Book of Psalms

1587 Execution of Mary Queen of Scots

1688 Glorious Revolution

1690 Battle of the Boyne

Book of Psalms is in Old Testament.

Psalm 1

Psalm 1 Verse 1

NIV. Blessed is the one who does not walk in step with the wicked or stand in the way that sinners take or sit in the company of mockers,

KJB. Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful.

Psalm 4

Psalm 4 Verse 4

NIV. Tremble and do not sin; when you are on your beds, search your hearts and be silent.

John Evelyn's Diary 16 September 1655. 16 Sep 1655. Preached at St. Gregory's one Darnel, on Psalm iv. 4, concerning the benefit of self-examination; more learning in SO SHORT A TIME AS AN HOUR I have seldom heard.

Psalm 4 Verses 6 and 7

NIV. 6 Many, Lord, are asking, "Who will bring us prosperity?" Let the light of your face shine on us. 7 Fill my heart with joy when their grain and new wine abound.

John Evelyn's Diary 05 March 1673. 05 Mar 1673. Our new vicar, Mr. Holden, preached in Whitehall Chapel, on Psalm iv. 6, 7. This gentleman is a very excellent and universal scholar, a good and wise man; but he had not the popular way of preaching, nor is in any measure fit for our plain and vulgar auditory, as his predecessor was. There was, however, no comparison between their parts for profound learning. But time and experience may form him to a more practical way than that he is in of University lectures and erudition; which is now universally left off for what is much more profitable.

Psalm 5

Psalm 5 Verse 6

KJB. Thou shalt destroy them that speak leasing: the LORD will abhor the bloody and deceitful man.

NIV. You destroy those who tell lies. The bloodthirsty and deceitful you, LORD, detest.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Henry I Beauclerc 1128. 1128. This same year came from Jerusalem Hugh of the Temple to the king (60) in Normandy; and the king (60) received him with much honour, and gave him rich presents in gold and in silver. And afterwards he sent him into England; and there he was received by all good men, who all gave him presents, and in Scotland also: and by him they sent to Jerusalem much wealth withal in gold and in silver. And he invited folk out to Jerusalem; and there went with him and after him more people than ever did before, since that the first expedition was in the day of Pope Urban. Though it availed little; for he said, that a mighty war was begun between the Christians and the heathens; but when they came thither, then was it nought but leasing. (159) Thus pitifully was all that people swinked. (160)

159. "Thou shalt destroy them that speak `leasing,'" etc. Psalms.

160. i.e. Vexed, harassed, fatigued, etc. Milton has used the word in the last sense.

Psalm 18

Psalm 18 Verse 13

NIV. The LORD thundered from heaven; the voice of the Most High resounded.

KJB. The LORD also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave his voice; hail stones and coals of fire.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 4 Chapter 3. It is no wonder that he joyfully beheld the day of his death, or rather the day of our Lord, which he had always carefully expected till it came; for notwithstanding his many merits of continence, humility, teaching, prayer, voluntary poverty, and other virtues, he was so full of the fear of God, so mindful of his last end in all his actions, that, as I was informed by one of the brothers who instructed me in divinity, and who had been bred in his monastery, and under his direction, whose name was Trumhere [Note. Probably Bishop Trumbert, possibly Bishop Trumhere -662], if it happened that there blew a strong gust of wind when he was reading or doing any other thing, he immediately called upon God for mercy, and begged it might be extended to all mankind. If the wind grew stronger, he closed his book, and prostrating himself on the ground, prayed still more earnestly. But, if it proved a violent storm of wind or rain, or else that the earth and air were filled with thunder and lightning, he would repair to the church, and devote himself to prayers and repeating of psalms till the weather became calm. Being asked by his followers why he did so, he answered, " Have not you read — ' The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave forth his voice. Yea, he sent out his arrows and scattered them ; and he shot out lightnings, and discomfited them.' [Note. Psalm 18 Verses 13 and 14] For the Lord moves the air, raises the winds, darts lightning, and thunders from heaven, to excite the inhabitants of the earth to fear him ; to put them in mind of the future judgment ; to dispel their pride, and vanquish their boldness, by bringing into their thoughts that dreadful time, when the heavens and the earth being in a flame, he will come in the clouds, with great power and majesty, to judge the quick and the dead. Wherefore," said he, " it behoves us to answer his heavenly admonition with due fear and love ; that, as often as he lifts his hand through the trembling sky, as it were to strike, but does not yet let it fall, we may immediately implore his mercy ; and searching the recesses of our hearts, and cleansing the filth of our vices, we may carefully behave ourselves so as never to be struck.''

Psalm 18 Verse 14

NIV. He shot his arrows and scattered the enemy, with great bolts of lightning he routed them.

