Paintings

Paintings is in Arts.

Windsor Beauties

Hampton Court Beauties

Around 1676 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (29). Portrait of Mary Scrope 1634-1721 (42). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1676 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Mary Scrope 1634-1721. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1686 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (39). Portrait of Frances Whitmore 1666-1695 (19). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1686 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Frances Whitmore 1666-1695. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (53). Portrait of Isabella Bennet Duchess Grafton 1655-1723 (44). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Isabella Bennet Duchess Grafton 1655-1723. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (53). Portrait of Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691 (31). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Mary Compton Countess Dorset 1669-1691. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (53). Portrait of Mary Bentinck Countess Essex 1679-1726 (20). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Mary Bentinck Countess Essex 1679-1726. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (53). Portrait of Carey Fraser Countess Peterborough Countess Monmouth 1660-1709 (40). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Carey Fraser Countess Peterborough Countess Monmouth 1660-1709. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (53). Portrait of Diana Vere Duchess St Albans 1679-1742 (21). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Diana Vere Duchess St Albans 1679-1742. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723 (53). Portrait of Margaret Cecil Countess Ranelagh 1672-1728 (28). One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Around 1700 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Margaret Cecil Countess Ranelagh 1672-1728. One of the Hampton Court Beauties.

Flagmen of Lowestoft

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Admiral John Lawson 1615-1665 (50). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Admiral John Lawson 1615-1665. One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Vice-Admiral Christopher Myngs 1625-1666 (39). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Vice-Admiral Christopher Myngs 1625-1666. One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Admiral George Ayscue 1616-1672 (49). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Admiral George Ayscue 1616-1672. One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (46). Portrait of Thomas Allin 1st Baronet 1612-1685 (53). One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Thomas Allin 1st Baronet 1612-1685. One of the Flagmen of Lowestoft.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 April 1666. 18 Apr 1666. [Up] and by coach with Sir W. Batten (65) and Sir Thos. Allen (54) to White Hall, and there after attending the Duke (32) as usual and there concluding of many things preparatory to the Prince (46) and Generall's going to sea on Monday next, Sir W. Batten (65) and Sir T. Allen (54) and I to Mr. Lilly's (47), the painter's; and there saw the heads, some finished, and all begun, of the Flaggmen in the late great fight with the Duke of Yorke (32) against the Dutch. The Duke of Yorke (32) hath them done to hang in his chamber, and very finely they are done indeed. Here is the Prince's (46), Sir G. Askue's (50), Sir Thomas Teddiman's, Sir Christopher Mings (40), Sir Joseph Jordan, Sir William Barkeley (27), Sir Thomas Allen (33), and Captain Harman's (41), as also the Duke of Albemarle's (57); and will be my Lord Sandwich's (40), Sir W. Pen's (44), and Sir Jeremy Smith's. Being very well satisfied with this sight, and other good pictures hanging in the house, we parted, and I left them, and [to] pass away a little time went to the printed picture seller's in the way thence to the Exchange, and there did see great plenty of fine prints; but did not buy any, only a print of an old pillar in Rome made for a Navall Triumph1, which for the antiquity of the shape of ships, I buy and keepe.
Thence to the Exchange, that is, the New Exchange, and looked over some play books and intend to get all the late new plays.
So to Westminster, and there at the Swan got a bit of meat and dined alone; and so away toward King's Street, and spying out of my coach Jane that lived heretofore at Jevons, my barber's, I went a little further and stopped, and went on foot back, and overtook her, taking water at Westminster Bridge, and spoke to her, and she telling me whither she was going I over the water and met her at Lambeth, and there drank with her; she telling me how he that was so long her servant, did prove to be a married man, though her master told me (which she denies) that he had lain with her several times in his house.
There left her 'sans essayer alcune cose con elle2', and so away by boat to the 'Change, and took coach and to Mr. Hales (66), where he would have persuaded me to have had the landskipp stand in my picture, but I like it not and will have it otherwise, which I perceive he do not like so well, however is so civil as to say it shall be altered.
Thence away to Mrs. Pierce's, who was not at home, but gone to my house to visit me with Mrs. Knipp. I therefore took up the little girle Betty and my mayde Mary that now lives there and to my house, where they had been but were gone, so in our way back again met them coming back again to my house in Cornehill, and there stopped laughing at our pretty misfortunes, and so I carried them to Fish Streete, and there treated them with prawns and lobsters, and it beginning to grow darke we away, but the jest is our horses would not draw us up the Hill, but we were fain to 'light and stay till the coachman had made them draw down to the bottom of the Hill, thereby warming their legs, and then they came up cheerfully enough, and we got up and I carried them home, and coming home called at my paper ruler's and there found black Nan, which pleases me mightily, and having saluted her again and again away home and to bed.... In all my ridings in the coach and intervals my mind hath been full these three weeks of setting in musique "It is decreed, &c".
Note 1. The columna rostrata erected in the Forum to C. Duilius, who obtained a triumph for the first naval victory over the Carthaginians, B.C. 261. Part of the column was discovered in the ruins of the Forum near the Arch of Septimius, and transferred to the Capitol. B.
Note 2. 'sans essayer alcune cose con elle'. Without trying to do anything with her.

