Latin Dictionary

1640 Treaty of Ripon

1685 Execution of the Duke of Monmouth

Latin Dictionary is in Latin.

ab officio

ab officio. to neglect ones duty.

John Evelyn's Diary 08 September 1686. 08 Sep 1686. Dr. Compton, Bishop of London (54), was on Monday suspended, on pretense of not silencing Dr. Sharp (41) [NOTE. Assumed to be the subsequent Archbishop?] at St. Giles's, for something of a sermon in which he zealously reproved the doctrine of the Roman Catholics. The Bishop having consulted the civilians, they told him he could not by any law proceed against Dr. Sharp (41) without producing witnesses, and impleaded according to form; but it was overruled by my Lord Chancellor (41), and the Bishop sentenced without so much as being heard to any purpose. This was thought a very extraordinary way of proceeding, and was universally resented, and so much the rather for that two Bishops, Durham (53) and Rochester (51), sitting in the commission and giving their suffrages the Archbishop of Canterbury (69) refused to sit among them. He was only suspended ab officio, and that was soon after taken off. He was brother to the Earl of Northampton (64), had once been a soldier, had traveled in Italy, but became a sober, grave, and excellent prelate.

Around 1675 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Henry Compton Bishop 1632-1713. Around 1685 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of George Around 1675 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of George Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Bishop Nathaniel Crew 3rd Baron Crew 1633-1721. In 1698 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Bishop Nathaniel Crew 3rd Baron Crew 1633-1721. Around 1675 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676 (attributed). Portrait of Bishop Nathaniel Crew 3rd Baron Crew 1633-1721. Around 1644. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of James Compton 3rd Earl of Northampton 1622-1681.

Aetatis suae

Aetatis suae. Aged, at the age of.

On 11 Jul 1673 Penelope Barkham 1665-1673 (8) died. She was buried at Church of St George South Acre. Inscription: Hic jacet Penelope, filia Domini Edwardi Barkham Baronetti (45), et Franciscæ Uxoris sue, qui quidem Penelope, Ætate Puellula, sed Prudentiâ, Pietate, Virtute Matrona omnibus satis, Parentibus nimis, et Deo maxime chara, terras reliquit, ad Nuptias Agni vocata Julij 11, 1673, Annoq; Ætatis suæ, Octavo.

amanuensis

amanuensis. A secretary, scribe. A person employed to write or type what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 July 1679. 06 Jul 1679. Now were there papers, speeches, and libels, publicly cried in the streets against the Dukes of York (45) and Lauderdale (63), etc., obnoxious to the Parliament, with too much and indeed too shameful a liberty; but the people and Parliament had gotten head by reason of the vices of the great ones.

There was now brought up to London a child, son of one Mr. Wotton, formerly amanuensis to Dr. Andrews, Bishop of Winton, who both read and perfectly understood Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Syriac, and most of the modern languages; disputed in divinity, law, and all the sciences; was skillful in history, both ecclesiastical and profane; in politics; in a word, so universally and solidly learned at eleven years of age, that he was looked on as a miracle. Dr. Lloyd (42), one of the most deeply learned divines of this nation in all sorts of literature, with Dr. Burnet (35), who had severely examined him, came away astonished, and they told me they did not believe there had the like appeared in the world. He had only been instructed by his father, who being himself a learned person, confessed that his son knew all that he himself knew. But, what was more admirable than his vast memory, was his judgment and invention, he being tried with divers hard questions, which required maturity of thought and experience. He was also dexterous in chronology, antiquities, mathematics. In sum, an intellectus universalis, beyond all that we read of Picus Mirandula, and other precocious wits, and yet withal a very humble child.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Before 05 Aug 1661 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of Thomas Hales 3rd Baronet Hales 1695-1762 and John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682. Ham House Ham Richmond. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682. Around 1675 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 and Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682 wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1670 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of John Maitland 1st Duke Lauderdale 1616-1682. Around 1675 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of Gilbert Burnet Bishop of Salisbury 1643-1715. Before 1687 Pieter Borsseler Painter 1634-1687. Portrait of Gilbert Burnet Bishop of Salisbury 1643-1715.

capellani

capellani. Chaplain.

On 03 Aug 1482. Brass to Simon Boleyn Priest who died in 1482 in Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. Inscription: Orate p. a'i'a. Simonis Boleyn, capellani, qui obt. 3 die mensis Augi. 1482.

John Evelyn's Diary 22 November 1644. 22 Nov 1644. Was the solemn and greatest ceremony of all the State Ecclesiastical, viz, the procession of the Pope (Innocent X.) to St. John di Laterano, which, standing on the steps of Ara Celi, near the Capitol, I saw pass in this manner:—First went a guard of Switzers to make way, and divers of the avant guard of horse carrying lances. Next followed those who carried the robes of the Cardinals, two and two; then the Cardinal's mace bearers; the caudatari, on mules; the masters of their horse; the Pope's barber, tailor, baker, gardener, and other domestic officers, all on horseback, in rich liveries; the squires belonging to the Guard; five men in rich liveries led five noble Neapolitan horses, white as snow, covered to the ground with trappings richly embroidered; which is a service paid by the King of Spain for the kingdoms of Naples and Sicily, pretended feudatories to the Pope; three mules of exquisite beauty and price, trapped in crimson velvet; next followed three rich litters with mules, the litters empty; the master of the horse alone, with his squires; five trumpeters; the armerieri estra muros; the fiscal and consistorial advocates; capellani, camerieri de honore, cubiculari and chamberlains, called secreti.

Then followed four other camerieri with four caps of the dignity-pontifical, which were Cardinals' hats carried on staves; four trumpets; after them a number of noble Romans and gentlemen of quality, very rich, and followed by innumerable staffiéri and pages; the secretaries of the chancellaria, abbreviatori-accoliti in their long robes, and on mules; auditori di rota; the dean of the rôti and master of the sacred palace, on mules, with grave but rich footclothes, and in flat episcopal hats; then went more of the Roman and other nobility and courtiers, with divers pages in most rich liveries on horseback; fourteen drums belonging to the Capitol; the marshals with their staves; the two syndics; the conservators of the city, in robes of crimson damask; the knight-gonfalonier and prior of the R. R., in velvet toques; six of his Holiness's mace bearers; then the captain, or governor, of the Castle of St. Angelo, upon a brave prancer; the governor of the city; on both sides of these two long ranks of Switzers, the masters of the ceremonies; the cross bearer on horseback, with two priests at each hand on foot; pages, footmen, and guards, in abundance. Then came the Pope himself, carried in a litter, or rather open chair, of crimson velvet, richly embroidered, and borne by two stately mules; as he went he held up two fingers, blessing the multitude who were on their knees, or looking out of their windows and houses, with loud vivas and acclamations of felicity to their new Prince. This chair was followed by the master of his chamber, cup bearer, secretary, and physician; then came the Cardinal-Bishops, Cardinal-Priests, Cardinal-Deacons, Patriarchs, Archbishops, and Bishops, all in their several and distinct habits, some in red, others in green flat hats with tassels, all on gallant mules richly trapped with velvet, and led by their servants in great state and multitudes; after them, the apostolical protonotary, auditor, treasurer, and referendaries; lastly, the trumpets of the rear guard, two pages of arms in helmets with feathers, and carrying lances; two captains; the pontifical standard of the Church; the two alfieri, or cornets, of the Pope's light horse, who all followed in armor and carrying lances; which, with innumerable rich coaches, litters, and people, made up the procession. What they did at St. John di Laterano, I could not see, by reason of the prodigious crowd; so I spent most of the day in viewing the two triumphal arches which had been purposely erected a few days before, and till now covered; the one by the Duke of Parma, in the Foro Romano, the other by the Jews in the Capitol, with flattering inscriptions. They were of excellent architecture, decorated with statues and abundance of ornaments proper for the occasion, since they were but temporary, and made up of boards, cloth, etc., painted and framed on the sudden, but as to outward appearance, solid and very stately. The night ended with fireworks. What I saw was that which was built before the Spanish Ambassador's house, in the Piazza del Trinita, and another, before that of the French. The first appeared to be a mighty rock, bearing the Pope's Arms, a dragon, and divers figures, which being set on fire by one who flung a rocket at it, kindled immediately, yet preserving the figure both of the rock and statues a very long time; insomuch as it was deemed ten thousand reports of squibs and crackers spent themselves in order. That before the French Ambassador's Palace was a Diana drawn in a chariot by her dogs, with abundance of other figures as large as the life, which played with fire in the same manner. In the meantime, the windows of the whole city were set with tapers put into lanterns, or sconces, of several colored oiled paper, that the wind might not annoy them; this rendered a most glorious show. Besides these, there were at least twenty other fireworks of vast charge and rare art for their invention before divers Ambassadors, Princes, and Cardinals' Palaces, especially that on the Castle of St. Angelo, being a pyramid of lights, of great height, fastened to the ropes and cables which support the standard pole. The streets were this night as light as day, full of bonfires, cannon roaring, music playing, fountains running wine, in all excess of joy and triumph.

coram Rege

coram Rege. In the presence of the King.

John Evelyn's Diary 30 March 1673. 30 Mar 1673. Easter day. Myself and son received the blessed Communion, it being his first time, and with that whole week's more extraordinary preparation. I beseech God to make him a sincere and good Christian, while I endeavor to instill into him the fear and love of God, and discharge the duty of a father.

At the sermon coram Rege, preached by Dr. Sparrow (61), Bishop of Exeter, to a most crowded auditory; I stayed to see whether, according to custom, the Duke of York (39) received the Communion with the King (42); but he did not, to the amazement of everybody. This being the second year he had forborne, and put it off, and within a day of the Parliament sitting, who had lately made so severe an Act against the increase of Popery, gave exceeding grief and scandal to the whole nation, that the heir of it, and the son of a martyr for the Protestant religion, should apostatize. What the consequence of this will be, God only knows, and wise men dread.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

John Evelyn's Diary 22 March 1678. 22 Mar 1678. Dr. South (43) preached coram Rege, an incomparable discourse on this text, "A wounded spirit who can bear!" Note: Now was our Communion table placed altarwise; the church steeple, clock, and other reparations finished.

constipo

constipatum

constipatum. Means crowded or closely pressed together.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. 8. Eodem anno Æthelwulfus rex praefatum filium suum Aelfredum (4), magno nobilium et etiam ignobilium numero constipatum, honorifice Romam transmisit. Quo tempore dominus Leo Papa apostolicae sedi praeerat, qui praefatum infantem Aelfredum (4) oppido ordinans unxit in regem, et in filium adoptionis sibimet accipiens confirmavit.

8. In the same year, king Ethelwulf sent his son Alfred (4), above-named, to Rome, with an honourable escort both of nobles and commoners. Pope Leo (the fourth) at that time presided over the apostolic see, and he anointed for king the aforesaid Alfred (4), and adopted him as his spiritual son.

cuius anime propicietur Deus

cuius anime propicietur Deus. Upon whose soul may God have mercy.

In Jun 1534 Thomas Leman Rector -1534 died. Rector of Church of St George South Acre from 1502 to 1534. Inscription: Orate pro anima Domini Thome Leman, quandam Rectoris istius Ecclesie qui obiit r Die Mensis Junii, an Mcccccxxxiiii, cuius anime propicietur Deus.

cūrō

cūrō translates as care for, arrange, see to, attend to, take care of, cure, govern, refresh, undertake.

curavit. Third-person singular perfect active indicative of cūrō.

curavit

curavit. Third-person singular perfect active indicative of cūrō.

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

cursus

cursus. A course, sometimes racetrack.

Neolithic Cursus. A Neolithic Cursus is a linear feature of banks and ditches ranging from 50m to nearly 10km. The word cursus was given by William Stukeley Antiquarian 1687-1765 from the Latin word cursus.

Deus dedit, culpa mea perdidit

Deus dedit, culpa mea perdidit. God gave, my fault it is lost.

Dicavit

Dicavit. Said, spoke.

On 17 Jan 1851 Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 (61) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Castle Ashby. Charles Compton 3rd Marquess Northampton 1816-1877 (35) succeeded 3rd Marquess Northampton 2C 1812, 11th Earl of Northampton 5C 1618.

Angel of the Resurrection sculpted by Pietro Tenerani Sculptor 1789-1869 (76) in 1866. The quote from First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 15 Verse 52. The inscription on the side Marmoris hoc sculpti eloquens silentium spe futuri patri charissimo dicavit filius.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib

Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib. Father forgive our sins.

On 25 Mar 1440 Geoffrey Boleyn 1380-1440 (60) died. Around 1414 Alice Bracton 1385-1414 (29) died. Memorial brass in the floor of the nave of Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. It originally also had tiny figures representing their 5 sons and 4 daughters, but the inlay is lost. Inscription: Hic jacet Galfrid. Boleyn qui obt. 25 die mensis Martij 1440, et Alicie, uxor. ejus, et pueror. suorum, quorum a'i'ab; &c. Label: Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib.

Dum Descendit Largitur

Dum Descendit Largitur. Dum = while, descendit = down, largitur = gives? If anoyone has a translation of this phrase we'd be very grateful if you shared it: email@twentytrees.co.uk.

Undated (around 1650?) monument to Rowland Woodward in the Church of St Leonard Church Apethorpe. Black marble panel with pilasters enriched with rosettes, a crowned skull on the apron and a large cartouche of arms flanked by obelisks each inscribed 'Dum Descendit Largitur'; the arms are of Woodward impaling Grimsdith.

Eloquens silentium

Eloquens silentium. Silently speaks.

On 17 Jan 1851 Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 (61) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Castle Ashby. Charles Compton 3rd Marquess Northampton 1816-1877 (35) succeeded 3rd Marquess Northampton 2C 1812, 11th Earl of Northampton 5C 1618.

Angel of the Resurrection sculpted by Pietro Tenerani Sculptor 1789-1869 (76) in 1866. The quote from First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 15 Verse 52. The inscription on the side Marmoris hoc sculpti eloquens silentium spe futuri patri charissimo dicavit filius.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

Encaenia

Encaenia is an academic or sometimes ecclesiastical ceremony, usually performed at colleges or universities.

Eiusoem Nominis tertius

Eiusoem Nominis tertius. Of the third name.