KJB. Yea, he sent out his arrows, and scattered them; and he shot out lightnings, and discomfited them.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 4 Chapter 3. It is no wonder that he joyfully beheld the day of his death, or rather the day of our Lord, which he had always carefully expected till it came; for notwithstanding his many merits of continence, humility, teaching, prayer, voluntary poverty, and other virtues, he was so full of the fear of God, so mindful of his last end in all his actions, that, as I was informed by one of the brothers who instructed me in divinity, and who had been bred in his monastery, and under his direction, whose name was Trumhere [Note. Probably Bishop Trumbert, possibly Bishop Trumhere -662], if it happened that there blew a strong gust of wind when he was reading or doing any other thing, he immediately called upon God for mercy, and begged it might be extended to all mankind. If the wind grew stronger, he closed his book, and prostrating himself on the ground, prayed still more earnestly. But, if it proved a violent storm of wind or rain, or else that the earth and air were filled with thunder and lightning, he would repair to the church, and devote himself to prayers and repeating of psalms till the weather became calm. Being asked by his followers why he did so, he answered, " Have not you read — ' The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave forth his voice. Yea, he sent out his arrows and scattered them ; and he shot out lightnings, and discomfited them.' [Note. Psalm 18 Verses 13 and 14] For the Lord moves the air, raises the winds, darts lightning, and thunders from heaven, to excite the inhabitants of the earth to fear him ; to put them in mind of the future judgment ; to dispel their pride, and vanquish their boldness, by bringing into their thoughts that dreadful time, when the heavens and the earth being in a flame, he will come in the clouds, with great power and majesty, to judge the quick and the dead. Wherefore," said he, " it behoves us to answer his heavenly admonition with due fear and love ; that, as often as he lifts his hand through the trembling sky, as it were to strike, but does not yet let it fall, we may immediately implore his mercy ; and searching the recesses of our hearts, and cleansing the filth of our vices, we may carefully behave ourselves so as never to be struck.''

Psalm 25

Psalm 25 Verse 1

KJ21. Unto Thee, O Lord, do I lift up my soul;.

Original Letters Illustrative of English History Second Series Volume III. Ellis notes that "the present narrative is from the Lansdowne MS. 51. art. 46. It is indorsed in Lord Burghley's hand, "8 Feb. 1586. The Manner of the Q. of Scotts death at Fodrynghay, wr. by Ro. Wy.

A Reporte of the manner of the execution of the Sc. Q. performed the viijth. of February, Anno 1586 [modern dating 1587] in the great hall at Fotheringhay, with relacion of speeches uttered and accions happening in the said execution, from the delivery of the said Sc. Q. to Mr Thomas Androwes Esquire Sherife of the County of Northampton unto the end of said execution..

THE READER shall now be presented with the Execution of the Queen of Scots (44) which was to the Court or three Statements of this Transaction were There was a Short one copies of which are Manuscripts Jul F vi foll 246 266 b and b Another a Copy of the Account of the Earl to the Lords of the Council dated on the day is MS Calig C ix fol 163 And there is a Office somewhat longer said to have been drawn evidently one of her servants present Narrative is from the Lansdowne MS in Lord Burghley s hand 8 Feb 1586 of Scotts death at Fodrynghay wr by Ro Wy Queen s death have been dressed up from writers but it is here given accurate and entire.

First, the said Scottish Queen, being carried by two of Sir Amias Paulett's (54) gentlemen, and the Sheriff (46) going before her, came most willingly out of her chamber into an entry next the Hall, at which place the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), commissioners for the execution, with the two governors of her person, and divers knights and gentlemen did meet her, where they found one of the Scottish Queen's servants, named Melvin [NOTE. Possibly Andrew Melville of Garvock Steward], kneeling on his knees, who uttered these words with tears to the Queen of Scots (44), his mistress, "Madam, it will be the sorrowfullest message that ever I carried, when I shall report that my Queen (44) and dear mistress is dead." Then the Queen of Scots, shedding tears, answered him, "You ought to rejoice rather than weep for that the end of Mary Stuart's (44) troubles is now come. Thou knowest, Melvin, that all this world is but vanity, and full of troubles and sorrows; carry this message from me, and tell my friends that I die a true woman to my religion, and like a true Scottish woman and a true Frenchwoman. But God forgive them that have long desired my end; and He that is the true Judge of all secret thoughts knoweth my mind, how that it ever hath been my desire to have Scotland and England united together. Commend me to my son, and tell him that I have not done anything that may prejudice his kingdom of Scotland; and so, good Melvin, farewell;" and kissing him, she bade him pray for her.

Then she turned to the Lords and told them that she had certain requests to make unto them. One was for a sum of money, which she said Sir Amyas Paulet (54) knew of, to be paid to one Curle her servant; next, that all her poor servants might enjoy that quietly which by her Will and Testament she had given unto them; and lastly, that they might be all well entreated, and sent home safely and honestly into their countries. "And this I do conjure you, my Lords, to do.".

Answer was made by Sir Amyas Paulet (54), "I do well remember the money your Grace speaketh of, and your Grace need not to make any doubt of the not performance of your requests, for I do surely think they shall be granted.".

"I have," said she, "one other request to make unto you, my Lords, that you will suffer my poor servants to be present about me, at my death, that they may report when they come into their countries how I died a true woman to my religion.".

