Biography of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502

1483 Death of Edward IV

1485 Battle of Bosworth

1486 Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

1486 Christening of Arthur Prince of Wales

1490 Arthur Tudor created Prince of Wales

1499 Proxy Marriage of Prince Arthur and Catherine of Aragon

1499 Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick

1501 Marriage of Arthur Tudor and Catherine of Aragon

1502 Death of Prince Arthur

1509 Marriage of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon

1536 Death of Catherine of Aragon

1612 Death of Prince Frederick

Battle of Bosworth

On 22 Aug 1485 Richard III King England 1452-1485 (32) was killed during the Battle of Bosworth. His second cousin once removed [his father] Henry Tudor (28) succeeded VII King England.
Those supporting Henry Tudor included:
John Blount 3rd Baron Mountjoy 1450-1485 (35).
John Cheney 1st Baron Cheyne 1442-1499 (43).
Richard Guildford 1450-1506 (35).
Walter Hungerford 1464-1516 (21).
Thomas Stanley 1st Earl Derby 1435-1504 (50).
John Wingfield -1525.
Edward Woodville Lord Scales 1456-1488 (29).
Edward Courtenay 1st Earl Devon 1459-1509 (26).
Rhys ap Thomas Deheubarth 1449-1525 (36).
Jasper Tudor 1st Duke Bedford 1431-1495 (53).
William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (47).
Giles Daubeney 1st Baron Daubeney 1451-1508 (34).
William Stanley Lord Chamberlain 1435-1495 (50).
Roger Kynaston of Myddle and Hordley 1433-1495 (52).
Henry Marney 1st Baron Marney 1447-1523 (38).
William Brandon 1456-1485 (29) was killed.
James Harrington 1430-1485 (55) was killed.
John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (60) was killed. He was buried firstly at Thetford Priory and therafter at Church of St Michael the Archangel Framlingham. His son Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (42) succeeded 13th Baron Mowbray 1C 1283, 14th Baron Segrave 2C 1295. Elizabeth Tilney Countess Surrey 1444-1497 (41) by marriage Baroness Mowbray, Baron Segrave 2C 1295.
John Sacheverell 1400-1485 (85) was killed.
Philibert Chandee 1st Earl Bath -1486,.
William Norreys 1441-1507 (44), Gilbert Talbot 1452-1517 (33), John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (42) and John Savage 1444-1492 (41) commanded,.
Robert Poyntz 1450-1520 (35) was knighted.
Those who fought for Richard III included:
John Bourchier 6th Baron Ferrers Groby 1438-1495 (47).
John Conyers Sheriff of Yorkshire 1411-1490 (74).
Thomas Dacre 2nd Baron Dacre Gilsland 1467-1525 (17).
William Berkeley 1st Marquess Berkeley 1426-1492 (59).
Richard Fitzhugh 6th Baron Fitzhugh 1457-1487 (28).
John Scrope 5th Baron Scrope Bolton 1437-1498 (48).
Thomas Scrope 6th Baron Scrope Masham 1459-1493 (26).
Henry Grey 4th or 7th Baron Grey Codnor 1435-1496 (50).
Edmund Grey 1st Earl Kent 1416-1490 (68).
Ralph Neville 3rd Earl Westmoreland 1456-1499 (29).
John Pole 1st Earl Lincoln 1462-1487 (23).
Humphrey Stafford 1426-1486 (59).
George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (17).
Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (42) was wounded.
Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (29) fought and escaped.
John Zouche 7th Baron Zouche Harringworth 1459-1526 (26) was captured.
John Babington 1423-1485 (62), William Alington 1420-1485 (65), Robert Mortimer 1442-1485 (43), Robert Brackenbury -1485, Richard Ratclyffe 1430-1485 (55) and Richard Bagot 1412-1485 (73) were killed.

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Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1486. This yeare Prince Arthure was borne at Windsore.

Marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth York

On 18 Jan 1486 [his father] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (28) and [his mother] Elizabeth, Edward IV's eldest daughter (19) were married at Westminster Abbey. They were third cousins. He a great x 3 grandson of King Edward III England. She a daughter of Edward IV King England 1442-1483. [his mother] She by marriage Queen Consort England.

Around 1675 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503. From a work of 1500.

On 20 Sep 1486 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 was created as Duke Cornwall.

