd Baron Willoughby de Eresby. Clementina Sarah Drummond Baroness Gwydyr Baroness Willoughby Eresby 1786-1865 (42) by marriage Baroness Willoughby de Eresby.
Monument in St Mary's Church Swinstead sculpted by James Forsyth Sculptor 1828-1910 in 1883. An elaborate Gothic Aedicule of limestone. Above the Recessed inscription an achievement of arms of the Bertie's.

Around 1815. Sampson Towgood Roch Painter 1757-1847. Miniature portrait of Priscilla Barbara Elizabeth Bertie 21st Baroness Willoughby Eresby 1761-1828.

After 30 Jun 1842. St Chad's Church Longford. Monument to Thomas Coke 1st Earl of Leicester 1754-1842 made by Robert Hall of Derby Sculptor with bust by Joseph Francis of London Sculptor. Gothic Aedicule.

Around 1730 William Aikman Painter 1682-1731. Portrait of Thomas Coke 1st Earl of Leicester 1754-1842.

Baldaccchino

Baldaccchino. A canopy over an altar, tomb, or throne. The original meaning of ‘baldachin’ is a silk cloth from Baghdad (baldacco in Italian). A baldacchino is supported by columns and can be portable or fixed

After 29 Apr 1714. St Michael's Church Stowe Nine Churches. Monument to Thomas Turner 1645-1714. Sculpted by Thomas Stayner Sculptor 1665-1733. Baldaccchino. Drapery. Baroque. The figure on the left is Faith who holds a model of a circular church. The figure on the right is Thomas Turner 1645-1714. Segmental Pediment. Moulded Cornice.

Baroque

After 29 Apr 1714. St Michael's Church Stowe Nine Churches. Monument to Thomas Turner 1645-1714. Sculpted by Thomas Stayner Sculptor 1665-1733. Baldaccchino. Drapery. Baroque. The figure on the left is Faith who holds a model of a circular church. The figure on the right is Thomas Turner 1645-1714. Segmental Pediment. Moulded Cornice.

Canopy

Capitals and Columns

Cartouche

On 11 Sep 1617 Anthony Mildmay -1617 died. He was buried at the Church of St Leonard Church Apethorpe. His inscription reads ... Here sleepeth in the Lord with certaine hope of resurection Sr Antony Mildmay Knt eldet sonne to Sr Walter Mildmay Knt Chaunclor of the Exchequor. to Queene Elizabeth. He was Embassador from Queen Eliza: to the most Christian King of Fraunce Henry the 4th Ano. 1596; He was to Prince and Country faithful, and serviceable, in peace and warre, to freinds constant to enemies reconciliable. Bountiful and loved hospitality. He died September 11 1617.
On 27 Jul 1620 Grace Sharington 1552-1620 (68) died. She was buried at the Church of St Leonard Church Apethorpe. The inscription of her monument reads ... Here also lyeth Grace Ladie Mildmay the only wife of the saied Sr Antho: Mildmay one of the heyres of Sr Henry Sharington Knt: of Lacock in the County of Wiltes who lived 50 years maried to him and three years a widow after him. she was most devout, unspotedly chast mayd, wife, and widow, compassionate in heart, and charitably helpful with phisick, cloathes, nourishment, or counsels to any in misery, She was most careful and wise in managing worldly estate. So as her life was a blessing to hirs, and hir death she blessed them which hapned July 27 1620.
From RCHME Inventory. It is of grey veined and black marble and is partly gilded and painted. Two effigies lie on a black and white marble tomb chest beneath a baldachino consisting of a shallow dome with a cupola having round-headed openings in its drum, which give light to the interior. The baldachino is supported at each end by a rectangular pier onto which curtains, hanging from the architrave of the dome, are looped. Against the piers are standing figures representing the four Virtues, and the frieze is inscribed 'Devoute', 'Wise', 'Charitable' and 'Just'; the frieze is also inscribed 'Chaste' and 'Valiant'. The head of the figure representing Justice is modern. Seated on the cornice are smaller figures, on the E. of Faith and on the W. of Hope; on the cupola dome is a seated figure of Charity. Crowning the cornice are freestanding cartouches of arms of Mildmay (N.E. and S.E.) and Sherington (N.W. and S.W.). Against the cupola drum are shields of arms of Mildmay impaling Sherington, both quartered with alliances, and Mildmay quarterly. The W. pier of the baldachino is inscribed with a record of the setting up of the monument by Sir Francis Fane (37) in 1621. The tomb chest is enriched with emblems of mortality and eulogistically-phrased inscriptions record the lives of Sir Anthony on the S., and of Lady Grace on the N. The effigies lie on rush mats, he in Greenwich armour, she in full mantle, ruff and head-dress. The authorship of the monument is not known but the figures of the four Virtues are in the manner of Maximillian Colt (42) (cf. Cecil monument, Hatfield, Hertfordshire); the baldachino may be compared with that over the tomb of the Countess of Derby at Harefield, Middlesex, probably also by Colt (42).

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Around 1585. Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Miniature Portrait of Anthony Mildmay -1617. Hilliard represents Mildmay standing in a luxurious tent filled with beautiful furniture preparing for a tournament surrounded by objects that allow the artist to feature a variety of rich textures including red velvet, blue ostrich feathers, and gleaming metal.Before 11 Sep 1617. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Anthony Mildmay -1617 at Emmanuel College which father Anthony Mildmay -1617 founded.Around 1625 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of Francis Fane 1st Earl Westmoreland 1580-1629.

On 24 Mar 1619 Robert Rich 1st Earl Warwick 1559-1619 (59) died. His son Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658 (31) succeeded 2nd Earl Warwick 3C 1618, 4th Baron Rich Leez. Frances Hatton Countess Warwick 1590-1623 (29) by marriage Countess Warwick.
He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Elizabethan Recumbent. Unusual head and shoulder portrait sculpture of deceased full face, with a profile of his wife Frances Wray Countess Warwick -1634 behind, set in a circular medallion. To either side are pelleted Pilasters supporting an entablature with scrolled Cartouche of arms and flanked by heraldic supporters. The whole is painted and gilded and beneath is a panel containing an inscribed poem. Above his Arms implaled with hers. His are quartered 1&4 Rich 2&3 Baldry Arms (his mother), hers quartered 1&4 Wray 2&3 Unknown. the monument is perhaps the work of Epiphanius Evesham. Sculpted by Epiphanius Evesham Sculptor -1623.

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In 1631 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658.Around 1632 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658.In 1633 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658.Around 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658.

After 1627. Monument in the Church of St Leonard Church Apethorpe to John Leigh -1627. Descended from the Leigh family of Addington. Grateful for further information as to his descent; email@twentytrees.co.uk.
Black marble panel flanked by Ionic columns supporting a frieze enriched with fruit and flowers, and an inverted broken pediment on which rest a reclining figure and a cartouche of arms of Leigh quartered with others

On 14 Nov 1627 Elizabeth Waldegrave -1627 died. On 06 Dec 1629 Arthur Coke 1587-1629 (42) died in Bury St Edmunds. Jacobean Hooded Monument sculpted by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (40) in St Andrew's Church Bramfield. White and black marble; reclining effigy of Elizabeth with Arthur kneeling in prayer above within an arched Recess; Arms over the arch and surrounding it are seven Cartouches.

After 25 Jul 1666. Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. Monument to Montagu Bertie 2nd Earl Lindsey 1608-1666. Two adjacent memorial tablets have moulded base and cornice and are surmounted by the Cartouche of arms and the Ancaster cannon. To the sides are military trophies in high relief and at the base, arms, anchors and helms.[Source: BLB].

After 19 Jan 1686. Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. Monument to Richard Bertie 1635-1686. Large swagged and scrolled cartouche surmounted by an urn and cornucupia and bearing two scrolled inscription panels, a shield of arms with palms supported by two putti.[Source: BLB].

In 1708. Albemarle Bertie 1668-1742 (40) erected a monument to members of the Bertie Family in Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. A large, semi-circular headed Sideboard Tomb supporting a black Sarcophagus with gadrooned top and lions feet, erected 1738. Commemorates seven members of the Bertie family. The rear has a marble surround with egg and dart moulding and scrolled imposts with Cartouche of arms to the top. Within are seven classical busts, supported on moulded corbels.[Source: BLB].

On 25 Jun 1766 Elizabeth Lygon 1742-1766 (24) died of consumption. She was buried at St Andrew's Church Wimpole. White marble inscription scroll flanked by putti beneath a shaped cornice enriched with torches and an urn, and with apron framing a cartouche of arms

Caryatid

Around 1578. Church of the Holy Trinity Bosbury. Monument to Richard Harford died 1578.
Large recessed wall Elizabethan Period monument commemorating Richard Harford died 1578, his wife Martha and Anthony Harford, attributed improbably to John Guldo of Hereford Sculptor, caryatid-type figures possibly Adam and Eve flank central semi-circular headed arched recess with segmental pediment. Two recumbent effigies, male and female in civil costume on sarcophagus supported by two grotesque animals, the whole enriched with foliage and flock motifs and rather more primitive in style than John Harford memorial on opposite wall.

Before 1736. Monument to Anne Brudenell (wife of Charles Lennox) in St Peter's Church Deene by Giovanni Battista Guelphi 1690-1736 on the west wall of the transept. Bust set against square surround with flanking caryatids, metope frieze and pediment over.

Cherubs

Around 1624. St Mary's Church Preston on Stour. Monument to Nicholas Stour and his two wives. Said to have been brought from St Mary's Chapel Islington, by the patron: bracketed shelf with kneeling figures, of front-facing man in armour with flanking women in profile, four Corinthian Columns of touch; entablature with armorial bearing and Cherubs holding skulls.

After 1702. Monument to Richard Francis Shireburn 1693-1702. Church of All Hallows Great Mitton. Sculpted by William Stanton Sculptor 1639-1705. Figure of boy against Reredos background, with Cherubs commissioned by Isabel Ingleby 1627-1693.

After 1708. All Saints Church Maiden Bradley. Monument to Edward Seymour 4th Baronet Seymour 1633-1708. Sculpted by John Michael Rysbrack 1694-1770; white marble reclining figure in front of tablet with pediment with cherubs, scrolled pediment with arms over. Powdered Wig. Heeled Shoes. Buckled Shoes.

In 1753 Andrea Soldi Painter 1703-1771. Portrait of John Michael Rysbrack 1694-1770.In 1728 John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of John Michael Rysbrack 1694-1770.

After 1713. St Andrew's Church Denton. Monument to Richard Welby -1713. Sculpted by Thomas Green Sculptor 1659-1730. The fully wigged standing life sized figure of the deceased stands in an arched surround flanked by fluted Pilasters with acanthus scrolls and broken segmental pediment contaning a cherub and putti leaning down from heaven holding a metal coronet, surmounted by an achievement. Beneath is he inscription panel and to either side putti holding memento mori, and mourning, one with tears.
The inscription reads:
M.S.
Here are deposited the Remains of
RICHARD WELBY of Denton Esqr
Lord of the Mannours of Welby Streglethorp Saperton and
Swinsted and High Sheriff of the County of Lincoln 1705
A Gentleman of an ancient & Virtuous Family, a good Christian
a Loyal Subject, a true lover of the Church
a sincere Respector of its Clergy and
a daily Frequentor of its Worship
In His private Character, Modest, Humble and Courteous
of great Probity and universal Charity
The Poor lost in him a liberal and silent Benefactor
his Tenants, a forbearing Landlord;
his Servants, a kind and prudent master;
his Relations, an invaluable Friend;
his Children, a most indulgent Father and
his Mournfull Wife ye Best of Husbands.
He marry'd MARY Daughter & Sole Heiress of JOHN TOWERS of
the Isle of Ely Esqr, by whom he had Issue;
MARY Interred here, SELINA, WILLIAM and JOHN twins, ELEANOR & RICHARD
After a tedious Sickness, which he bore with exemplary patience
and resignation, he dyed on Easter day 1713
In hopes of a Joyfull Resurrection; & lament his loss
the Righteous shall be had in everlasting Remembrance
MARY his once happy Wife now Sorrowfull Relict
??????? her own Affection
Erected this Monument Dec 10 1714.