Then the Earl of Kent (46), one of the commissioners, answered, "Madam, it cannot well be granted, for that it is feared lest some of them would with speeches both trouble and grieve your Grace, and disquiet the company, of which we have had already some experience, or seek to wipe their napkins in some of your blood, which were not convenient." "My Lord," said the Queen of Scots, "I will give my word and promise for them that they shall not do any such thing as your Lordship has named. Alas! poor souls, it would do them good to bid me farewell. And I hope your Mistress (53), being a maiden Queen, in regard of womanhood, will suffer me to have some of my own people about me at my death. And I know she hath not given you so straight a commission, but that you may grant me more than this, if I were a far meaner woman than I am." And then (seeming to be grieved) with some tears uttered these words: "You know that I am cousin to your Queen (53) [NOTE. They were first-cousin once-removed], and descended from the blood of Henry the Seventh [NOTE. She was a Great Granddaughter of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509], a married Queen of France [NOTE. She had married Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560 (43)], and the anointed Queen of Scotland.".

Whereupon, after some consultation, they granted that she might have some of her servants according to her Grace's request, and therefore desired her to make choice of half-a-dozen of her men and women: who presently said that of her men she would have Melvin, her apothecary, her surgeon, and one other old man beside; and of her women, those two that did use to lie in her chamber.

After this, she being supported by Sir Amias's (54) two gentlemen aforesaid, and Melvin carrying up her train, and also accompanied with the Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen aforenamed, the Sheriff (46) going before her, she passed out of the entry into the Great Hall, with her countenance careless, importing thereby rather mirth than mournful cheer, and so she willingly stepped up to the scaffold which was prepared for her in the Hall, being two feet high and twelve feet broad, with rails round about, hung and covered with black, with a low stool, long cushion, and block, covered with black also. Then, having the stool brought her, she sat her down; by her, on the right hand, sat the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), and on the left hand stood the Sheriff (46), and before her the two executioners; round about the rails stood Knights, Gentlemen, and others.

Then, silence being made, the Queen's Majesty's Commission for the execution of the Queen of Scots (44) was openly read by Mr. Beale, clerk of the Council (46); and these words pronounced by the Assembly, "God save the Queen." During the reading of which Commission the Queen of Scots (44) was silent, listening unto it with as small regard as if it had not concerned her at all; and with as cheerful a countenance as if it had been a pardon from her Majesty (53) for her life; using as much strangeness in word and deed as if she had never known any of the Assembly, or had been ignorant of the English language.

Then one Doctor Fletcher, Dean of Peterborough (42), standing directly before her, without the rail, bending his body with great reverence, began to utter this exhortation following: "Madam, the Queen's most excellent Majesty," &c, and iterating these words three or four times, she told him, "Mr. Dean (42), I am settled in the ancient Catholic Roman religion, and mind to spend my blood in defence of it." Then Mr. Dean (42) said: "Madam, change your opinion, and repent you of your former wickedness, and settle your faith only in Jesus Christ, by Him to be saved." Then she answered again and again, "Mr. Dean (42), trouble not yourself any more, for I am settled and resolved in this my religion, and am purposed therein to die." Then the Earl of Shrewsbury (59) and the Earl of Kent (46), perceiving her (44) so obstinate, told her that since she would not hear the exhortation begun by Mr. Dean (42), "We will pray for your Grace, that it stand with God's will you may have your heart lightened, even at the last hour, with the true knowledge of God, and so die therein." Then she answered, "If you will pray for me, my Lords, I will thank you; but to join in prayer with you I will not, for that you and I are not of one religion.".

Then the Lords called for Mr. Dean (42), who, kneeling on the scaffold stairs, began this prayer, "O most gracious God and merciful Father," &c, all the Assembly, saving the Queen of Scots (44) and her servants, saying after him. During the saying of which prayer, the Queen of Scots (44), sitting upon a stool, having about her neck an Agnus Dei, in her hand a crucifix, at her girdle a pair of beads with a golden cross at the end of them, a Latin book in her hand, began with tears and with loud and fast voice to pray in Latin; and in the midst of her prayers she slided off from her stool, and kneeling, said divers Latin prayers; and after the end of Mr. Dean's (42) prayer, she kneeling, prayed in English to this effect: "For Christ His afflicted Church, and for an end of their troubles; for her son; and for the Queen's Majesty (53), that she might prosper and serve God aright." She confessed that she hoped to be saved "by and in the blood of Christ, at the foot of whose Crucifix she would shed her blood." Then said the Earl of Kent (46), "Madam, settle Christ Jesus in your heart, and leave those trumperies." Then she little regarding, or nothing at all, his good counsel, went forward with her prayers, desiring that "God would avert His wrath from this Island, and that He would give her grief and forgiveness for her sins." These, with other prayers she made in English, saying she forgave her enemies with all her heart that had long sought her blood, and desired God to convert them to the truth; and in the end of the prayer she desired all saints to make intercession for her to Jesus Christ, and so kissing the crucifix, and crossing of her also, said these words: "Even as Thy arms, O Jesus, were spread here upon the Cross, so receive me into Thy arms of mercy, and forgive me all my sins.".

Her (44) prayer being ended, the executioners, kneeling, desired her Grace to forgive them her death; who answered, "I forgive you with all my heart, for now, I hope, you shall make an end of all my troubles." Then they, with her two women, helping of her up, began to disrobe her of her apparel; she never changed her countenance, but with smiling cheer she uttered these words, "that she never had such grooms to make her unready, and that she never put off her clothes before such a company.".

