Biography of Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685

In Dec 1629 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (19) and Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (14) were married. They were second cousins once removed.

In 1715 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688. Around 1647 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688. Around 1678 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 in his Garter Robes. Before 10 Sep 1687 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688.

On 24 Feb 1633 Walter Butler 11th Earl Ormonde 4th Earl Ossory 1559-1633 (74) died. [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (22) succeeded 12th Earl Ormonde, 5th Earl Ossory. Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (17) by marriage Countess Ormonde.

On 15 Jul 1639 Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 was born to [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (28) and Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (23).

On 30 Aug 1642 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (31) was created 1st Marquess Ormonde 1C 1642. Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (27) by marriage Marchioness Ormonde.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 May 1650. 07 May 1650. I went with Sir Richard Browne's (45) lady and my wife (15), together with the Earl of Chesterfield (66), [his brother] Lord Ossory (15) and his brother (10), to Vamber, a place near the city famous for butter; when, coming homeward, being on foot, a quarrel arose between [his brother] Lord Ossory (15) and a man in a garden, who thrust [his brother] Lord Ossory (15) from the gate with uncivil language; on which our young gallants struck the fellow on the pate, and bade him ask pardon, which he did with much submission, and so we parted. But we were not gone far before we heard a noise behind us, and saw people coming with guns, swords, staves, and forks, and who followed, flinging stones; on which, we turned, and were forced to engage, and with our swords, stones, and the help of our servants (one of whom had a pistol) made our retreat for near a quarter of a mile, when we took shelter in a house, where we were besieged, and at length forced to submit to be prisoners. Lord Hatton (44), with some others, were taken prisoners in the flight, and his [his brother] lordship (15) was confined under three locks and as many doors in this rude fellow's master's house, who pretended to be steward to Monsieur St. Germain, one of the presidents of the Grand Chambre du Parlement, and a Canon of Nôtre Dame. Several of us were much hurt. One of our lackeys escaping to Paris, caused the bailiff of St. Germain to come with his guard and rescue us. Immediately afterward, came Monsieur St. Germain himself, in great wrath, on hearing that his housekeeper was assaulted; but when he saw the King's officers, the gentlemen and noblemen, with his Majesty's Resident and understood the occasion, he was ashamed of the accident, requesting the fellow's pardon, and desiring the ladies to accept their submission and a supper at his house. It was ten o'clock at night ere we got to Paris, guarded by Prince Griffith (a Welsh hero going under that name, and well known in England for his extravagancies), together with the scholars of two academies, who came forth to assist and meet us on horseback, and would fain have alarmed the town we received the affront from: which, with much ado, we prevented.

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After 1654 Philip Stanhope 2nd Earl Chesterfield 1634-1714 and [his sister] Elizabeth Butler Countess Chesterfield 1640-1665 were married. [his sister] She by marriage Countess Chesterfield.

Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Elizabeth Butler Countess Chesterfield 1640-1665.

On 14 Nov 1659 [his brother] Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (25) and Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688 (24) were married at Den Bosch.

In 1649 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Emilia Nassau Beverweert Countess Ossory 1635-1688.

On 10 Aug 1660 Esmé Stewart 2nd Duke Richmond 5th Duke Lennox 1649-1660 (11) died of smallpox at Paris. He was buried in on 04 Sep 1660 in the Richmond Vault, Westminster Abbey. Charles Stewart 6th Duke Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1639-1672 (21) succeeded 6th Duke Lennox, 3rd Duke Richmond 2C 1641. Mary Stewart Countess Arran 1651-1668 (9) succeeded 5th Baron Clifton.

Around 1668 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Charles Stewart 6th Duke Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1639-1672.

On 30 Mar 1661 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (50) was created 1st Duke Ormonde by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (30). Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (45) by marriage Duchess Ormonde.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

In May 1662 Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (22) was created 1st Earl Arran 2C 1662.

On 26 Oct 1662 William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707 (22) and [his sister] Mary Butler Duchess Devonshire 1646-1710 (16) were married.