On 07 Sep 1384 John Harsick III -1384 died. Brass in Church of St George South Acre of John Harsick III -1384 and his wife Catherine Calthorpe holding hands. Great Helm with Feathers. Camail and Jupon Period. His coat of arms Harsick. Her showing Harsick impaled with Calthorp Arms. At his feet a lion couchant, at hers a dog couchant. Inscription: Hic iacet Dns. Johes. Harsick Miles eiusoem Nominis tertius, qui obiit Serto die Septembris Ano Dni. Mccclxxxiv. cuius anime propicictur Deus Amen, et Domina Katherina Uxor.

Ex Libris

Ex Libris. an inscription in or on a book, to indicate the owner; bookplate.

In 1616 Anne Keilway Baroness Harington 1554-1620 (62) bequeathed to Oakham Parish Library around 200 religious works in Latin and Greek devoted to theology, history, ecclesiastical and canon law intended for the use of the Vicar and local clergy. It is one of the earliest known parochial libraries. The books were bound in leather tooled with the Harington Harrington knot in gilt, with the Latin ex libris

fari quae sentiat

On 27 Sep 1931 Robert Walpole 5th Earl Orford 1854-1931 (77) died. Monument in Church of St Andrew Wickmere sculpted by Esmond Burton Sculptor 1886-1964 (45). The stone brought from St Paul's Island in the Pacific where HMS Magaera, in which the Earl of Orford served as a midshipman, was wrecked in 1871. Armorials include Walpole impaled Barkham. Motto fari quae sentiat. Saracen's Head Crest.

Fari quae sentiat. Say what one feels. Horace. The Walpole family motto.

Fiat Voluntas

Fiat Voluntas. Thy will be done.

1581. Church of St John The Baptist Kinlet. Monument to George Blount 1513-1581 (68) and Constance Talbot 1517-1565 (64).

The following Epitaph is engraved on a white marble slab, by the side of the large Tudor Monument, which contains the kneeling figures of Sir George and Constantia Talbot, his wife, and their two children. Underneath is the entombed figure. The monument is richly decorated with the quarterings of Blount Blount and Talbot Talbot. [Latin Epitaph at Kinlet translated by the late Stanley Leighton, M.A., F.S.A.]

HERE LYETH THE BODY OF SIR GEORGE BLOUNT KNIGHT WHICH WAS LORDE OF KINLET WHO DIED IN THE YEARE OF OURE LORD GOD 1581 HERE THYRE CHILDREN BE JOHN AND ALSO DORETHY.

FIAT VOLVNTAS DEI 1584 ANNO DOMINI. AVOVS SERVIR JESUIS

Laid in this tomb is Blount of noble race, Ennobled by light of his own, and BY THE light of his father he was; His lineage most high, knightly by either parent, Worthy of these was the son's knightly name; Arms, and the charger fiery were his delight, on the day of battle, But the palace of his King delighted his youth, In manhood Scotland and the realms of France Felt his generosity in war; to both he was a terror; His neighbour's quarrels and disputes he settled all, At home he was a man of peace, Nor did he make unfitting nuptial for himself, The daughter of a knight he wedded of equal lineage, Who bore two children, of whom a daughter (47) lives, The son (34) before his father sought the realms above; After his son's death, he gives many lands to his nephew And makes him the heir of this very place — Rowland Lacon who laid his lifeless body in a tomb But his spirit the realms above hold. This Lacon an Esquire in filial memory of love This record raised. His nephew and his heir

CHRIST S LIFE'S AIM.

Be near good Christ to England, To Prince, to Nobles, And to all other Inhabitants ; Good Christ, I pray grant Peace — For by this the life of men is quiet — By this, their journey safe And all good things do multiply. By strife, what has been gotten By great labor, melts away, So to Thine own give everlasting peace — May virtue which is learning's light, Be given too, and blessings come — Far off be what, At any time may hurt.

Fiat justitia

Fiat justitia. Let justice be done.

The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes 1st Baronet 1602 1650 Volume 1 Chapter X 1621. 03 May 1621. Upon Thursday, May the 3rd, Sir Francis Bacon (60), Lord Verulam and Viscount St. Alhan, who had been exuted of the Lord Chancellor's place the Tuesday foregoing, by the taking of the great seal of England from him, was, for his notorious and base bribery in that place, censured by the Upper House of Parliament, to pay 40,000/. fine1 to the King, to be imprisoned, during his Majesty's pleasure, in the Tower of London, never again to be capable of any place of judicature under his Majesty, or to sit amongst the Peers in the Upper House.

Never had any man in those great places of gain he had gone through, having been Attorney Greneral before he was Lord Chancellor, so ill-husbanded the time, or provided for himself. His vast prodigality had eaten up all his gains; for it was agreed by all men, that he owed at this present at least £20,000 more than he was worth. Had he followed the just and virtuous steps of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt., his father, that continued Lord Keeper of the Great Seal some eighteen years under Queen Elizabeth, of ever blessed memory, his life might have been as glorious as by his many vices it proved infamous. For though he were an eminent scholar imd a reasonable good lawyer, both which he much adorned with his eloquent expression of himself and his graced delivery, yet his vices were so stupendous and great, as they utterly obscured and out-poised his virtues. He was immoderately ambitious and excessively proud, to maintain which he was necessitated to injustice and bribery, taking sometimes most basely of both sides. To this latter wickedness the favour he had with the beloved Marquis of Buckingham (28) emboldened him, as I learned in discourse from a gentleman of his bedchamber, who told me he was sure his lord should never fall as long as the said Marquis continued in favour. His most abominable and darling sin, I should rather bury in silence than mention it, were it not a most admirable instance how men are inflamed by wickedness, and held captive by the devil2. He lived, many years after his fall, in his lodgings in Gray's Inn, in Holborn, in great want and penury.

Note 1. Meade, in a note dated May 4th, 1621, says: — "On Monday divers lords were with the Lord Chancellor. The next morning the seal was taken from him, who, at delivering of it up, said, Deus dedit, culpa mea perdidit. Yesterday he was censured to pay to the King for his fine and ransom forty thousand pounds, imprisonment in the Tower during the King's pleasure, and never to sit again in Parliament, not in any court of justice, or be in commission, or ever come within the verge, or within twelve miles of the Court; and escaped degradation narrowly." — MS. Barl. 389. Meade adds, " Sir John Bennet and othen are like to follow. Fiat justitia!"

Note 2. D'Ewes here specifically charges Bacon with on abominable offence, in language too gross for publication. He states that it was supposed by some, that he would have been tried at the bar of justice for it; and says, that his guilt was so notorious while he was at York House, in the Strand, and at his lodgings in Gray's Inn, Holborn, that the following verses were cast into his rooms:

"Within this sty a hog3 doth lie. That must be hang'd for villany."

It is but right to add, that D'Ewes is the only authority for this imputation.

Not 3. Alluding, of course, to his surname of Bacon.

In 1576 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619, whilst in France, painted a portrait of Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626 who was attached to the English Embassy at the time. In 1731 (Copy of 1618 original).John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626. Unknown Painter. Posthumous portrait of Nicholas Bacon Lord Keeper 1510-1579. Before 1628 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. In 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 wearing his Garter Robes and Leg Garter. Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. In 1619 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. Around 1625 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628.

Filia

Filia. Daughter.

On 11 Jul 1673 Penelope Barkham 1665-1673 (8) died. She was buried at Church of St George South Acre. Inscription: Hic jacet Penelope, filia Domini Edwardi Barkham Baronetti (45), et Franciscæ Uxoris sue, qui quidem Penelope, Ætate Puellula, sed Prudentiâ, Pietate, Virtute Matrona omnibus satis, Parentibus nimis, et Deo maxime chara, terras reliquit, ad Nuptias Agni vocata Julij 11, 1673, Annoq; Ætatis suæ, Octavo.

Filium

Filium. Sons.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. 8. Eodem anno Æthelwulfus rex praefatum filium suum Aelfredum (4), magno nobilium et etiam ignobilium numero constipatum, honorifice Romam transmisit. Quo tempore dominus Leo Papa apostolicae sedi praeerat, qui praefatum infantem Aelfredum (4) oppido ordinans unxit in regem, et in filium adoptionis sibimet accipiens confirmavit.

8. In the same year, king Ethelwulf sent his son Alfred (4), above-named, to Rome, with an honourable escort both of nobles and commoners. Pope Leo (the fourth) at that time presided over the apostolic see, and he anointed for king the aforesaid Alfred (4), and adopted him as his spiritual son.

Filius

Filius. Son .

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

On 17 Jan 1851 Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 (61) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Castle Ashby. Charles Compton 3rd Marquess Northampton 1816-1877 (35) succeeded 3rd Marquess Northampton 2C 1812, 11th Earl of Northampton 5C 1618.

Angel of the Resurrection sculpted by Pietro Tenerani Sculptor 1789-1869 (76) in 1866. The quote from First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 15 Verse 52. The inscription on the side Marmoris hoc sculpti eloquens silentium spe futuri patri charissimo dicavit filius.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

firmato

firmata

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

grātia

Grātia. In English 'grace'.

gratiae. Genitive or Dative singular of grātia.

gratiae

gratiae. Genitive or Dative singular of grātia.

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

Hic jacet

Hic jacet. Here lies, here is buried.

On 07 Sep 1384 John Harsick III -1384 died. Brass in Church of St George South Acre of John Harsick III -1384 and his wife Catherine Calthorpe holding hands. Great Helm with Feathers. Camail and Jupon Period. His coat of arms Harsick. Her showing Harsick impaled with Calthorp Arms. At his feet a lion couchant, at hers a dog couchant. Inscription: Hic iacet Dns. Johes. Harsick Miles eiusoem Nominis tertius, qui obiit Serto die Septembris Ano Dni. Mccclxxxiv. cuius anime propicictur Deus Amen, et Domina Katherina Uxor.

On 25 Mar 1440 Geoffrey Boleyn 1380-1440 (60) died. Around 1414 Alice Bracton 1385-1414 (29) died. Memorial brass in the floor of the nave of Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. It originally also had tiny figures representing their 5 sons and 4 daughters, but the inlay is lost. Inscription: Hic jacet Galfrid. Boleyn qui obt. 25 die mensis Martij 1440, et Alicie, uxor. ejus, et pueror. suorum, quorum a'i'ab; &c. Label: Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib.

On 11 Jul 1673 Penelope Barkham 1665-1673 (8) died. She was buried at Church of St George South Acre. Inscription: Hic jacet Penelope, filia Domini Edwardi Barkham Baronetti (45), et Franciscæ Uxoris sue, qui quidem Penelope, Ætate Puellula, sed Prudentiâ, Pietate, Virtute Matrona omnibus satis, Parentibus nimis, et Deo maxime chara, terras reliquit, ad Nuptias Agni vocata Julij 11, 1673, Annoq; Ætatis suæ, Octavo.

Horresco referens

Horresco referens. I shudder as I tell the story

John Evelyn's Diary 27 January 1689. 27 Jan 1689. I dined at the Admiralty, where was brought in a child not twelve years old, the son of one Dr. Clench, of the most prodigious maturity of knowledge, for I cannot call it altogether memory, but something more extraordinary. Mr. Pepys (55) and myself examined him, not in any method, but with promiscuous questions, which required judgment and discernment to answer so readily and pertinently. There was not anything in chronology, history, geography, the several systems of astronomy, courses of the stars, longitude, latitude, doctrine of the spheres, courses and sources of rivers, creeks, harbors, eminent cities, boundaries and bearings of countries, not only in Europe, but in any other part of the earth, which he did not readily resolve and demonstrate his knowledge of, readily drawing out with a pen anything he would describe. He was able not only to repeat the most famous things which are left us in any of the Greek or Roman histories, monarchies, republics, wars, colonies, exploits by sea and land, but all the sacred stories of the Old and New Testament; the succession of all the monarchies, Babylonian, Persian, Greek, Roman, with all the lower Emperors, Popes, Heresiarchs, and Councils, what they were called about, what they determined, or in the controversy about Easter, the tenets of the Gnostics, Sabellians, Arians, Nestorians; the difference between St. Cyprian and Stephen about re-baptism, the schisms. We leaped from that to other things totally different, to Olympic years, and synchronisms; we asked him questions which could not be resolved without considerable meditation and judgment, nay of some particulars of the Civil Laws, of the Digest and Code. He gave a stupendous account of both natural and moral philosophy, and even in metaphysics.

Having thus exhausted ourselves rather than this wonderful child, or angel rather, for he was as beautiful and lovely in countenance as in knowledge, we concluded with asking him if, in all he had read or heard of, he had ever met with anything which was like this expedition of the Prince of Orange (38), with so small a force to obtain three great kingdoms without any contest. After a little thought, he told us that he knew of nothing which did more resemble it than the coming of Constantine the Great out of Britain, through France and Italy, so tedious a march, to meet Maxentius, whom he overthrew at Pons Milvius with very little conflict, and at the very gates of Rome, which he entered and was received with triumph, and obtained the empire, not of three kingdoms only, but of all the then known world. He was perfect in the Latin authors, spoke French naturally, and gave us a description of France, Italy, Savoy, Spain, ancient and modernly divided; as also of ancient Greece, Scythia, and northern countries and tracts: we left questioning further. He did this without any set or formal repetitions, as one who had learned things without book, but as if he minded other things, going about the room, and toying with a parrot there, and as he was at dinner (tanquam aliua agens, as it were) seeming to be full of play, of a lively, sprightly temper, always smiling, and exceedingly pleasant, without the least levity, rudeness, or childishness.

His father assured us he never imposed anything to charge his memory by causing him to get things by heart, not even the rules of grammar; but his tutor (who was a Frenchman) read to him, first in French, then in Latin; that he usually played among other boys four or five hours every day, and that he was as earnest at his play as at his study. He was perfect in arithmetic, and now newly entered into Greek. In sum (horresco referens), I had read of divers forward and precocious youths, and some I have known, but I never did either hear or read of anything like to this sweet child, if it be right to call him child who has more knowledge than most men in the world. I counseled his father not to set his heart too much on this jewel, "Immodicis brevis est ætas, et rara senectus", as I myself learned by sad experience in my most dear child Richard (36), many years since, who, dying before he was six years old, was both in shape and countenance and pregnancy of learning, next to a prodigy.

In 1666. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 February 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 May 1666. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar.

ibidem

ibidem. Same. Same time, same place, same reference. Commonly abbreviated to Ibid.