Then she, being stripped of all her apparel saving her petticoat and kirtle, her two women beholding her made great lamentation, and crying and crossing themselves prayed in Latin; she, turning herself to them, embracing them, said these words in French, "Ne criez vous; j'ay promis pour vous;" and so crossing and kissing them, bade them pray for her, and rejoice and not weep, for that now they should see an end of all their mistress's (44) troubles. Then she, with a smiling countenance, turning to her men servants, as Melvin and the rest, standing upon a bench nigh the scaffold, who sometime weeping, sometime crying out aloud, and continually crossing themselves, prayed in Latin, crossing them with her hand bade them farewell; and wishing them to pray for her even until the last hour.

This done, one of the women having a Corpus Christi cloth lapped up three-corner ways, kissing it, put it over the Queen of Scots' (44) face, and pinned it fast to the caul of her head. Then the two women departed from her, and she kneeling down upon the cushion most resolutely, and without any token or fear of death, she spake aloud this Psalm in Latin, "In te, Domine, confido, non confundar in eternum," &c. [Ps. xxv.]. Then, groping for the block, she laid down her head, Putting her chin over the block with both her hands, which holding there, still had been cut off, had they not been espied. Then lying upon the block most quietly, and stretching out her arms, cried, "In manus tuas, Domine," &c, three or four times. Then she lying very still on the block, one of the executioners holding of her slightly with one of his hands, she endured two strokes of the other executioner with an axe, she making very small noise or none at all, and not stirring any part of her from the place where she lay; and so the executioner cut off her head, saving one little grisle, which being cut asunder, he lifted up her head to the view of all the assembly, and bade "God save the Queen." Then her dressing of lawn falling off from her head, it appeared as grey as one of threescore and ten years old, polled very short, her face in a moment being so much altered from the form she had when she was alive, as few could remember her by her dead face. Her lips stirred up and down a quarter of an hour after her head was cut off.

Then Mr. Dean (42) said with a loud voice, "So perish all the Queen's enemies;" and afterwards the Earl of Kent (46) came to the dead body, and standing over it, with a loud voice said, "Such end of all the Queen's and the Gospel's enemies.".

Then one of the executioners pulling off her (44) garters, espied her little dog which was crept under her clothes, which could not be gotten forth but by force, yet afterward would not depart from the dead corpse, but came and lay between her head and her shoulders, which being imbrued with her blood, was carried away and washed, as all things else were that had any blood was either burned or clean washed; and the executioners sent away with money for their fees, not having any one thing that belonged unto her. And so, every man being commanded out of the Hall, except the Sheriff (46) and his men, she was carried by them up into a great chamber lying ready for the surgeons to embalm her.

Around 1559 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. Around 1576 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. In 1576. After Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619. Portrait of Mary Queen of Scots. Around 1575. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of George Seton 5th Lord Seton -1513. Wearing the clothes he wore at the wedding of Mary Queen of Scots and the French Dauphin on 24 Apr 1558. In 1582 Unknown Painter. Portrait of George Talbot 6th Earl Shrewsbury 6th Earl Waterford 1528-1590. Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father. Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland. Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. Around 1560 François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560. 1572. After François Clouet Painter 1510-1572. Portrait of Francis II King France King Consort Scotland 1544-1560. Around 1575. Adrian Vanson -1602. Portrait of George Seton 5th Lord Seton -1513. Wearing the clothes he wore at the wedding of Mary Queen of Scots and the French Dauphin on 24 Apr 1558.

Psalm 26

Psalm 26 Verse 8

NIV. Lord, I have loved the habitation of thy house, and the place where thine honour dwelleth.

John Evelyn's Diary 19 July 1691. 19 Jul 1691. In the morning Dr. Tenison (54) preached the first sermon, taking his text from Psalm xxvi. 8. "Lord, I have loved the habitation of thy house, and the place where thine honor dwelleth". In concluding, he gave that this should be made a parish church so soon as the Parliament sat, and was to be dedicated to the Holy Trinity, in honor of the three undivided persons in the Deity; and he minded them to attend to that faith of the church, now especially that Arianism, Socinianism, and atheism began to spread among us. In the afternoon, Mr. Stringfellow preached on Luke vii. 5. "The centurion who had built a synagogue". He proceeded to the due praise of persons of such public spirit, and thence to such a character of pious benefactors in the person of the generous centurion, as was comprehensive of all the virtues of an accomplished Christian, in a style so full, eloquent, and moving, that I never heard a sermon more apposite to the occasion. He modestly insinuated the obligation they had to that person who should be the author and promoter of such public works for the benefit of mankind, especially to the advantage of religion, such as building and endowing churches, hospitals, libraries, schools, procuring the best editions of useful books, by which he handsomely intimated who it was that had been so exemplary for his benefaction to that place. Indeed, that excellent person, Dr. Tenison, had also erected and furnished a public library [in St. Martin's]; and set up two or three free schools at his own charges. Besides this, he was of an exemplary, holy life, took great pains in constantly preaching, and incessantly employing himself to promote the service of God both in public and private. I never knew a man of a more universal and generous spirit, with so much modesty, prudence, and piety.

The great victory of King William's army in Ireland was looked on as decisive of that war. The French General, St. Ruth (41), who had been so cruel to the poor Protestants in France, was slain, with divers of the best commanders; nor was it cheap to us, having 1,000 killed, but of the enemy 4,000 or 5,000.