MARY WELBY
Ob June 8 1759
Ae 74

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After 1738. Monument to Joseph Ashley -1738 in Saint Leodegarius Church Ashby St Ledgers. Grey and white marble architectural wall tablet with Pediment and winged Cherubs heads below. Signed by Nathaniel Hedges Sculptor 1749-1784.

Chrisom Child

Around 1450. Church of St John The Baptist Kinlet. Monument to unknown woman with Chrisom Child.

On 25 Jun 1601 Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (45) died at Berwick on Tweed. His son Robert Bertie 1582 1642 (18) succeeded 14th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. He was buried at St James' Church Spilsby.
On 15 Feb 1610 Catherine Bertie 1595-1610 (15) died in childbirth. She was buried at St James' Church Spilsby.
Monument Elizabethan Recumbent. Tall Sideboard Tomb with reclining hooded figure of Lady Katherine, daughter of Peregrine, with Chrisom Child in the crib at her feet. Above a standing figure of Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (45) in a niche, with strapwork embellishments, all supported on composite columns with a dentilated cornice.

Around 1597 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601.Before 27 Jun 1641 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Robert Bertie 1582 1642.

After 1607. Monument to father, son and daughter-in-law in Church of St Oswald Methley to (right) John Savile 1545-1607, (middle) Henry Savile 1st Baronet 1579-1632 and (right) Mary Dent. Probably sculpted by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647. Chrisom Child. Ruff.

On 07 Aug 1616 William Savage 1554-1616 (62) died. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Elmley.
On 31 Jan 1631 Giles Savage 1585-1631 (46) died. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Elmley.
On 11 Jun 1674 Katherine Dalston 1590-1674 (84) died (she the wife of Giles Savage 1585-1631 (31)) at Elmley Castle. She was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Elmley.
Alabaster table tomb with Father, Son and Daughter-in-Law. She holding a Chrisom Child probably representing stillborn, or died soon after birth. At their feet two lions and what is described as a stag with an arrow through its neck.

On 17 Jan 1625 Henry Sacheverell 1566-1625 (59) died. He was buried at Holy Trinity Church Ratcliffe on Soar.
Dutch School mural monument with his three wives (Marie Giddings -1600 wearing Bongrace, Elizabeth Copley -1616 and Lucie Boughton 1570-1625 (55)) above and he recumbent. Below effigies of children including Chrisom Child. Possibly Jasper Hollemans Sculptor or Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (38).

After 15 Aug 1625. St Oswald's Church Malpas. Monument to Hugh "The Younger" Cholmondeley 1552-1601 and Mary Holford 1562-1625. Jacobean Period. She wearing a Bongrace. Chrisom Child.

On 22 May 1653 unamed child was born to Charles Paulet 1st Duke Bolton 1630-1699 (23) and Christian Freschville 1633-1653 (19). She died in childbirth. The child died seven days later on 29 May 1653. Both were buried at the Church of St John the Baptist Staveley. Monument erected by her husband Charles Paulet 1st Duke Bolton 1630-1699 (23) the future Duke Bolton. Reclining figure with Chrisom Child.
Armorials...
Top Middle Paulet differenced with a label argent three points impaled Freschville.
Top Left: His Arms, in sixths 1 Paulet 2 Possibly Seymour although wings should be Or 3 Unknown Arms 4 Unknown Arms 5 Unknown Arms 6 St John with a label argent three points to reflect his status as son of the current owner of the Arms.
Top Right: Her Arms, in sixths 1 Freschville 2 Unknown Arms 3 Unknown Arms 4 Unknown Arms 5 Unknown Arms 6 Harrington.

Cornucopia

On 30 Jun 1753 George Strode of Parnham -1753 died. On 14 Sep 1746 Catherine Brodrepp -1746 died. Monument in Church of St Mary Beaminster. Classical Period.
Probably by Peter Scheemakers Sculptor 1691-1781 (62), erected by Thomas Strode, brother of George, with reclining figures of a man and woman on a sarcophagus and on either side standing allegorical figures one with a cornucopia the other an anchor, above is an achievement-of-arms.

On 17 Sep 1766 Lieutenant-General Bennett Noel 1715-1766 (51) died. He was buried at the Church of St Peter and St Paul Exton. After 07 Apr 1784 Elizabeth Adams 1715-1784 (69) was buried with her husband.
Monument sculpted by Joseph Nollekens Sculptor 1737-1823 (29). A reclining female figure with a cornucopia, on a sarcophagus backed by an obelisk with medallions and putti.

Crocketed

In 1406 John Curzon -1406 died. Monument in All Saints Church Kedleston. Fluted Period. Lancastrian Esses Collar. Reset in tomb recess with depressed crocketed and pinnacled ogee arch, with shields above.

After 29 Jul 1509. St Mary the Virgin Church Chipping Norton. Monument to Richard "The Elder" Croft -1509 and Eleanor Cornwall 1428-1519. Finely made in alabaster. Fluted Period. Two complete effigies,still Gothic in line and detail, on a crocketed niched chest with angels and shields. Chunky Lions Mane. Chest with Weepers. Chest with Angels with Rounded Wings holding Shields. Gabled Headress with Lappets.

On 13 Mar 1518 Thomas Babington 1449-1518 (69) died at Ashover. He was buried at All Saints Church Ashover.
Monument to Thomas Babington 1449-1518 (69) and Editha Fitzherbert 1457-1511 (61). Excellent painted alabaster. Monument of the Tudor Period with the colours much refreshed. He in civilian clothes with a purse (aka scrip aka gypciere) hanging from his belt. Dogs chewing at her dress. Gabled Headress. The chest tomb of exceptional quality with the fifteen weepers under Crocketed canopies broadly undamaged. The weepers are believed to represent Thomas and Editha's children and their respective spouses. The chest tomb now abuts the south wall of the chancel meaning only three sides visible. Carved by Harpur and Moorecock of Burton on Trent. Babington impaled Fitzherbert. Chest with Angels with Rounded Wings.

Cornice

Drapery

After 29 Apr 1714. St Michael's Church Stowe Nine Churches. Monument to Thomas Turner 1645-1714. Sculpted by Thomas Stayner Sculptor 1665-1733. Baldaccchino. Drapery. Baroque. The figure on the left is Faith who holds a model of a circular church. The figure on the right is Thomas Turner 1645-1714. Segmental Pediment. Moulded Cornice.

Egg and Dart

On 29 Aug 1582 Thomas St Paul -1582 died. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Monument to Thomas St Paul -1582 and Faith Grantham. Fine freestanding tomb chest with canopy. The sides of the tomb chest have acanthus Pilasters, the panels between contain wreathed shields. The full length recumbent albaster effigies show the man in full plate armour holding sword and prayerbook, head on helm, feet on a cushion with flowers. His wife is in a long dress with cloak and close fitting hat, holding a bible. The inscription runs round the top edge of the chest. The canopy is supported on six pillars, those at the angles being circular and bulbous, the others in the form of obelisks decorated with fishscale Paterae, with elaborate Ionic Capitals with roses in the necking. The entablature has an egg and dart frieze. Above the heads of the columns are five female and one male weepers. At the centre of the canopy is a raised altar bearing shields and surmounted by the kneeling figure of the heir clad in armour. In front kneels a larger figure of a girl. the monument is all painted and gilded.

In 1708. Albemarle Bertie 1668-1742 (40) erected a monument to members of the Bertie Family in Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. A large, semi-circular headed Sideboard Tomb supporting a black Sarcophagus with gadrooned top and lions feet, erected 1738. Commemorates seven members of the Bertie family. The rear has a marble surround with egg and dart moulding and scrolled imposts with Cartouche of arms to the top. Within are seven classical busts, supported on moulded corbels.[Source: BLB].

St Andrew's Church Denton. In ashlar. The latin raised letter inscription is set in an egg and dart surround, flanked by Ionic Pilasters and free standing Composite fluted columns, supporting a pediment containing a pair of naked female figures holding hour glasses leaning on a skull. The frieze is decorated with medallions. The reclining figure of the deceased, his prayer book in hand, lies on a half rolled up mattress on a tomb chest on which are portrayed his wife and six children, all named in raised letters.

Entablature

On 29 Aug 1582 Thomas St Paul -1582 died. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Monument to Thomas St Paul -1582 and Faith Grantham. Fine freestanding tomb chest with canopy. The sides of the tomb chest have acanthus Pilasters, the panels between contain wreathed shields. The full length recumbent albaster effigies show the man in full plate armour holding sword and prayerbook, head on helm, feet on a cushion with flowers. His wife is in a long dress with cloak and close fitting hat, holding a bible. The inscription runs round the top edge of the chest. The canopy is supported on six pillars, those at the angles being circular and bulbous, the others in the form of obelisks decorated with fishscale Paterae, with elaborate Ionic Capitals with roses in the necking. The entablature has an egg and dart frieze. Above the heads of the columns are five female and one male weepers. At the centre of the canopy is a raised altar bearing shields and surmounted by the kneeling figure of the heir clad in armour. In front kneels a larger figure of a girl. the monument is all painted and gilded.

On 28 Oct 1613 George St Paul Baronet St Paul 1562-1613 (51) died. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Monument to George St Paul Baronet St Paul 1562-1613 (51) and Frances Wray Countess Warwick -1634. Elizabethan Recumbent. A base supporting the reclining figures of the deceased with composite Pillars supporting an entablature and armorial termination. In the base is a central semi-circular niche containing a carving of the deceased's daughter, flanked by niches containing mourning putti. Above on the lower step is a figure of Frances in full mourning dress with formal Ruff and hat, reclining on a cushion holding a prayer book. On the upper step he reclines in plate armour with a sword. The figures are contained in a semi-circular headed Recess with roses in the archivolt and on the back wall is an inscribed rectangular panel with scrolls and memento mori. The Pillars to either side support a frieze and entablature from which rise flaming urns and at the angles, and at the centre is a raised achievement of arms flanked by scrolled shields and obelisks. Possibly sculpted by Cornelius Cure Sculptor -1607.

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On 24 Mar 1619 Robert Rich 1st Earl Warwick 1559-1619 (59) died. His son Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658 (31) succeeded 2nd Earl Warwick 3C 1618, 4th Baron Rich Leez. Frances Hatton Countess Warwick 1590-1623 (29) by marriage Countess Warwick.
He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Elizabethan Recumbent. Unusual head and shoulder portrait sculpture of deceased full face, with a profile of his wife Frances Wray Countess Warwick -1634 behind, set in a circular medallion. To either side are pelleted Pilasters supporting an entablature with scrolled Cartouche of arms and flanked by heraldic supporters. The whole is painted and gilded and beneath is a panel containing an inscribed poem. Above his Arms implaled with hers. His are quartered 1&4 Rich 2&3 Baldry Arms (his mother), hers quartered 1&4 Wray 2&3 Unknown. the monument is perhaps the work of Epiphanius Evesham. Sculpted by Epiphanius Evesham Sculptor -1623.

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Around 1624. St Mary's Church Preston on Stour. Monument to Nicholas Stour and his two wives. Said to have been brought from St Mary's Chapel Islington, by the patron: bracketed shelf with kneeling figures, of front-facing man in armour with flanking women in profile, four Corinthian Columns of touch; entablature with armorial bearing and Cherubs holding skulls.

