Biography of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694

1677 Marriage of William of Orange and Princess Mary Stewart

1683 Marriage of Lady Anne and Prince George

1685 Death and Burial of Charles II

1688 Abdication of James II

1689 Act of Poll

1689 Coronation William III and Mary II

1694 Death of Queen Mary II

1702 Death of King William III

On 14 Oct 1633 [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 was born to [her grandfather] Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (32) and [her grandmother] Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 (23) at St James's Palace. [her father] He was created 1st Duke York 5C 1633 at birth by his father.

Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 when Duke of York.Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666.Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 wearing his Garter Robes.Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701.In 1633 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 known as Charles I with M.De St Antoine.Around 1637 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.Around 1625 John Hoskins Painter 1590-1664. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and the dwarf Jeffrey Hudson.Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669 and her son Charles James Stewart 1629-1629.Before 09 Dec 1641 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of Henrietta Maria Bourbon Queen Consort England 1609-1669.

On 06 Nov 1650 William Orange Nassau II Prince Orange 1626-1650 (24) died. His son [her future husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 succeeded III Prince Orange.

Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar.

On 03 Sep 1660 [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (26) and [her mother] Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (23) were married. He a son of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649. in secret. [her mother] She by marriage Duchess York.

Around 1661 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671.Around 1662 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. One of the Windsor Beauties.Around 1665 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671.

On 30 Apr 1662 Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 was born to [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (28) and [her mother] Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (25) at St James's Palace.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 01 May 1662. 01 May 1662. Sir G. Carteret (52), Sir W. Pen (41), and myself, with our clerks, set out this morning from Portsmouth very early, and got by noon to Petersfield; several officers of the Yard accompanying us so far. Here we dined and were merry. At dinner comes my Lord Carlingford (59) from London, going to Portsmouth: tells us that the [her mother] Duchess of York (25) is brought to bed of a girl, [Mary, afterwards Queen of England.] at which I find nobody pleased; and that Prince Rupert (42) and the Duke of Buckingham (34) are sworn of the Privy Councell. He himself made a dish with eggs of the butter of the sparagus, which is very fine meat, which I will practise hereafter.
To horse again after dinner, and got to Gilford, where after supper I to bed, having this day been offended by Sir W. Pen's (41) foolish talk, and I offending him with my answers. Among others he in discourse complaining of want of confidence, did ask me to lend him a grain or two, which I told him I thought he was better stored with than myself, before Sir George (52). So that I see I must keep a greater distance than I have done, and I hope I may do it because of the interest which I am making with Sir George (52).
To bed all alone, and my Will in the truckle bed1.
Note 1. According to the original Statutes of Corpus Christi Coll. Oxon, a Scholar slept in a truckle bed below each Fellow. Called also "a trindle bed". Compare Hall's description of an obsequious tutor: "He lieth in a truckle bed While his young master lieth o'er his head". Satires, ii. 6, 5. The bed was drawn in the daytime under the high bed of the tutor. See Wordsworth's "University Life in the Eighteenth Century".—M. B.

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John Evelyn's Diary 01 September 1662. 01 Sep 1662. Being invited by Lord Berkeley (34), I went to Durdans, where dined his [her uncle] Majesty (32), the Queen (23), Duke, [her mother] Duchess (25), Prince Rupert (42), Prince Edward, and abundance of noblemen. I went, after dinner, to visit my brother (45) of Woodcot, my sister having been delivered of a son a little before, but who had now been two days dead.

On 06 Feb 1665 [her sister] Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 was born to [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and [her mother] Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (27) at St James's Palace at 11:39pm being their fourth child and second daughter. She was baptised Anglican in the Chapel Royal with her elder sister Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (2) being Godparent as well as Anne Scott Duchess Monmouth and Buccleuch 1651-1732 (13) and Gilbert Sheldon Archbishop of Canterbury 1598-1677 (66).

In 1703 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Possibly school of. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.In 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.

On 03 Sep 1665 [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (31) and [her mother] Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (28) were married. He a son of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649. again.

In 1666 [her brother] Charles Stewart 1st Duke Kendal 1666-1667 was created 1st Duke Kendal 1C 1666 by his grandfather [her grandfather] Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649 (65).

On 03 Dec 1666 [her brother] James Stewart 1st Duke Cambridge 1663-1667 (3) was created 1st Duke Cambridge 1C 1664 by his father [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (33). See Diary of Samuel Pepys 06 December 1666.
Those present included [her uncle] Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (36), [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (33), Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682 (46), William Cecil 2nd Earl Salisbury 1591-1668 (75), George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 (57), Thomas Howard 1st Earl Berkshire 1587-1669 (79), Charles Stewart 6th Duke Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1639-1672 (27), Edward Montagu 2nd Earl Manchester 1602-1671 (64), James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685 (17).

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Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes.Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes.Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles IIAround 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682, Colonel John Russell 1620-1687 and Colonel William Murray.Before 1656 Gerrit van Honthorst Painter 1592-1656. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.Around 1672 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682.Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Prince Rupert Palatinate Simmern 1st Duke Cumberland 1619-1682. Before 03 Jan 1670  Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670.Before 03 Jan 1670 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of George Monck 1st Duke Albemarle 1608-1670 in his Garter Robes.Around 1668 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Charles Stewart 6th Duke Lennox 3rd Duke Richmond 1639-1672.Around 1664 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Edward Montagu 2nd Earl Manchester 1602-1671.Around 1670. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of James Scott 1st Duke Monmouth 1st Duke Buccleuch 1649-1685.

On 22 May 1667 [her brother] Charles Stewart 1st Duke Kendal 1666-1667 died.

On 20 Jun 1667 [her brother] James Stewart 1st Duke Cambridge 1663-1667 (3) died at Richmond Palace. He was buried at Westminster Abbey. Duke Cambridge 1C 1664 extinct.

On 07 Oct 1667 [her brother] Edgar Stewart 1st Duke Cambridge 1667-1671 was created 1st Duke Cambridge 2C 1667 by his uncle [her uncle] Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (37).