Psalm 28

Psalm 28 Verse 7

KJB. The LORD is my strength and my shield; my heart trusted in him, and I am helped: therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; and with my song will I praise him.

NIV. The LORD is my strength and my shield; my heart trusts in him, and he helps me. My heart leaps for joy, and with my song I praise him.

Psalm 31

Psalm 32 Verse 1

ESV. Blessed is the one whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.

NIV. Of David. A maskil. Blessed is the one whose transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered.

KJB. A Psalm of David, Maschil. Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History of England Book 5 Chapter 13 How another contrarywise before his death saw a book containing his sins which was shown him by devils. [704 709 a.d.]. Thus spoke that wretch in his despair, and soon after died, and now in vain suffers in eternal torments that penance which he failed to suffer for a short time with the fruits of forgiveness. Of whom it is manifest, that (as the blessed Pope Gregory writes of certain persons) he did not see these things for his own sake, since they did not avail him, but for the sake of others, who, knowing of his end, should be afraid to put off the time of repentance, whilst they have leisure, lest, being prevented by sudden death, they should perish impenitent. And whereas he saw diverse books laid before him by the good and evil spirits, this was done by Divine dispensation, that we may keep in mind that our deeds and thoughts are not scattered to the winds, but are all kept to be examined by the Supreme Judge, and will in the end be shown us either by friendly angels or by the enemy. And whereas the angels first drew forth a white book, and then the devils a black one; the former a very small one, the latter one very great; it is to be observed, that in his first years he did some good actions, all which he nevertheless obscured by the evil actions of his youth. If, contrarywise, he had taken care in his youth to correct the errors of his boyhood, and by well-doing to put them away from the sight of God, he might have been admitted to the fellowship of those of whom the Psalm says, "Blessed are those whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered." This story, as I learned it of the venerable Bishop Pechthelm, I have thought good to set forth plainly, for the salvation of such as shall read or hear it.

Psalm 36

Psalm 36 Verses 5 6 and 7

NIV. Your love, Lord, reaches to the heavens, your faithfulness to the skies. 6 Your righteousness is like the highest mountains, your justice like the great deep. You, Lord, preserve both people and animals. 7 How priceless is your unfailing love, O God! People take refuge in the shadow of your wings.

John Evelyn's Diary 02 December 1688. 02 Dec 1688. Dr. Tenison (52) preached at St. Martin's on Psalm xxxvi. 5, 6, 7, concerning Providence. I received the blessed Sacrament. Afterward, visited my Lord Godolphin (43), then going with the Marquis of Halifax (55) and Earl of Nottingham (41) as Commissioners to the Prince of Orange (38); he told me they had little power. Plymouth declared for the Prince (38). Bath, York, Hull, Bristol, and all the eminent nobility and persons of quality through England, declare for the Protestant religion and laws, and go to meet the Prince (38), who every day sets forth new Declarations against the Papists. The great favorites at Court, Priests and Jesuits, fly or abscond. Everything, till now concealed, flies abroad in public print, and is cried about the streets. Expectation of the Prince (38) coming to Oxford. The Prince of Wales and great treasure sent privily to Portsmouth, the Earl of Dover (52) being Governor. Address from the Fleet not grateful to his Majesty (55). The Papists in offices lay down their commissions, and fly. Universal consternation among them; it looks like a revolution.

Around 1678 Mary Beale aka Cradock Painter 1633-1699. Portrait of George Savile 1st Marquess Halifax 1633-1695. Around 1680 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of King William III of England, Scotland and Ireland 1650-1702 wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1698. Francois de Troy Painter 1645-1730. Portrait of James Before 1694 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of King James II when Duke of York. Around 1666 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II and Anne Hyde Queen Consort England 1637-1671. See Diary of Samuel Pepys 24 March 1666. Before 04 Jan 1674 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of King James II wearing his Garter Robes. Around 1672 Henri Gascar Painter 1635-1701. Portrait of King James II.

Psalm 39

Psalm 36 Verse 6

NIV. Surely everyone goes around like a mere phantom; in vain they rush about, heaping up wealth without knowing whose it will finally be.

John Evelyn's Diary 27 October 1672. 27 Oct 1672. I went to hear that famous preacher, Dr. Frampton (50), at St. Giles's, on Psalm xxxix. 6. This divine had been twice at Jerusalem, and was not only a very pious and holy man, but excellent in the pulpit for the moving affections.

Psalm 44

Psalm 44 Verse 17

NIV. All this came upon us, though we had not forgotten you; we had not been false to your covenant.

KJB. All this is come upon us; yet have we not forgotten thee, neither have we dealt falsely in thy covenant.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 March 1686. 07 Mar 1686. Dr Frampton, Bp. of Gloucester (64), preach'd on 44 Psalm, 17, 18, 19, shewing the severall afflictions of the Church of Christ from the primitives to this day, applying exceedingly to the present conjuncture, when many were wavering in their minds, and greate temptations appearing thro' the favour now found by the Papists, so as the people were full of jealousies and discouragement. The Bp. (64) magnified the Church of England, exhorting to constancy and perseverance.

Psalm 44 Verse 18

NIV. Our hearts had not turned back; our feet had not strayed from your path.