On 03 Sep 1634 Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634 (82) died. Monument in Church of St Mary the Virgin Tittleshall. Simple sarcophagus on pedestal with lying effigy. Pair of flanking Tuscan columns supporting a full entablature with putti on frieze and broken segmental pediment. Carved and painted achievement in and above tympanum flanked by four reclining figures of the Virtues on pediment extrados.
Above. Quarterly of eight: Coke, Crispin, Folkard, Sparham, Nerford, Yarmouth, Knightley and Pawe. The crest is broken. Farrer says it was: On a chapeau Azure, turned up Ermine, an ostrich Argent, holding in its mouth a horseshoe Or. The motto reads Prudens qui Patiens.
The effigy was carved by John Hargrave, the rest of the memorial was made by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (47).
Below the effigy are three shields. Left Coke implaling Paston. His first wife Bridget Paston -1598. Middle Coke. Right Coke impaling Cecil; his second wife Elizabeth Cecil Countess Berkshire 1596-1672 (38).

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Before 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634.1593. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634.

Festoon

John Evelyn's Diary 17 November 1644. 17 Nov 1644. I walked to Villa Borghese, a house and ample garden on Mons Pincius, yet somewhat without the city walls, circumscribed by another wall full of small turrets and banqueting-houses; which makes it appear at a distance like a little town. Within it is an elysium of delight, having in the centre of it a noble palace; but the entrance of the garden presents us with a very glorious fabric, or rather door-case, adorned with divers excellent marble statues. This garden abounded with all sorts of delicious fruit and exotic simples, fountains of sundry inventions, groves, and small rivulets. There is also adjoining to it a vivarium for ostriches, peacocks, swans, cranes, etc., and divers strange beasts, deer, and hares. The grotto is very rare, and represents, among other devices, artificial rain, and sundry shapes of vessels, flowers, etc.; which is effected by changing the heads of the fountains. The groves are of cypress, laurel, pine, myrtle, and olive. The four sphinxes are very antique, and worthy observation. To this is a volary, full of curious birds. The house is square with turrets, from which the prospect is excellent toward Rome, and the environing hills, covered as they now are with snow, which indeed commonly continues even a great part of the summer, affording sweet refreshment. Round the house is a baluster of white marble, with frequent jettos of water, and adorned with a multitude of statues. The walls of the house are covered with antique incrustations of history, as that of Curtius, the Rape of Europa, Leda, etc. The cornices above consist of fruitages and festoons, between which are niches furnished with statues, which order is observed to the very roof. In the lodge, at the entry, are divers good statues of Consuls, etc., with two pieces of field artillery upon carriages, (a mode much practiced in Italy before the great men's houses) which they look on as a piece of state more than defense. In the first hall within, are the twelve Roman Emperors, of excellent marble; between them stand porphyry columns, and other precious stones of vast height and magnitude, with urns of oriental alabaster. Tables of pietra-commessa: and here is that renowned Diana which Pompey worshiped, of eastern marble: the most incomparable Seneca of touch, bleeding in an huge vase of porphyry, resembling the drops of his blood; the so famous Gladiator, and the Hermaphrodite upon a quilt of stone. The new piece of Daphne, and David, of Cavaliero Bernini, is observable for the pure whiteness of the stone, and the art of the statuary plainly stupendous. There is a multitude of rare pictures of infinite value, by the best masters; huge tables of porphyry, and two exquisitely wrought vases of the same. In another chamber, are divers sorts of instruments of music: among other toys that of a satyr, which so artificially expressed a human voice, with the motion of eyes and head, that it might easily afright one who was not prepared for that most extravagant sight. They showed us also a chair that catches fast any one who sits down in it, so as not to be able to stir out, by certain springs concealed in the arms and back thereof, which at sitting down surprises a man on the sudden, locking him in by the arms and thighs, after a true treacherous Italian guise. The perspective is also considerable, composed by the position of looking-glasses, which render a strange multiplication of things resembling divers most richly furnished rooms. Here stands a rare clock of German work; in a word, nothing but what is magnificent is to be seen in this Paradise.
The next day, I went to the Vatican, where, in the morning, I saw the ceremony of Pamfilio, the Pope's nephew, receiving a Cardinal's hat; this was the first time I had seen his Holiness in pontificalibus. After the Cardinals and Princes had met in the consistory, the ceremony was in the Pope's chapel, where he was at the altar invested with most pompous rites.

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John Evelyn's Diary 29 January 1645. 29 Jan 1645. We descried Mount Cæcubus, famous for the generous wine it heretofore produced, and so rode onward the Appian Way, beset with myrtles, lentiscuses, bays, pomegranates, and whole groves of orange trees, and most delicious shrubs, till we came to Formiana [Formiæ], where they showed us Cicero's tomb, standing in an olive grove, now a rude heap of stones without form or beauty; for here that incomparable orator was murdered. I shall never forget how exceedingly I was delighted with the sweetness of this passage, the sepulchre mixed among all sorts of verdure; besides being now come within sight of the noble city, Cajeta [Gaieta], which gives a surprising prospect along the Tyrrhene Sea, in manner of a theater: and here we beheld that strangely cleft rock, a frightful spectacle, which they say happened upon the passion of our Blessed Savior; but the haste of our procaccio did not suffer us to dwell so long on these objects and the many antiquities of this town as we desired.
At Formi, we saw Cicero's grot; dining at Mola, and passing Sinuessa, Garigliano (once the city Mintern), and beheld the ruins of that vast amphitheater and aqueduct yet standing; the river Liris, which bounded the old Latium, Falernus, or Mons Massacus, celebrated for its wine, now named Garo; and this night we lodged at a little village called St. Agatha, in the Falernian Fields, near to Aurunca and Sessa.
The next day, having passed [the river] Vulturnus, we come by the Torre di Francolisi, where Hannibal, in danger from Fabius Maximus, escaped by debauching his enemies; and so at last we entered the most pleasant plains of Campania, now called Terra di Lavoro; in very truth, I think, the most fertile spot that ever the sun shone upon. Here we saw the slender ruins of the once mighty Capua, contending at once both with Rome and Carthage, for splendor and empire, now nothing but a heap of rubbish, except showing some vestige of its former magnificence in pieces of temples, arches, theatres, columns, ports, vaults, colosses, etc., confounded together by the barbarous Goths and Longobards; there is, however, a new city, nearer to the road by two miles, fairly raised out of these heaps. The passage from this town to Naples (which is about ten or twelve English post miles) is as straight as a line, of great breadth, fuller of travelers than I remember any of our greatest and most frequented roads near London; but, what is extremely pleasing, is the great fertility of the fields, planted with fruit trees, whose boles are serpented with excellent vines, and they so exuberant, that it is commonly reported one vine will load five mules with its grapes. What adds much to the pleasure of the sight is, that the vines, climbing to the summit of the trees, reach in festoons and fruitages from one tree to another, planted at exact distances, forming a more delightful picture than painting can describe. Here grow rice, canes for sugar, olives, pomegranates, mulberries, citrons, oranges, figs, and other sorts of rare fruits. About the middle of the way is the town Aversa, whither came three or four coaches to meet our lady travelers, of whom we now took leave, having been very merry by the way with them and the capitáno, their gallant.

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John Evelyn's Diary 17 April 1645. 17 Apr 1645. Monday, we went to hear music in the Chiesa Nova; and, though there were abundance of ceremonies at the other great churches, and great exposure of relics, yet being wearied with sights of this nature, and the season of the year, summer, at Rome being very dangerous, by reason of the heat minding us of returning northward, we spent the rest of our time in visiting such places as we had not yet sufficiently seen. Only I do not forget the Pope's benediction of the Gonfalone, or Standard, and giving the hallowed palms; and, on May Day, the great procession of the University and the muleteers at St. Anthony's, and their setting up a foolish May pole in the Capitol, very ridiculous. We therefore now took coach a little out of town, to visit the famous Roma Soterránea, being much like what we had seen at St. Sebastians. Here, in a cornfield, guided by two torches, we crept on our bellies into a little hole, about twenty paces, which delivered us into a large entry that led us into several streets, or alleys, a good depth in the bowels of the earth, a strange and fearful passage for divers miles, as Bosio has measured and described them in his book. We ever and anon came into pretty square rooms, that seemed to be chapels with altars, and some adorned with very ordinary ancient painting. Many skeletons and bodies are placed on the sides one above the other in degrees like shelves, whereof some are shut up with a coarse flat stone, having engraven on them Pro Christo, or a cross and palms, which are supposed to have been martyrs. Here, in all likelihood, were the meetings of the Primitive Christians during the persecutions, as Pliny the Younger describes them. As I was prying about, I found a glass phial, filled (as was conjectured) with dried blood, and two lachrymatories. Many of the bodies, or rather bones (for there appeared nothing else) lay so entire, as if placed by the art of the chirurgeon, but being only touched fell all to dust. Thus, after wandering two or three miles in this subterranean meander, we returned almost blind when we came into the daylight, and even choked by the smoke of the torches. It is said that a French bishop and his retinue adventuring too far into these dens, their lights going out, were never heard of more.
We were entertained at night with an English play at the Jesuits', where we before had dined; and the next day at Prince Galicano's, who himself composed the music to a magnificent opera, where were present Cardinal Pamphilio, the Pope's nephew, the Governors of Rome, the cardinals, the ambassadors, ladies, and a number of nobility and strangers. There had been in the morning a joust and tournament of several young gentlemen on a formal defy, to which we had been invited; the prizes being distributed by the ladies, after the knight-errantry way. The lancers and swordsmen running at tilt against the barriers, with a great deal of clatter, but without any bloodshed, giving much diversion to the spectators, and was new to us travelers.
The next day Mr. Henshaw and I spent the morning in attending the entrance and cavalcade of Cardinal Medici, the ambassador from the Grand Duke of Florence, by the Via Flaminia. After dinner, we went again to the Villa Borghese, about a mile without the city; the garden is rather a park, or a Paradise, contrived and planted with walks and shades of myrtles, cypress, and other trees, and groves, with abundance of fountains, statues, and bass-relievos, and several pretty murmuring rivulets. Here they had hung large nets to catch woodcocks. There was also a vivary, where, among other exotic fowls, was an ostrich; besides a most capacious aviary; and, in another inclosed part, a herd of deer. Before the palace (which might become the court of a great prince) stands a noble fountain, of white marble, enriched with statues. The outer walls of the house are encrusted with excellent antique bass-relievos, of the same marble, incornished with festoons and niches set with statues from the foundation to the roof. A stately portico joins the palace, full of statues and columns of marble, urns, and other curiosities of sculpture. In the first hall were the Twelve Cæsars, of antique marble, and the whole apartments furnished with pictures of the most celebrated masters, and two rare tables of porphyry, of great value. But of this already: for I often visited this delicious place.
This night were glorious fire-works at the palace of Cardinal Medici before the gate, and lights of several colors all about the windows through the city, which they contrive by setting the candles in little paper lanterns dyed with various colors, placing hundreds of them from story to story; which renders a gallant show.