Diary of Samuel Pepys 02 April 1669. 02 Apr 1669. Up, and by water to White Hall, and there with the Office attended the [her father] Duke of York (35), and staid in White Hall till about noon, and so with W. Hewer (27) to the Cocke (52), and there he and I dined alone with great content, he reading to me, for my memory's sake, my late collections of the history of the Navy, that I might represent the same by and by to the [her father] Duke of York (35); and so, after dinner, he and I to White Hall, and there to the [her father] Duke of York's (35) lodgings, whither he, by and by, by his appointment come: and alone with him an hour in his closet, telling him mine and W. Coventry's (41) advice touching the present posture of the Navy, as the Duke of Buckingham (41) and the rest do now labour to make changes therein; and that it were best for him to suffer the [her uncle] King (38) to be satisfied with the bringing in of a man or two which they desire. I did also give the [her father] Duke of York (35) a short account of the history of the Navy, as to our Office, wherewith he was very well satisfied: but I do find that he is pretty stiff against their bringing in of men against his mind, as the Treasures were, and particularly against Child's' coming in, because he is a merchant. After much discourse with him, we parted; and [he to] the Council, while I staid waiting for his telling me when I should be ready to give him a written account of the administration of the Navy. This caused me to wait the whole afternoon, till night. In the mean time, stepping to the [her mother] Duchess of York's (32) side to speak with Lady Peterborough (47); I did see the young Duchess (6)1, a little child in hanging sleeves; dance most finely, so as almost to ravish me, her ears were so good: taught by a Frenchman that did heretofore teach the [her uncle] King (38), and all the King's children, and the [her grandmother] Queen-Mother (59) herself, who do still dance well.
Thence to the council door and Mr. Chevins (67) took me into the back stairs, and they with his friend, Mr. Fowkes, for whom he is very solicitous in some things depending in this Office, he did make me, with some others that he took in (among others, Alderman Back well), eat a pickled herrings, the largest I ever saw, and drink variety of wines till I was almost merry; but I did keep in good tune; and so, after the Council was up, I home; and there find my wife not yet come home from Deptford, he she hath been all this day to see her mother, but she come and by, and so to talk, and supper, and to bed. This night I did bring home from the King's potticary's, in White Hall by Mr. Cooling's direction, a water that he says did him mighty good for his eyes. I pray God it may do me good; but, by his description, his disease was the same as mine, and this do encourage me to use it.
Note 1. The Princess Mary (6), afterwards Queen of England.

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Around 1670 Edward Lake Chaplain 1641-1704 (28) was appointed Chaplain to Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (7) and [her sister] Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (4).

On 31 Mar 1671 [her mother] Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671 (34) died.

On 08 Jun 1671 [her brother] Edgar Stewart 1st Duke Cambridge 1667-1671 (3) died. Duke Cambridge 2C 1667 extinct.

On 20 Sep 1673 [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (39) and [her step-mother] Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (14) were married. He a son of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649.

In 1687 Studio of Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718.In 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718.Around 1685 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718.Around 1680 Simon Pietersz Verelst Painter 1644-1710. Portrait of Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718.

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680 (57). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (13).

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.

John Evelyn's Diary 01 August 1676. 01 Aug 1676. In the afternoon, after prayers at St. James's Chapel, was christened a daughter of Dr. Leake's (34), the [her father] Duke's (42) Chaplain: godmothers were Lady Mary (14), daughter of the [her father] Duke of York (42), and the Duchess of Monmouth (25): godfather, the Earl of Bath (47).

Before 1677 Barbara Villiers Viscountess Fitzhardinge 1654-1708 became a Maid of Honour to the daughters of [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701: Princess Mary and [her sister] Princess Anne and possibly others.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 October 1677. 23 Oct 1677. Saw again the [her future husband] Prince of Orange (26); his marriage with the Lady Mary (15), eldest daughter to the [her father] Duke of York (44), by [her mother] Mrs. Hyde (40), the late Duchess, was now declared.

Marriage of William of Orange and Princess Mary Stewart

On 04 Nov 1677 [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (27) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (15) were married. They were first cousins. He a grandson of Charles I King England Scotland and Ireland 1600-1649. She a daughter of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701. She by marriage Princess Orange.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 November 1677. 15 Nov 1677. The Queen's (38) birthday, a great ball at Court, where the [her husband] Prince of Orange (27) and his new Princess (15) danced.

In 1679 Thomas Ken Bishop 1637-1711 (41) was appointed Chaplain to Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (16).

Marriage of Lady Anne and Prince George

On 28 Jul 1683 Prince George of Denmark 1st Duke Cumberland 1653-1708 (30) and [her sister] Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (18) were married at Chapel Royal St James's Palace. They were second cousins once removed. She a daughter of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701.

Before 28 Oct 1708 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of Prince George of Denmark 1st Duke Cumberland 1653-1708.Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Prince George of Denmark 1st Duke Cumberland 1653-1708. Walmer Castle.

On 29 Nov 1683 Henry Waldegrave 1st Baron Waldegrave Chewton Somerset 1661-1689 (22) and [her sister] Henrietta Fitzjames Countess Newcastle 1667-1730 (16) were married. She a daughter of James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701.

Death and Burial of Charles II

On 06 Feb 1685 [her uncle] Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (54) died at 1145 in the morning at Whitehall Palace attended by Charles Scarburgh Physician 1615-1694 (69). His brother [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (51) succeeded II King England Scotland and Ireland. [her step-mother] Mary of Modena Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland 1658-1718 (26) by marriage Queen Consort England Scotland and Ireland. His brother [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (51), William Chiffinch 1602-1691 (83), Richard Mason 1633-1685 (52) and William Sancroft Archbishop of Canterbury 1617-1693 (68) were present.

Before 08 Mar 1685 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Richard Mason 1633-1685.Around 1688 Jacob Huysmans Painter 1633-1696. Portrait of Richard Mason 1633-1685.