KJB. Our heart is not turned back, neither have our steps declined from thy way;.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 March 1686. 07 Mar 1686. Dr Frampton, Bp. of Gloucester (64), preach'd on 44 Psalm, 17, 18, 19, shewing the severall afflictions of the Church of Christ from the primitives to this day, applying exceedingly to the present conjuncture, when many were wavering in their minds, and greate temptations appearing thro' the favour now found by the Papists, so as the people were full of jealousies and discouragement. The Bp. (64) magnified the Church of England, exhorting to constancy and perseverance.

Psalm 44 Verse 19

NIV. But you crushed us and made us a haunt for jackals; you covered us over with deep darkness.

KJB. Though thou hast sore broken us in the place of dragons, and covered us with the shadow of death.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 March 1686. 07 Mar 1686. Dr Frampton, Bp. of Gloucester (64), preach'd on 44 Psalm, 17, 18, 19, shewing the severall afflictions of the Church of Christ from the primitives to this day, applying exceedingly to the present conjuncture, when many were wavering in their minds, and greate temptations appearing thro' the favour now found by the Papists, so as the people were full of jealousies and discouragement. The Bp. (64) magnified the Church of England, exhorting to constancy and perseverance.

Psalm 49

Psalm 49 Verse 13

NIV. This is the fate of those who trust in themselves, and of their followers, who approve their sayings.

KJB. This their way is their folly: yet their posterity approve their sayings. Selah.

John Evelyn's Diary 24 March 1686. 24 Mar 1686. Dr. Cradock (Provost of Eaton) (23) preached at the same place on 49 Psalm 13 shewing the vanity of earthly enjoyments.

Psalm 51

Psalm 55

Psalm 65

Psalm 65 Verse 12

NIV. The grasslands of the wilderness overflow; the hills are clothed with gladness.

John Evelyn's Diary 01 January 1669. 01 Jan 1669. Imploring his blessing for the year entering, I went to church, where our Doctor preached on Psalm lxv. 12, apposite to the season, and beginning a new year.

Psalm 68

Psalm 68 Verse 30

KJB. Rebuke the company of spearmen, the multitude of the bulls, with the calves of the people, till every one submit himself with pieces of silver: scatter thou the people that delight in war.

NIV. Rebuke the beast among the reeds, the herd of bulls among the calves of the nations. Humbled, may the beast bring bars of silver. Scatter the nations who delight in war.

Psalm 79

Psalm 79 Verse 8

NIV. Do not hold against us the sins of past generations; may your mercy come quickly to meet us, for we are in desperate need.

KJB. O remember not against us former iniquities: let thy tender mercies speedily prevent us: for we are brought very low.

Psalm 90

Psalm 90 Verse 11

NIV. Who knoweth the power of thine anger? even according to thy fear, so is thy wrath.

John Evelyn's Diary 28 September 1653. 28 Sep 1653. At Greenwich preached that holy martyr, Dr. Hewer, on Psalm xc. 11, magnifying the grace of God to penitents, and threatening the extinction of his Gospel light for the prodigious impiety of the age.

Psalm 90 Verse 12

NIV. Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom.

Psalm 91

Psalm 91 Verse 11

Latin. quoniam angelis suis mandabit de te ut custodiant te in omnibus viis tuis

NIV. For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways;

KJB. For he shall give his angels charge over thee, to keep thee in all thy ways.

Chronicle of Gregory 1432. And soo rode he forthe unto the Crosse in Cheppe. There stode a ryalle castelle of jasper grene, and there yn ij grene treys stondyng uppe ryght, shewyng the ryght tytyllys of the Kyng of Inglond and of Fraunce, convaying fro Synt Edwarde and Synt Lowys be kyngys unto the tyme of Kyng Harry the vjte , every kynge stondynge whythe hys cote armowre, sum lyberdys and sum flouredelysse ; and on that othyr syde was made the Jesse1 of owre Lorde ascendyng uppewarde from Davyd unto Jesu. And so rode he forthe unto the Lytylle Condyte. And there was a ryalle mageste of the Trynyte, fulle of angelys syngyng hevynly songys, blessynge ande halowynge the kyngys whythe thes resonys in Latyn wrytyn : Angelis suis2 mandavit de3 te ut custodiant te, etc. Longitudinem dierum replebo in eum4 et ostendam illi salutare meum5. And thenne wente he forthe unto Poulys, and there he was ressayvyd whythe many byschoppys and prelatys whythe dene and the quere, and whythe devoute songe, as hyt longythe to a kynge. Ande so he offerryd there and thankyd God of hys goode speede and of hys welfare. And thenne he rode to Westemyster, and there he restyd hym; and on the nexte day folowynge the mayre and the aldyrmen6 whythe a certayne comeners that were worthy men, and they presentyde the kynge whythe an hampyr of sylvyr and gylte, whythe a M there yn of nobellys, &c.

1. Jesse. Perhaps the writer meant "Geste," a history; but more probably he has left out some words. Fabyan speaks here of "the sprynge of Jesse, wherin was shewyd the genelogy of our blessed Lady."

2. Angelis suis. Angelus suus, MS.

3. de. This word is crossed through as if it were positively inaccurate, and the sentence read "Angelus suus mandavit te."