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John Evelyn's Diary 21 May 1645. 21 May 1645. We dined at Sienna, where we could not pass admiring the great church built entirely both within and without with white and black marble in polished squares, by Macarino, showing so beautiful after a shower has fallen. The floor within is of various colored marbles, representing the story of both Testaments, admirably wrought. Here lies Pius II The bibliotéca is painted by P. Perrugino and Raphael. The life of Æneas Sylvius is in FRESCO; in the middle are the Three Graces, in antique marble, very curious, and the front of this building, though Gothic, is yet very fine. Among other things, they show St. Catharine's disciplining cell, the door whereof is half cut out into chips by the pilgrims and devotees, being of deal wood.
Setting out hence for Pisa, we went again to see the Duomo in which the Emperor Henry VII. lies buried, poisoned by a monk in the Eucharist. The bending tower was built by Busqueto Delichio, a Grecian architect, and is a stupendous piece of art. In the gallery of curiosities is a fair mummy; the tail of a sea-horse; coral growing on a man's skull; a chariot automaton; two pieces of rock crystal, in one of which is a drop of water, in the other three or four small worms; two embalmed children; divers petrifactions, etc. The garden of simples is well furnished, and has in it the deadly yew, or taxus, of the ancients; which Dr. Belluccio, the superintendent, affirms that his workmen cannot endure to clip for above the space of half an hour at a time, from the pain of the head which surprises them.
We went hence from Leghorn, by coach, where I took up ninety crowns for the rest of my journey, with letters of credit for Venice, after I had sufficiently complained of my defeat of correspondence at Rome.
The next day, I came to Lucca, a small but pretty territory and state of itself. The city is neat and well fortified, with noble and pleasant walks of trees on the works, where the gentry and ladies used to take the air. It is situate on an ample plain by the river Serchio, yet the country about it is hilly. The Senate-house is magnificent. The church of St. Michael is a noble piece, as is also St. Fredian, more remarkable to us for the corpse of St. Richard, an English king, who died here on his pilgrimage toward Rome. This epitaph is on his tomb:
Hic rex Richardus requiescit, sceptifer, almus;.
Rex Fuit Anglorum; regnum tenet iste Polorum.
Regnum demisit; pro Christo cuncta reliquit.
Ergo, Richardum nobis debit Anglia sanctum.
Hic genitor Sanctæ Wulburgæ Virginis almæ.
Est Vrillebaldi sancti simul et Vinebaldi,.
Suffragium quorum nobis det regna Polorum.
Next this, we visited St. Croce, an excellent structure all of marble both without and within, and so adorned as may vie with many of the fairest even in Rome: witness the huge cross, valued at £15,000, above all venerable for that sacred volto which (as tradition goes) was miraculously put on the image of Christ, and made by Nicodemus, while the artist, finishing the rest of the body, was meditating what face to set on it. The inhabitants are exceedingly civil to strangers, above all places in Italy, and they speak the purest Italian. It is also cheap living, which causes travelers to set up their rest here more than in Florence, though a more celebrated city; besides, the ladies here are very conversable, and the religious women not at all reserved; of these we bought gloves and embroidered stomachers, generally worn by gentlemen in these countries. The circuit of this state is but two easy days' journey, and lies mixed with the Duke of Tuscany's but having Spain for a protector (though the least bigoted of all Roman Catholics), and being one of the fortified cities in Italy, it remains in peace. The whole country abounds in excellent olives, etc.
Going hence for Florence, we dined at Pistoria, where, besides one church, there was little observable: only in the highway we crossed a rivulet of salt water, though many miles from the sea. The country is extremely pleasant, full of gardens, and the roads straight as a line for the best part of that whole day, the hedges planted with trees at equal distances, watered with clear and plentiful streams.
Rising early the next morning we arrived at Peggio Imperiale, being a palace of the Great Duke, not far from the city, having omitted it in my passage to Rome. The ascent to the house is by a stately gallery as it were of tall and overgrown cypress trees for near half a mile. At the entrance of these ranges, are placed statues of the Tiber and Arno, of marble; those also of Virgil, Ovid, Petrarch, and Dante. The building is sumptuous, and curiously furnished within with cabinets of pietra-commessa in tables, pavements, etc., which is a magnificence, or work, particularly affected at Florence. The pictures are, Adam and Eve by Albert Durer, very excellent; as is that piece of carving in wood by the same hand standing in a cupboard. Here is painted the whole Austrian line; the Duke's mother, sister to the Emperor, the foundress of this palace, than which there is none in Italy that I had seen more magnificently adorned, or furnished.
We could not omit in our passage to re-visit the same, and other curiosities which we had neglected on our first being at Florence. We went, therefore, to see the famous piece of Andrea del Sarto, in the Annunciata. The story is, that the painter in a time of dearth borrowed a sack of corn of the religious of that convent, and repayment being demanded, he wrought it out in this picture, which represents Joseph sitting on a sack of corn, and reading to the Blessed Virgin; a piece infinitely valued. There fell down in the cloister an old man's face painted on the wall in fresco, greatly esteemed, and broke into crumbs; the Duke sent his best painters to make another instead of it, but none of them would presume to touch a pencil where Andrea had wrought, like another Apelles; but one of them was so industrious and patient, that, picking up the fragments, he laid and fastened them so artificially together, that the injury it had received was hardly discernible. Andrea del Sarto lies buried in the same place. Here is also that picture of Bartolomeo, who having spent his utmost skill in the face of the angel Gabriel, and being troubled that he could not exceed it in the Virgin, he began the body and to finish the clothes, and so left it, minding in the morning to work on the face; but, when he came, no sooner had he drawn away the cloth that was hung before it to preserve it from the dust, than an admirable and ravishing face was found ready painted; at which miracle all the city came in to worship. It is now kept in the Chapel of the Salutation, a place so enriched by devotees, that none in Italy, save Loretto, is said to exceed it. This picture is always covered with three shutters, one of which is of massy silver; methinks it is very brown, the forehead and cheeks whiter, as if it had been scraped. They report that those who have the honor of seeing it never lose their sight—happy then we! Belonging to this church is a world of plate, some whole statues of it, and lamps innumerable, besides the costly vows hung up, some of gold, and a cabinet of precious stones.
Visiting the Duke's repository again, we told at least forty ranks of porphyry and other statues, and twenty-eight whole figures, many rare paintings and relievos, two square columns with trophies. In one of the galleries, twenty-four figures, and fifty antique heads; a Bacchus of M. Angelo, and one of Bandinelli; a head of Bernini, and a most lovely Cupid, of Parian marble; at the further end, two admirable women sitting, and a man fighting with a centaur; three figures in little of Andrea; a huge candlestick of amber; a table of Titian's painting, and another representing God the Father sitting in the air on the Four Evangelists; animals; divers smaller pieces of Raphael; a piece of pure virgin gold, as big as an egg. In the third chamber of rarities is the square cabinet, valued at 80,000 crowns, showing on every front, a variety of curious work; one of birds and flowers, of pietra-commessa; one, a descent from the cross, of M. Angelo; on the third, our Blessed Savior and the Apostles, of amber; and, on the fourth, a crucifix of the same. Between the pictures, two naked Venuses, by Titian; Adam and Eve, by Durer; and several pieces of Portdenone, and del Frate. There is a globe of six feet diameter. In the Armory, were an entire elk, a crocodile, and among the harness, several targets and antique horse-arms, as that of Charles V.; two set with turquoises, and other precious stones; a horse's tail, of a wonderful length. Then, passing the Old Palace, which has a very great hall for feasts and comedies, the roof rarely painted, and the side walls with six very large pictures representing battles, the work of Gio. Vassari. Here is a magazine full of plate; a harness of emeralds; the furnitures of an altar four feet high, and six in length, of massy gold; in the middle is placed the statue of Cosmo II, the bass-relievo is of precious stones, his breeches covered with diamonds; the moldings of this statue, and other ornaments, festoons, etc., are garnished with jewels and great pearls, dedicated to St. Charles, with this inscription, in rubies:
Cosimus Secundus Dei gratiâ Magnus Dux Etruriæ ex voto.
There is also a King on horseback, of massy gold, two feet high, and an infinity of such like rarities. Looking at the Justice, in copper, set up on a column by Cosmo, in 1555, after the victory over Sienna, we were told that the Duke, asking a gentleman how he liked the piece, he answered, that he liked it very well, but that it stood too high for poor men to come at it.
Prince Leopold has, in this city, a very excellent collection of paintings, especially a St. Catherine of P. Veronese; a Venus of marble, veiled from the middle to the feet, esteemed to be of that Greek workman who made the Venus at the Medici's Palace in Rome, altogether as good, and better preserved, an inestimable statue, not long since found about Bologna.
Signor Gaddi is a lettered person, and has divers rarities, statues, and pictures of the best masters, and one bust of marble as much esteemed as the most antique in Italy, and many curious manuscripts; his best paintings are, a Virgin of del Sarto, mentioned by Vassari, a St. John, by Raphael, and an Ecce Homo, by Titian.
The hall of the Academy de la Crusca is hung about with impresses and devices painted, all of them relating to corn sifted from the bran; the seats are made like breadbaskets and other rustic instruments used about wheat, and the cushions of satin, like sacks.
We took our farewell of St. Laurence, more particularly noticing that piece of the Resurrection, which consists of a prodigious number of naked figures, the work of Pontormo. On the left hand is the Martyrdom of St. Laurence, by Bronzino, rarely painted indeed. In a chapel is the tomb of Pietro di Medici, and his brother John, of copper, excellently designed, standing on two lions' feet, which end in foliage, the work of M. Angelo. Over against this, are sepulchres of all the ducal family. The altar has a statue of the Virgin giving suck, and two Apostles. Paulus Jovius has the honor to be buried in the cloister. Behind the choir is the superb chapel of Ferdinand I., consisting of eight faces, four plain, four a little hollowed; in the other are to be the sepulchres, and a niche of paragon, for the statue of the prince now living, all of copper gilt; above, is a large table of porphyry, for an inscription for the Duke, in letters of jasper. The whole chapel, walls, pavement, and roof, are full of precious stones united with the moldings, which are also of gilded copper, and so are the bases and capitals of the columns. The tabernacle, with the whole altar, is inlaid with cornelians, lazuli, serpentine, agates, onyxes, etc. On the other side are six very large columns of rock crystal, eight figures of precious stones of several colors, inlaid in natural figures, not inferior to the best paintings, among which are many pearls, diamonds, amethysts, topazes, sumptuous and sparkling beyond description. The windows without side are of white marble. The library is the architecture of Raphael; before the port is a square vestibule of excellent art, of all the orders, without confusion; the ascent to it from the library is excellent. We numbered eighty-eight shelves, all MSS. and bound in red, chained; in all about 3,500 volumes, as they told us.
The Arsenal has sufficient to arm 70,000 men, accurately preserved and kept, with divers lusty pieces of ordnance, whereof one is for a ball of 300 pounds weight, and another for 160, which weighs 72,500 pounds.
When I was at Florence, the celebrated masters were: for pietra-commessa (a kind of mosaic, or inlaying, of various colored marble, and other more precious stones), Dominico Benetti and Mazotti; the best statuary, Vincentio Brochi. This statuary makes those small figures in plaster and pasteboard, which so resemble copper that, till one handles them, they cannot be distinguished, he has so rare an art of bronzing them; I bought four of him. The best painter, Pietro Beretino di Cortona.
This Duke has a daily tribute for every courtezan, or prostitute, allowed to practice that infamous trade in his dominions, and so has his Holiness the Pope, but not so much in value.
Taking leave of our two jolly companions, Signor Giovanni and his fellow, we took horses for Bologna; and, by the way, alighted at a villa of the Grand Duke's, called Pratolino. The house is a square of four pavilions, with a fair platform about it, balustred with stone, situate in a large meadow, ascending like an amphitheater, having at the bottom a huge rock, with water running in a small channel, like a cascade; on the other side, are the gardens. The whole place seems consecrated to pleasure and summer retirement. The inside of the palace may compare with any in Italy for furniture of tapestry, beds, etc., and the gardens are delicious, and full of fountains. In the grove sits Pan feeding his flock, the water making a melodious sound through his pipe; and a Hercules, whose club yields a shower of water, which, falling into a great shell, has a naked woman riding on the backs of dolphins. In another grotto is Vulcan and his family, the walls richly composed of corals, shells, copper, and marble figures, with the hunting of several beasts, moving by the force of water. Here, having been well washed for our curiosity, we went down a large walk, at the sides whereof several slender streams of water gush out of pipes concealed underneath, that interchangeably fall into each other's channels, making a lofty and perfect arch, so that a man on horseback may ride under it, and not receive one drop of wet. This canopy, or arch of water, I thought one of the most surprising magnificences I had ever seen, and very refreshing in the heat of the summer. At the end of this very long walk, stands a woman in white marble, in posture of a laundress wringing water out of a piece of linen, very naturally formed, into a vast laver, the work and invention of M. Angelo Buonarotti. Hence, we ascended Mount Parnassus, where the Muses played to us on hydraulic organs. Near this is a great aviary. All these waters came from the rock in the garden, on which is the statue of a giant representing the Apennines, at the foot of which stands this villa. Last of all, we came to the labyrinth, in which a huge colosse of Jupiter throws out a stream over the garden. This is fifty feet in height, having in his body a square chamber, his eyes and mouth serving for windows and door.
We took horse and supped that night at Il Ponte, passing a dreadful ridge of the Apennines, in many places capped with snow, which covers them the whole summer. We then descended into a luxurious and rich plain. The next day we passed through Scarperia, mounting the hills again, where the passage is so straight and precipitous toward the right hand, that we climbed them with much care and danger; lodging at Firenzuolo, which is a fort built among the rocks, and defending the confines of the Great Duke's territories.
The next day we passed by the Pietramala, a burning mountain. At the summit of this prodigious mass of hills, we had an unpleasant way to Pianura, where we slept that night and were entertained with excellent wine. Hence to Scargalasino, and to bed at Loiano. This plain begins about six miles from Bologna.
Bologna belongs to the Pope, and is a famous University, situate in one of the richest spots of Europe for all sorts of provisions. It is built like a ship, whereof the Torre d'Asinelli may go for the mainmast. The city is of no great strength, having a trifling wall about it, in circuit near five miles, and two in length. This Torre d'Asinelli, ascended by 447 steps of a foot rise, seems exceedingly high, is very narrow, and the more conspicuous from another tower called Garisendi, so artificially built of brick (which increases the wonder) that it seems ready to fall. It is not now so high as the other; but they say the upper part was formerly taken down, for fear it should really fall, and do mischief.
Next, we went to see an imperfect church, called St. Petronius, showing the intent of the founder, had he gone on. From this, our guide led us to the schools, which indeed are very magnificent. Thence to St. Dominic's, where that saint's body lies richly enshrined. The stalls, or seats, of this goodly church have the history of the Bible inlaid with several woods, very curiously done, the work of one Fr. Damiano di Bergamo, and a friar of that order. Among other relics, they show the two books of Esdras, written with his own hand. Here lie buried Jac. Andreas, and divers other learned persons. To the church joins the convent, in the quadrangle whereof are old cypresses, said to have been planted by their saint.
Then we went to the palace of the Legate; a fair brick building, as are most of the houses and buildings, full of excellent carving and moldings, so as nothing in stone seems to be better finished or more ornamental; witness those excellent columns to be seen in many of their churches, convents, and public buildings; for the whole town is so cloistered, that one may pass from house to house through the streets without being exposed either to rain or sun.
Before the stately hall of this palace stands the statue of Paul IV. and divers others; also the monument of the coronation of Charles V. The piazza before it is the most stately in Italy, St. Mark's at Venice only excepted. In the center of it is a fountain of Neptune, a noble figure in copper. Here I saw a Persian walking about in a rich vest of cloth of tissue, and several other ornaments, according to the fashion of his country, which much pleased me; he was a young handsome person, of the most stately mien.
I would fain have seen the library of St. Savior, famous for the number of rare manuscripts; but could not, so we went to St. Francis, a glorious pile, and exceedingly adorned within.
After dinner I inquired out a priest and Dr. Montalbano, to whom I brought recommendations from Rome: this learned person invented, or found out, the composition of the lapis illuminabilis, or phosphorus. He showed me their property (for he had several), being to retain the light of the sun for some competent time, by a kind of imbibition, by a particular way of calcination. Some of these presented a blue color, like the flame of brimstone, others like coals of a kitchen fire. The rest of the afternoon was taken up in St. Michael in Bosco, built on a steep hill on the edge of the city, for its fabric, pleasant shade and groves, cellars, dormitory, and prospects, one of the most delicious retirements I ever saw; art and nature contending which shall exceed; so as till now I never envied the life of a friar. The whole town and country to a vast extent are under command of their eyes, almost as far as Venice itself. In this convent there are many excellent paintings of Guido Reni; above all, the little cloister of eight faces, painted by Caracci in fresco. The carvings in wood, in the sacristy, are admirable, as is the inlaid work about the chapel, which even emulates the best paintings; the work is so delicate and tender. The paintings of the Savior are of Caracci and Leonardo, and there are excellent things of Raphael which we could not see.
In the church of St. John is a fine piece of St. Cecilia, by Raphael. As to other paintings, there is in the church of St. Gregory an excellent picture of a Bishop giving the habit of St. Bernard to an armed soldier, with several other figures in the piece, the work of Guerchino. Indeed, this city is full of rare pieces, especially of Guido Domenico, and a virgin named Isabella Sirani, now living, who has painted many excellent pieces, and imitates Guido so well, that many skillful artists have been deceived.
At the Mendicants are the Miracles of St. Eloy, by Reni, after the manner of Caravaggio, but better; and here they showed us that famous piece of Christ calling St. Matthew, by Annibal Caracci. The Marquis Magniani has the whole frieze of his hall painted in fresco by the same hand.
Many of the religious men nourish those lapdogs which the ladies are so fond of, and which they here sell. They are a pigmy sort of spaniels, whose noses they break when puppies; which, in my opinion, deforms them.
At the end of the turning in one of the wings of the dormitory of St. Michael, I found a paper pasted near the window, containing the dimensions of most of the famous churches in Italy compared with their towers here, and the length of this gallery, a copy whereof I took.
From hence being brought to a subterranean territory of cellars, the courteous friars made us taste a variety of excellent wines; and so we departed to our inn.
The city is famous also for sausages; and here is sold great quantities of Parmegiano cheese, with Botargo, Caviare, etc., which makes some of their shops perfume the streets with no agreeable smell. We furnished ourselves with wash balls, the best being made here, and being a considerable commodity. This place has also been celebrated for lutes made by the old masters, Mollen, Hans Frey, and Nicholas Sconvelt, which were of extraordinary price; the workmen were chiefly Germans. The cattle used for draught in this country (which is very rich and fertile, especially in pasturage) are covered with housings of linen fringed at the bottom, that dangle about them, preserving them from flies, which in summer are very troublesome.
From this pleasant city, we proceeded toward Ferrara, carrying with us a bulletino, or bill of health (customary in all these parts of Italy, especially in the State of Venice) and so put ourselves into a boat that was towed with horses, often interrupted by the sluices (inventions there to raise the water for the use of mills, and to fill the artificial canals) at each of which we stayed till passage was made. We went by the Castle Bentivoglio, and, about night arrived at an ugly inn called Mal Albergo, agreeable to its name, whence, after we had supped, we embarked and passed that night through the Fens, where we were so pestered with those flying glow-worms, called Luccioli, that one who had never heard of them, would think the country full of sparks of fire. Beating some of them down and applying them to a book, I could read in the dark by the light they afforded.
Quitting our boat, we took coach, and by morning got to Ferrara, where, before we could gain entrance, our guns and arms were taken from us of custom, the lock being taken off before, as we were advised. The city is in a low marshy country, and therefore well fortified. The houses and streets have nothing of beauty, except the palace and church of St. Benedict, where Ariosto lies buried, and there are some good statues, the palazzo del Diamante, citadel, church of St. Dominico. The market-place is very spacious, having in its centre the figure of Nicholao Oläo once Duke of Ferrara, on horseback, in copper. It is, in a word, a dirty town, and, though the streets be large they remain ill paved; yet it is a University and now belongs to the Pope. Though there are not many fine houses in the city, the inn where we lodged was a very noble palace, having an Angel for its sign.
We parted from hence about three in the afternoon, and went some of our way on the canal, and then embarked on the Po; or Padus; by the poets called Eridanus, where they feign Phæton to have fallen after his rash attempt, and where Io was metamorphosed into a cow. There was in our company, among others, a Polonian Bishop, who was exceeding civil to me in this passage, and afterward did me many kindnesses at Venice. We supped this night at a place called Corbua, near the ruins of the ancient city, Adria, which gives name to the Gulf, or Sea. After three miles, having passed thirty on the Po, we embarked in a stout vessel, and through an artificial canal, very straight, we entered the Adige, which carried us by break of day into the Adriatic, and so sailing prosperously by Chioza (a town upon an island in this sea), and Palestina, we came over against Malamocco (the chief port and anchorage where our English merchantmen lie that trade to Venice) about seven at night, after we had stayed at least two hours for permission to land, our bill of health being delivered, according to custom. So soon as we came on shore, we were conducted to the Dogana, where our portmanteaus were visited, and then we got to our lodging, which was at honest Signor Paulo Rhodomante's at the Black Eagle, near the Rialto, one of the best quarters of the town. This journey from Rome to Venice cost me seven pistoles, and thirteen julios.