Immodicis brevis est ætas, et rara senectus

Immodicis brevis est ætas, et rara senectus. From Martial: For the unduly blessed life is brief and old age comes rarely.

John Evelyn's Diary 27 January 1689. 27 Jan 1689. I dined at the Admiralty, where was brought in a child not twelve years old, the son of one Dr. Clench, of the most prodigious maturity of knowledge, for I cannot call it altogether memory, but something more extraordinary. Mr. Pepys (55) and myself examined him, not in any method, but with promiscuous questions, which required judgment and discernment to answer so readily and pertinently. There was not anything in chronology, history, geography, the several systems of astronomy, courses of the stars, longitude, latitude, doctrine of the spheres, courses and sources of rivers, creeks, harbors, eminent cities, boundaries and bearings of countries, not only in Europe, but in any other part of the earth, which he did not readily resolve and demonstrate his knowledge of, readily drawing out with a pen anything he would describe. He was able not only to repeat the most famous things which are left us in any of the Greek or Roman histories, monarchies, republics, wars, colonies, exploits by sea and land, but all the sacred stories of the Old and New Testament; the succession of all the monarchies, Babylonian, Persian, Greek, Roman, with all the lower Emperors, Popes, Heresiarchs, and Councils, what they were called about, what they determined, or in the controversy about Easter, the tenets of the Gnostics, Sabellians, Arians, Nestorians; the difference between St. Cyprian and Stephen about re-baptism, the schisms. We leaped from that to other things totally different, to Olympic years, and synchronisms; we asked him questions which could not be resolved without considerable meditation and judgment, nay of some particulars of the Civil Laws, of the Digest and Code. He gave a stupendous account of both natural and moral philosophy, and even in metaphysics.

Having thus exhausted ourselves rather than this wonderful child, or angel rather, for he was as beautiful and lovely in countenance as in knowledge, we concluded with asking him if, in all he had read or heard of, he had ever met with anything which was like this expedition of the Prince of Orange (38), with so small a force to obtain three great kingdoms without any contest. After a little thought, he told us that he knew of nothing which did more resemble it than the coming of Constantine the Great out of Britain, through France and Italy, so tedious a march, to meet Maxentius, whom he overthrew at Pons Milvius with very little conflict, and at the very gates of Rome, which he entered and was received with triumph, and obtained the empire, not of three kingdoms only, but of all the then known world. He was perfect in the Latin authors, spoke French naturally, and gave us a description of France, Italy, Savoy, Spain, ancient and modernly divided; as also of ancient Greece, Scythia, and northern countries and tracts: we left questioning further. He did this without any set or formal repetitions, as one who had learned things without book, but as if he minded other things, going about the room, and toying with a parrot there, and as he was at dinner (tanquam aliua agens, as it were) seeming to be full of play, of a lively, sprightly temper, always smiling, and exceedingly pleasant, without the least levity, rudeness, or childishness.

His father assured us he never imposed anything to charge his memory by causing him to get things by heart, not even the rules of grammar; but his tutor (who was a Frenchman) read to him, first in French, then in Latin; that he usually played among other boys four or five hours every day, and that he was as earnest at his play as at his study. He was perfect in arithmetic, and now newly entered into Greek. In sum (horresco referens), I had read of divers forward and precocious youths, and some I have known, but I never did either hear or read of anything like to this sweet child, if it be right to call him child who has more knowledge than most men in the world. I counseled his father not to set his heart too much on this jewel, "Immodicis brevis est ætas, et rara senectus", as I myself learned by sad experience in my most dear child Richard (36), many years since, who, dying before he was six years old, was both in shape and countenance and pregnancy of learning, next to a prodigy.

In 1666. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 February 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 May 1666. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar.

Incipit

Incipit. The first line of a text.

jejune

jejune. Of writing, dry and uninteresting.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. Museums, nevertheless, have their uses, and Evelyn's comparatively jejune record has laid us under no small obligation. But for Pepys's amazing indiscretion and garrulity, qualities of which one cannot have too little in life, or too much in the record of it, Evelyn would have been esteemed the first diarist of his age. Unable for want of these qualifications to draw any adequate picture of the stirring life around him, he has executed at least one portrait admirably, his own. The likeness is, moreover, valuable, as there is every reason to suppose it typical, and representative of a very important class of society, the well-bred and well-conducted section of the untitled aristocracy of England. We may well believe that these men were not only the salt but the substance of their order. There was an ill-bred section exclusively devoted to festivity and sport. There was an ill-conducted section, plunged into the dissipations of court life. But the majority were men like Evelyn: not, perhaps, equally refined by culture and travel, or equally interested in literary research and scientific experiment, but well informed and polite; no strangers to the Court, yet hardly to be called courtiers, and preferring country to town; loyal to Church and King but not fanatical or rancorous; as yet but slightly imbued with the principles of civil and religious liberty, yet adverse to carry the dogma of divine right further than the right of succession; fortunate in having survived all ideas of serfdom or vassalage, and in having few private interests not fairly reconcilable with the general good. Evelyn was made to be the spokesman of such a class, and, meaning to speak only for himself, he delivers its mind concerning the Commonwealth and the Restoration, the conduct of the later Stuart Kings and the Revolution.

Around 1644. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658. Portrait of John Evelyn 1620-1706. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of John Evelyn 1620-1706. Around 1650 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of John Evelyn 1620-1706. In 1666. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 February 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 May 1666. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703.

nec

nec translates to not.

De Latere

De Latere means from, from the point of view of, on the side of, in respect of, away. Compare with the word 'lateral'.

A Legate de Latere is the highest rank of Papal Legate literally meaning 'on the Pope's side'.De Latere.

Legatus

A Legatus, anglicised as legate, was a high-ranking Roman military officer in the Roman Army, equivalent to a modern high-ranking general officer. Initially used to delegate power, the term became formalised under Augustus as the officer in command of a legion.

Le roy le veut

Le roy le veut. The King wills it.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 64 To Richard Bentley, Esq. We found the ruins of Bayham Abbey, which the Barrets and Hardings bid us visit. There are small but pretty remains, and a neat little Gothic house built near them by their nephew Pratt. They have found a tomb of an abbot, with a crosier, at length on the stone.

Here our woes increase. The roads row bad beyond all badness, the night dark beyond all darkness, our guide frightened beyond all frightfulness. However, without being at all killed, we got UP, or down,—I forget which, it was so dark,—a famous precipice called Silver Hill, and about ten at night arrived at a wretched village called Rotherbridge. We had still six miles hither, but determined to stop, as it would be a pity to break our necks before we had seen all we intended. But alas! there was only one bed to be had: all the rest were inhabited by smugglers, whom the people of the house called mountebanks; and with one of whom the lady of the den told Mr. Chute he might lie. We did not at all take to this society, but, armed with links and lanthems, set out again upon this impracticable journey. At two o'clock in the morning we got hither to a still worse inn, and that crammed with excise officers, one of whom had just shot a smuggler. However, as we were neutral powers, we have passed safely through both armies hitherto, and can give you a little farther history of our wandering through these mountains, where the young gentlemen are forced to drive their curricles with a pair of oxen. the only morsel of good road we have found, was what even the natives had assured us was totally impracticable: these were eight miles to Hurst Monceaux.(338) It is seated at the end of a large vale, five miles in a direct line to the sea, with wings of blue hills covered with wood, one of which falls down to the in a sweep of a hundred acres. The building, for the convenience of water to the moat, sees nothing at all; indeed it is entirely imagined on a plan of defence, with drawbridges actually in being, round towers, watch-towers mounted on them, and battlements pierced for the passage of arrows from long bows. It was built in the time of Henry VI., and is as perfect as the first day. It does not seem to have been ever quite finished, or at least that age was not arrived at the luxury of white-wash; for almost all the walls, except in the principal chambers, are in their native brickhood. It is a square building, each side about two hundred feet in length; a porch and cloister, very like Eton College; and the whole is much in the same taste, the kitchen extremely so, with three vast funnels to the chimneys going up on the inside. There are two or three little courts for offices, but no magnificence of apartments. It is scarcely furnished with a few necessary beds and chairs: one side has been sashed, and a drawing-room and dining-room and two or three rooms wainscoted by the Earl of Sussex, who married a natural daughter of Charles II. Their arms with delightful carvings by Gibbons-, particularly two pheasants, hang over the chimneys. Over the great drawing-room chimney is the first coat armour of the first Leonard, Lord Dacre, with all his alliances. Mr. Chute was transported, and called cousin with ten thousand quarterings.(339) The chapel is small, and mean: the Virgin and seven long lean saints, ill done, remain in the windows. There have been four more, but seem to have been removed for light; and we actually found St. Catherine, and another gentlewoman with a church in her hand, exiled into the buttery. There remain two odd cavities, with very small wooden screens on each side the altar, which seem to have been confessionals. The outside is a mixture of gray brick and stone, that has a very venerable appearance. The drawbridges are romantic to a degree; and there is a dungeon, that gives one a delightful idea of living in the days of soccage and under such goodly tenures. They showed us a dismal chamber which they called Drummer's-hall, and suppose that Mr. Addison's comedy is descended from it. In the windows of the gallery over the cloisters, which leads all round to the apartments, is the device of the Fienneses, a wolf holding a baton with a scroll, Le roy le veut — an unlucky motto, as I shall tell you presently, to the last peer of that line. The estate is two thousand a year, and so compact as to have but seventeen houses upon it. We walked up a brave old avenue to the church, with ships sailing on our left hand the whole way. Before the altar lies a lank brass knight, knight William Fienis, chevalier, who obiit c.c.c.c.v. that is in 1405. By the altar is a beautiful tomb, all in our trefoil taste, varied into a thousand little canopies and patterns, and two knights reposing on their backs. These were Thomas, Lord Dacre, and his only son Gregory, who died sans issue. An old grayheaded beadsman of the family talked to us of a blot in the scutcheon; and we had observed that the field of the arms was green instead of blue, and the lions ramping to the right, contrary to order. This and the man's imperfect narrative let us into the circumstances of the personage before us; for there is no inscription. He went in a Chevy-chase style to hunt in a Mr. Pelham's (340) park at Lawton: the keepers opposed, a fray ensued, a man was killed. The haughty baron took the death upon himself, as most secure of pardon; but however, though there was no chancellor of the exchequer in the question, he was condemned to be hanged: Le roy le Vouloist.

(338) the ancient inheritance of Lord Dacre of the South.-E.

(339) Chaloner Chute, Esq, of the Vine, married Catherine, daughter of Richard, Lord Dacre.-E.

(340) At the date of this letter Mr. Pelham was prime minister.

Around 1556 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 with an inset portrait of husband Thomas Fiennes 9th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1515-1541. In 1559 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Neville Baroness Dacre Gilsland 1524-1576 and her son Gregory Fiennes 10th Baron Dacre Gilsland 1539-1594.

longum

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

Marmoris hoc sculpti

Marmoris hoc sculpti. The block of stone from which this is sculpted.

On 17 Jan 1851 Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 (61) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Castle Ashby. Charles Compton 3rd Marquess Northampton 1816-1877 (35) succeeded 3rd Marquess Northampton 2C 1812, 11th Earl of Northampton 5C 1618.

Angel of the Resurrection sculpted by Pietro Tenerani Sculptor 1789-1869 (76) in 1866. The quote from First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 15 Verse 52. The inscription on the side Marmoris hoc sculpti eloquens silentium spe futuri patri charissimo dicavit filius.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

Martij

Martij. March.

Mensis

Mensis. Month.

On 25 Mar 1440 Geoffrey Boleyn 1380-1440 (60) died. Around 1414 Alice Bracton 1385-1414 (29) died. Memorial brass in the floor of the nave of Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. It originally also had tiny figures representing their 5 sons and 4 daughters, but the inlay is lost. Inscription: Hic jacet Galfrid. Boleyn qui obt. 25 die mensis Martij 1440, et Alicie, uxor. ejus, et pueror. suorum, quorum a'i'ab; &c. Label: Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib.

On 03 Aug 1482. Brass to Simon Boleyn Priest who died in 1482 in Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. Inscription: Orate p. a'i'a. Simonis Boleyn, capellani, qui obt. 3 die mensis Augi. 1482.

In Jun 1534 Thomas Leman Rector -1534 died. Rector of Church of St George South Acre from 1502 to 1534. Inscription: Orate pro anima Domini Thome Leman, quandam Rectoris istius Ecclesie qui obiit r Die Mensis Junii, an Mcccccxxxiiii, cuius anime propicietur Deus.

moram

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

mutatis mutandis

mutatis mutandis means changes have been made where necessary but the main point remains the same.

John Evelyn's Diary Introduction. The two chief diarists of the age of Charles the Second are, mutatis mutandis, not ill characterized by the remark of a wicked wit upon the brothers Austin. "John Austin", it was said, "served God and died poor: Charles Austin served the devil, and died rich. Both were clever fellows. Charles was much the cleverer of the two". Thus John Evelyn and Samuel Pepys, the former a perfect model of decorum, the latter a grievous example of indecorum, have respectively left us diaries, of which the indecorous is to the decorous as a zoölogical garden is to a museum: while the disparity between the testamentary bequests of the two Austins but imperfectly represents the reputation standing to Pepys's account with posterity in comparison with that accruing to his sedate and dignified contemporary.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II Around 1644. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658. Portrait of John Evelyn 1620-1706. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of John Evelyn 1620-1706. Around 1650 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of John Evelyn 1620-1706. In 1666. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 February 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 May 1666. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703.

Noli me tangere

Noli me tangere means "Touch me not". Best known from the Gospel of John Chapter 20 Verse 17 for being what Jesus says to Mary Magdelene after his resurrection.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 September 1680. 02 Sep 1680. I had an opportunity, his Majesty (50) being still at Windsor, of seeing his private library at Whitehall, at my full ease. I went with expectation of finding some curiosities, but, though there were about 1,000 volumes, there were few of importance which I had not perused before. They consisted chiefly of such books as had from time to time been dedicated, or presented to him; a few histories, some Travels and French books, abundance of maps and sea charts, entertainments and pomps, buildings and pieces relating to the navy, some mathematical instruments; but what was most rare, were three or four Romish breviaries, with a great deal of miniature and monkish painting and gilding, one of which is most exquisitely done, both as to the figures, grotesques, and compartments, to the utmost of that curious art. There is another in which I find written by the hand of King Henry VII., his giving it to his dear daughter, Margaret, afterward Queen of Scots, in which he desires her to pray for his soul, subscribing his name at length. There is also the process of the philosophers' great elixir, represented in divers pieces of excellent miniature, but the discourse is in high Dutch, a MS. There is another MS. in quarto, of above 300 years old, in French, being an institution of physic, and in the botanical part the plants are curiously painted in miniature; also a folio MS. of good thickness, being the several exercises, as Themes, Orations, Translations, etc., of King Edward VI., all written and subscribed by his own hand, and with his name very legible, and divers of the Greek interleaved and corrected after the manner of schoolboys' exercises, and that exceedingly well and proper; with some epistles to his preceptor, which show that young prince to have been extraordinarily advanced in learning, and as Cardan, who had been in England affirmed, stupendously knowing for his age. There is likewise his journal, no less testifying his early ripeness and care about the affairs of state.