John Evelyn's Diary 04 February 1685. 04 Jun 1685. Then the [her father] King (51) rose, the Lords accompanying him to his bed-chamber, where, whilst he repos'd himselfe, tired indeede as he was with griefe and watching, they return'd againe Into the Council-chamber to take order for the proclaiming his Ma*, which (after some debate) they consented should be in the very forme his grandfather K. James I. was, after ye death of Queene Elizabeth; as likewise that the Lords, &c. should proceede in their coaches thro' the Citty for the more solemnity of it. Upon this was I, and severall other Gentlemen waiting in the Privy-gallerie, admitted into ye Council-chamber to be witnesse of what was resolv'd on. Thence with the Lords, the Lord Marshall and Heraulds, and other Crowne Officers being ready, we first went to White-hall gate, where the Lords stood on foote bare-headed, whilst the Herauld proclaim'd his [her uncle] Majesty's (55) title to the Imperial Crowne and Succession according to ye forme, the trumpets and kettle-drums having first sounded 3 times, which ended with the people's acclamations. Then a Herauld call'd the Lords' coaches according to rank, myselfe accompanying the solemnity in my Lord Cornwallis's (29) coach, first to Temple Barr, where the Lord Maior and his brethren met us on horseback, in all theire formalities, and proclaim'd the [her uncle] King (55); hence to the Exchange in Cornhill, and so we return'd in the order we set forth. Being come to Whitehall, we all went and kiss'd the [her father] King (51) and [her step-mother] Queenes (26) hands. He had ben on ye bed, but was now risen and in his undresse. The Queene (23) was in bed in her appartment, but put forth her hand, seeming to be much afflicted, as I believe she was, having deported herselfe so decently upon all occasions since she came into England, which made her universally belov'd. Thus concluded this sad and not joyfull day.
I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and prophanenesse, gaming and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfullnesse of God (it being Sunday evening) which this day se'nnight I was witnesse of, the [her uncle] King (55) sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleaveland, and Mazarine, &c a French boy singing love songs, in that glorious gallery, whilst about 20 of the greate courtiers and other dissolute persons were at Basset round a large table, a bank of at least 2000 in gold before them, upon which two gentlemen who were with me made reflexions with astonishment. Six days after was all in the dust! It was enjoyn'd that those who put on mourning should wear it as for a father, in ye most solemn manner.

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In 1686 Catherine Sedley Countess Dorchester and Portmore 1657-1717 (28) was created 1st Earl Dorchester 1C 1686 for life by [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (52) for services as his mistress. Her father Charles Sedley 5th Baronet 1639-1701 (46) quipped "As the [her father] king (52) has made my daughter a countess, the least I can do, in common gratitude, is to assist in making his Majesty's daughter (23) a queen".

In 1684 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Catherine Sedley Countess Dorchester and Portmore 1657-1717.

Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687 (30). Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (23).

Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.

In 1687 [her illegitimate half-brother] James Fitzjames 1st Duke Berwick 1670-1734 (16) was created 1st Duke Berwick by his father [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (53).

John Evelyn's Diary 08 July 1688. 08 Jul 1688. One of the [her father] King's (54) chaplains preached before the Princess (26) on Exodus xiv. 13, "Stand still, and behold the salvation of the Lord", which he applied so boldly to the present conjuncture of the Church of England, that more could scarce be said to encourage desponders. The Popish priests were not able to carry their cause against their learned adversaries, who confounded them both by their disputes and writings.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 November 1688. 02 Nov 1688. It was now certainly reported by some who saw the fleet, and the [her husband] Prince (37) embark, that they sailed from the Brill on Wednesday morning, and that the Princess of Orange (26) was there to take leave of her husband.

Abdication of James II

On 23 Dec 1688 [her father] James II King England Scotland and Ireland 1633-1701 (55) abdicated II King England Scotland and Ireland. His daughter Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) succeeded II King England Scotland and Ireland. His nephew [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (38) succeeded IIi King England Scotland and Ireland.

In 1689 William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707 (48) was appointed 498th Knight of the Garter by [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (38) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26).

Before 1708 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.In 1697 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.Around 1660 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.Around 1655. Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Cavendish 1st Duke Devonshire 1640-1707.Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.

In 1689 Frederick Schomberg 1st Duke Schomberg 1615-1690 (73) was appointed 497th Knight of the Garter by [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (38) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26).

After 1689 Dr Henry Dove -1694 was appointed Chaplain to [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 January 1689. 15 Jan 1689. I visited the Archbishop of Canterbury (71), where I found the Bishops of St. Asaph (61), Ely (51), Bath and Wells (51), Peterborough (61), and Chichester (65), the Earls of Aylesbury (33) and [her uncle] Clarendon, Sir George Mackenzie (53), Lord-Advocate of Scotland, and then came in a Scotch Archbishop, etc. After prayers and dinner, divers serious matters were discoursed, concerning the present state of the Public, and sorry I was to find there was as yet no accord in the judgments of those of the Lords and Commons who were to convene; some would have the Princess (26) made Queen without any more dispute, others were for a Regency; there was a Tory party (then so called), who were for inviting his [her father] Majesty (55) again upon conditions; and there were Republicans who would make the [her husband] Prince of Orange (38) like a Stadtholder. The Romanists were busy among these several parties to bring them into confusion: most for ambition or other interest, few for conscience and moderate resolutions. I found nothing of all this in this assembly of Bishops, who were pleased to admit me into their discourses; they were all for a Regency, thereby to salve their oaths, and so all public matters to proceed in his [her father] Majesty's (55) name, by that to facilitate the calling of Parliament, according to the laws in being. Such was the result of this meeting.
My Lord of Canterbury (71) gave me great thanks for the advertisement I sent him in October, and assured me they took my counsel in that particular, and that it came very seasonably.
I found by the Lord-Advocate (53) that the Bishops of Scotland (who were indeed little worthy of that character, and had done much mischief in that Church) were now coming about to the true interest, in this conjuncture which threatened to abolish the whole hierarchy in that kingdom; and therefore the Scottish Archbishop (55) and Lord-Advocate (53) requested the Archbishop of Canterbury (71) to use his best endeavors with the [her father] Prince (55) to maintain the Church there in the same state, as by law at present settled.
It now growing late, after some private discourse with his Grace (71), I took my leave, most of the Lords being gone.
The trial of the bishops was now printed.
The great convention being assembled the day before, falling upon the question about the government, resolved that [her father] King James (55) having by the advice of the Jesuits and other wicked persons endeavored to subvert the laws of the Church and State, and deserted the Kingdom, carrying away the seals, etc., without any care for the management of the government, had by demise abdicated himself and wholly vacated his right; they did therefore desire the Lords' concurrence to their vote, to place the crown on the next heir, the [her husband] Prince of Orange (38), for his life, then to the Princess (26), his wife, and if she died without issue, to the [her sister] Princess of Denmark (23), and she failing, to the heirs of the [her father] Prince (55), excluding forever all possibility of admitting a Roman Catholic.
Note. The reference to Prince is somewhat abiguous. It may refer to [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (38).