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John Evelyn's Diary 23 August 1662. 23 Aug 1662. I was spectator of the most magnificent triumph that ever floated on the Thames, considering the innumerable boats and vessels, dressed and adorned with all imaginable pomp, but, above all, the thrones, arches, pageants, and other representations, stately barges of the Lord Mayor and companies, with various inventions, music, and peals of ordnance both from the vessels and the shore, going to meet and conduct the new Queen (23) from Hampton Court to Whitehall, at the first time of her coming to town. In my opinion, it far exceeded all the Venetian Bucentoras, etc., on the Ascension, when they go to espouse the Adriatic. His Majesty (32) and the Queen (23) came in an antique-shaped open vessel, covered with a state, or canopy, of cloth of gold, made in form of a cupola, supported with high Corinthian pillars, wreathed with flowers, festoons and garlands. I was in our newly built vessel, sailing among them.

John Evelyn's Diary 28 August 1670. 28 Aug 1670. One of the Canons preached; then followed the offering of the Knights of the Order, according to custom; first the poor Knights, in procession, then, the Canons in their formalities, the Dean and Chancellor, then his Majesty (40) (the Sovereign), the Duke of York (36), Prince Rupert (50); and, lastly, the Earl of Oxford (43), being all the Knights that were then at Court.
I dined with the Treasurer (40), and consulted with him what pieces I was to add; in the afternoon the King (40) took me aside into the balcony over the terrace, extremely pleased with what had been told him I had begun, in order to his commands, and enjoining me to proceed vigorously in it. He told me he had ordered the Secretaries of State to give me all necessary assistance of papers and particulars relating to it and enjoining me to make it a LITTLE KEEN, for that the Hollanders had very unhandsomely abused him in their pictures, books, and libels.
Windsor was now going to be repaired, being exceedingly ragged and ruinous. Prince Rupert (50), the Constable, had begun to trim up the keep or high round Tower, and handsomely adorned his hall with furniture of arms, which was very singular, by so disposing the pikes, muskets, pistols, bandoleers, holsters, drums, back, breast, and headpieces, as was very extraordinary. Thus, those huge steep stairs ascending to it had the walls invested with this martial furniture, all new and bright, so disposing the bandoleers, holsters, and drums, as to represent festoons, and that without any confusion, trophy-like. From the hall we went into his bedchamber, and ample rooms hung with tapestry, curious and effeminate pictures, so extremely different from the other, which presented nothing but war and horror.
The King (40) passed most of his time in hunting the stag, and walking in the park, which he was now planting with rows of trees.