There are besides many pompous volumes, some embossed with gold, and intaglios on agates, medals, etc. I spent three or four entire days, locked up, and alone, among these books and curiosities. In the rest of the private lodgings contiguous to this, are divers of the best pictures of the great masters, Raphael, Titian, etc., and in my esteem, above all, the "Noli me tangere" of our blessed Savior to Mary Magdalen after his Resurrection, of Hans Holbein; than which I never saw so much reverence and kind of heavenly astonishment expressed in a picture.

There are also divers curious clocks, watches, and pendules of exquisite work, and other curiosities. An ancient woman who made these lodgings clean, and had all the keys, let me in at pleasure for a small reward, by means of a friend.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Gospel of John Chapter 20 Verse 17. KJB. Jesus saith unto her, Touch me not; for I am not yet ascended to my Father: but go to my brethren, and say unto them, I ascend unto my Father, and your Father; and to my God, and your God.

opima spolia

opima spolia. Rich spoils. The armour, arms, and other effects that an ancient Roman general stripped from the body of an opposing commander slain in single combat.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 59 To George Montagu Esq. 06 Jun 1752. Arlington_Street. To George Montagu Esq (39).

I have just been in London for two or three days, to fetch an adventure, and am returned to my hill and castle. I can't say I lost my labour, as you shall hear. Last Sunday night, being as wet a night as you shall see in a summer's day, about half an hour after twelve, I was just come home from White's, and undressing to step into bed, I heard Harry, who you know lies forwards, roar out, "Stop thief!" and run down stairs. I ran after him. Don't be frightened; I have not lost one enamel, nor bronze, nor have been shot through the head again. A gentlewoman, who lives at Governor Pitt's (59),(312) next door but one to me, and where Mr. Bentley used to live, was going to bed too, and heard people breaking into Mr. Freeman's house, who, like some acquaintance of mine in Albemarle-street, goes out of town, locks up his doors, and leaves the community to watch his furniture. N. B. It was broken open but two years ago, and all the chairmen vow they shall steal his house away another time, before we shall trouble our heads about it. Well, madam called out "watch;" two men who were centinels, ran away, and Harry's voice after them. Down came I, and with a posse of chairmen and watchmen found the third fellow in the area of Mr. Freeman's house. Mayhap you have seen all this in the papers, little thinking who commanded the detachment. Harry fetched a blunderbuss to invite the thief up. One of the chairmen, who was drunk, cried, "Give me the blunderbuss, I'll shoot him!" But as the general's head was a little cooler, he prevented military execution, and took the prisoner without bloodshed, intending to make his triumphal entry into the metropolis of Twickenham with his captive tied to the wheels of his postchaise. I find my style rises so much with the recollection of my victory, that I don't know how to descend to tell you that the enemy was a carpenter, and had a leather apron on. The next step was to share my glory with my friends. I despatched a courier to White's for George Selwyn, who you know, loves nothing upon earth so well as a criminal, except the execution of him. It happened very luckily, that the drawer, who received my message, has very lately been robbed himself, and had the wound fresh in his memory. He stalked up into the club-room, stopped short, and with a hollow trembling voice said, "Mr. Selwyn! Mr. Walpole's compliments to you, and he has got a house-breaker for you!" A squadron immediately came to reinforce me, and having summoned Moreland with the keys of the fortress, we marched into the house to search for more of the gang. Colonel Seabright with his sword drawn went first, and then I, exactly the figure of Robinson Crusoe, with a candle and lanthorn in my hand, a carbine upon my shoulder, my hair wet and about my ears, and in a linen night-gown and slippers. We found the kitchen shutters forced but not finished; and in the area a tremendous bag of tools, a hammer large enough for the hand of a Joel, and six chisels! All which opima spolia, as there was no temple of Jupiter Capitolinus in the neighbourhood, I was reduced to offer on the altar of Sir Thomas Clarges (63).

Am now, as I told you, returned to my plough with as much humility and pride as any of my great predecessors. We lead quite a rural life, have had a sheep-shearing, a hay-making, a syllabub under the cow, and a fishing of three gold fish out of Poyang,(313) for a present to Madam Clive. They breed with me excessively, and are grown to the size of small perch. Every thing grows, if tempests would let it; but I have had two of my largest trees broke to-day with the wind, and another last week. I am much obliged to you for the flower you offer me, but by the description it is an Austrian rose, and I have several now in bloom. Mr. Bentley is with me, finishing the drawings for Gray's Odes; there are some mandarin-cats fishing for gold fish, which will delight you; au reste, he is just where he was: he has heard something about a journey to Haughton, to the great Cu(314) of Hauculeo, but it don't seem fixed, unless he hears farther. Did he tell you the Prices and your aunt Cosby had dined here from Hampton Court? The mignonette beauty looks mighty well in his grandmother's jointure. The Memoires of last year are quite finished, but I shall add some pages of notes, that will not want anecdotes. Discontents, of the nature of those about Windsor-park, are spreading about Richmond. Lord Brooke, who has taken the late Duchess of Rutland's at Petersham, asked for a key; the answer was, (mind it, for it was tolerably mortifying to an Earl,) "that the Princess had already refused one to my Lord Chancellor."

By the way, you know that reverend head of the law is frequently shut up here with my Lady M * * * * h, who is as rich and as tipsy as Cacafogo in the comedy. What a jumble of avarice, lewdness, dignity,—and claret!

You will be pleased with a story of Lord Bury (28), that is come from Scotland: he is quartered at Inverness: the magistrates invited him to an entertainment with fire-works, which they intended to give on the morrow for the Duke's birthday. He thanked them, assured them he would represent their zeal to his Royal Highness; but he did not doubt but it would be more agreeable to him, if they postponed it to the day following, the anniversary of the battle of Culloden. They stared, said they could not promise on their own authority, but would go and consult their body. They returned, told him it was unprecedented, and could not be complied with. Lord Bury replied, he was sorry they had not given a negative at once, for he had mentioned it to his soldiers, who would not bear a disappointment, and was afraid it would provoke them to some outrage upon the town. This did;-they celebrated Culloden. Adieu!

(312) George Morton Pitt (59), Esq, Member for Pontefract.-E.

(313) Mr. Walpole called his gold-fish pond, Poyang.

(314) The Earl of Halifax (35).

In 1764 Joshua Reynolds 1723-1788. Portrait of George Montagu Dunk 2nd Earl Halifax 1716-1771. In 1767 Daniel Gardner Painter 1750-1805. Portrait of George Montagu Dunk 2nd Earl Halifax 1716-1771 in conversation with his secretaries. He wearing his Leg Garter.

Orate pro anima

Orate pro anima. Pray for the soul.

On 03 Aug 1482. Brass to Simon Boleyn Priest who died in 1482 in Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. Inscription: Orate p. a'i'a. Simonis Boleyn, capellani, qui obt. 3 die mensis Augi. 1482.

In Jun 1534 Thomas Leman Rector -1534 died. Rector of Church of St George South Acre from 1502 to 1534. Inscription: Orate pro anima Domini Thome Leman, quandam Rectoris istius Ecclesie qui obiit r Die Mensis Junii, an Mcccccxxxiiii, cuius anime propicietur Deus.

Pace

Pace. Peace.

John Evelyn's Diary 18 January 1645. 18 Jan 1645. I went to see the Pope's Palace, the Vatican, where he for the most part keeps his Court. It was first built by Pope Symmachus, and since augmented to a vast pile of building by his successors. That part of it added by Sextus V. is most magnificent. This leads us into divers terraces arched sub dio, painted by Raphael with the histories of the Bible, so esteemed, that artists come from all parts of Europe to make their studies from these designs. The foliage and grotesque about some of the compartments are admirable. In another room are represented at large, maps and plots of most countries in the world, in vast tables, with brief descriptions. The stairs which ascend out of St. Peter's portico into the first hall, are rarely contrived for ease; these lead into the hall of Gregory XIII., the walls whereof, half way to the roof, are incrusted with most precious marbles of various colors and works. So is also the pavement inlaid work; but what exceeds description is, the volta, or roof itself, which is so exquisitely painted, that it is almost impossible for the skillfullest eyes to discern whether it be the work of the pencil upon a flat, or of a tool cut deep in stone. The Rota dentata, in this admirable perspective, on the left hand as one goes out, the Setella, etc., are things of art incomparable. Certainly this is one of the most superb and royal apartments in the world, much too beautiful for a guard of gigantic Switzers, who do nothing but drink and play at cards in it. Going up these stairs is a painting of St. Peter, walking on the sea toward our Savior.

Out of this I went into another hall, just before the chapel, called the Sàla del Conclave, full of admirable paintings; among others is the Assassination of Coligni, the great [Protestant] French Admiral, murdered by the Duke of Guise, in the Parisian massacre at the nuptials of Henry IV, with Queen Margaret; under it is written, "Coligni et sociorum cædes:" on the other side, "Rex Coligi necem probat"..

There is another very large picture, under which is inscribed:

Alexander Papa III., Frederici Primi Imperatoris iram et impetum fugiens, abdidit se Venetijs; cognitum et à senatu perhonorificè susceptum, Othone Imperatoris filio navali prælio victo captoq; Fredericus, pace facta, supplex adorat; fidem et obedientiam pollicitus. Ita Pontifici sua dignitas Venet. Reip. beneficio restituta MCLXXVIII.

This inscription I the rather took notice of, because Urban VIII. had caused it to be blotted out during the difference between him and that State; but it was now restored and refreshed by his successor, to the great honor of the Venetians. The Battle of Lepanto is another fair piece here.

Now we came into the Pope's chapel, so much celebrated for the Last Judgment painted by M. Angelo Buonarotti. It is a painting in fresco, upon a dead wall at the upper end of the chapel, just over the high altar, of a vast design and miraculous fancy, considering the multitude of naked figures and variety of posture. The roof also is full of rare work. Hence, we went into the sacristia where were showed all the most precious vestments, copes, and furniture of the chapel. One priestly cope, with the whole suite, had been sent from one of our English Henrys, and is shown for a great rarity. There were divers of the Pope's pantoufles that are kissed on his foot, having rich jewels embroidered on the instep, covered with crimson velvet; also his tiara, or triple crown, divers miters, crosiers, etc., all bestudded with precious stones, gold, and pearl, to a very great value; a very large cross, carved (as they affirm) out of the holy wood itself; numerous utensils of crystal, gold, agate, amber, and other costly materials for the altar.

We then went into those chambers painted with the Histories of the burning of Rome, quenched by the procession of a Crucifix; the victory of Constantine over Maxentius; St. Peter's delivery out of Prison; all by Julio Romano, and are therefore called the Painters' Academy, because you always find some young men or other designing from them: a civility which is not refused in Italy, where any rare pieces of the old and best masters are extant, and which is the occasion of breeding up many excellent men in that profession.

The Sala Clementina's Suffito is painted by Cherubin Alberti, with an ample landscape of Paul Bril's.

We were then conducted into a new gallery, whose sides were painted with views of the most famous places, towns, and territories in Italy, rarely done, and upon the roof the chief Acts of the Roman Church since St. Peter's pretended See there. It is doubtless one of the most magnificent galleries in Europe.—Out of this we came into the Consistory, a noble room, the volta painted in grotesque, as I remember. At the upper end, is an elevated throne and a baldachin, or canopy of state, for his Holiness, over it.

From thence, through a very long gallery (longer, I think, than the French Kings at the Louvre), but only of bare walls, we were brought into the Vatican Library. This passage was now full of poor people, to each of whom, in his passage to St. Peter's, the Pope gave a mezzo grosse. I believe they were in number near 1,500 or 2,000 persons.

This library is the most nobly built, furnished, and beautified of any in the world; ample, stately, light, and cheerful, looking into a most pleasant garden. The walls and roof are painted, not with antiques and grotesques, like our Bodleian at Oxford, but emblems, figures, diagrams, and the like learned inventions, found out by the wit and industry of famous men, of which there are now whole volumes extant. There were likewise the effigies of the most illustrious men of letters and fathers of the church, with divers noble statues, in white marble, at the entrance, viz, Hippolytus and Aristides. The General Councils are painted on the side walls. As to the ranging of the books, they are all shut up in presses of wainscot, and not exposed on shelves to the open air, nor are the most precious mixed among the more ordinary, which are showed to the curious only; such are those two Virgils written on parchment, of more than a thousand years old; the like, a Terence; the "Acts of the Apostles" in golden capital letters; Petrarch's "Epigrams", written with his own hand; also a Hebrew parchment, made up in the ancient manner, from whence they were first called "Volumina", with the Cornua; but what we English do much inquire after, the book which our Henry VIII. writ against Luther.25.

The largest room is 100 paces long; at the end is the gallery of printed books; then the gallery of the Duke of Urban's library, in which are MSS. of remarkable miniature, and divers Chinese, Mexican, Samaritan, Abyssinian, and other oriental books.

In another wing of the edifice, 200 paces long, were all the books taken from Heidelberg, of which the learned Gruter, and other great scholars, had been keepers. These walls and volte are painted with representations of the machines invented by Domenico Fontana for erection of the obelisks; and the true design of Mahomet's sepulchre at Mecca.

Out of this we went to see the Conclave, where, during a vacancy, the Cardinals are shut up till they are agreed upon a new election; the whole manner whereof was described to us.

Hence we went into the Pope's Armory, under the library. Over the door is this inscription: URBANUS VIII. LITTERIS ARMA, ARMA LITTERIS.