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Four Days' Battle

Diary of Samuel Pepys 18 July 1666. 18 Jul 1666. Up in good case, and so by coach to St. James's after my fellows, and there did our business, which is mostly every day to complain of want of money, and that only will undo us in a little time. Here, among other things, before us all, the Duke of Yorke (32) did say, that now at length he is come to a sure knowledge that the Dutch did lose in the late engagements twenty-nine captains and thirteen ships. Upon which Sir W. Coventry (38) did publickly move, that if his Royal Highness had this of a certainty, it would be of use to send this down to the fleete, and to cause it to be spread about the fleete, for the recovering of the spirits of the officers and seamen; who are under great dejectedness for want of knowing that they did do any thing against the enemy, notwithstanding all that they did to us. Which, though it be true, yet methought was one of the most dishonourable motions to our countrymen that ever was made; and is worth remembering.
Thence with Sir W. Pen (45) home, calling at Lilly's (47), to have a time appointed when to be drawn among the other Commanders of Flags the last year's fight. And so full of work Lilly (47) is, that he was faro to take his table-book out to see how his time is appointed, and appointed six days hence for him to come between seven and eight in the morning.
Thence with him home; and there by appointment I find Dr. Fuller (58), now Bishop of Limericke, in Ireland; whom I knew in his low condition at Twittenham. I had also by his desire Sir W. Pen (45), and with him his lady (42) and daughter (15), and had a good dinner, and find the Bishop the same good man as ever; and in a word, kind to us, and, methinks, one of the comeliest and most becoming prelates in all respects that ever I saw in my life. During dinner comes an acquaintance of his, Sir Thomas Littleton (45); whom I knew not while he was in my house, but liked his discourse; and afterwards, by Sir W. Pen (45), do come to know that he is one of the greatest speakers in the House of Commons, and the usual second to the great Vaughan (62). So was sorry I did observe him no more, and gain more of his acquaintance.
After dinner, they being gone, and I mightily pleased with my guests, I down the river to Greenwich, about business, and thence walked to Woolwich, reading "The Rivall Ladys" all the way, and find it a most pleasant and fine writ play.
At Woolwich saw Mr. Shelden, it being late, and there eat and drank, being kindly used by him and Bab, and so by water to Deptford, it being 10 o'clock before I got to Deptford, and dark, and there to Bagwell's (29), and, having staid there a while, away home, and after supper to bed. The Duke of Yorke (32) said this day that by the letters from the Generals they would sail with the Fleete this day or to-morrow.

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Pre-Raphealite Brotherhood

In Sep 1847 the Pre-Raphealite Brotherhood was formed at 7 Gower Street, the home of John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896 (18). The founder members included brothers Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882 (19) and William Michael Rossetti Author 1829-1919 (17), and William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910 (20), John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896 (18) and Thomas Woolner Sculptor 1825-1892 (21).