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John Evelyn's Diary 18 January 1671. 18 Jan 1671. This day I first acquainted his Majesty (40) with that incomparable young man, Gibbon (22), whom I had lately met with in an obscure place by mere accident, as I was walking near a poor solitary thatched house, in a field in our parish, near Sayes Court. I found him shut in; but looking in at the window, I perceived him carving that large cartoon, or crucifix, of Tintoretto, a copy of which I had myself brought from Venice, where the original painting remains. I asked if I might enter; he opened the door civilly to me, and I saw him about such a work as for the curiosity of handling, drawing, and studious exactness, I never had before seen in all my travels. I questioned him why he worked in such an obscure and lonesome place; he told me it was that he might apply himself to his profession without interruption, and wondered not a little how I found him out. I asked if he was unwilling to be made known to some great man, for that I believed it might turn to his profit; he answered, he was yet but a beginner, but would not be sorry to sell off that piece; on demanding the price, he said £100. In good earnest, the very frame was worth the money, there being nothing in nature so tender and delicate as the flowers and festoons about it, and yet the work was very strong; in the piece was more than one hundred figures of men, etc. I found he was likewise musical, and very civil, sober, and discreet in his discourse. There was only an old woman in the house. So, desiring leave to visit him sometimes, I went away.
Of this young artist (22), together with my manner of finding him out, I acquainted the King (40), and begged that he would give me leave to bring him and his work to Whitehall Palace, for that I would adventure my reputation with his Majesty (40) that he had never seen anything approach it, and that he would be exceedingly pleased, and employ him. The King (40) said he would himself go see him. This was the first notice his Majesty (40) ever had of Mr. Gibbon (22).

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On 20 Jan 1770 Charles Yorke 1722-1770 (47) died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church Wimpole. Grey marble obelisk on break-front pedestal of white marble with inscription tablet flanked by festoons and frieze carved with emblems of the Chancellor's office; at the base of the obelisk two putti unveil a portrait medallion and at the apex is an achievement of arms; signed 'P. SCHEEMAKER (79) FaT'.

In 1756 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Charles Yorke 1722-1770.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 March 1646. The famous lapidaries of Venice for false stones and pastes, so as to emulate the best diamonds, rubies, etc., were Marco Terrasso and Gilbert.
An account of what Bills of Exchange I took up at Venice since my coming from Rome, till my departure from Padua: [Note. removed].
In company, then, with Mr. Waller, one Captain Wray (son of Sir Christopher, whose father had been in arms against his Majesty, and therefore by no means welcome to us), with Mr. Abdy, a modest and learned man, we got that night to Vicenza, passing by the Euganéan hills, celebrated for the prospects and furniture of rare simples, which we found growing about them. The ways were something deep, the whole country flat and even as a bowling-green. The common fields lie square, and are orderly planted with fruit trees, which the vines run and embrace, for many miles, with delicious streams creeping along the ranges.
Vicenza is a city in the Marquisate of Treviso, yet appertaining to the Venetians, full of gentlemen and splendid palaces, to which the famous Palladio, born here, has exceedingly contributed, having been the architect. Most conspicuous is the Hall of Justice; it has a tower of excellent work; the lower pillars are of the first order; those in the three upper corridors are Doric; under them, are shops in a spacious piazza. The hall was built in imitation of that at Padua, but of a nobler design, à la moderne. The next morning, we visited the theater, as being of that kind the most perfect now standing, and built by Palladio, in exact imitation of the ancient Romans, and capable of containing 5,000 spectators. The scene, which is all of stone, represents an imperial city, the order Corinthian, decorated with statues. Over the Scenario is inscribed: "Virtuti ac Genio Olympior: Academia Theatrum hoc à fundamentis erexit Palladio Architect: 1584". The scene declines eleven feet, the soffito painted with clouds. To this there joins a spacious hall for solemn days to ballot in, and a second for the Academics. In the piazza is also the podesta, or governor's house, the facciata being of the Corinthian order, very noble. The piazza itself is so large as to be capable of jousts and tournaments, the nobility of this city being exceedingly addicted to this knight-errantry, and other martial diversions. In this place are two pillars in imitation of those at St. Mark's at Venice, bearing one of them a winged lion, the other the statue of St. John the Baptist.
In a word, this sweet town has more well-built palaces than any of its dimensions in all Italy, besides a number begun and not yet finished (but of stately design) by reason of the domestic dissensions between them and those of Brescia, fomented by the sage Venetians, lest by combining, they might think of recovering their ancient liberty. For this reason, also, are permitted those disorders and insolences committed at Padua among the youth of these two territories. It is no dishonor in this country to be some generations in finishing their palaces, that without exhausting themselves by a vast expense at once, they may at last erect a sumptuous pile. Count Oleine's Palace is near perfected in this manner. Count Ulmarini is more famous for his gardens, being without the walls, especially his cedrario, or conserve of oranges, eleven score of my paces long, set in order and ranges, making a canopy all the way by their intermixing branches for more than 200 of my single paces, and which being full of fruit and blossoms, was a most delicious sight. In the middle of this garden, was a cupola made of wire, supported by slender pillars of brick, so closely covered with ivy, both without and within, that nothing was to be perceived but green; between the arches there dangled festoons of the same. Here is likewise a most inextricable labyrinth.

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Frieze

Grecian

On 08 Feb 1809 Brownlow Bertie 5th Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1729-1809 (79) died without male issue at Grimsthorpe South Kesteven. He was buried at St Mary's Church Swinstead on 17 Feb 1809. Duke Ancaster and Kesteven extinct. His third cousin Albermarle Bertie 9th Earl Lindsey 1744-1818 (64) succeeded 9th Earl Lindsey.
Sculpted by Richard Westmacott Sculptor 1775-1856 (33). A handsome white marble wall tablet in Grecian style depicting deceased and wife on a catafalque with mourning female figure, flanked by mother, children and angel. Above a scrolled cornice with Ducal coronet and palm. Beneath a rectangular inscription panel, flanked by scrolled brackets.

St Mary's Church Preston on Stour. That on the left Grecian with standing mourner, sculpted by Richard "The Elder" Westmacott Sculptor 1747-1808. On the right, Grecian style with figures of Faith and Hope, sculpted by Richard Westmacott Sculptor 1775-1856.

Medallion

On 24 Mar 1619 Robert Rich 1st Earl Warwick 1559-1619 (59) died. His son Robert Rich 2nd Earl Warwick 1587-1658 (31) succeeded 2nd Earl Warwick 3C 1618, 4th Baron Rich Leez. Frances Hatton Countess Warwick 1590-1623 (29) by marriage Countess Warwick.
He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Elizabethan Recumbent. Unusual head and shoulder portrait sculpture of deceased full face, with a profile of his wife Frances Wray Countess Warwick -1634 behind, set in a circular medallion. To either side are pelleted Pilasters supporting an entablature with scrolled Cartouche of arms and flanked by heraldic supporters. The whole is painted and gilded and beneath is a panel containing an inscribed poem. Above his Arms implaled with hers. His are quartered 1&4 Rich 2&3 Baldry Arms (his mother), hers quartered 1&4 Wray 2&3 Unknown. the monument is perhaps the work of Epiphanius Evesham. Sculpted by Epiphanius Evesham Sculptor -1623.

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After 01 Jan 1741. Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. Monument to Peregrine Bertie 2nd Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1686-1741. Flat Obelisk before which stands life sized carving of the deceased leaning on an Urn, in Roman dress, a putto holding a medallion of the Duchess Jane Brownlow Duchess Ancaster and Kesteven -1736. Sculpted by Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762.

In 1751 Andrea Soldi Painter 1703-1771. Portrait of Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762.In 1762 Adrien Carpentiers Painter 1713-1778. Portrait of Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762.

After 16 May 1758. Monument in the Church of St Mary Southwick to George Lynn 1707-1758 commissioned by his widow Anne Bellamy 1710-1767 attributed to Louis Francois Roubiliac Sculptor 1702-1762. Grey and white marble with oval medallion of deceased suspended from broad flat obelisk; drapery below with figure of his wife seated female figure to right, leaning against Urn.

On 10 Jul 1759 Catherine Blount Freeman 1737-1759 (22) died of a malignant fever. She was buried at St Andrew's Church Wimpole. Armorial Yorke differencede with a crescent to indicate son of the current holder; her husband Charles Yorke 1722-1770 (36) with an inescutcheon of Freeman Arms quartered with unknown arms two lions passant guardant with a bordure engrailed.
Stylised sarcophagus in white veined marble, bearing a white inscription panel; above is an urn in brown marble against a grey background standing on a base of three steps around which are grouped three putti: two garlanding the urn while the third stands by in dejection with reversed torch; in front of the steps is a portrait medallion and at the base of the sarcophagus is an achievement of arms; signed 'JAMES STUART (46), INVT. PR. SCHEEMAKERS (68), SCULP. MDCCLXI'.

After 06 Mar 1764. St Andrew's Church Wimpole. Monument to Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764 and Margaret Cocks Countess Hardwicke -1761.
Framed inscription panel in white marble surmounted by an enriched sarcophagus in brown veined marble against a grey obelisk to which is affixed an achievement of arms in oval frame; around the base are putti with wreaths and emblems of office; on each side, life-size figures, one of Athene; two medallions on the sarcophagus depict the Earl and Countess; signed 'J. STUART, INVT P. SCHEEMAKERS, SCULPR.'

1763. William Hoare Painter 1707-1792. Portrait of Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764 wearing the Robes of Lord Keeper of the Great Seal and holding the Great Seal.In 1756 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Philip Yorke 1st Earl Hardwicke 1690-1764.Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Margaret Cocks Countess Hardwicke -1761.

On 17 Sep 1766 Lieutenant-General Bennett Noel 1715-1766 (51) died. He was buried at the Church of St Peter and St Paul Exton. After 07 Apr 1784 Elizabeth Adams 1715-1784 (69) was buried with her husband.
Monument sculpted by Joseph Nollekens Sculptor 1737-1823 (29). A reclining female figure with a cornucopia, on a sarcophagus backed by an obelisk with medallions and putti.

On 06 Sep 1776 James Lenox Dutton 1713-1776 (63) died. He was buried at Church of Saint Mary Magdalene Sherborne. Monument to James Lenox Dutton 1713-1776 (63) and his second wife Jane Bond -1776 sculpted by Richard "The Elder" Westmacott Sculptor 1747-1808 (29) in 1791. Remarkble for the quality of the carving and the stone (probably Carrara Marble) and the skeleton. Believed to be called Immortality Trampling Death. Life-sized angel leans on a medallion with profiles of the deceased, underfoot a prostrate skeleton (representing death).

On 30 Dec 1820 Agneta Johnson 1740-1820 (80) died. Buried at St Andrew's Church Wimpole.
Inscription tablet flanked by pilasters with figures of her husband in robes of state and of two sons, and with medallion portrait at the head, all in white marble, signed 'J. FLAXMAN (65), R.A. Sculptor'

Before 1826 . John Jackson Painter 1778-1831. Portrait of John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826.Around 1797. Henry Howard Painter 1769-1847. Portrait of John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826.Before 07 Dec 1826. Henry Howard Painter 1769-1847. Portrait of John Flaxman Sculptor 1755-1826.

St Andrew's Church Denton. In ashlar. The latin raised letter inscription is set in an egg and dart surround, flanked by Ionic Pilasters and free standing Composite fluted columns, supporting a pediment containing a pair of naked female figures holding hour glasses leaning on a skull. The frieze is decorated with medallions. The reclining figure of the deceased, his prayer book in hand, lies on a half rolled up mattress on a tomb chest on which are portrayed his wife and six children, all named in raised letters.

Obelisk

Ogee Arch

In 1406 John Curzon -1406 died. Monument in All Saints Church Kedleston. Fluted Period. Lancastrian Esses Collar. Reset in tomb recess with depressed crocketed and pinnacled ogee arch, with shields above.

Paterae

Around 1327. Lady Chapel of Hereford Cathedral Monument to Joanna Plunket de Kilpec Countess Hereford, wife of Henry de Bohun, [1327], altar-tomb with effigy in wallrecess, plain altar-tomb with moulded top-edge enriched with Paterae and heads alternately, at head recumbent canopy with ogee cinque-foiled arch, crockets and finial; effigy of woman in wimple and veiled head-dress, tight sleeves and loose gown, head on cushion and feet on dog; all set in a 13th-century recess with moulded and segmental-pointed arch and label with head-stops and apex turned up to mitre with string-course of chapel; remains of black and red colour on effigy and arch, traces of painted figure and arch on back of recess and remains of decoration in spandrels of arch, including a diaper of fleur-de-lis and rosettes and two shields-of-arms (a) Plunkenet and (b) formerly Bohun but now obliterated. Bohun. Pye.