I hardly believe any prince in Europe is able to show a more completely furnished library of Mars, for the quality and quantity, which is 40,000 complete for horse and foot, and neatly kept. Out of this we passed again by the long gallery, and at the lower end of it down a very large pair of stairs, round, without any steps as usually, but descending with an evenness so ample and easy, that a horse-litter, or coach, may with ease be drawn up; the sides of the vacuity are set with columns: those at Amboise, on the Loire, in France, are something of this invention, but nothing so spruce. By these, we descended into the Vatican gardens, called Belvedere, where entering first into a kind of court, we were showed those incomparable statues (so famed by Pliny and others) of Laocoon with his three sons embraced by a huge serpent, all of one entire Parian stone, very white and perfect, somewhat bigger than the life, the work of those three celebrated sculptors, Agesandrus, Polydorus, and Artemidorus, Rhodians; it was found among the ruins of Titus's baths, and placed here. Pliny says this statue is to be esteemed before all pictures and statues in the world; and I am of his opinion, for I never beheld anything of art approach it. Here are also those two famous images of Nilus with the children playing about him, and that of Tiber; Romulus and Remus with the Wolf; the dying Cleopatra; the Venus and Cupid, rare pieces; the Mercury; Cybel; Hercules; Apollo; Antinous: most of which are, for defense against the weather, shut up in niches with wainscot doors. We were likewise showed the relics of the Hadrian Moles, viz, the Pine, a vast piece of metal which stood on the summit of that mausoleum; also a peacock of copper, supposed to have been part of Scipio's monument.

In the garden without this (which contains a vast circuit of ground) are many stately fountains, especially two casting water into antique lavers, brought from Titus's baths; some fair grots and water-works, that noble cascade where the ship dances, with divers other pleasant inventions, walks, terraces, meanders, fruit trees, and a most goodly prospect over the greatest part of the city. One fountain under the gate I must not omit, consisting of three jettos of water gushing out of the mouths or proboscides of bees (the arms of the late Pope), because of the inscription:

Quid miraris Apem, quae mel de floribus haurit? Si tibi mellitam gutture fundit aquam.

Papilio

Papilio. Butterfly.

1720. Church of St Rumbold Stoke Doyle. Monument to Edward Ward Judge 1638-1714 (82) sculpted by John Michael Rysbrack 1694-1770 (25) in 1720 and was erected in 1725 during the rebuilding of the church. Elbow Reclining Figure in Judges's Robes. Ionic columns with Pediment. Arms at top being Ward impaled with his wife's Elizabeth Papillon 1658- (61); her arms having three butterflies being a pun on her surname Papillon. Powdered Wig. Heeled Shoes. Buckled Shoes.

In 1753 Andrea Soldi Painter 1703-1771. Portrait of John Michael Rysbrack 1694-1770. In 1728 John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of John Michael Rysbrack 1694-1770.

Patri Charissimo

Patri Charissimo. Very dear father.

On 17 Jan 1851 Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 (61) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Castle Ashby. Charles Compton 3rd Marquess Northampton 1816-1877 (35) succeeded 3rd Marquess Northampton 2C 1812, 11th Earl of Northampton 5C 1618.

Angel of the Resurrection sculpted by Pietro Tenerani Sculptor 1789-1869 (76) in 1866. The quote from First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 15 Verse 52. The inscription on the side Marmoris hoc sculpti eloquens silentium spe futuri patri charissimo dicavit filius.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

Per verba de prœsenti

Per verba de prœsenti. A phrase applied to contracts of marriage. A verbal marriage contract.

Peristyle

Peristyle. A row of columns surrounding a space within a building such as a court or internal garden or edging a veranda or porch.

Preceptor

Preceptor. Teacher, tutor, etc. One who upholds precepts.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 October 1663. 24 Oct 1663. Mr. Edward Phillips came to be my son's (8) preceptor: this gentleman was nephew to Milton, who wrote against Salmasius's "Defensio"; but was not at all infected with his principles, though brought up by him.

Prudens qui Patiens

Prudens qui Patiens. He who is patient is prudent.

On 03 Sep 1634 Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634 (82) died. Monument in Church of St Mary the Virgin Tittleshall. Simple sarcophagus on pedestal with lying effigy. Pair of flanking Tuscan columns supporting a full entablature with putti on frieze and broken segmental pediment. Carved and painted achievement in and above tympanum flanked by four reclining figures of the Virtues on pediment extrados.

Above. Quarterly of eight: Coke, Crispin, Folkard, Sparham, Nerford, Yarmouth, Knightley and Pawe. The crest is broken. Farrer says it was: On a chapeau Azure, turned up Ermine, an ostrich Argent, holding in its mouth a horseshoe Or. The motto reads Prudens qui Patiens.

The effigy was carved by John Hargrave, the rest of the memorial was made by Nicholas Stone Sculptor 1587-1647 (47).

Below the effigy are three shields. Left Coke implaling Paston. His first wife Bridget Paston -1598. Middle Coke. Right Coke impaling Cecil; his second wife Elizabeth Cecil Countess Berkshire 1596-1672 (38).

Before 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634. 1593. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Edward Coke Lord Chief Justice 1552-1634.

qui obiit

qui obiit. Who died.

On 07 Sep 1384 John Harsick III -1384 died. Brass in Church of St George South Acre of John Harsick III -1384 and his wife Catherine Calthorpe holding hands. Great Helm with Feathers. Camail and Jupon Period. His coat of arms Harsick. Her showing Harsick impaled with Calthorp Arms. At his feet a lion couchant, at hers a dog couchant. Inscription: Hic iacet Dns. Johes. Harsick Miles eiusoem Nominis tertius, qui obiit Serto die Septembris Ano Dni. Mccclxxxiv. cuius anime propicictur Deus Amen, et Domina Katherina Uxor.

On 25 Mar 1440 Geoffrey Boleyn 1380-1440 (60) died. Around 1414 Alice Bracton 1385-1414 (29) died. Memorial brass in the floor of the nave of Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. It originally also had tiny figures representing their 5 sons and 4 daughters, but the inlay is lost. Inscription: Hic jacet Galfrid. Boleyn qui obt. 25 die mensis Martij 1440, et Alicie, uxor. ejus, et pueror. suorum, quorum a'i'ab; &c. Label: Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib.

On 03 Aug 1482. Brass to Simon Boleyn Priest who died in 1482 in Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. Inscription: Orate p. a'i'a. Simonis Boleyn, capellani, qui obt. 3 die mensis Augi. 1482.

In Jun 1534 Thomas Leman Rector -1534 died. Rector of Church of St George South Acre from 1502 to 1534. Inscription: Orate pro anima Domini Thome Leman, quandam Rectoris istius Ecclesie qui obiit r Die Mensis Junii, an Mcccccxxxiiii, cuius anime propicietur Deus.

Quis talia fando temperet a lacrimis

John Evelyn's Diary 30 December 1640. 30 Dec 1640. I saw his Majesty (40) (coming from his Northern Expedition) ride in pomp and a kind of ovation, with all the marks of a happy peace, restored to the affections of his people, being conducted through London with a most splendid cavalcade; and on the 3d of November following (a day never to be mentioned without a curse), to that long ungrateful, foolish, and fatal Parliament, the beginning of all our sorrows for twenty years after, and the period of the most happy monarch in the world: Quis talia fando!

But my father (53) being by this time entered into a dropsy, an indisposition the most unsuspected, being a person so exemplarily temperate, and of admirable regimen, hastened me back to Wotton, December the 12th; where, the 24th following, between twelve and one o'clock at noon, departed this life that excellent man and indulgent parent, retaining his senses and piety to the last, which he most tenderly expressed in blessing us, whom he now left to the world and the worst of times, while he was taken from the evil to come.

In 1611 Robert In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine. Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

Quondam

Quondam. that once was; former.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 October 1667. 11 Oct 1667. And then rose and called W. Hewer (25), and he and I, with pails and a sieve, did lock ourselves into the garden, and there gather all the earth about the place into pails, and then sift those pails in one of the summer-houses, just as they do for dyamonds in other parts of the world; and there, to our great content, did with much trouble by nine o'clock (and by the time we emptied several pails and could not find one), we did make the last night's forty-five up seventy-nine: so that we are come to about twenty or thirty of what I think the true number should be; and perhaps within less; and of them I may reasonably think that Mr. Gibson might lose some: so that I am pretty well satisfied that my loss is not great, and do bless God that it is so well1, and do leave my father to make a second examination of the dirt, which he promises he will do, and, poor man, is mightily troubled for this accident, but I declared myself very well satisfied, and so indeed I am; and my mind at rest in it, being but an accident, which is unusual; and so gives me some kind of content to remember how painful it is sometimes to keep money, as well as to get it, and how doubtful I was how to keep it all night, and how to secure it to London: and so got all my gold put up in bags.

And so having the last night wrote to my Lady Sandwich (42) to lend me John Bowles to go along with me my journey, not telling her the reason, that it was only to secure my gold, we to breakfast, and then about ten o'clock took coach, my wife and I, and Willet, and W. Hewer (25), and Murford and Bowles (whom my Lady lent me), and my brother John (26) on horseback; and with these four I thought myself pretty safe. But, before we went out, the Huntingdon musick come to me and played, and it was better than that of Cambridge. Here I took leave of my father, and did give my sister 20s. She cried at my going; but whether it was at her unwillingness for my going, or any unkindness of my wife's, or no, I know not; but, God forgive me! I take her to be so cunning and ill-natured, that I have no great love for her; but only [she] is my sister, and must be provided for. My gold I put into a basket, and set under one of the seats; and so my work every quarter of an hour was to look to see whether all was well; and I did ride in great fear all the day, but it was a pleasant day, and good company, and I mightily contented. Mr. Shepley saw me beyond St. Neots, and there parted, and we straight to Stevenage, through Bald Lanes, which are already very bad; and at Stevenage we come well before night, and all sat, and there with great care I got the gold up to the chamber, my wife carrying one bag, and the girl another, and W. Hewer (25) the rest in the basket, and set it all under a bed in our chamber; and then sat down to talk, and were very pleasant, satisfying myself, among other things, from John Bowles, in some terms of hunting, and about deere, bucks, and does. And so anon to supper, and very merry we were, and a good supper, and after supper to bed. Brecocke alive still, and the best host I know almost.

Note 1. About the year 1842, in removing the foundation of an old wall, adjoining a mansion at Brampton always considered the quondam residence of the Pepys family, an iron pot, full of silver coins, was discovered, and taken to the Earl of Sandwich, the owner of the house, in whose possession they still remain. The pot was so much corroded, that a small piece of it only could be preserved. The coins were chiefly half-crowns of Elizabeth and the two elder Stuarts, and all of a date anterior to the Restoration. Although Pepys states that the treasure which he caused to be buried was gold exclusively, it is very probable that, in the confusion, a pot full of silver money was packed up with the rest; but, at all events, the coincidence appeared too singular to pass over without notice. B.

In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Hewer 1642-1715. In or before 1674. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Jemima Crew Countess Sandwich 1625-1674.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 July 1685. 15 Jul 1685. I went to see Dr. Tenison's (48) Library [in St. Martin's.].

Monmouth (36) was this day brought to London and examin'd before the King (51), to whom he made greate submission, acknowledg'd his seduction by Ferguson the Scot (48), whom he nam'd ye bloudy villain. He was sent to ye Tower, had an interview with his late Dutchesse (34), whom he receiv'd coldly, having liv'd dishonestly with ye Lady Henrietta Wentworth (24) for two yeares. He obstinately asserted his conversation with that debauch'd woman to be no in, whereupon, seeing he could not be persuaded to his last breath, the divines who were sent to assist him thought not fit to administer the Holy Communion to him. For ye rest of his faults he profess'd greate sorrow, and so died without any apparent feare; he would not make use of a cap or other circumstance, but lying downe, bid the fellow do his office better than to the late Lord Russell (45), and gave him gold; but the wretch made five chopps before he had his head off; wch so incens'd the people, that had he not been guarded and got away, they would have torn him to pieces. The Duke (36) made no speech on the scaffold (wch was on Tower Hill) but gave a paper containing not above 5 or 6 lines, for the King (51), in which he disclaims all title to ye Crown, acknowledges that the late King (55), his father, had indeede told him he was but his base sonn, and so desir'd his Ma* to be kind to his wife and children. This relation I had from Dr. Tenison (Rector of St. Martin's) (48), who, with the Bishops of Ely (47) and Bath and Wells (48), were sent to him by his Ma*, and were at the execution.

Thus ended this quondam Duke (36), darling of his father (55) and ye ladies, being extreamly handsome and adroit; an excellent souldier and dancer, a favourite of the people, of an easy nature, debauch'd by lust, seduc'd by crafty knaves who would have set him up only to make a property, and took the opportunity of the King (55) being of another religion, to gather a party of discontented men. He fail'd, and perish'd. He was a lovely person, had a virtuous and excellent lady that brought him greate riches, and a second dukedom in Scotland. He was Master of the Horse, General of the King (55) his father's Army, Gentleman of the Bedchamber, Knight of the Garter, Chancellor of Cambridge, in a word had accumulations without end. See what ambition and want of principles brought him to! He was beheaded on Tuesday 14th July [Note. Most sources quote 15 Jul 1685]. His mother (55), whose name was Barlow [Note. Lucy Walter is often spoken of incorrectly as Mrs. Walters or Waters, and during her career she seems to have adopted the alias of Mrs. Barlo or Barlow (the name of a family with which the Walters of Pembrokeshire had intermarried). From Dictionary of National Biography.], daughter of some very meane creatures, was a beautiful strumpet, whom I had often seene at Paris; she died miserably without any thing to bury her; yet this Perkin had ben made to believe that the King (55) had married her; a monstrous and ridiculous forgerie; and to satisfy the world of the iniquity of the report, the King (55) his father (If his father he really was, for he most resembl'd one Sidney (89), who was familiar with his mother (55)) publickly and most solemnly renounc'd it, to be so enter'd in the Council Booke some yeares since, with all ye Privy Councellors at testation.