Between 1848 and 1849. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882 (19). "The Girlhood of Mary". Model for St Anne Frances Mary Lavinia Polidori 1800-1886 (47), model for Mary Christina Georgina Rossetti 1830-1894 (17). Note the initials PRB bottom left under his name. First exhibited at the Free Exhibition at the Hyde Park Corner Gallery. It was bought for £80 by Harriet Baring Marchioness Bath 1804-1892 (43) who subsequently gifted it to her daughter Louisa Isabella Harriet Thynne 1834-1919 (14).

Between 1848 and 1849. Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882. "The Girlhood of Mary". Model for St Anne Frances Mary Lavinia Polidori 1800-1886, model for Mary Christina Georgina Rossetti 1830-1894. Note the initials PRB bottom left under his name. First exhibited at the Free Exhibition at the Hyde Park Corner Gallery. It was bought for £80 by Harriet Baring Marchioness Bath 1804-1892 who subsequently gifted it to her daughter Louisa Isabella Harriet Thynne 1834-1919.

1849. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896 (19). "Isabella". From the poem Isabella and the Pot of Basil and the book Decameron Day Four Story Five. Note the initials PRB on the bottom of the table leg.

1849. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896. "Isabella". From the poem Isabella and the Pot of Basil and the book Decameron Day Four Story Five. Note the initials PRB on the bottom of the table leg.

1851. William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910 (23). "Rienzi vowing to obtain Justice for the Death of his Young Brother, slain in a Skirmish between the Colonna and the Orsini Factions". Note the initials PRB bottom right under his name. From the 1835 novel Rienzi, the Last of the Roman Tribunes, by Bulwer Lytton, about Cola di Rienzi (1313–1354), a papal notary who led a popular uprising in Rome.

1851. William Holman Hunt Painter 1827-1910. "Rienzi vowing to obtain Justice for the Death of his Young Brother, slain in a Skirmish between the Colonna and the Orsini Factions". Note the initials PRB bottom right under his name. From the 1835 novel Rienzi, the Last of the Roman Tribunes, by Bulwer Lytton, about Cola di Rienzi (1313–1354), a papal notary who led a popular uprising in Rome.

1851 to 1852. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896 (21). "Ophelia". Hamlet Act IV Scene 7 Part IV in which Queen Gertrude describes Ophelia's death to Laertes. Millais painted the scene near Tolworth using the River Hogsmill. Elizabeth Siddal Model 1829-1862 (21) modelled in a bath-tub at 7 Gower Street. Note the initials PRB bottom right next to his name.

1851 to 1852. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896. "Ophelia". Hamlet Act IV Scene 7 Part IV in which Queen Gertrude describes Ophelia's death to Laertes. Millais painted the scene near Tolworth using the River Hogsmill. Elizabeth Siddal Model 1829-1862 modelled in a bath-tub at 7 Gower Street. Note the initials PRB bottom right next to his name.

Around 1857 Simeon Solomon Painter 1840-1905 (16) was introduced by Dante Gabriel Rossetti Painter 1828-1882 (28) to members of the Pre-Raphealite Brotherhood including Algernon Charles Poet Swinburne 1837–1909 (19) and Edward Coley Burne-Jones Painter Baronet 1833-1898 (23).

Masque

Companies

The King's Company

The Black Prince. On 19 Oct 1667 was staged first by The King's Company at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane Convent Garden. The opening performance was attended by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (37).
Edward Kynaston Actor 1640-1706 (27) played The Black Prince.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes.Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes.Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Wrestling