Before 1708 Godfrey Kneller 1646-1723. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. In 1697 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. Around 1660 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707. Around 1655. Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 11 August 1664. 11 Aug 1664. Up, and through pain, to my great grief forced to wear my gowne to keep my legs warm. At the office all the morning, and there a high dispute against Sir W. Batten (63) and Sir W. Pen (43) about the breadth of canvas again, they being for the making of it narrower, I and Mr. Coventry (36) and Sir J. Minnes (65) for the keeping it broader.

So home to dinner, and by and by comes Mr. Creed, lately come from the Downes, and dined with me. I show him a good countenance, but love him not for his base ingratitude to me. However, abroad, carried my wife to buy things at the New Exchange, and so to my Lady Sandwich's (39), and there merry, talking with her a great while, and so home, whither comes Cocker (33) with my rule, which he hath engraved to admiration, for goodness and smallness of work: it cost me 14s. The doing, and mightily pleased I am with it.

By and by, he gone, comes Mr. Moore and staid talking with me a great while about my Lord's businesses, which I fear will be in a bad condition for his family if my Lord should miscarry at sea.

He gone, I late to my office, and cannot forbear admiring and consulting my new rule, and so home to supper and to bed. This day, for a wager before the King (34), my Lords of Castlehaven (47) and Arran (25) (a son of my [his father] Lord of Ormond's (53)), they two alone did run down and kill a stoute bucke in St. James's parke.

Before 23 Jun 1686 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of William Coventry 1628-1686. Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of John Mennes Comptroller 1599-1671. In or before 1674. John Hayls Painter 1600-1679. Portrait of Jemima Crew Countess Sandwich 1625-1674.

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Diary of Samuel Pepys 03 February 1665. 03 Feb 1665. Thence, being invited, to my uncle Wight's (63), where the Wights all dined; and, among the others, pretty Mrs. Margaret, who indeed is a very pretty lady; and though by my vowe it costs me 12d. a kiss after the first, yet I did adventure upon a couple.

So home, and among other letters found one from Jane, that is newly gone, telling me how her mistresse won't pay her her Quarter's wages, and withal tells me how her mistress will have the boy sit 3 or 4 hours together in the dark telling of stories, but speaks of nothing but only her indiscretion in undervaluing herself to do it, but I will remedy that, but am vexed she should get some body to write so much because of making it publique. Then took coach and to visit my Lady Sandwich (40), where she discoursed largely to me her opinion of a match, if it could be thought fit by my Lord, for my Lady Jemimah, with Sir G. Carteret's (55) eldest son; but I doubt he hath yet no settled estate in land. But I will inform myself, and give her my opinion. Then Mrs. Pickering (23) (after private discourse ended, we going into the other room) did, at my Lady's command, tell me the manner of a masquerade1 before the King (34) and Court the other day. Where six women (my Baroness Castlemayne (24) and Duchesse of Monmouth being two of them) and six men (the Duke of Monmouth (15) and Lord Arran (25) and Monsieur Blanfort, being three of them) in vizards, but most rich and antique dresses, did dance admirably and most gloriously. God give us cause to continue the mirthe! So home, and after awhile at my office to supper and to bed.

Note 1. The masquerade at Court took place on the 2nd, and is referred to by Evelyn, who was present, in his Diary. Some amusing incidents connected with the entertainment are related in the "Grammont Memoirs (chapter vii.).

Before 07 Nov 1666. William Faithorne Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709 and her son Charles Fitzroy 1st Duke Southampton as Madonna and Child. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. One of the Windsor Beauties. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1690 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of Barbara Villiers 1st Duchess of Cleveland 1640-1709. Around 1670. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685.