Ross, tutor to the Duke of Monmouth, proposed to Bishop Cozens (90) to sign a certificate of the King's (55) marriage to Mrs. Barlow, though her own name was Walters: this the Bishop refused. She was born of a gentleman's family in Wales, but having little means and less grace, came to London to make her fortune. Algernon Sidney (62), then a Colonel in Cromwell's army, had agreed to give her 50 broad pieces (as he told the Duke of York) but being ordered hastily away with his regiment, he missed his bargain. She went into Holland, where she fell into the hands of his brother Colonel Robert Sidney (89), who kept her for some time, till the King (55) hearing of her, got her from him. On which the Colonel was heard to say, Let who will have her she is already sped and after being with the King (55) she was so soon with child that the world had no cause to doubt whose child it was, and the rather that when he grew to be a man, he very much resembled the Colonel both in stature and countenance, even to a wort on his face. However the King (55) owned the child. In the King's (55) absence she behaved so loosely, that on his return from his escape at Worcester, he would have no further commerce with her, and she became a common prostitute at Paris. Life of King James II Vol I.

Had it not pleas'd God to dissipate this attempt in ye beginning, there would in all appearance have gather'd an irresistable force which would have desperately proceeded to ye ruine of ye Church and Govern ment, so general was the discontent and expectation of the opportunity. For my owne part I look'd upon this deliverance as most signal. Such an Inundation of phanatics and men of impious principles must needs have caus'd universal disorder, cruelty, injustice, rapine, sacrilege, and confusion, an unavoidable civil war and misery without end. Blessed be God the knot was happily broken, and a faire prospect of tranquillity for the future if we reforme, be thankful!, and make a right use of this mercy.

Around 1670. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685. Before 1694 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II. Before 21 Jul 1683. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of William Russell 1639-1683. Before 1681 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of William Russell 1639-1683. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

redeō

redeō translates to return, come back, revert.

redire. Present active infinitive of redeō.

redire

redire. Present active infinitive of redeō.

Rex dedit, culpa abstulit

Rex dedit, culpa abstulit. The King gave, I take the blame,

The Autobiography and Correspondence of Sir Simonds D'Ewes 1st Baronet 1602 1650 Volume 1 Chapter X 1621. Tuesday, the 1st day of May, the Count of Gondomar (93) fearing some mischief from the apprentices of London, there were divers companies of soldiers appointed to guard, and watch in several quarters of the City, which still did more and more argue the potency this Spanish Ambassador had in the English Court.

Sir Francis Bacon (60), Viscount St. Alban, had been often questioned during this parliament in the Upper House, for his gross and notorious bribery, and though he had for divers weeks abstained from coming to the Parliament House, yet had the broad seal still remained with him till this first day of May, in the afternoon; and he, by that means, as yet remained Lord Chancellor of England.

The four lords that came for it were Henry Viscount Mandeville (58), Lord Treasurer, Lodowick Stewart (46), Duke of Lennox, Lord Steward of the King's house-hold, William Herbert (41), Earl of Pembroke, Lord Chamberlain of the same household, and Thomas Earl of Arundel (35), Earl Marshal of England (whom I should have placed before Pembroke); they, coming to York House to him, where he lay, told him they were sorry to visit him upon such an occasion, and wished it had been better. " No, my lords," replied he, " the occasion is good;" and then delivering them the great seal, he added, " It was the King's favour that gave me this, and it is my fault that hath taken it away: Rex dedit, culpa abstulit" — or words to that effect. So leaving him, the said four lords carried the gage they had received to Whitehall, to the King, who was overheard by some near him to say upon their delivery of it to him, " Now, by my soul, I am pained at the heart where to bestow this; for as to my lawyers, I think they be all knaves." Which it seemeth his Majesty spake at that time to prepare a way to bestow it on a clergyman, as the Marquis of Buckingham (28) had intended; for otherwise there were at this present divers able wise lawyers, very honest and religious men, fit for the place, in whom there might easily have been found as much integrity, and less fawning and flattery than in the clergy; and, accordingly, Doctor Williams (39), now Dean of Westminster, and before that time made Bishop of Lincoln, was sworn Lord Keeper, and had the great seal delivered to him. On October the 9th, next ensuing, being the first day of Michaelmas Term, one Lloyd, or Floud, a Papist, being of the Inner Temple, having spoken these buse and opprobrious words following of the distressed Prince Elector Palatine and his royal lady, to wit, — " What is now become of your goodman Palsgrave, and your goodwife Palsgrave?1 — they had, I think, as much right to the kingdom of Bohemia as I have to the principality of Wales," was censured by the House of Commons, to pay a fine to the King, to be imprisoned during the King's pleasure, to ride disgracefully two several days in the open street upon a horse, with his face to the tail of it, and each day to stand in the pillory. The execution was long deferred, his fine and imprisonment remitted, and himself and his fellow Romanists began to boast that nothing should be inflicted. But at last, tho two Houses of Parliament appearing stoutly in the cause, he underwent the first day's punishment on May the 30th, being Wednesday, and the second on Friday the 1st day of June, on which Midsummer Term began. These days' actions I have added a little before the due time, that I might at once finish the relation of this business; in which the faithful zealous affection of the whole state and kingdom, in their body representative, consisting of the two Houses of Parliament, was fully expressed to that royal Princess, our King's only daughter, amidst the many scorns and oppressions of her irreconcilable and bloody enemies.

Note 1. This exclamation is given somewhat differently by Meade in the Harl. MSS. He says, " On Tuesday, Floyd, a counsellor, steward and receiver in Shropshire to the old Lord Chancellor Ellesmere and the Earl of Suffolk, a papist, and prisoner in the Fleet, was censured to ride thrice with papers, and stand in the pillory, and first at Westminster, for saying, Goodman Palsgrave. and Goody Palsgrave may or must go pack their children at their backs and beg. On Wednesday should have been the first time, but his Majesty stayed it. Yesterday the King and House met; his Majesty thanked them for the care they had of his son-in-law, daughter, and grandchildren's honour; if it were in them to censure this prisoner, the censure should be executed, otherwise there should be a punishment equivalent to that they had set down; which gave good content."

" On Saturday last the lords of the Upper House added imto Floyd's censure formerly passed in the Lower House. On Monday he received part of his punishment: for he rode from Fleet Bridge to the Standard in Cheapside with his face towards the horse's tail, and papers in his hat having this inscription, — For using ignominiuos and despiteful behaviour, reproachful and malicious words, against the Prince and Princess Palatine, the King's only daughter, and chiidren. Then he stood two hours in the pillory; then had the K branded on his forehead, and was conveyed to the Fleet." — Letter dated June 1st, Harl. MSS.

This punishment would have been still more severe, had it not been for the intercession of the Prince. This, at least, was the general report: yet Meade cautiously adds, " Whether true, I yet know not." In another letter it is stated that Floyd's ears were cut before he was placed in the pillory; but this seems to be an error.

In 1576 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619, whilst in France, painted a portrait of Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626 who was attached to the English Embassy at the time. In 1731 (Copy of 1618 original).John Vanderbank Painter 1694-1739. Portrait of Francis Bacon 1st Viscount St Alban 1561-1626. Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Ludovic Stewart 2nd Duke Lennox 1st Duke Richmond 1574-1624. Before 1630 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of William Herbert 3rd Earl Pembroke 1580-1630. In 1618 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646. In 1630 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 and wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1629 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646. Before 1628 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. In 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 wearing his Garter Robes and Leg Garter. Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. In 1619 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. Around 1625 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. Before 1634 Gilbert Jackson Painter 1595-1648. Portrait of John Williams Archbishop of York 1582-1650.

Sat superest

Sat superest. Enough is left.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 64 To Richard Bentley, Esq. Here we are, my dear Sir, in the middle of our pilgrimage; and lest we should never return from this holy land of abbeys and Gothic castles, I begin a letter to you. that I hope some charitable monk, when he has buried our bones, will deliver to you. We have had piteous distresses, but then we have seen glorious sights! You shall hear of each in their order.

Monday, Wind S. E.—at least that was our direction—While they were changing our horses at Bromley, we went to see the Bishop of Rochester's palace; not for the sake of any thing there was to be seen, but because there was a chimney, in which had stood a flower-pot, in which was put the counterfeit plot against Bishop Sprat. 'Tis a paltry parsonage, with nothing of antiquity but two panes of glass, purloined from Islip's chapel in Westminster Abbey, with that abbot's rebus, an eye and a slip of a tree. In the garden there is a clear little pond, teeming with gold fish. The Bishop is more prolific than I am.

From Sevenoaks we went to Knowle. The park is sweet, with much old beech, and an immense sycamore before the great gate, that makes me more in love than ever with sycamores. The house is not near so extensive as I expected:(330) the outward court has a beautiful decent simplicity that charms one. The apartments are many, but not large. The furniture throughout, ancient magnificence; loads of portraits, not good nor curious; ebony cabinets, embossed silver in vases, dishes, etc. embroidered beds, stiff chairs, and sweet bags lying on velvet tables, richly worked in silk and gold. There are two galleries, one very small; an old hall, and a spacious great drawing-room. There is never a good staircase. The first little room you enter has sundry portraits of the times; but they seem to have been bespoke by the yard, and drawn all by the same painter; One should be happy if they were authentic; for among them there is Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, Gardiner of Winchester, the Earl of Surry, the poet, when a boy, and a Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, but I don't know which. The only fine picture is of Lord Goring and Endymion Porter by Vandyke. There is a good head of the Queen of Bohemia, a whole-length of Duc d'Espernon, and another good head of the Clifford, Countess of Dorset, who wrote that admirable haughty letter to Secretary Williamson, when he recommended a person to her for member for Appleby: "I have been bullied by an usurper, I have been neglected by a court, but I won't be dictated to by a subject: your man shan't stand. Ann Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery." In the chapel is a piece of ancient tapestry: Saint Luke in his first profession is holding an urinal. Below stairs is a chamber of poets and players, which is proper enough in that house; for the first Earl wrote a play,(331) and the last Earl was a poet, (332) and I think married a player (333) Major Mohun and Betterton are curious among the latter, Cartwright and Flatman among the former. The arcade is newly enclosed, painted in fresco, and with modern glass of all the family matches. In the gallery is a whole-length of the unfortunate Earl of Surry, with his device, a broken column, and the motto Sat superest. My father had one of them, but larger, and with more emblems, which the Duke of Norfolk bought at my brother's sale. There is one good head of henry VIII., and divers of Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex, the citizen who came to be lord treasurer, and was very near coming to be hanged.(334) His Countess, a bouncing kind of lady-mayoress, looks pure awkward amongst so much good company. A visto cut through the wood has a delightful effect from the front: but there are some trumpery fragments of gardens that spoil the view from the state apartments.

(329) Only son of Dr. Richard Bentley, the celebrated Divine and classical scholar. He was educated at Trinity College, under his father. Cumberland, who was his nephew, describes him as a man of various and considerable accomplishments; possessing a fine genius, great wit, and a brilliant imagination; "but there was," he adds, "a certain eccentricity and want of prudence in his character, that involved him in distresses, and reduced him to situations uncongenial with his feelings, and unpropitious to the cultivation and encouragement of his talents."-E.

(330) Evelyn in his Diary for July 25, 1673, says, "In my way I visited my Lord of Dorset's house at Knowle, near Sevenoaks, a greate old-fashion'd house."-E.

(331) Thomas Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, while a student in the Temple, wrote his tragedy of Gordobuc, which was played before Queen Elizabeth, at Whitehall, in 1561. He was created Earl of Dorset by James the First, in 1604.-E.

(332) Charles Sackville, sixth Earl of Dorset. On the day previous to the naval engagement with the Dutch, in 1665, he is said to have composed his celebrated song, "to all you Ladies now on Land."-E.

(333) On the contrary, he married the Lady Frances, daughter of the Earl of Middlesex, who survived him.-E. [Note. This appears to be a mistake insofar as Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677 married Frances Cranfield Countess Dorset 1622-1687 who was the daughter of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645. Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 married firstly Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth and Dorset 1645-1679 and secondly Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691. There, however, references to his marrying an actress Alice Lee with whom he appear to have had a daughter Mary Sackville Countess Orrery -1714.]

(334) Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex, married two wives: the first was the daughter of a London citizen; the second, the daughter of James Brett, Esq. and half-sister of Mary Beaumont, created Countess of Buckingham. To this last alliance, Lord Middlesex owed his extraordinary advancement.-E.

Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Henry Howard 1516-1547. Around 1533 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Henry Howard 1516-1547. Around 1575 Unknown Painter. Based on a work of 1546. After William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Henry Howard 1516-1547. Around 1575 based on a work of 1546.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Henry Howard 1516-1547. In 1546 Unknown Painter. Italian. Portrait of Henry Howard 1516-1547 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter. His right Thomas of Brotherton 1st Earl Norfolk 1300 1338 Arms, his left Thomas of Woodstock Plantagenet 1st Duke Albemarle 1st Duke Gloucester 1355 1397 Arms. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Endymion Porter 1587-1649. Around 1627 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Endymion Porter 1587-1649. Around 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of Anne Clifford Countess Dorset and Pembroke 1590-1676. Before 1591. Hieronimo Custodis Painter -1593. Portrait of Thomas Sackville 1st Earl Dorset 1536-1608. In 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645. Before 11 Dec 1643 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield 1st Earl Middlesex 1575-1645. Around 1650. Robert Walker Painter 1599-1658. Portrait of Richard Sackville 5th Earl Dorset 1622-1677. Before 09 Dec 1641. After Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Frances Cranfield Countess Dorset 1622-1687. Before 1652 John Weesop Painter -1652. Portrait of Frances Cranfield Countess Dorset 1622-1687. Around 1670 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Mary Bagot Countess Falmouth and Dorset 1645-1679. Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Scribere est agere

Scribere est agere. To write is to act.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 62 To George Montagu Esq. 20 Jul 1752. Arlington_Street. To George Montagu Esq (39).