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John Evelyn's Diary 06 February 1689. 06 Feb 1689. The [her father] King's (55) coronation day was ordered not to be observed, as hitherto it had been.
The Convention of the Lords and Commons now declare the [her husband] Prince (38) and Princess (26) of Orange King and Queen of England, France, and Ireland (Scotland being an independent kingdom), the [her husband] Prince (38) and Princess (26) being to enjoy it jointly during their lives; but the executive authority to be vested in the [her husband] Prince (38) during life, though all proceedings to run in both names, and that it should descend to their issue, and for want of such, to the [her sister] Princess Anne of Denmark (24) and her issue, and in want of such, to the heirs of the body of the Prince, if he survive, and that failing, to devolve to the Parliament, as they should think fit. These produced a conference with the Lords, when also there was presented heads of such new laws as were to be enacted. It is thought on these conditions they will be proclaimed.
There was much contest about the [her husband] King's (38) abdication, and whether he had vacated the government. The Earl of Nottingham (41) and about twenty Lords, and many Bishops, entered their protests, but the concurrence was great against them.
The Princess (26) hourly expected. Forces sending to Ireland, that kingdom being in great danger by the Earl of Tyrconnel's (59) army, and expectations from France coming to assist them, but that King was busy in invading Flanders, and encountering the German Princes. It is likely that this will be the most remarkable summer for action, which has happened in many years.

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1685-1699 Glorious Revolution

John Evelyn's Diary 21 February 1689. 21 Feb 1689. Dr. Burnet (45) preached at St. James's on the obligation to walk worthy of God's particular and signal deliverance of the nation and church.
I saw the new Queen (26) and [her husband] King (38), with great acclamation and general good reception. Bonfires, bells, guns, etc. It was believed that both, especially the Princess (26), would have shown some (seeming) reluctance at least, of assuming her [her father] father's (55) crown, and made some apology, testifying by her regret that he should by his mismanagement necessitate the nation to so extraordinary a proceeding, which would have shown very handsomely to the world, and according to the character given of her piety; consonant also to her [her husband] husband's (38) first declaration, that there was no intention of deposing the [her father] King (55), but of succoring the nation; but nothing of all this appeared; she came into Whitehall laughing and jolly, as to a wedding, so as to seem quite transported. She rose early the next morning, and in her undress, as it was reported, before her women were up, went about from room to room to see the convenience of Whitehall; lay in the same bed and apartment where the late [her step-mother] Queen (30) lay, and within a night or two sat down to play at basset, as the [her step-mother] Queen (30), her predecessor used to do. She smiled upon and talked to everybody, so that no change seemed to have taken place at Court since her last going away, save that infinite crowds of people thronged to see her, and that she went to our prayers. This carriage was censured by many. She seems to be of a good nature, and that she takes nothing to heart: while the [her husband] Prince (38), her husband, has a thoughtful countenance, is wonderfully serious and silent, and seems to treat all persons alike gravely, and to be very intent on affairs: Holland, Ireland, and France calling for his care.
Divers Bishops and Noblemen are not at all satisfied with this so sudden assumption of the Crown, without any previous sending, and offering some conditions to the absent King; or on his not returning, or not assenting to those conditions, to have proclaimed him Regent; but the major part of both Houses prevailed to make them King and Queen immediately, and a crown was tempting. This was opposed and spoken against with such vehemence by [her uncle] Lord Clarendon (her own uncle), that it put him by all preferment, which must doubtless have been as great as could have been given him. My [her uncle] Lord of Rochester (46), his brother, overshot himself, by the same carriage and stiffness, which their friends thought they might have well spared when they saw how it was like to be overruled, and that it had been sufficient to have declared their dissent with less passion, acquiescing in due time.
The Archbishop of Canterbury (72) and some of the rest, on scruple of conscience and to salve the oaths they had taken, entered their protests and hung off, especially the Archbishop, who had not all this while so much as appeared out of Lambeth. This occasioned the wonder of many who observed with what zeal they contributed to the [her husband] Prince's (38) expedition, and all the while also rejecting any proposals of sending again to the absent [her father] King (55); that they should now raise scruples, and such as created much division among the people, greatly rejoicing the old courtiers, and especially the Papists.
Another objection was, the invalidity of what was done by a convention only, and the as yet unabrogated laws; this drew them to make themselves on the 22d a Parliament, the new [her husband] King (38) passing the act with the crown on his head. The lawyers disputed, but necessity prevailed, the government requiring a speedy settlement.
Innumerable were the crowds, who solicited for, and expected offices; most of the old ones were turned out. Two or three white staves were disposed of some days before, as Lord Steward, to the Earl of Devonshire (49); Treasurer of the household, to Lord Newport (92); Lord Chamberlain to the [her uncle] King (58), to my Lord of Dorset (46); but there were as yet none in offices of the civil government save the Marquis of Halifax (55) as Privy Seal. A council of thirty was chosen, Lord Derby (34) president, but neither Chancellor nor Judges were yet declared, the new Great Seal not yet finished.

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Coronation William III and Mary II

John Evelyn's Diary 11 April 1689. 11 Apr 1689. I saw the procession to and from the Abbey Church of Westminster, with the great feast in Westminster Hall, at the coronation of King William and Queen Mary. What was different from former coronations, was some alteration in the coronation oath. Dr. Burnet (45), now made Bishop of Sarum, preached with great applause. The Parliament men had scaffolds and places which took up the one whole side of the Hall. When the [her husband] King (38) and Queen (26) had dined, the ceremony of the Champion, and other services by tenure were performed. The Parliament men were feasted in the Exchequer chamber, and had each of them a gold medal given them, worth five-and-forty shillings. On the one side were the effigies of the [her uncle] King (58) and Queen inclining one to the other; on the reverse was Jupiter throwing a bolt at Phäeton the words, "Ne totus absumatur": which was but dull, seeing they might have had out of the poet something as apposite. The sculpture was very mean.
Much of the splendor of the proceeding was abated by the absence of divers who should have contributed to it, there being but five Bishops, four Judges (no more being yet sworn), and several noblemen and great ladies wanting; the feast, however, was magnificent. The next day the House of Commons went and kissed their new Majesties' hands in the Banqueting House.