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In Jul 1665 [his sister] Elizabeth Butler Countess Chesterfield 1640-1665 (25) died.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 July 1665. 24 Jul 1665. And then up and home, and there dressed myself, and by appointment to Deptford, to Sir G. Carteret's (55), between six and seven o'clock, where I found him and my George Carteret 1st Baronet Metesches 1610-1680 (55) and Lady (63) almost ready, and by and by went over to the ferry, and took coach and six horses nobly for Dagenhams, himself and lady and their little daughter, Louisonne, and myself in the coach; where, when we come, we were bravely entertained and spent the day most pleasantly with the young ladies, and I so merry as never more. Only for want of sleep, and drinking of strong beer had a rheum in one of my eyes, which troubled me much. Here with great content all the day, as I think I ever passed a day in my life, because of the contentfulnesse of our errand, and the noblenesse of the company and our manner of going. But I find Mr. Carteret (24) yet as backward almost in his caresses, as he was the first day. !At night, about seven o'clock, took coach again; but, Lord! to see in what a pleasant humour Sir G. Carteret (55) hath been both coming and going; so light, so fond, so merry, so boyish (so much content he takes in this business), it is one of the greatest wonders I ever saw in my mind. But once in serious discourse he did say that, if he knew his son to be a debauchee, as many and, most are now-a-days about the Court, he would tell it, and my Lady Jem. should not have him; and so enlarged both he and she about the baseness and looseness of the Court, and told several stories of the Duke of Monmouth (16), and Richmond (26), and some great person, my [his father] Lord of Ormond's (54) second son (26), married to a Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (26) and lady (14) of extraordinary quality (fit and that might have been made a wife for the King (35) himself), about six months since, that this great person hath given the pox to———; and discoursed how much this would oblige the Kingdom if the King (35) would banish some of these great persons publiquely from the Court, and wished it with all their hearts.

We set out so late that it grew dark, so as we doubted the losing of our way; and a long time it was, or seemed, before we could get to the water-side, and that about eleven at night, where, when we come, all merry (only my eye troubled me, as I said), we found no ferryboat was there, nor no oares to carry us to Deptford. However, afterwards oares was called from the other side at Greenwich; but, when it come, a frolique, being mighty merry, took us, and there we would sleep all night in the coach in the Isle of Doggs. So we did, there being now with us my Lady Scott, and with great pleasure drew up the glasses, and slept till daylight, and then some victuals and wine being brought us, we ate a bit, and so up and took boat, merry as might be; and when come to Sir G. Carteret's (55), there all to bed.

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On 04 Jul 1668 Mary Stewart Countess Arran 1651-1668 (16) died. Charles Stewart 6th Duke Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1639-1672 (29) succeeded 6th Baron Clifton.

In 1673 William Stanley 9th Earl Derby 1655-1702 (18) and [his niece] Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (13) were married. They were half third cousins. He a great x 5 grandson of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. [his niece] She by marriage Countess Derby.

On 19 Feb 1674 [his son] James Butler 1674-1676 was born to Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (34) and Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 (19).

In 1675 [his son] Thomas Butler 1675-1681 was born to Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (35) and Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 (20).

In Jan 1675 [his brother] John Butler 1st Earl Gowran 1643-1677 (32) and Anne Chichester Countess Gowran and Longford -1697 were married.

On 13 Apr 1676 [his brother] John Butler 1st Earl Gowran 1643-1677 (33) was created 1st Earl Gowran, 1st Viscount Clonmore, 1st Baron Aghrim. Anne Chichester Countess Gowran and Longford -1697 by marriage Countess Gowran.

In 1677 [his brother] John Butler 1st Earl Gowran 1643-1677 (34) died at Paris.

In 1679 [his daughter] Charlotte Butler Baroness Cornwallis 1679-1725 was born to Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (39) and Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 (24).

On 30 Jul 1680 [his brother] Thomas Butler 6th Earl Ossory 1634-1680 (46) died. He was buried in the Duke of Ormonde Vault Henry VII Chapel Westminster Abbey the next day.

On 16 Mar 1681 [his son] Thomas Butler 1681-1685 was born to Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (41) and Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 (26).

In 1682 [his nephew] James Butler 2nd Duke Ormonde 1665-1745 (16) and Anne Hyde -1685 were married.

On 09 Nov 1682 [his father] James Butler 1st Duke Ormonde 1610-1688 (72) was created 1st Duke Ormonde England by Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (52). Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (67) by marriage Duchess Ormonde England.