Diary of Samuel Pepys 27 June 1661. 28 Jun 1661. At home all the morning practising to sing, which is now my great trade, and at noon to my Lady and dined with her.
So back and to the office, and there sat till 7 at night, and then Sir W. Pen (40) and I in his coach went to Moorefields, and there walked, and stood and saw the wrestling, which I never saw so much of before, between the north and west countrymen.
So home, and this night had our bed set up in our room that we called the Nursery, where we lay, and I am very much pleased with the room.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 26 May 1662. 26 May 1662. Up by four o'clock in the morning, and fell to the preparing of some accounts for my Lord of Sandwich.
By and by, by appointment comes Mr. Moore, and, by what appears to us at present, we found that my Lord is above £7,000 in debt, and that he hath money coming into him that will clear all, and so we think him clear, but very little money in his purse.
So to my Lord's, and after he was ready, we spent an hour with him, giving him an account thereof; and he having some £6,000 in his hands, remaining of the King's, he is resolved to make use of that, and get off of it as well as he can, which I like well of, for else I fear he will scarce get beforehand again a great while.
Thence home, and to the Trinity House; where the Brethren (who have been at Deptford choosing a new Maister; which is Sir J. Minnes (63), notwithstanding Sir W. Batten (61) did contend highly for it: at which I am not a little pleased, because of his proud lady) about three o'clock came hither, and so to dinner. I seated myself close by Mr. Prin (62), who, in discourse with me, fell upon what records he hath of the lust and wicked lives of the nuns heretofore in England, and showed me out of his pocket one wherein thirty nuns for their lust were ejected of their house, being not fit to live there, and by the Pope's command to be put, however, into other nunnerys. I could not stay to end dinner with them, but rose, and privately went out, and by water to my brother's, and thence to take my wife to the Redd Bull, where we saw "Doctor Faustus", but so wretchedly and poorly done, that we were sick of it, and the worse because by a former resolution it is to be the last play we are to see till Michaelmas.
Thence homewards by coach, through Moorefields, where we stood awhile, and saw the wrestling. At home, got my lute upon the leads, and there played, and so to bed.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 25 August 1663. 25 Aug 1663. Up very early and removed the things out of my chamber into the dining room, it being to be new floored this day. So the workmen being come and falling to work there, I to the office, and thence down to Lymehouse to Phin. Pett's about masts, and so back to the office, where we sat; and being rose, and Mr. Coventry (35) being gone, taking his leave, for that he is to go to the Bath with the Duke (29) to-morrow, I to the 'Change and there spoke with several persons, and lastly with Sir W. Warren, and with him to a Coffee House, and there sat two hours talking of office business and Mr. Wood's knavery, which I verily believe, and lastly he tells me that he hears that Captain Cocke (46) is like to become a principal officer, either a Controller or a Surveyor, at which I am not sorry so either of the other may be gone, and I think it probable enough that it may be so.
So home at 2 o'clock, and there I found Ashwell gone, and her wages come to 50s., and my wife, by a mistake from me, did give her 20s. more; but I am glad that she is gone and the charge saved.
After dinner among my joyners, and with them till dark night, and this night they made an end of all; and so having paid them 40s. for their six days' work, I am glad they have ended and are gone, for I am weary and my wife too of this dirt. My wife growing peevish at night, being weary, and I a little vexed to see that she do not retain things in her memory that belong to the house as she ought and I myself do, I went out in a little seeming discontent to the office, and after being there a while, home to supper and to bed.
To-morrow they say the King (33) and the Duke (29) set out for the Bath.
This noon going to the Exchange, I met a fine fellow with trumpets before him in Leadenhall-street, and upon enquiry I find that he is the clerk of the City Market; and three or four men carried each of them an arrow of a pound weight in their hands. It seems this Lord Mayor begins again an old custome, that upon the three first days of Bartholomew Fayre, the first, there is a match of wrestling, which was done, and the Lord Mayor (48) there and Aldermen in Moorefields yesterday: to-day, shooting: and to-morrow, hunting. And this officer of course is to perform this ceremony of riding through the city, I think to proclaim or challenge any to shoot. It seems that the people of the fayre cry out upon it as a great hindrance to them.

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John Evelyn's Diary 19 February 1667. 19 Feb 1667. I saw a comedy acted at Court. In the afternoon, I witnessed a wrestling match for £1,000 in St. James's Park, before his Majesty (36), a vast assemblage of lords and other spectators, between the western and northern men, Mr. Secretary Morice (64) and Lord Gerard being the judges. The western men won. Many great sums were betted.