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On 11 Apr 1689 [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (38) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) were crowned II King England Scotland and Ireland at Westminster Abbey.
John Ashburnham 1st Baron Ashburnham 1656-1710 (33) carried the canopy being one of the Barons of the Cinque Ports.
George Compton 4th Earl of Northampton 1664-1727 (24) bore the King's sceptre and cross at Westminster Abbey.

Around 1758 Pompeo Batoni Painter 1708-1787. Portrait of George Compton 4th Earl of Northampton 1664-1727.

John Evelyn's Diary 12 April 1689. 12 Apr 1689. I went with the Bishop of St. Asaph (61) to visit my Lord of Canterbury (58) at Lambeth, who had excused himself from officiating at the coronation, which was performed by the Bishop of London (57), assisted by the Archbishop of York (74). We had much private and free discourse with his Grace (58) concerning several things relating to the Church, there being now a bill of comprehension to be brought from the Lords to the Commons. I urged that when they went about to reform some particulars in the Liturgy, Church discipline, Canons, etc., the baptizing in private houses without necessity might be reformed, as likewise so frequent burials in churches; the one proceeding much from the pride of women, bringing that into custom which was only indulged in case of imminent danger, and out of necessity during the rebellion, and persecution of the clergy in our late civil wars; the other from the avarice of ministers, who, in some opulent parishes, made almost as much of permission to bury in the chancel and the church, as of their livings, and were paid with considerable advantage and gifts for baptizing in chambers. To this they heartily assented, and promised their endeavor to get it reformed, utterly disliking both practices as novel and indecent.
We discoursed likewise of the great disturbance and prejudice it might cause, should the new oath, now on the anvil, be imposed on any, save such as were in new office, without any retrospect to such as either had no office, or had been long in office, who it was likely would have some scruples about taking a new oath, having already sworn fidelity to the government as established by law. This we all knew to be the case of my Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (58), and some other persons who were not so fully satisfied with the Convention making it an abdication of King James, to whom they had sworn allegiance.
[her father] King James (55) was now certainly in Ireland with the Marshal d'Estrades (82), whom he made a Privy Councillor; and who caused the [her father] King (55) to remove the Protestant Councillors, some whereof, it seems, had continued to sit, telling him that the King of France (50), his master, would never assist him if he did not immediately do it; by which it is apparent how the poor [her father] Prince (55) is managed by the French.
Scotland declares for [her husband] King William (38) and Queen Mary (26), with the reasons of their setting aside [her father] King James (55), not as abdicating, but forfeiting his right by maladministration; they proceeded with much more caution and prudence than we did, who precipitated all things to the great reproach of the nation, all which had been managed by some crafty, ill-principled men. The new Privy Council have a Republican spirit, manifestly undermining all future succession of the Crown and prosperity of the Church of England, which yet I hope they will not be able to accomplish so soon as they expect, though they get into all places of trust and profit.

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On 22 Apr 1689 Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (29) was appointed Principal Lady in Waiting to Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) as well as Groom of the Stool and Mistress of the Robes attracting a salary of £1200 per annum (£800 and £400 respectively).

Act of Poll

John Evelyn's Diary 26 April 1689. 26 Apr 1689. I heard the lawyers plead before the Lords the writ of error in the judgment of Oates (39), as to the charge against him of perjury, which after debate they referred to the answer of Holloway, etc., who were his judges. I then went with the Bishop of St. Asaph (61) to the Archbishop (72) at Lambeth, where they entered into discourse concerning the final destruction of Antichrist, both concluding that the third trumpet and vial were now pouring out. My Lord St. Asaph (61) considered the killing of the two witnesses, to be the utter destruction of the Cevennes Protestants by the French and Duke of Savoy, and the other the Waldenses and Pyrenean Christians, who by all appearance from good history had kept the primitive faith from the very Apostles' time till now. The doubt his Grace suggested was, whether it could be made evident that the present persecution had made so great a havoc of those faithful people as of the other, and whether there were not yet some among them in being who met together, it being stated from the text, Apoc. xi., that they should both be slain together. They both much approved of Mr. Mede's way of interpretation, and that he only failed in resolving too hastily on the King of Sweden's (94) (Gustavus Adolphus) success in Germany. They agreed that it would be good to employ some intelligent French minister to travel as far as the Pyrenees to understand the present state of the Church there, it being a country where hardly anyone travels.
There now came certain news that [her father] King James (55) had not only landed in Ireland, but that he had surprised Londonderry, and was become master of that kingdom, to the great shame of our government, who had been so often solicited to provide against it by timely succor, and which they might so easily have done. This is a terrible beginning of more troubles, especially should an army come thence into Scotland, people being generally disaffected here and everywhere else, so that the seamen and landmen would scarce serve without compulsion.
A new oath was now fabricating for all the clergy to take, of obedience to the present Government, in abrogation of the former oaths of allegiance, which it is foreseen many of the bishops and others of the clergy will not take. The penalty is to be the loss of their dignity and spiritual preferment. This is thought to have been driven on by the Presbyterians, our new governors. God in mercy send us help, and direct the counsels to his glory and good of his Church!
Public matters went very ill in Ireland: confusion and dissensions among ourselves, stupidity, inconstancy, emulation, the governors employing unskillful men in greatest offices, no person of public spirit and ability appearing,—threaten us with a very sad prospect of what may be the conclusion, without God's infinite mercy.
A fight by Admiral Herbert (41) with the French, he imprudently setting on them in a creek as they were landing men in Ireland, by which we came off with great slaughter and little honor—so strangely negligent and remiss were we in preparing a timely and sufficient fleet. The Scots Commissioners offer the crown to the new King and Queen on conditions. Act of Poll money came forth, sparing none. Now appeared the Act of Indulgence for the Dissenters, but not exempting them from paying dues to the Church of England clergy, or serving in office according to law, with several other clauses. A most splendid embassy from Holland to congratulate the [her husband] King (38) and Queen (26) on their accession to the crown.