On 21 Jul 1684 [his mother] Elizabeth Preston Duchess Ormonde 1615-1684 (68) died. On 24 Jul 1684 she was buried in the Duke of Ormonde Vault Henry VII Chapel Westminster Abbey.

In 1685 [his nephew] James Butler 2nd Duke Ormonde 1665-1745 (19) and Mary Somerset Duchess Ormonde 1664-1733 (21) were married.

Around 1695. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Mary Somerset Duchess Ormonde 1664-1733.

On 25 Jan 1685 Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 (45) died.

On 30 Nov 1716 Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 (61) died.

Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 and Mary Stewart Countess Arran 1651-1668 were married. She by marriage Countess Arran.

Richard Butler 1st Earl Arran 1639-1685 and Dorothy Ferrers Countess Arran 1655-1716 were married. She by marriage Countess Arran.

Memoirs of Count Grammont by Anthony Hamilton Chapter 8. The court, as we have mentioned before, was an entire scene of gallantry and amusements, with all the politeness and magnificence, which the inclinations of a prince, naturally addicted to tenderness and pleasure, could suggest; the beauties were desirous of charming, and the men endeavoured to please; all studied to set themselves off to the best advantage; some distinguished themselves by dancing; others by show and magnificence; some by their wit, many by their amours, but few by their constancy. There was a certain Italian at court, famous for the guitar; he had a genius for music, and he was the only man who could make any thing of the guitar: his style of play was so full of grace and tenderness, that he would have given harmony to the most discordant instruments. The truth is, nothing was so difficult as to play like this foreigner. The king's relish for his compositions had brought the instrument so much into vogue, that every person played upon it, well or ill; and you were as sure to see a guitar on a lady's toilette, as rouge or patches. The Duke of York played upon it tolerably well, and the Earl of Arran like Francisco himself. This Francisco had composed a saraband, which either charmed or infatuated every person; for the whole guitarery at court were trying at it, and God knows what an universal strumming there was. The Duke of York, pretending not to be perfect in it, desired Lord Arran to play it to him. [his sister] Lady Chesterfield had the best guitar in England. The Earl of Arran, who was desirous of playing his best, conducted his royal highness to his sister's apartments; she was lodged at court, at her father's, the Duke of Ormond's, and this wonderful guitar was lodged there too. Whether this visit had been preconcerted or not, I do not pretend to say; but it is certain that they found both the lady and the guitar at home; they likewise found there Lord Chesterfield, so much surprised at this unexpected visit, that it was a considerable time before he thought of rising from his seat, to receive them with due respect.

Jealousy, like a malignant vapour, now seized upon his brain; a thousand suspicions, blacker than ink, took possession of his imagination, and were continually increasing; for whilst the brother played upon the guitar to the duke, the sister ogled and accompanied him with her eyes, as if the coast had been clear, and no enemy to observe them. This saraband was at least repeated twenty times; the duke declared it was played to perfection. [his sister] Lady Chesterfield found fault with the composition; but her husband, who clearly perceived that he was the person played upon, thought it a most detestable piece. However, though he was in the last agony, at being obliged to curb his passion, while others gave a free scope to theirs, he was resolved to find out the drift of the visit; but it was not in his power; for having the honour to be chamberlain to the queen, a messenger came to require his immediate attendance on her majesty. His first thought was to pretend sickness; the second to suspect that the queen, who sent for him at such an unseasonable time, was in the plot; but at last, after all the extravagant ideas of a suspicious man, and all the irresolutions of a jealous husband, he was obliged to go.