After 10 Aug 1358. Monument to Piers Grandison 2nd Baron Grandison -1358. Lady Chapel of Hereford Cathedral. Mid 14th-century, altar-tomb with effigy and canopy, altar-tomb with range of cinquefoil-headed panels in front and panelled buttresses at ends carried up to the cornice of the canopy, effigy in mixed mail and plate-armour with camail and ridged bascinet, hauberk with scalloped lower edge, cyclas, enriched Hip Belt with dagger hanging in front and sword at side, head on cushions and feet on hound; recess with panelled back, moulded jambs and square head enriched with Paterae and trefoiled and sub-cusped pendant tracery below the head; vaulted soffit to canopy; canopy with range of six bays of open arcading with trefoiled and sub-cusped heads, crockets and finials, in arcading two headless figures of the Coronation of the Virgin, headless figure with book, archbishop with cross-staff, St. John the Baptist holding a roundel with the Agnus Dei, and a bishop, last four figures brought from elsewhere; canopy finished with enriched cornice and pierced parapet with quatrefoils and cusped cresting.

On 29 Aug 1582 Thomas St Paul -1582 died. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Monument to Thomas St Paul -1582 and Faith Grantham. Fine freestanding tomb chest with canopy. The sides of the tomb chest have acanthus Pilasters, the panels between contain wreathed shields. The full length recumbent albaster effigies show the man in full plate armour holding sword and prayerbook, head on helm, feet on a cushion with flowers. His wife is in a long dress with cloak and close fitting hat, holding a bible. The inscription runs round the top edge of the chest. The canopy is supported on six pillars, those at the angles being circular and bulbous, the others in the form of obelisks decorated with fishscale Paterae, with elaborate Ionic Capitals with roses in the necking. The entablature has an egg and dart frieze. Above the heads of the columns are five female and one male weepers. At the centre of the canopy is a raised altar bearing shields and surmounted by the kneeling figure of the heir clad in armour. In front kneels a larger figure of a girl. the monument is all painted and gilded.

After 22 Jul 1779. Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. Monument to Peregrine Bertie 3rd Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1714-1778 and Robert Bertie 4th Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1756-1779. On the south side by Charles Harris Sculptor 1749-1795. Pointed back panel of black marble before which is a carving of the deceased seated in ducal robes, holding a cameo of the Duchess, beside him stands the fourth Duke in Roman dress. The figures are flanked by urns. The base is carved with flutes and paterae and to the centre are bronze plates bearing the memorial inscription.

Around 1760 Joshua Reynolds Painter 1723-1788. Portrait of Peregrine Bertie 3rd Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1714-1778.

Pedestal

After 26 Jul 1723. Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. Monument to Robert Bertie 1st Duke Ancaster and Kesteven 1660-1723 sculpted by Peter Scheemakers Sculptor 1691-1781 and Henry Cheere 1st Baronet Sculptor 1703-1781. A Classical Period with Corinthian Capitals supporting open dentilated pediment with garland, urns and putti. Before the Aedicule a rounded Pedestal supports a marble image of the deceased attired as a Roman General.

On 01 May 1775 Mary Montagu Duchess Montagu 1711-1775 (64) died. Monument in St Edmund's Church Warkton. Sculpted by Peter Mathias Van Gelder Sculptor 1742-1809 (33). Mary's monument is more decorative that her parent's; Rococo. The composition of the monument centres around an ornate funerary Urn, which stands upon a Pedestal containing an inscription to Mary. To the right sits a grief stricken woman, inconsolable over the loss of an aristocrat considered a great benefactor to the poor and needy. In her left arm she cradles a baby, and a second, tearful child sits at her feet. To the right of the woman is that of an older woman draped in a shawl, who gently caresses the hand of the first babe. To the left of the Urn, an angel comforts the mourners, pointing to heaven.

Around 1735 Gavin Hamilton Painter 1723-1798. Portrait of John Montagu 2nd Duke Montagu 1690-1749 and Mary Churchill Duchess Montagu 1689-1751, and Mary Montagu Duchess Montagu 1711-1775.

On 02 Feb 1880 George Hamilton Seymour Conway 1797-1880 (82) died. In 1882. Church of St Nicholas Alcester. Monument to George Hamilton Seymour Conway 1797-1880 (82) sculpted by Count Gleichen (46). Seated figure on Pedestal.

Pediment

prie-dieu

On 24 Jan 1592 James Harrington 1511-1592 (81) died. He was buried in the Church of St Peter and St Paul Exton. Monument to James Harrington 1511-1592 (81) and Lucy Sidney 1520-1591 (72). A large standing Elizabethan Period monument with 2 kneeling figures at a prie-dieu in a double aedicule. Wrought in various marbles and enriched with low-relief carving, strapwork etc. surmounted by obelisk, and arms. Stylistically similar to the monument to Robert Keilway. Possibly sculpted by Nicholas Johnson Sculptor -1624 or Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (5).

On 27 Jun 1598 Bridget Paston -1598 died. Monument in Church of St Mary the Virgin Tittleshall. Arched niche with kneeling effigy at prie-dieu which carries the inscription. Flanking pilasters with partly painted carved trophies surrounded by ribbon-work. Carved achievement in strapwork surround above and eight kneeling weepers below.
Armorials top left Coke and top right Paston.
Above the monument an amorial Quarterly: Coke, Crispin, Folkard and Pawe impaling Quarterly of Seventeen with 1 Paston, 2 Peche 3 Leach 4 Somerton 5 Peyver 6 Walcot 7 Berry 8 Craven 9 Kerdeston 10 Wachesam or Sotherton 11 Hethersett 12 Charles 13 Tatshall 14 Hengrave 15 Gerbridge 16 Mautby 17 Basinges?.

Monument to Edward Waties of Ludlow -1635 and his wife Martha Fox -1629. She died 02 Oct 1629. St Laurence's Church Ludlow. prie-dieu.

Putti

Recess

In 1406 John Curzon -1406 died. Monument in All Saints Church Kedleston. Fluted Period. Lancastrian Esses Collar. Reset in tomb recess with depressed crocketed and pinnacled ogee arch, with shields above.

On 07 May 1592 Christopher Wray Chief Justice 1524-1592 (68) died. He was was buried in St Michael's Church Glentworth. Monument to Sir Chistopher and his wife Anne Girlington. Elizabethan Recumbent. Elephant and Castle Crest. Pink, white and blue-grey marble. Two recumbent effigies, Sir Christopher above and a little behind his wife, he in red robes, black cap and thick ruff; she in black robes, large ruff and hood. Four kneeling white marble daughters below. Ornate tomb recess above with flanking pink marble columns with white and gold Corinthian Capitals. Undersurface of Recess decorated with white and gold bay leaves. Plaque inscribed above with raised plaque above with Sir Christopher's son at prayer flanked by coats of arms and obelisks.

In 1582 Seventtenth Century copy.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Christopher Wray Chief Justice 1524-1592.

On 28 Oct 1613 George St Paul Baronet St Paul 1562-1613 (51) died. He was buried at St Lawrence's Church Snarford. Monument to George St Paul Baronet St Paul 1562-1613 (51) and Frances Wray Countess Warwick -1634. Elizabethan Recumbent. A base supporting the reclining figures of the deceased with composite Pillars supporting an entablature and armorial termination. In the base is a central semi-circular niche containing a carving of the deceased's daughter, flanked by niches containing mourning putti. Above on the lower step is a figure of Frances in full mourning dress with formal Ruff and hat, reclining on a cushion holding a prayer book. On the upper step he reclines in plate armour with a sword. The figures are contained in a semi-circular headed Recess with roses in the archivolt and on the back wall is an inscribed rectangular panel with scrolls and memento mori. The Pillars to either side support a frieze and entablature from which rise flaming urns and at the angles, and at the centre is a raised achievement of arms flanked by scrolled shields and obelisks. Possibly sculpted by Cornelius Cure Sculptor -1607.

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On 14 Nov 1627 Elizabeth Waldegrave -1627 died. On 06 Dec 1629 Arthur Coke 1587-1629 (42) died in Bury St Edmunds. Jacobean Hooded Monument sculpted by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (40) in St Andrew's Church Bramfield. White and black marble; reclining effigy of Elizabeth with Arthur kneeling in prayer above within an arched Recess; Arms over the arch and surrounding it are seven Cartouches.

On 27 Sep 1850 Chandos Leigh 1st Baron Leigh 1791-1850 (59) died. His son William Henry Leigh 2nd Baron Leigh 1824-1905 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Leigh of Stoneleigh in Warwickshire 2C 1839. Caroline Amelia Grosvenor Baroness Leigh 1828-1906 (22) by marriage Baroness Leigh of Stoneleigh in Warwickshire.
Monument in Church of the Virgin Mary Stoneleigh. An elaborate Recess in late C19 Gothic style constructed in 1850 for alabaster Table Tomb; unclear as to why the effigy was not installed.

Reredos

After 1702. Monument to Richard Francis Shireburn 1693-1702. Church of All Hallows Great Mitton. Sculpted by William Stanton Sculptor 1639-1705. Figure of boy against Reredos background, with Cherubs commissioned by Isabel Ingleby 1627-1693.

Before 1910. St Mary the Virgin Church Buckland St Mary. A magnificient Reredos sculpted in alabaster by James Forsyth Sculptor 1828-1910.

Church of the Holy Trinity Arrow. Reredos. Possibly James Forsyth Sculptor 1828-1910.

High Alter and Reredos. St Laurence's Church Ludlow.

Sarcophagus

Sideboard Tomb

On 19 Sep 1580 Catherine Willoughby Duchess Suffolk 1519-1580 (61) died. Her son Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (24) succeeded 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. Mary Vere Baroness Willoughby Eresby -1624 by marriage Baroness Willoughby de Eresby.
She was buried at St James' Church Spilsby with her second husband Richard Bertie Baron Willoughby 1516-1582 (63). Elizabethan Period. Sideboard Tomb. Cornice supported by three figures of a monk and two wildmen, each holding aloft a shield of arms. In the frieze are flowers, fruit and escutcheons.

On 25 Jun 1601 Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (45) died at Berwick on Tweed. His son Robert Bertie 1582 1642 (18) succeeded 14th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. He was buried at St James' Church Spilsby.
On 15 Feb 1610 Catherine Bertie 1595-1610 (15) died in childbirth. She was buried at St James' Church Spilsby.
Monument Elizabethan Recumbent. Tall Sideboard Tomb with reclining hooded figure of Lady Katherine, daughter of Peregrine, with Chrisom Child in the crib at her feet. Above a standing figure of Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (45) in a niche, with strapwork embellishments, all supported on composite columns with a dentilated cornice.

In 1708. Albemarle Bertie 1668-1742 (40) erected a monument to members of the Bertie Family in Church of St Michael and All Angels Edenham. A large, semi-circular headed Sideboard Tomb supporting a black Sarcophagus with gadrooned top and lions feet, erected 1738. Commemorates seven members of the Bertie family. The rear has a marble surround with egg and dart moulding and scrolled imposts with Cartouche of arms to the top. Within are seven classical busts, supported on moulded corbels.[Source: BLB].

Strapwork

On 25 Feb 1560 Catherine Blount 1518-1560 (42) died. On 11 Aug 1580 Maurice Berkeley Standard Bearer 1506-1581 (74) died. Church of St Mary Bruton. Recumbent effigies of himself and his two wives Catherine Blount 1518-1560 (42) and Elizabeth Sands 1533-1585 (27) in an Easter sepulchre-type recess with double round arched front, Corinthian pilasters and strapwork panels. Ruff. Panel with quartered arms 1 Berkeley 2 probably Tiptoft, possibly Wotton Arms 3 Unknown Arms 4 probably Babington, possibly Zouche differenced with a label three points, overall a Crescent.