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John Evelyn's Diary 19 July 1689. 19 Jul 1689. The Marshal de Schomberg (73) went now as General toward Ireland, to the relief of Londonderry. Our fleet lay before Brest. The Confederates passing the Rhine, besiege Bonn and Mayence, to obtain a passage into France. A great victory gotten by the Muscovites, taking and burning Perecop. A new rebel against the Turks threatens the destruction of that tyranny. All Europe in arms against France, and hardly to be found in history so universal a face of war.
The Convention (or Parliament as some called it) sitting, exempt the Duke of Hanover (29) from the succession to the crown, which they seem to confine to the present new [her husband] King (38), his wife (27), and [her sister] Princess Anne of Denmark (24), who is so monstrously swollen, that it is doubted whether her being thought with child may prove a TYMPANY only, so that the unhappy family of the Stuarts seems to be extinguishing; and then what government is likely to be next set up is unknown, whether regal and by election, or otherwise, the Republicans and Dissenters from the Church of England evidently looking that way.
The Scots have now again voted down Episcopacy there. Great discontents through this nation at the slow proceedings of the [her husband] King (38), and the incompetent instruments and officers he advances to the greatest and most necessary charges.

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John Evelyn's Diary 05 November 1689. 05 Nov 1689. The Bishop of St. Asaph (62), Lord Almoner, preached before the [her husband] King (39) and Queen (27), the whole discourse being an historical narrative of the Church of England's several deliverances, especially that of this anniversary, signalized by being also the birthday of the Prince of Orange, his marriage (which was on the 4th), and his landing at Torbay this day. There was a splendid ball and other rejoicings.

In 1690 George Wilhelm Hanover Duke Brunswick Lüneburg 1624-1705 (65) was appointed 500th Knight of the Garter by [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (39) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (27).

In 1690 Frederick I King Prussia 1657-1713 (32) was appointed 499th Knight of the Garter by his first cousin [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (39) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (27).

John Evelyn's Diary 09 March 1690. 09 Mar 1690. Preached at Whitehall Dr. Burnet (46), late Bishop of Sarum, on Heb. iv. 13, anatomically describing the texture of the eye; and that, as it received such innumerable sorts of spies through so very small a passage to the brain, and that without the least confusion or trouble, and accordingly judged and reflected on them; so God who made this sensory, did with the greatest ease and at once see all that was done through the vast universe, even to the very thought as well as action. This similitude he continued with much perspicuity and aptness; and applied it accordingly, for the admonishing us how uprightly we ought to live and behave ourselves before such an all-seeing Deity; and how we were to conceive of other his attributes, which we could have no idea of than by comparing them by what we were able to conceive of the nature and power of things, which were the objects of our senses; and therefore it was that in Scripture we attribute those actions and affections of God by the same of man, not as adequately or in any proportion like them, but as the only expedient to make some resemblance of his divine perfections; as when the Scripture says, "God will remember the sins of the penitent no more:" not as if God could forget anything, but as intimating he would pass by such penitents and receive them to mercy.
I dined at the Bishop of St. Asaph's (62), Almoner to the new Queen (27), with the famous lawyer Sir George Mackenzie (54) (late Lord Advocate of Scotland), against whom both the Bishop (62) and myself had written and published books, but now most friendly reconciled. He related to us many particulars of Scotland, the present sad condition of it, the inveterate hatred which the Presbyterians show to the family of the Stuarts, and the exceeding tyranny of those bigots who acknowledge no superior on earth, in civil or divine matters, maintaining that the people only have the right of government; their implacable hatred to the Episcopal Order and Church of England. He observed that the first Presbyterian dissents from our discipline were introduced by the Jesuits' order, about the 20 of Queen Elizabeth, a famous Jesuit among them feigning himself a Protestant, and who was the first who began to pray extempore, and brought in that which they since called, and are still so fond of, praying by the Spirit. This Jesuit remained many years before he was discovered, afterward died in Scotland, where he was buried at ... having yet on his. Monument, "Rosa inter spinas"..

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John Evelyn's Diary 04 June 1690. 04 Jun 1690. [her husband] King William (39) set forth on his Irish expedition, leaving the Queen (28) Regent.

Battle of the Boyne

John Evelyn's Diary 24 June 1690. 24 Jun 1690. Dined with Mr. Pepys (57), who the next day was sent to the Gatehouse, and several great persons to the Tower, on suspicion of being affected to [her father] King James (56); among them was the [her uncle] Earl of Clarendon, the Queen's (28) uncle. [her husband] King William (39) having vanquished [her father] King James (56) in Ireland, there was much public rejoicing. It seems the Irish in [her father] King James's (56) army would not stand, but the English-Irish and French made great resistance. Schomberg (74) was slain, and Dr. Walker (72), who so bravely defended Londonderry. [her husband] King William (39) received a slight wound by the grazing of a cannon bullet on his shoulder, which he endured with very little interruption of his pursuit. Hamilton (55), who broke his word about Tyrconnel (60), was taken. It is reported that [her father] King James (56) is gone back to France. Drogheda and Dublin surrendered, and if [her husband] King William (39) be returning, we may say of him as Cæsar said, "Veni, vidi, vici". But to alloy much of this, the French fleet rides in our channel, ours not daring to interpose, and the enemy threatening to land.

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In 1691 Thomas Ken Bishop 1637-1711 (53) was deprived of his See by [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (40) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (28). He was given lodgings at Longleat House by Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth 1640-1714 (51) with whom he was at Oxford. He resided at Longleat for some twenty years.

Before 1714 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Thomas Thynne 1st Viscount Weymouth 1640-1714.