4. Longitudinem — in eum. So in MS.

5. meum. eum, MS.; see Ps. xc. (xci.) 11, 16.

6. aldyrmen. aldyrman, MS.

Psalm 91 Verse 16

Latin. longitudine dierum replebo eum et ostendam illi salutare meum

NIV. With long life I will satisfy him and show him my salvation.

KJB. With long life will I satisfy him, and shew him my salvation.

Chronicle of Gregory 1432. And soo rode he forthe unto the Crosse in Cheppe. There stode a ryalle castelle of jasper grene, and there yn ij grene treys stondyng uppe ryght, shewyng the ryght tytyllys of the Kyng of Inglond and of Fraunce, convaying fro Synt Edwarde and Synt Lowys be kyngys unto the tyme of Kyng Harry the vjte , every kynge stondynge whythe hys cote armowre, sum lyberdys and sum flouredelysse ; and on that othyr syde was made the Jesse1 of owre Lorde ascendyng uppewarde from Davyd unto Jesu. And so rode he forthe unto the Lytylle Condyte. And there was a ryalle mageste of the Trynyte, fulle of angelys syngyng hevynly songys, blessynge ande halowynge the kyngys whythe thes resonys in Latyn wrytyn : Angelis suis2 mandavit de3 te ut custodiant te, etc. Longitudinem dierum replebo in eum4 et ostendam illi salutare meum5. And thenne wente he forthe unto Poulys, and there he was ressayvyd whythe many byschoppys and prelatys whythe dene and the quere, and whythe devoute songe, as hyt longythe to a kynge. Ande so he offerryd there and thankyd God of hys goode speede and of hys welfare. And thenne he rode to Westemyster, and there he restyd hym; and on the nexte day folowynge the mayre and the aldyrmen6 whythe a certayne comeners that were worthy men, and they presentyde the kynge whythe an hampyr of sylvyr and gylte, whythe a M there yn of nobellys, &c.

1. Jesse. Perhaps the writer meant "Geste," a history; but more probably he has left out some words. Fabyan speaks here of "the sprynge of Jesse, wherin was shewyd the genelogy of our blessed Lady."

2. Angelis suis. Angelus suus, MS.

3. de. This word is crossed through as if it were positively inaccurate, and the sentence read "Angelus suus mandavit te."

4. Longitudinem — in eum. So in MS.

5. meum. eum, MS.; see Ps. xc. (xci.) 11, 16.

6. aldyrmen. aldyrman, MS.

Psalm 102

Psalm 102 Verse 27

NIV. But you remain the same, and your years will never end.

John Evelyn's Diary 07 March 1666. 07 Mar 1666. Dr. Sancroft (49), since Archbishop of Canterbury, preached before the King (35) about the identity and immutability of God, on Psalm cii. 27.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Psalm 104

1 Praise the Lord, my soul. Lord my God, you are very great; you are clothed with splendor and majesty.

2 The Lord wraps himself in light as with a garment; he stretches out the heavens like a tent

3 and lays the beams of his upper chambers on their waters. He makes the clouds his chariot and rides on the wings of the wind.

4 He makes winds his messengers,b flames of fire his servants.

5 He set the earth on its foundations; it can never be moved.

6 You covered it with the watery depths as with a garment; the waters stood above the mountains.

7 But at your rebuke the waters fled, at the sound of your thunder they took to flight;

8 they flowed over the mountains, they went down into the valleys, to the place you assigned for them.

9 You set a boundary they cannot cross; never again will they cover the earth.

10 He makes springs pour water into the ravines; it flows between the mountains.

11 They give water to all the beasts of the field; the wild donkeys quench their thirst.

12 The birds of the sky nest by the waters; they sing among the branches.

13 He waters the mountains from his upper chambers; the land is satisfied by the fruit of his work.

14 He makes grass grow for the cattle, and plants for people to cultivate—bringing forth food from the earth:

15 wine that gladdens human hearts, oil to make their faces shine, and bread that sustains their hearts.

16 The trees of the Lord are well watered, the cedars of Lebanon that he planted.

17 There the birds make their nests; the stork has its home in the junipers.

18 The high mountains belong to the wild goats; the crags are a refuge for the hyrax.

19 He made the moon to mark the seasons, and the sun knows when to go down.

20 You bring darkness, it becomes night, and all the beasts of the forest prowl.

21 The lions roar for their prey and seek their food from God.

22 The sun rises, and they steal away; they return and lie down in their dens.

23 Then people go out to their work, to their labor until evening.

24 How many are your works, Lord! In wisdom you made them all; the earth is full of your creatures.

25 There is the sea, vast and spacious, teeming with creatures beyond number—living things both large and small.

26 There the ships go to and fro, and Leviathan, which you formed to frolic there.

27 All creatures look to you to give them their food at the proper time.

28 When you give it to them, they gather it up; when you open your hand, they are satisfied with good things.

29 When you hide your face, they are terrified; when you take away their breath, they die and return to the dust.

30 When you send your Spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the ground.

31 May the glory of the Lord endure forever; may the Lord rejoice in his works—

32 he who looks at the earth, and it trembles, who touches the mountains, and they smoke.