You have threatened me with a messenger from the secretary's office to seize my papers; who would ever have taken you for a prophet? If Goody Compton (60),(320) your colleague, had taken upon her to foretell, there was enough of the witch and prophetess in her person and mysteriousness to have made a superstitious person believe she might be a cousin of Nostradamus, and heiress of some of her visions; but how came you by second sight? Which of the Cues matched in the Highlands? In short, not to keep you in suspense, for I believe you are so far inspired as to be ignorant how your prophecy was to be accomplished, as we were sitting at dinner t'other day, word was brought that one of the King's messengers was at the door. Every drop of ink in my pen ran cold; Algernon Sidney danced before my eyes, and methought I heard my Lord Chief-Justice Lee, in a voice as dreadful as Jefferies', mumble out, Scribere est agere. How comfortable it was to find that Mr. Amyand, who was at table, had ordered this appanage of his dignity to attend him here for orders! However, I have buried the Memoires under the oak in my garden, where they are to be found a thousand years hence, and taken perhaps for a Runic history in rhyme. I have part of another valuable MS. to dispose of, which I shall beg leave to commit to your care, and desire it may be concealed behind the wainscot in Mr. Bentley's Gothic house, whenever you build it. As the great person is living to whom it belonged, it would be highly dangerous to make it public; as soon as she is in disgrace, I don't know whether it Will not be a good way of making court to her successor, to communicate it to the world, as I propose doing, under the following title: "The Treasury of Art and Nature, or a Collection of inestimable Receipts, stolen out of the Cabinet of Madame de Pompadour (30), and now first published for the use of his fair Countrywomen, by a true born Englishman and philomystic." * * * * * * * * * * * * *

So the pretty Miss Bishop (24),(321) instead of being my niece, is to be Mrs. Bob Brudenel (25). What foolish birds are turtles when they have scarce a hole to roost in! Adieu!

(320) The Hon. George Compton (60) son of Lord Northampton (87), Mr. Montagu's colleague for Northampton.-E.

(321) Daughter of Sir Cecil Bishop (51).

Around 1758 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of George Compton 4th Earl of Northampton 1664-1727.

Spe futuri

Spe futuri. Hope for the future.

On 17 Jan 1851 Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851 (61) died. He was buried at Church of St Mary Magdalen Castle Ashby. Charles Compton 3rd Marquess Northampton 1816-1877 (35) succeeded 3rd Marquess Northampton 2C 1812, 11th Earl of Northampton 5C 1618.

Angel of the Resurrection sculpted by Pietro Tenerani Sculptor 1789-1869 (76) in 1866. The quote from First Letter to the Corinthians Chapter 15 Verse 52. The inscription on the side Marmoris hoc sculpti eloquens silentium spe futuri patri charissimo dicavit filius.

Around 1845. Thomas Phillips 1770-1845. Portrait of Spencer Compton 2nd Marquess Northampton 1790-1851.

Sic transit gloria mundi

Sic transit gloria mundi. Thus passes the glory of the world.

Diary of Henry Machyn October 1559. 21 Oct 1559. The xxj day of October was cared from Halewell unto Sordyche chyrche my lade the contes of Rutland, with xxx [30] clarkes and prestes syngyng, and mony pore men and powre women in blake gownes a lx [60] and mo, morners to the nomber of a C [100] and ij [2] haroldes of armes, master Garter (49) and master Yorke; then cam the corsse; a-for a grett baner of armes, and a-bowt her iiij [4] goodly banerrolles of dyvers armes; and master Beycon mad the sermon; and after a grett dolle of money, ij d [2 pence] a-pesse; and so to dener, and yt was wryten a-bowt the valans Sic transit gloria mundi, and ther was vj [6] dosen penselles and vj [6] dosen skochyons.

suum

suum. His.

Life of Alfred by Asser Part 1 849 887 Page 1. 8. Eodem anno Æthelwulfus rex praefatum filium suum Aelfredum (4), magno nobilium et etiam ignobilium numero constipatum, honorifice Romam transmisit. Quo tempore dominus Leo Papa apostolicae sedi praeerat, qui praefatum infantem Aelfredum (4) oppido ordinans unxit in regem, et in filium adoptionis sibimet accipiens confirmavit.

8. In the same year, king Ethelwulf sent his son Alfred (4), above-named, to Rome, with an honourable escort both of nobles and commoners. Pope Leo (the fourth) at that time presided over the apostolic see, and he anointed for king the aforesaid Alfred (4), and adopted him as his spiritual son.

tanquam aliua agens

tanquam aliua agens. Acting like another, acting liek someone else.

John Evelyn's Diary 27 January 1689. 27 Jan 1689. I dined at the Admiralty, where was brought in a child not twelve years old, the son of one Dr. Clench, of the most prodigious maturity of knowledge, for I cannot call it altogether memory, but something more extraordinary. Mr. Pepys (55) and myself examined him, not in any method, but with promiscuous questions, which required judgment and discernment to answer so readily and pertinently. There was not anything in chronology, history, geography, the several systems of astronomy, courses of the stars, longitude, latitude, doctrine of the spheres, courses and sources of rivers, creeks, harbors, eminent cities, boundaries and bearings of countries, not only in Europe, but in any other part of the earth, which he did not readily resolve and demonstrate his knowledge of, readily drawing out with a pen anything he would describe. He was able not only to repeat the most famous things which are left us in any of the Greek or Roman histories, monarchies, republics, wars, colonies, exploits by sea and land, but all the sacred stories of the Old and New Testament; the succession of all the monarchies, Babylonian, Persian, Greek, Roman, with all the lower Emperors, Popes, Heresiarchs, and Councils, what they were called about, what they determined, or in the controversy about Easter, the tenets of the Gnostics, Sabellians, Arians, Nestorians; the difference between St. Cyprian and Stephen about re-baptism, the schisms. We leaped from that to other things totally different, to Olympic years, and synchronisms; we asked him questions which could not be resolved without considerable meditation and judgment, nay of some particulars of the Civil Laws, of the Digest and Code. He gave a stupendous account of both natural and moral philosophy, and even in metaphysics.

Having thus exhausted ourselves rather than this wonderful child, or angel rather, for he was as beautiful and lovely in countenance as in knowledge, we concluded with asking him if, in all he had read or heard of, he had ever met with anything which was like this expedition of the Prince of Orange (38), with so small a force to obtain three great kingdoms without any contest. After a little thought, he told us that he knew of nothing which did more resemble it than the coming of Constantine the Great out of Britain, through France and Italy, so tedious a march, to meet Maxentius, whom he overthrew at Pons Milvius with very little conflict, and at the very gates of Rome, which he entered and was received with triumph, and obtained the empire, not of three kingdoms only, but of all the then known world. He was perfect in the Latin authors, spoke French naturally, and gave us a description of France, Italy, Savoy, Spain, ancient and modernly divided; as also of ancient Greece, Scythia, and northern countries and tracts: we left questioning further. He did this without any set or formal repetitions, as one who had learned things without book, but as if he minded other things, going about the room, and toying with a parrot there, and as he was at dinner (tanquam aliua agens, as it were) seeming to be full of play, of a lively, sprightly temper, always smiling, and exceedingly pleasant, without the least levity, rudeness, or childishness.

His father assured us he never imposed anything to charge his memory by causing him to get things by heart, not even the rules of grammar; but his tutor (who was a Frenchman) read to him, first in French, then in Latin; that he usually played among other boys four or five hours every day, and that he was as earnest at his play as at his study. He was perfect in arithmetic, and now newly entered into Greek. In sum (horresco referens), I had read of divers forward and precocious youths, and some I have known, but I never did either hear or read of anything like to this sweet child, if it be right to call him child who has more knowledge than most men in the world. I counseled his father not to set his heart too much on this jewel, "Immodicis brevis est ætas, et rara senectus", as I myself learned by sad experience in my most dear child Richard (36), many years since, who, dying before he was six years old, was both in shape and countenance and pregnancy of learning, next to a prodigy.

In 1666. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 14 February 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 17 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 23 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 28 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 30 March 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 04 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 20 April 1666, Diary of Samuel Pepys 16 May 1666. In 1689 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Samuel Pepys Diarist 1633-1703. Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar.

tempus

tempus translates to time, period, season.

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

terminus post quem

terminus post quem. A terminus post quem is the earliest time the event may have happened.

Knap Hill. Historic England 1005704.

Summary: The site of Knap Hill, a causewayed enclosure. It encompasses an area of circa 2.4 hectares and consists of a single circuit of sub-triangular plan, conforming to the contours of the hill and possibly incomplete on the steepest, southern side. Exceptionally compared to other enclosures, the causeways seem to correspond precisely to gaps in the bank. It is unclear if the earthworks ever formed a complete enclosure. Excavations by the Cunningtons in 1908-9 first demonstrated the causewayed nature of the earthworks, as well as recovering pottery which they felt to be Neolithic in date. Further excavations in 1961 confirmed the Cunningtons' observations. Romano British pottery and an extended inhumation probably relates to the adjacent, later earthwork enclosure. The site and its archaeological history were re-investigated as part of the RCHME project focusing on enclosure and industry in the Neolithic period in 1995. Knap Hill was also subsequently included in a research programme into the dating of the early Causewayed Enclosures of southern Britain and of Ireland. The results suggested that Knap Hill was probably constructed in the 35th century cal BC, (that is to say between 3500-4001cal BC) probably more than a century later than Windmill Hill and the West Kennet long barrow. It is unclear, however, for how long activity continued. On the basis that the ditch was left to infill naturally, that there is no sign of recutting, and because there is a scarcity of sherds and bones, a short duration, probably of well under a century and perhaps only a generation or two, is possible.

More information: (SU 12106368) Neolithic Camp (NR) Knap Hill (NAT).

A causewayed camp on Knap Hill (see plan), excavated by BH and ME Cunnington in 1908-9 and G Connah in 1961. The excavations revealed Windmill Hill sherds in the silting of the ditches, Beaker sherds on the surface of the ditches and Romano-British sherds, probably associated with the plateau enclosure (see SU 16 SW 13). Other finds nearly all from within a few feet of the bottom of the ditch include fragments of red deer antlers, a human jawbone, flint flakes and a few sarsen chips. The finds are now in Devizes Museum. Connah concludes from his excavations that the causewayed ditches undoubtedly belong to the Windmill Hill culture and that the scarcity of the pottery and occupation material may suggest that the camp was of a defensive character and abandoned at an early stage - perhaps before completion.

Radiocarbon dating of antler fragments from the primary rubble of the ditch - 4710+- 115 BP or 2760BC. Charcoal from the upper silting of the ditch - 3790+- 130BP or 1840BC.

SU 12106365 Knap Hill causewayed camp occupies a hill top position overlooking the Pewsey Vale to the S. The causewayed bank can be traced only on the N and W sides, but accepting the natural gradient of the hill for the eastern and southern extent, then the area enclosed would have been approximately 1.7 hectares. There is a bowl barrow (see SU 16 SW 23) and some flint digging disturbance within the camp, and in the E the perimeter of the IA/RB "plateau" enclosure obscures the terminal on the causewayed bank. Resurveyed in conjunction with RCHM manuscript plan at 1:2500.

The Neolithic causwayed enclosure and associated features described by the previous authorities have been mapped at 1:10,000 scale from aerial photographs and the 1:1000 plan produced as part of the industry and Enclosure in the Neolithic Project (Event UID 923509).

Surveyed by the RCHME as part of the above project.

Knap Hill encloses an area of 2.4 hectares and consists of a single circuit of sub-triangular plan, conforming to the contours of the hill and possibly incomplete on the steepest, southern side. Exceptionally to other enclosures, the causeways seem to correspond precisely to gaps in the bank.

Two radiocarbon dates were obtained by Connah following his 1961 excavations (Table 3.3: BM-205, -208; Connah 1969). They bracket the infilling of the ditch, the sample for BM-205 coming from near the base and that for BM-208 from the topmost fill. BM-205 was measured on an antler implement which had arguably been used to dig the ditch and would have been contemporary with that event. BM-208 was measured on an unidentified bulk charcoal sample which may have included material of diverse ages, and can hence provide only a terminus post quem for its context.

Knap Hill was included in a research programme into the dating of the early Causewayed Enclosures of southern Britain and of Ireland, using chronological estimates produced by Bayesian statistical analysis of radiocarbon dates. In addition to attempting to establish a construction date and duration for the monument, the proximity of the site to Windmill Hill and to a concentration of long barrows posed the question of its chronological relation to them. Six further radiocarbon measurements were therefore obtained. A model which incorporates this interpretation of the archaeological sequence with the radiocarbon dates was constructed. The model suggested that Knap Hill was probably constructed in the 35th century cal BC, probably rather more than a century later than both Windmill Hill and the West Kennet long barrow. It is unclear, however, for how long activity continued at this enclosure. On the basis that the ditch was left to infill naturally and there is no sign of recutting, and because there is a scarcity of sherds and bones, a short duration, probably of well under a century and perhaps only a generation or two, is plausible.

Terræ filius

Terræ filius. The University Buffoon. Or basely born.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 February 1668. 24 Feb 1668. Thence to the Exchange and left her; while meeting Dr. Gibbons (52) there, he and I to see an organ at the Dean of Westminster's lodgings at the Abby, the Bishop of Rochester (43); where he lives like a great prelate, his lodgings being very good; though at present under great disgrace at Court, being put by his Clerk of the Closet's place. I saw his lady, of whom the 'Terræ filius' of Oxford was once so merry1 and two children, whereof one a very pretty little boy, like him, so fat and black. Here I saw the organ; but it is too big for my house, and the fashion do not please me enough; and therefore will not have it.

Note 1. A scholar appointed to make a satirical and jesting speech at an Act in the University of Oxford. Mr. Christopher Wordsworth gives, in his "Social Life at the English Universities in the Eighteenth Century", 1874, a list of terra-filii from 1591 to 1713 (pp. 296- 298, 680). The 'Terræ filius' was sometimes expelled the university on account of the licence of his speech. The practice was discontinued early in the eighteenth century.

Around 1822. George Perfect Harding Painter 1781-1853. Portrait of John Dolben Archbishop 1625-1686. Cleary not contemporary the source of the image unknown.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 July 1669. 10 Jul 1669. The next day began the more solemn lectures in all the faculties, which were performed in the several schools, where all the Inceptor-Doctors did their exercises, the Professors having first ended their reading. The assembly now returned to the Theater, where the Terræ filius entertained the auditory with a tedious, abusive, sarcastical rhapsody, most unbecoming the gravity of the University, and that so grossly, that unless it be suppressed, it will be of ill consequence, as I afterward plainly expressed my sense of it both to the Vice-Chancellor and several Heads of Houses, who were perfectly ashamed of it, and resolved to take care of it in future. The old facetious way of rallying upon the questions was left off, falling wholly upon persons, so that it was rather licentious lying and railing than genuine and noble wit. In my life, I was never witness of so shameful an entertainment.