John Ashton Edmund Elliot Richard Graham 1691. On Fryday, the 2d day of this Sessions, my Lord Preston (41), John Ashton and Edmund Elliot, were all Arrained for High Treason, my Lord Preston (41) was Tryed on Saturday by the name of Sir Richard Graham, Mr. Ashton on Monday. The Indictments against them consisted of Two Parts, the First of which set forth, That they had a Treasonable Design carrying on to Depose the King and Queen, and to Subvert and Alter the Government of the Kingdom of England, and to raise War and Rebellion in the same; which said Traiterous and Wicked Designs and Purposes to bring to pass, they did, on the 29th of December last, Meet and Conspire together, with several other Traitors not yet discovered, and did Compose several Treasonable Letters, Notes and Memorandums in writing, which set forth the most effectual way and means how they might Dethrone and Depose our Most Gracious Sovereign Lord and Lady the [her husband] King (40) and Queen (28), and further describing therein how the Affairs of this Kingdom stood, and of what Strength and Force our Shipping was; as also the Fortifications of several Sea-Port-Towns within this Kingdom. The Second Part was their adhering to the Kings's Enemies: And to that end, that they might Acquaint Lewis the French King of the same, they did hire a Boat and Embarque themselves in order to Transport themselves and Pacquet of Treasonable Letters into France, agreeing to pay for their said Passages the Sum of One hundred Pound; and, in order to their Treasonable Voyage, they had made their Passage as far as below Gravesend, but were then Taken by Captain Billop, who Cruised abroad to search for them.
After this the Evidence for the [her husband] King (40) being called, gave an Account particularly from Step to Step, how cunningly and subtilly they managed this horrid Conspiracy, by hiring the Smack called the Thomas and Elizabeth, to convey them secretly into France; in order to which they took Water in a Skuller at Surrey-Stairs, and went on Board the aforesaid Vessel, which lay in the River of Thames over against the Tower: From thence they set Sail down the River, till coming within the View of the George Frigate, lying in Long-reach, they desired the Master of the Smack to hide them under the Quarter-Hatches; which was done, they having some Fear of being discovered: There they remained till past that Danger, and then came up; but when they were within Sight of Gravesend they hid again, and a little below it Captain Billop came aboard them, under Pretence of Pressing the Masters two Men, who were assistants to him; but indeed his Design and real Intention was to find out those Traytors, which, upon Search, he found lying along under the Hatches; and after their being haled up he search'd them, and found a Pacquet of Treasonable Papers in Mr. Ashton's Bosom: which he with the Prisoners carried before my Lord Nottingham; who examined the Papers, and after being examined by the Cabinet Council they were committed to the Tower. The Evidence was very full and plain against them both, much to the same effect and purport: The Letters being also Read against them in Court, were adjudged to be of no less Import than High-Treason. Upon the whole they had nothing material to offer in their Defence; so after a very long hearing, they were both found Guilty of High Treason. Edmond Elliot was ordered to remain till further order.

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John Evelyn's Diary 11 July 1691. 11 Jul 1691. I dined with Mr. Pepys (58), where was Dr. Cumberland (59), the new Bishop of Norwich [Note. Should be John Moore Bishop 1646-1707], Dr. Lloyd (54) having been put out for not acknowledging the Government. Cumberland [Note. John Moore Bishop 1646-1707] is a very learned, excellent man. Possession was now given to Dr. Tillotson (60), at Lambeth, by the Sheriff; Archbishop Sancroft was gone (74), but had left his nephew to keep possession; and he refusing to deliver it up on the Queen's message (29), was dispossessed by the Sheriff, and imprisoned. This stout demeanor of the few Bishops who refused to take the oaths to [her husband] King William (40), animated a great party to forsake the churches, so as to threaten a schism; though those who looked further into the ancient practice, found that when (as formerly) there were Bishops displaced on secular accounts, the people never refused to acknowledge the new Bishops, provided they were not heretics. The truth is, the whole clergy had till now stretched the duty of passive obedience, so that the proceedings against these Bishops gave no little occasion of exceptions; but this not amounting to heresy, there was a necessity of receiving the new Bishops, to prevent a failure of that order in the Church. I went to visit [her uncle] Lord Clarendon in the Tower, but he was gone into the country for air by the Queen's (29) permission, under the care of his warden.

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In 1692 John George Wettin IV Elector Saxony 1668-1694 (23) was appointed 501st Knight of the Garter by his third cousin [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (41) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (29).

In 1692 Charles Sackville 6th Earl Dorset 1643-1706 (48) was appointed 502nd Knight of the Garter by [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (41) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (29).

William III Creation of New Lords

John Evelyn's Diary 28 February 1692. 28 Feb 1692. Lord Marlborough (41) having used words against the [her husband] King (41), and been discharged from all his great places, his wife (31) was forbidden the Court, and the [her sister] Princess of Denmark (27) was desired by the Queen (29) to dismiss her from her service; but she refusing to do so, goes away from Court to Sion house. Divers new Lords made: Sir Henry Capel (53), Sir William Fermor (43), etc. Change of Commissioners in the Treasury. The Parliament adjourned, not well satisfied with affairs. The business of the East India Company, which they would have reformed, let fall. The Duke of Norfolk (37) does not succeed in his endeavor to be divorced.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 April 1692. 06 Apr 1692. A fast. [her father] King James (58) sends a letter written and directed by his own hand to several of the Privy Council, and one to his daughter (29), the Queen Regent, informing them of the [her step-mother] Queen (33) being ready to be brought to bed, and summoning them to be at the birth by the middle of May, promising as from the French King (53), permission to come and return in safety.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 April 1692. 24 Apr 1692. Much apprehension of a French invasion, and of an universal rising. Our fleet begins to join with the Dutch. Unkindness between the Queen (29) and her [her sister] sister (27). Very cold and unseasonable weather, scarce a leaf on the trees.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 September 1692. 15 Sep 1692. There happened an earthquake, which, though not so great as to do any harm in England, was universal in all these parts of Europe. It shook the house at Wotton, but was not perceived by any save a servant or two, who were making my bed, and another in a garret. I and the rest being at dinner below in the parlor, were not sensible of it. The dreadful one in Jamaica this summer was profanely and ludicrously represented in a puppet play, or some such lewd pastime, in the fair of Southwark, which caused the Queen (30) to put down that idle and vicious mock show.

John Evelyn's Diary 13 July 1693. 13 Jul 1693. I saw the Queen's (31) rare cabinets and collection of china; which was wonderfully rich and plentiful, but especially a large cabinet, looking-glass frame and stands, all of amber, much of it white, with historical bas-reliefs and statues, with medals carved in them, esteemed worth £4,000, sent by the Duke of Brandenburgh, whose country, Prussia, abounds with amber, cast up by the sea; divers other China and Indian cabinets, screens, and hangings. In her library were many books in English, French, and Dutch, of all sorts; a cupboard of gold plate; a cabinet of silver filagree, which I think was our Queen Mary's, and which, in my opinion, should have been generously sent to her.

