Crown

Crown is in Coins.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 September 1662. 18 Sep 1662. At the office all the morning, and at noon Sir G. Carteret (52), Mr. Coventry (34), and I by invitation to dinner to Sheriff Maynell's, the great money-man; he, Alderman Backwell (44), and much noble and brave company, with the privilege of their rare discourse, which is great content to me above all other things in the world.
And after a great dinner and much discourse, we arose and took leave, and home to the business of my office, where I thank God I take delight, and in the evening to my lodging and to bed. Among other discourse, speaking concerning the great charity used in Catholic countrys, Mr. Ashburnham did tell us, that this last year, there being great want of corn in Paris, and so a collection made for the poor, there was two pearls brought in, nobody knew from whom (till the Queen (23), seeing them, knew whose they were, but did not discover it), which were sold for 200,000 crownes.

Crown

By 1551, silver was being used to produce crowns, although gold was sometimes still used. The silver crown was quite large, being about 38mm and weighing about one ounce. Around that time many Europeans countries had similar sized silver coins which made them good for international trade as they were essentially interchangeable.
The metal used was 92.5% silver and the rest copper so as to make the coin harder. This hardness, together with a milled edge, made 'clipping' (which was cutting slices off the edge to steal some free silver) more difficult.

Chronicle of Greyfriars King Edward VI. 16 Dec 1551. Item the xvj. day was a proclamacion for the new qwyne that no man [should speak ill o]f it, for because that the pepulle sayd dyvers that ther was the ragyd staffea it.
Note a. One of the many intimations of the unpopularity of the duke of Northumberland (47), whose badge was the ragged staff.