We may easily imagine what his state of mind was when he arrived at the palace. Alarms are to the jealous, what disasters are to the unfortunate: they seldom come alone, but form a series of persecution. He was informed that he was sent for to attend the queen at an audience she gave to seven or eight Muscovite ambassadors: he had scarce begun to curse the Muscovites, when his brother-in-law appeared, and drew upon himself all the imprecations he bestowed upon the embassy: he no longer doubted his being in the plot with the two persons he had left together; and in his heart sincerely wished him such recompense for his good offices as such good offices deserved. It was with great difficulty that he restrained himself from immediately acquainting him what was his opinion of such conduct: he thought that what he had already seen was a 'sufficient proof of his wife's infidelity; but before the end of the very same day, some circumstances occurred, which increased his suspicions, and persuaded him, that they had taken advantage of his absence, and of the honourable officiousness of his brother-in-law. He passed, however, that night with tranquillity; but the next morning, being reduced, to the necessity either of bursting or giving vent to his sorrows and conjectures, he did nothing but think and walk about the room until Park-time. He went to court, seemed very busy, as if seeking for some person or other, imagining that people guessed at the subject of his uneasiness: he avoided every body; but at length meeting with Hamilton, he thought he was the very man that he wanted; and having desired him to take an airing with him in Hyde Park, he took him up in his coach, and they arrived at the Ring, without a word having passed between them.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

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Memoirs of Count Grammont by Anthony Hamilton Chapter 8. The Duke of York consented, and Lord Falmouth having assembled both his counsel and his witnesses, conducted them to his royal highness's cabinet, after having instructed them how to act: these gentlemen were the Earl of Arran, Jermyn, Talbot, and Killegrew, all men of honour; but who infinitely preferred the Duke of York's interest to Miss Hyde's reputation, and who, besides, were greatly dissatisfied, as well as the whole court, at the insolent authority of the prime minister. The duke having told them, after a sort of preamble, that although they could not be ignorant of his affection for Miss Hyde, yet they might be unacquainted with the engagements his tenderness for her had induced him to contract; that he thought himself obliged to perform all the promises he had made her; but as the innocence of persons of her age was generally exposed to court scandal, and as certain reports, whether false or true, had been spread abroad on the subject of her conduct, he conjured them as his friends, and charged them upon their duty, to tell him sincerely every thing they knew upon the subject, since he was resolved to make their evidence the rule of his conduct towards her. They all appeared rather reserved at first, and seemed not to dare to give their opinions upon an affair of so serious and delicate a nature; but the Duke of York having renewed his entreaties, each began to relate the particulars of what he knew, and perhaps of more than he knew, of poor Miss Hyde; nor did they omit any circumstance necessary to strengthen the evidence. For instance, the Earl of Arran, who spoke first, deposed, that in the gallery at Honslaerdyk, where the Countess of Ossory, his sister-in-law, and Jermyn, were playing at nine-pins, Miss Hyde, pretending to be sick, retired to a chamber at the end of the gallery; that he, the deponent, had followed her, and having cut her lace, to give a greater probability to the pretence of the vapours, he had acquitted himself to the best of his abilities, both to assist and to console her.

Talbot said, that she had made an appointment with him in the chancellor's cabinet, while he was in council; and, that not paying so much attention to what was upon the table, as to what they were engaged in, they had spilled a bottle full of ink upon a despatch of four pages, and that the king's monkey, which was blamed for this accident, had been a long time in disgrace.

Jermyn mentioned many places where he had received long and favourable audiences: however, all these articles of accusation amounted only to some delicate familiarities, or at most, to what is generally denominated the innocent part of an intrigue; but Killegrew, who wished to surpass these trivial depositions, boldly declared that he had had the honour of being upon the most intimate terms with her: he was of a sprightly and witty humour, and had the art of telling a story in the most entertaining manner, by the graceful and natural turn he could give it: he affirmed that he had found the critical minute in a certain closet built over the water, for a purpose very different from that of giving ease to the pains of love: that three or four swans had been witnesses to his happiness, and might perhaps have been witnesses to the happiness of many others, as the lady frequently repaired to that place, and was particularly delighted with it.

Around 1661 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. One of the Windsor Beauties. Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Around 1643. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Hyde 1st Earl Clarendon 1609-1674.

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Memoirs of Count Grammont by Anthony Hamilton Chapter 6. The [his father] Duke of Ormond's sons and his nephews had been in the king's court during his exile, and were far from diminishing its lustre after his return. The Earl of Arran had a singular address in all kinds of exercises, played well at tennis and on the guitar, and was pretty successful in gallantry: his elder brother, the Earl of Ossory, was not so lively, but of the most liberal sentiments, and of great probity.