33 I will sing to the Lord all my life; I will sing praise to my God as long as I live.

34 May my meditation be pleasing to him, as I rejoice in the Lord.

35 But may sinners vanish from the earth and the wicked be no more.

Praise the Lord, my soul.

Praise the Lord.b

Note a. Or angels

Note b. Hebrew Hallelu Yah; in the Septuagint this line stands at the beginning of Psalm 105.

Psalm 118

Psalm 118 Verse 24

KJB. This is the day which the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.

John Evelyn's Diary 29 May 1661. 29 May 1661. This was the first anniversary appointed by act of Parliament to be observed as a day of general thanksgiving for the miraculous restoration of his Majesty (31): our vicar preaching on Psalm cxviii. 24, requiring us to be thankful and rejoice, as indeed we had cause.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes. Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes. Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Psalm 126

Psalm 126 Verse 5

NIV. Those who sow with tears will reap with songs of joy.

KJB. They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.

Psalm 132

Psalm 132 Verse 18

Latin. Inimicos ejus induam confusione super ipsum autem florebit sanctificatio eius.

NIV. I will clothe his enemies with shame, but his head will be adorned with a radiant crown.

KJB. His enemies will I clothe with shame: but upon himself shall his crown flourish.

Chronicle of Gregory 1432. 14 Feb 1432. And yn Syn Volantynys day he come unto London; and he was worthely fette in to the cytte whythe the mayre and hys aldyrmen whythe alle the worthy comyns of the cytte and every crafte in hyr devys.

And whenne the kynge (10) come to Londyn Brygge there was made a towre, and there yn stondynge a gy aunte welle arayde and welle be-sene, whythe a swerde holdynge uppe on hye, sayynge thys reson in Latyn, Inimicos ejus induam confusione. And on every syde of hym stode an antiloppe, that one holdynge the armys of Ingelond and that othyr the armys of Fraunce. Ande at the drawe brygge there was a nothyr ryalle toure, there yn stondynge iij empryssys ryally arayde, whythe crownys on hyr heddys, the whyche namys folowyn here: fyrste, Nature; the secunde, Grace; the thyrde, Fortune, presentyng hym whythe gyftys of grace. The fyrste gaffe hym Scyence an Cunnynge, and the secunde gaffe hym Prosperyte and Eyches. And on the ryght syde of the emperyssys stode vij fayre maydyns clothyde alle in whyte, i-powderyde whythe sonnys of golde, presentynge the kyng whythe vij gyftys of the Holy Goste in the lykenys of vij whyte dovys by fygure owtwarde, whythe thys resonys : Impleat te Dominus spiritu1 sapiencie et intellectus, spiritu consitij etfortitudinis, sciencie et pietatys, spiritu timorys Domini. And on the lyfte syde of thes emperysse stode vi j othyr fay re maydyns in why the, powdery de why the sterrys of golde, presentyng the kyng whythe vij gyftys of worschyppe. The fyrste was a crowne of glorye, the seconde with a cepter of clennysse, the iij whythe a swyrde of ryght and vyctorye, the iiij whythe a mantelle of prudence, the v whythe a schylde of fay the, the vj an helme of helme, the vij a gyrdylle of love and of parfyte pes. And thys maydens song an hevynly songe unto the kynge of praysynge and of hys vyctorye and welle comynge home. And whenne he come unto Cornehylle, there yn the vij scyence, and every scyence schewynge hys propyr corny ng wondyrly i-wroughte.

1. spiritu. spiritus, MS.

Psalm 133

Psalm 133 Verse 1

NIV. A song of ascents. Of David. How good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in unity!

KJB. A Song of degrees of David. Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!

Psalm 144

Psalm 144 Verse 10

NIV. to the One who gives victory to kings, who delivers his servant David. From the deadly sword.

KJB. It is he that giveth salvation unto kings: who delivereth David his servant from the hurtful sword.

Psalm 150

KJV. Praise ye the Lord. Praise God in his sanctuary: praise him in the firmament of his power.

2 Praise him for his mighty acts: praise him according to his excellent greatness.

3 Praise him with the sound of the trumpet: praise him with the psaltery and harp.

4 Praise him with the timbrel and dance: praise him with stringed instruments and organs.

5 Praise him upon the loud cymbals: praise him upon the high sounding cymbals.

6 Let every thing that hath breath praise the Lord. Praise ye the Lord.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 08 January 1665. 08 Jan 1665. Lord's Day. Up betimes, and it being a very fine frosty day, I and my boy walked to White Hall, and there to the Chappell, where one Dr. Beaumont preached a good sermon, and afterwards a brave anthem upon the 150 Psalm, where upon the word "trumpet" very good musique was made.

So walked to my Lady's and there dined with her (my boy going home), where much pretty discourse, and after dinner walked to Westminster, and there to the house where Jane Welsh had appointed me, but it being sermon time they would not let me in, and said nobody was there to speak with me. I spent the whole afternoon walking into the Church and Abbey, and up and down, but could not find her, and so in the evening took a coach and home, and there sat discoursing with my wife, and by and by at supper, drinking some cold drink I think it was, I was forced to go make water, and had very great pain after it, but was well by and by and continued so, it being only I think from the drink, or from my straining at stool to do more than my body would. So after prayers to bed.