After this ribaldry, the Proctors made their speeches. Then began the music art, vocal and instrumental, above in the balustrade corridor opposite to the Vice-Chancellor's seat. Then Dr. Wallis, the mathematical Professor, made his oration, and created one Doctor of music according to the usual ceremonies of gown (which was of white damask), cap, ring, kiss, etc. Next followed the disputations of the Inceptor-Doctors in Medicine, the speech of their Professor, Dr. Hyde, and so in course their respective creations. Then disputed the Inceptors of Law, the speech of their Professor, and creation. Lastly, Inceptors of Theology: Dr. Compton (37) (brother of the Earl of Northampton) being junior, began with great modesty and applause; so the rest. After which, Dr. Tillotson (38), Dr. Sprat (34), etc., and then Dr. Allestree's (47) speech, the King's (39) Professor, and their respective creations. Last of all, the Vice-Chancellor, shutting up the whole in a panegyrical oration, celebrating their benefactor and the rest, apposite to the occasion.

Thus was the Theater dedicated by the scholastic exercises in all the Faculties with great solemnity; and the night, as the former, entertaining the new Doctor's friends in feasting and music. I was invited by Dr. Barlow (61), the worthy and learned Professor of Queen's College.

Around 1675 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Henry Compton Bishop 1632-1713. Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

terras reliquit

terras reliquit. Left thsi earth, left the earth.

teterrima belli causa

teterrima belli causa. Most shaheful cause of war. From Horace.

Letters of Horace Walpole Earl of Orford Volume 2 Letter 57 To George Montagu Esq. 12 May 1752. Arlington_Street. To George Montagu Esq (39).

You deserve no charity, for you never write but to ask it. When you are tired of yourself and the country, you think over all London, and consider who will be proper to send you an account of it. Take notice, I won't be your gazetteer; nor is my time come for being a dowager, a maker of news, a day-labourer in scandal. If you care for nobody but for what they can tell you, you must provide yourself elsewhere. The town is empty, nothing in it but flabby mackerel, and wooden gooseberry tarts, and a hazy east wind. My sister is gone to Paris; I go to Strawberry Hill in three days for the summer, if summer there will ever be any.

If you want news you must send to Ireland, where there is almost a civil war, between the Lord Lieutenant and Primate on one side (observe, I don't tell you what that side is), and the Speaker on the other, who carries questions by wholesale in the House of Commons against the Castle; and the teterrima belli causa is not the common one.

Reams of scandalous verses and ballads are come over, too bad to send you, if I had them, but I really have not. What is more provoking for the Duke of Dorset (64), an address is come over directly to the King (not as usual through the channel of the Lord Lieutenant), to assure him of their great loyalty, and apprehensions of being misrepresented. This is all I know, and you see, most imperfectly.

I was t'other night to see what is now grown the fashion, Mother Midnight's Oratory.(309) It appeared the lowest buffoonery in the world even to me, who am used to my uncle Horace (73). There is a bad oration to ridicule, what it is too like, Orator Henley; all the rest is perverted music: there is a man who plays so nimbly on the kettle-drum, that he has reduced that noisy instrument to an object of sight; for, if you don't see the tricks with his hands, it is no better than ordinary: another plays on a violin and trumpet together: another mimics a bagpipe with a German flute, and makes it full as disagreeable. There is an admired dulcimer, a favourite salt-box, and a really curious jew's-harp. Two or three men intend to persuade you that they play on a broomstick, which is drolly brought in, carefully shrouded in a case, so as to be mistaken for a bassoon or bass-viol; but they succeed in nothing but the action. The last fellow imitates * * * * * curtseying to a French horn. There are twenty medley overtures, and a man who speaks a prologue and an epilogue, in which he counterfeits all the actors and singers upon earth: in short, I have long been convinced, that what I used to imagine the most difficult thing in the world, mimicry, is the easiest; for one has seen for these two or three years, at Foote's and the other theatres, that when they lost one mimic, they called,Odd man!" and another came and succeeded just as well.

Adieu! I have told you much more than I intended, and much more than I could conceive I had to say, except how does Miss Montagu?

P. S. Did you hear Captain Hotham's bon-mot on Sir Thomas Robinson's making an assembly from the top of his house to the bottom? He said, he wondered so many people would go to Sir Thomas's, as he treated them all de haut en bas.

(309) "Among other diversions and amusements which increase upon us, the town," says the Gentleman's Magazine for January 1752, "has been lately entertained with a kind of farcical performance, called 'The Old Woman's Oratory,' conducted by Mrs. Mary Midnight and her family, intended as a banter on Henley's Oratory, and a puff for the Old Woman's Magazine."-E.

In 1715 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of Lionel Cranfield Sackville 1st Duke Dorset 1688-1765. In 1650. Unknown Painter. Portrait of unknown person previously believed to be Horatio Walpole 1st Baron Walpole 1678-1757.

Tout ou Rien

Tout ou Rien. All or nothing.

Tout Bien ou Rien

Tout Bien ou Rien. All well or nothing, or Do your best or not at all, or Do it well or not at all.

Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes

Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes. I fear the Danaans [Greeks], even those bearing gifts," but it is usually translated in English as "Beware (or be wary) of Greeks bearing gifts. A quote from Virgil's Aeneid.

Chronica Majora 1237 Llewellyn asks the King of England to confirm their treaty. After 13 Jan 1237. In this year Llewellyn, prince of Wales (65), by special messengers sent word to the king that, as his time of life required that he should thenceforth abandon all strife and the tumult of war, and should for the future enjoy tranquillity and peace, he had determined to place himself and all his possessions under the authority and protection of him, the English king, and would hold his lands from him in all faith and friendship, and enter into an indissoluble treaty; and if the king should be proceeding on any expedition, he would to the best of his power, as his liege subject, promote it, by assisting him with troops, arms, horses, and money. To confirm and ratify this treaty, the bishops of Hereford and Chester [Note. In 1237 Chester wasn't a Bishopric?] were sent as mediators to bring the aforesaid matter to a conclusion. The cause of this message is said to have been that the said Llewellyn, owing to an attack of paralysis, was unable of himself to oppose the grievous attacks of his son Griffin (39), who was making war against him. Many of the nobles of Wales agreed to this treaty, and confirmed it at the same time as Llewellyn; some of them, however, strongly opposed their compacts. The faith of the Welsh is a want of faith, and they show no mercy when they have it in their power; and when fortune befriends them, they persecute those who fall into their power; but when defeated, they either fly or humble themselves: and such persons are never to be trusted, as the poet says, "I fear the Greeks, even when they bring gifts;" the philosopher Seneca also says, "You will never make safe treaty with any enemy."

Traditio Lampadis

Traditio Lampadis. Delivering the lamp, possibly in the sense of bringing light.

Brief Lives: Elizabeth Danvers. [716]His[CY] mother, an Italian, prodigious parts for a woman. I have heard my father's mother say that she had Chaucer at her fingers' ends.

A great politician; great witt and spirit, but revengefull[717].

Knew how to manage her estate as well as any man; understood jewells as well as any jeweller.

Very beautifull, but only short-sighted. To obtain pardons for her sonnes[718] she maryed Sir Edmund Carey, cosen-german to queen Elizabeth, but kept him to hard meate.

Smyth of Smythcotes—Naboth's vineyard—digitus Dei[CZ].

The arcanum—'traditio lampadis' in the family of Latimer[DA] of poysoning king Henry 8—from my lady Purbec.

Notes.

716. MS. Aubr. 8, fol. 25.

717. Aubrey, in the margin, notes 'Anne Bulleyn.'

718. For the murder of Henry Long.

[CY]. i.e. Henry, earl of Danby's. She was Elizabeth, daughter of John Nevill, the last lord Latimer. 'An Italian' may mean that she knew that language, among her other accomplishments. I can make nothing of a note added by Aubrey here, which seems to read '... Cowley, crop-ear'd.'

[CZ]. I do not know to what circumstance, in the history of the Danvers family, Aubrey here applies 1 Kings xxi. 19.

[DA]. Catherine Parr, last consort of Henry VIII, was widow of John, 3rd lord Latimer; and step-mother of John, 4th lord Latimer, the father of this Elizabeth Danvers, whose grand-daughter ('viscountess Purbeck') was Aubrey's informant.

Around 1534 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Drawing of Queen Anne Boleyn of England. The attribution is contentious. Around 1580 based on a work of around 1534.Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Anne Boleyn of England. Around 1639 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henry Danvers 1st Earl Danby 1573-1644 in his Garter Robes. In 1544 Master John Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548. Around 1590 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine Parr Queen Consort England 1512-1548. In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Frances Coke Viscountess Purbeck 1602-1645.

trahō

trahō. Trahō translates to drag, pull, trail, extract, withdraw, draw out.

traxit. Third-person singular perfect active indicative of trahō.

traxit

traxit. Third-person singular perfect active indicative of trahō.

1260. In the year of grace 1260.Henry King of England (52), son of King John (93), etc.

Original Latin Text:

Anno gratiae MCCLX. Henricus rex Angliae (52), filius regis Johannis (93), pace firmata cum rege Franciae, ibidem per longum tempus moram traxit; nec in Angliam redire curavit, donec episcopi et magnates Angliae ei literatorie mandaverunt quod reverti in Angliam properaret; quod si non faceret, ad placitum suum in Anglia non rediret. Quo audito, rex in se reversus, in Angliam rediit; sed quidam malitiosi falsis rumoribus inter patrem et filium suum Edwardum discordiam seminavervmt, asserentes quod dictus Edwardus et consiliarii sui guerram domino regi movere procurarunt; propter quod dominus rex supra modum iratus, multos milites de partibus transmarinis usque Londoniam secum adduxit; et eis ultra pontem dimissis in partibus Sureiae, ipse civitatem Londonise ingressus est, et ibi aliquandiu moram fecit, portis civitatis firmatis et seratis, apposuit custodes, ut nullus nisi ab eo licentiatus ingrederetur.

Comes vero Gloverni, et Johannes Maunsel, et quidam alii qui de concilio regis fuerunt, ad placitum suum ingressum et egressum habuerunt.

Rex vero proliibuit, ne filius suus Edwardus, nec aliquis qui de consilio suo extiterat, coram ipso venirent, dicens, "Coram me non appareat filius mens Edwardus, quia si eum videro, quin ipsum osculer me non cohibebo.".

Tandem, amore paterno commotus, et magnatum precibus devictus, ipsum ad osculum pacis recepit, et regina mater sua similiter, quae, ut dicebatur, causa totius malitis extiterat.

Dum ista aguntur, quantos honores et quantas expensas, omnibus qui interesse voluerint, dominus Edwardus fecerit, lingua vix potest explicare.

Utcunque

Utcunque. However, whenever, one way or another.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 22 January 1661. 22 Jan 1661. To the Comptroller's (50) house, where I read over his proposals to the Lord Admiral for the regulating of the officers of the Navy, in which he hath taken much pains, only he do seem to have too good opinion of them himself. From thence in his coach to Mercer's Chappell, and so up to the great hall, where we met with the King's Councell for Trade, upon some proposals of theirs for settling convoys for the whole English trade, and that by having 33 ships (four fourth-rates, nineteen fifths, ten sixths) settled by the King for that purpose, which indeed was argued very finely by many persons of honour and merchants that were there.

It pleased me much now to come in this condition to this place, where I was once a petitioner for my exhibition in Paul's School; and also where Sir G. Downing (36) (my late master) was chairman, and so but equally concerned with me.

From thence home, and after a little dinner my wife and I by coach into London, and bought some glasses, and then to Whitehall to see Mrs. Fox, but she not within, my wife to my mother Bowyer, and I met with Dr. Thomas Fuller (52), and took him to the Dog, where he tells me of his last and great book that is coming out: that is, his History of all the Families in England;' and could tell me more of my own, than I knew myself.And also to what perfection he hath now brought the art of memory; that he did lately to four eminently great scholars dictate together in Latin, upon different subjects of their proposing, faster than they were able to write, till they were tired; and by the way in discourse tells me that the best way of beginning a sentence, if a man should be out and forget his last sentence (which he never was), that then his last refuge is to begin with an Utcunque.

From thence I to Mr. Bowyer's, and there sat a while, and so to Mr. Fox's (33), and sat with them a very little while, and then by coach home, and so to see Sir Win. Pen (39), where we found Mrs. Martha Batten and two handsome ladies more, and so we staid supper and were very merry, and so home to bed.

Before 1725. John James Baker Painter -1725. Portrait of Stephen Fox Paymaster 1627-1716.

uxor

uxor. Wife.

On 25 Mar 1440 Geoffrey Boleyn 1380-1440 (60) died. Around 1414 Alice Bracton 1385-1414 (29) died. Memorial brass in the floor of the nave of Church of St Peter and St Paul Salle. It originally also had tiny figures representing their 5 sons and 4 daughters, but the inlay is lost. Inscription: Hic jacet Galfrid. Boleyn qui obt. 25 die mensis Martij 1440, et Alicie, uxor. ejus, et pueror. suorum, quorum a'i'ab; &c. Label: Dominus propitius esto nobis peccatorib.

On 11 Jul 1673 Penelope Barkham 1665-1673 (8) died. She was buried at Church of St George South Acre. Inscription: Hic jacet Penelope, filia Domini Edwardi Barkham Baronetti (45), et Franciscæ Uxoris sue, qui quidem Penelope, Ætate Puellula, sed Prudentiâ, Pietate, Virtute Matrona omnibus satis, Parentibus nimis, et Deo maxime chara, terras reliquit, ad Nuptias Agni vocata Julij 11, 1673, Annoq; Ætatis suæ, Octavo.

vix ea nostra voco

vix ea nostra voco. I can scarcely call these things our own. A quote from Ovid that alludes to ancestry.

On 14 Jan 1725 John Anstis, Garter King at Arms, by order of King George I granted by patent to Sir Andrew Fountaine 1676-1753 (49), Knt then vice-chamberlain to the Princess of Wales, and tutor to his highness Prince William, for whom he was installed (as proxy) knight of the honourable Order of the Bath, supporters to his arms, viz on either side a lion gules with wings erected or, with the old family motto of, Vix Ea Nostra Voco, and the ancient arms of Fountaine, or, a fess gules between three elephants heads erased sable.

After 27 Jul 1746. Church of St Mary Narford. Monument to Elizabeth Clent 1706-1746 and her grandmother Sarah Chicheley. An urn and inscription panel. Inscribed chest with a heavy plinth, surmounted by a sarcophagus and an obelisk with an urn finial and heraldic achievement with motto of the Fountaine family vix ea nostra voco.