On 21 Dec 1579 Thomas Richards -1579 died. Monument to Thomas Richards -1579. In 1603 Elizabeth Fiennes 1523-1603 (80) died.
Monument in St Mary the Virgin Church Chipping Norton. Finely made in alabaster. Elizabethan Period. Renaissance chest with stripped-down strapwork. Rush Mat. Dress Folds at Feet. Ruff.

On 24 Jan 1592 James Harrington 1511-1592 (81) died. He was buried in the Church of St Peter and St Paul Exton. Monument to James Harrington 1511-1592 (81) and Lucy Sidney 1520-1591 (72). A large standing Elizabethan Period monument with 2 kneeling figures at a prie-dieu in a double aedicule. Wrought in various marbles and enriched with low-relief carving, strapwork etc. surmounted by obelisk, and arms. Stylistically similar to the monument to Robert Keilway. Possibly sculpted by Nicholas Johnson Sculptor -1624 or Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (5).

In 1596 William Dix -1596 died. He was buried in the Chancel of the Church of St Andrew Wickmere. Monument kneeling figures. Ionic columns, strapwork around armorials, panels with raised shields.

On 27 Jun 1598 Bridget Paston -1598 died. Monument in Church of St Mary the Virgin Tittleshall. Arched niche with kneeling effigy at prie-dieu which carries the inscription. Flanking pilasters with partly painted carved trophies surrounded by ribbon-work. Carved achievement in strapwork surround above and eight kneeling weepers below.
Armorials top left Coke and top right Paston.
Above the monument an amorial Quarterly: Coke, Crispin, Folkard and Pawe impaling Quarterly of Seventeen with 1 Paston, 2 Peche 3 Leach 4 Somerton 5 Peyver 6 Walcot 7 Berry 8 Craven 9 Kerdeston 10 Wachesam or Sotherton 11 Hethersett 12 Charles 13 Tatshall 14 Hengrave 15 Gerbridge 16 Mautby 17 Basinges?.

On 25 Jun 1601 Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (45) died at Berwick on Tweed. His son Robert Bertie 1582 1642 (18) succeeded 14th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. He was buried at St James' Church Spilsby.
On 15 Feb 1610 Catherine Bertie 1595-1610 (15) died in childbirth. She was buried at St James' Church Spilsby.
Monument Elizabethan Recumbent. Tall Sideboard Tomb with reclining hooded figure of Lady Katherine, daughter of Peregrine, with Chrisom Child in the crib at her feet. Above a standing figure of Peregrine Bertie 13th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1555-1601 (45) in a niche, with strapwork embellishments, all supported on composite columns with a dentilated cornice.

Table Tomb

On 17 Sep 1563 Henry Manners 2nd Earl Rutland 1526-1563 (36) died. His son Edward Manners 3rd Earl Rutland 1549-1587 (14) succeeded 3rd Earl Rutland 3C 1525, 14th Baron Ros Helmsley.
On 13 Oct 1559 Margaret Neville Countess Rutland -1559 died. She was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Bottesford.
Monument an unusual Table Tomb with their effigies beneath surmounted by effigies of their children, and the Arms of Manners and Neville. He wearing a Leg Garter.
His arms showing quarterly: 1&4: Manners Augmented. Paternal Great Great Grandfather Thomas Ros 9th Baron Ros Helmsley 1427-1464 2nd: Top Row: Ros, Roet, Trusbutt [or Belvoir], Bottom Row: Todeni [Albini ancient], Daubeney, Badlesmere. Possibly a reference to Maudit. 3rd Quarterly: 1 Thomas Holland 2nd Earl Kent 1350 1397, 2 Tiptoft. Paternal Great Grandmother Philippa Tiptoft Baroness Ros Helmsley 1423-1487, 3 Unknown 4 Powys.

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On 07 Aug 1616 William Savage 1554-1616 (62) died. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Elmley.
On 31 Jan 1631 Giles Savage 1585-1631 (46) died. He was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Elmley.
On 11 Jun 1674 Katherine Dalston 1590-1674 (84) died (she the wife of Giles Savage 1585-1631 (31)) at Elmley Castle. She was buried at St Mary the Virgin Church Elmley.
Alabaster table tomb with Father, Son and Daughter-in-Law. She holding a Chrisom Child probably representing stillborn, or died soon after birth. At their feet two lions and what is described as a stag with an arrow through its neck.

On 27 Sep 1850 Chandos Leigh 1st Baron Leigh 1791-1850 (59) died. His son William Henry Leigh 2nd Baron Leigh 1824-1905 (26) succeeded 2nd Baron Leigh of Stoneleigh in Warwickshire 2C 1839. Caroline Amelia Grosvenor Baroness Leigh 1828-1906 (22) by marriage Baroness Leigh of Stoneleigh in Warwickshire.
Monument in Church of the Virgin Mary Stoneleigh. An elaborate Recess in late C19 Gothic style constructed in 1850 for alabaster Table Tomb; unclear as to why the effigy was not installed.

On 20 Mar 1925 George Nathaniel Curzon 1st Marquess Kedleston 1859-1925 (66) died. His daughter Mary Irene Curzon 2nd Lady Ravensdale Kedleston 1896-1966 (29) succeeded 2nd Baron Ravensdale Kedleston. Monument in All Saints Church Kedleston to George Nathaniel Curzon 1st Marquess Kedleston 1859-1925 (66) and his first wife Mary Victoria Leiter Baroness Curzon Kedleston 1870-1906 (55). Table Tomb in white marble; two angels holding the crown of life lean over the effigies designed by Bertram Mckennal Sculptor 1863-1931 (61).

1914. Hubert Von Herkommer Painter 1849-1914. Portrait of George Nathaniel Curzon 1st Marquess Kedleston 1859-1925.1913. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of George Nathaniel Curzon 1st Marquess Kedleston 1859-1925.1887. Alexandre Cabanel Painter 1823-1889. Portrait of Mary Victoria Leiter Baroness Curzon Kedleston 1870-1906.

Tympanum

Around 1573. Church of the Holy Trinity Bosbury. Monument to John Harford died 1559. Large recessed wall Elizabethan Period monument commemorating John Harford died 1559, signed by John Guldo of Hereford Sculptor: 'JOHN GULDO of Hereford made this tombe w. his owne hande Ano. Dn. 1573. Pedimented surround with Corinthian columns on tall bases, semi-circular head to arched recess with Ionic capitals to pilasters, recumbent effigy in civil costume on sarcophagus supported by two lions, the whole enriched with rosettes in spandrels and large leaves and rounded in tympanum, shell motif and three panels with vases and two shields and an achievement of arms at back of recess.

On 03 Sep 1634 Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634 (82) died. Monument in Church of St Mary the Virgin Tittleshall. Simple sarcophagus on pedestal with lying effigy. Pair of flanking Tuscan columns supporting a full entablature with putti on frieze and broken segmental pediment. Carved and painted achievement in and above tympanum flanked by four reclining figures of the Virtues on pediment extrados.
Above. Quarterly of eight: Coke, Crispin, Folkard, Sparham, Nerford, Yarmouth, Knightley and Pawe. The crest is broken. Farrer says it was: On a chapeau Azure, turned up Ermine, an ostrich Argent, holding in its mouth a horseshoe Or. The motto reads Prudens qui Patiens.
The effigy was carved by John Hargrave, the rest of the memorial was made by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (47).
Below the effigy are three shields. Left Coke implaling Paston. His first wife Bridget Paston -1598. Middle Coke. Right Coke impaling Cecil; his second wife Elizabeth Cecil Countess Berkshire 1596-1672 (38).

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John Evelyn's Diary 18 April 1680. 18 Apr 1680. On the earnest invitation of the Earl of Essex (48), I went with him to his house at Cashiobury, in Hertfordshire. It was on Sunday, but going early from his house in the square of St. James, we arrived by ten o'clock; this he thought too late to go to church, and we had prayers in his chapel. The house is new, a plain fabric, built by my friend, Mr. Hugh May (58). There are divers fair and good rooms, and excellent carving by Gibbons, especially the chimney-piece of the library. There is in the porch, or entrance, a painting by Verrio, of Apollo and the Liberal Arts. One room pargeted with yew, which I liked well. Some of the chimney mantels are of Irish marble, brought by my Lord from Ireland, when he was Lord-Lieutenant, and not much inferior to Italian. The tympanum, or gable, at the front is a bass-relievo of Diana hunting, cut in Portland stone, handsomely enough. I do not approve of the middle doors being round: but, when the hall is finished as designed, it being an oval with a cupola, together with the other wing, it will be a very noble palace. The library is large, and very nobly furnished, and all the books are richly bound and gilded; but there are no MSS., except the Parliament Rolls and Journals, the transcribing and binding of which cost him, as he assured me, £500.
No man has been more industrious than this noble Lord in planting about his seat, adorned with walks, ponds, and other rural elegancies; but the soil is stony, churlish, and uneven, nor is the water near enough to the house, though a very swift and clear stream runs within a flight-shot from it in the valley, which may fitly be called Coldbrook, it being indeed excessively cold, yet producing fair trouts. It is a pity the house was not situated to more advantage: but it seems it was built just where the old one was, which I believe he only meant to repair; this leads men into irremediable errors, and saves but a little.
The land about is exceedingly addicted to wood, but the coldness of the place hinders the growth. Black cherry trees prosper even to considerable timber, some being eighty feet long; they make also very handsome avenues. There is a pretty oval at the end of a fair walk, set about with treble rows of Spanish chestnut trees.
The gardens are very rare, and cannot be otherwise, having so skillful an artist to govern them as Mr. Cooke, who is, as to the mechanic part, not ignorant in mathematics, and pretends to astrology. There is an excellent collection of the choicest fruit.
As for my Lord, he is a sober, wise, judicious, and pondering person, not illiterate beyond the rate of most noblemen in this age, very well versed in English history and affairs, industrious, frugal, methodical, and every way accomplished. His Lady (44) (being sister of the late Earl of Northumberland (35)) is a wise, yet somewhat melancholy woman, setting her heart too much on the little lady, her daughter (6), of whom she is over fond. They have a hopeful son (9) at the Academy.
My Lord was not long since come from his Lord-Lieutenancy of Ireland, where he showed his abilities in administration and government, as well as prudence in considerably augmenting his estate without reproach. He had been Ambassador-extraordinary in Denmark, and, in a word, such a person as became the son of that worthy hero his father (72) to be, the late Lord Capel, who lost his life for King Charles I.
We spent our time in the mornings in walking, or riding, and contriving [alterations], and the afternoons in the library, so as I passed my time for three or four days with much satisfaction. He was pleased in conversation to impart to me divers particulars of state, relating to the present times. He being no great friend to the D—— [Note. Probably Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 (39)] was now laid aside, his integrity and abilities being not so suitable in this conjuncture. 21st. I returned to London.

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Urn

Wall Monument

After 1634. Monument to Brian Jansen. Alabaster Wall Monument with kneeling figures and children below in Saint Leodegarius Church Ashby St Ledgers.

After 1740. Monument to Moses Ashley -1740 in Saint Leodegarius Church Ashby St Ledgers. Grey and white marble Wall Monument with portrait bust in roundel sculpted by Nathaniel Hedges Sculptor 1749-1784.

On 21 Sep 1761 John Bentley Ashley 1702-1761 (59) died. Monument to John Bentley Ashley 1702-1761 (59) in Saint Leodegarius Church Ashby St Ledgers. Sculpted by John Bacon 1740-1799 (20). Standing wall monument with two large allegorical figures flanking the inscription. Above them is a Sarcophagus on which is a Roman lamp on front of a black Obelisk. Also to James Ashley -1798. Simple Wall Monument with Urn and Obelisk. Also to Jane Pocock 1710-1784 (51) and by whose will the. Monument was erected.

West Facade

Around 1230. The West Facade of Peterborough Cathedral. Early English Gothic style. The three arches with Recesses unique.

Beverley Minster West Facade.