In 1694 Charles Talbot 1st Duke Shrewsbury 1660-1718 (33) was appointed 503rd Knight of the Garter by [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (43) and Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (31).

Before 1718. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Charles Talbot 1st Duke Shrewsbury 1660-1718.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 March 1694. 10 Mar 1694. Mr. Stringfellow preached at Trinity parish, being restored to that place, after the contest between the Queen (31) and the Bishop of London (62) who had displaced him.

John Evelyn's Diary 25 March 1694. 25 Mar 1694. Mr. Goode, minister of St. Martin's, preached; he was likewise put in by the Queen (31), on the issue of her process with the Bishop of London (62).

Death of Queen Mary II

On 28 Dec 1694 Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (32) died of smallpox shortly after midnight at Kensington Palace. Her body lay in state at the Banqueting House.
On 05 Mar 1695 she was buried in Westminster Abbey. Thomas Tenison Archbishop of Canterbury 1636-1715 (58) preached the sermon.
She had reigned for five years. Her husband [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (44) continued to reign for a further eight years.

John Evelyn's Diary 29 December 1694. 29 Dec 1694. The smallpox increased exceedingly, and was very mortal. The Queen (32) died of it on the 28th.

John Evelyn's Diary 13 January 1695. 13 Jan 1695. The Thames was frozen over. The deaths by smallpox increased to five hundred more than in the preceding week. The [her husband] King (44) and [her sister] Princess Anne (29) reconciled, and she was invited to keep her Court at Whitehall, having hitherto lived privately at Berkeley House; she was desired to take into her family divers servants of the late Queen (32); to maintain them the [her husband] King (44) has assigned her £5,000 a quarter.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 February 1695. 24 Feb 1695. I saw the Queen (32) lie in state.

Funeral of Queen Mary II

John Evelyn's Diary 08 March 1695. 08 Mar 1695. I supped at the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry's (67), who related to me the pious behavior of the Queen (32) in all her sickness, which was admirable. She never inquired of what opinion persons were, who were objects of charity; that, on opening a cabinet, a paper was found wherein she had desired that her body might not be opened, or any extraordinary expense at her funeral, whenever she should die. This paper was not found in time to be observed. There were other excellent things under her own hand, to the very least of her debts, which were very small, and everything in that exact method, as seldom is found in any private person. In sum, she was such an admirable woman, abating for taking the Crown without a more due apology, as does, if possible, outdo the renowned Queen Elizabeth.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 March 1695. 10 Mar 1695. I dined at the Earl of Sunderland's (53) with Lord Spencer (19). My Lord showed me his library, now again improved by many books bought at the sale of Sir Charles Scarborough (79), an eminent physician, which was the very best collection, especially of mathematical books, that was I believe in Europe, once designed for the [her uncle] King's (64) Library at St. James's; but the Queen (32) dying, who was the great patroness of that design, it was let fall, and the books were miserably dissipated.
The new edition of Camden's "Britannia" was now published (by Bishop Gibson (26)), with great additions; those to Surrey were mine, so that I had one presented to me. Dr. Gale (60) showed me a MS. of some parts of the New Testament in vulgar Latin, that had belonged to a monastery in the North of Scotland, which he esteemed to be about eight hundred years old; there were some considerable various readings observable, as in John i., and genealogy of St. Luke.

1696 Plot to Assassinate King William III

John Evelyn's Diary 28 April 1696. 28 Apr 1696. The Venetian Ambassador made a stately entry with fifty footmen, many on horseback, four rich coaches, and a numerous train of gallants. More executions this week of the assassins. Oates (46) dedicated a most villainous, reviling book against [her father] King James (62), which he presumed to present to [her husband] King William (45), who could not but abhor it, speaking so infamously and untruly of his late beloved Queen's (33) own father.

1702 Death of King William III

On 08 Mar 1702 [her husband] William III King England Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 (51) died. His first cousin [her sister] Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 (37) succeeded I King England Scotland and Ireland.

Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 was christened at Chapel Royal St James's Palace.

Act of Poll

Grant to the King and Queen of 10s. in every £100 of Personal Estate.
Wee Your Majestyes most Dutyfull and Loyal Subjects the Commons Assembled in Parlyament haveing entred into a Serious Consideration of the great and extraordinary Expences in which Your Majesties are Engaged for the Reduceing of Ireland and for the Carrying on the Warr against the French King In order towards the Enabling Your Majesties to Prosecute the said Ends with Speede and Vigour doe most humbly present to Your Majestyes a Free Gift of the severall Sums of Money hereafter specified Beseeching Your Majestyes that it may be Enacted And bee it Enacted by the King and Queens most Excellent Majestyes by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spirituall and Temporall and of the Commons in this present Parliament Assembled and by the Authoritie of the same That all and every Person and Persons Bodies Politick and Corporate Guilds or Fraternities within this Kingdome of England Dominion of Wales or Towne of Berwicke upon Tweede haveing any Personall Estate either in Debts oweing to them within this Realme or without which he she or they doe not account as desperate other then such Debts as now are or shall be oweing from Their Majestyes (over and besides such just Debts as he she or they shall bona fide owe) or in ready Moneys shall yield and pay unto Their Majestyes for every Hundred pounds in such Debts and ready Moneys the Summe of Ten shillings (to be paid by the Lender notwithstanding any Agreement to the contrary) to be Assessed Imposed Levyed and Collected in manner herein after mentioned.
II. Public Officers (Exceptions) to pay is. for every 20s. of the Profits of their Offices.
III. Pensions, &c. from Government exceeding £20 per Ann. to pay is in the Pound.
IV. Judges, Serjeants at Law, Barristers, Advocates, and Persons practising Physick, to pay 3s. in the Pound.
V. Rates of Payments by Peers, &c.
VI. Gentleman having Estate of £300 or more, to pay 20s. though an Infant; under that Estate, on Oath, not charged.
VII. Archbishop, £50. Bishop, £20. Deans, £10. Archdeacons, £2. 10s.
etc.

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