On 20 Sep 1486 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 was born to [his father] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (29) and [his mother] Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (20) at Winchester Cathedral Priory.

Christening of Arthur Prince of Wales

On 24 Sep 1486 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 was christened at Winchester Cathedral by Bishop John Alcock 1430-1500 (56).
Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (71) held the child. His godparents included Thomas Stanley 1st Earl Derby 1435-1504 (51), William Fitzalan 16th Earl Arundel 1417-1487 (68), John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (44), Thomas Fitzalan 17th Earl Arundel 1450-1524 (36), [his grandmother] Elizabeth Woodville Queen Consort England 1437-1492 (49) and [his aunt] Cecily York Viscountess Welles 1469-1507 (17).
Richard Woodville 3rd Earl Rivers 1453-1491 (33) was present.

In 1489 Thomas Wriothesley Garter King of Arms 1488-1534 (1) was appointed Wallingford Pursuivant of Arms in Ordinary in the service of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (2).

On 29 Nov 1489 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (3) was created as Earl Chester 7C 1489.

On 29 Nov 1489 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (3) was appointed Knight of the Bath.

Arthur Tudor created Prince of Wales

On 27 Feb 1490 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (3) was created Prince of Wales at Westminster Palace.
Thomas West 8th Baron De La Warr 5th Baron West 1457-1525 (33) was appointed Knight of the Bath.

On 08 May 1491 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (4) was appointed 240th Knight of the Garter by his father [his father] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (34). at St George's Chapel Windsor Castle.

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502.

On 28 Jun 1491 [his brother] Henry VIII was born to [his father] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (34) and [his mother] Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (25) at Palace of Placentia. [his brother] He was created as Duke Cornwall.

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.

In 1494 [his brother] Henry VIII (2) was created 1st Duke York 3C 1494.

On 01 Apr 1495 Cecily "Rose of Raby" Neville Duchess York 1415-1495 (79) made her last will. It was proved 27 Aug 1495.
Source: A Selection From the Wills of Eminent Persons by Camden Society (Great Britain). Published 1838. Transcribed by John Gough Nichols and John Bruce.
IN the name of allmyghty God, the blessed Trinite, fader and son and the holigost, trusting in the meanes and mediacions of oure blessed Lady Moder, of oure most blessed Saviour Jh'u Crist, and by the intercession of holy Saint John Baptist, and all the saintes of heven: I, CECILLE, wife unto the right noble prince Richard late Duke of Yorke (83), fader unto the most cristen prince my Lord and son [his grandfather] King Edward the iiij th (52), the first day of Aprill the yere of our Lord M.CCCC.lxxxxv. after the computacion of the Church of Englond, of hole mynde and body, loving therfore be it to Jh'u, make and ordeigne my testament in fourme and maner ensuyng.
Furst, I bequeath and surrendour my soule in to the mercifull handes of allmyghty God my maker, and in to protecion of the blessed yrgin our lady Saint Mary, and suffrage of Saint John Baptist, and of all other saintes of heven. Also my body to be buried beside the body of my moost entierly best beloved Lord and housbond, fader unto my said lorde and son, and in his tumbe within the collegiate church of Fodringhay, a if myn executours by the sufferaunce of the [his father] King (38) finde goode sufficient therto; and elles at the [his father] Kinges (38) pleasure. And I will that after my deceasse all my dettes sufficiently appering and proved be paid, thanking oure Lord at this tyme of making of this my testament to the knolege of my conscience I am not muche in dett; and if it happen, as I trust to God it shalnot, that there be not found sufficient money aswell to pay my dettes as to enture my body, than in advoiding such charges as myght growe for the same, the whiche God defende, I lymytte and assigne all such parcelles of plate as belongith to my chapell, pantry, cellour, ewry, and squillery, to the perfourmyng of the same, as apperith in the inventary, except such plate as I have bequeithed. Also I geve and bequeith to the Kinges noble grace all such money as is owing to me of the customes, and two cuppes of gold.
Also I geve and bequeith to the [his mother] Quene (29) a crosse croslette of diamantes, a sawter with claspes of silver and guilte enameled covered with grene clothe of golde, and a pix with the fleshe of Saint Cristofer.
Also I bequeith to my lady the [his grandmother] Kinges moder (51) a portuos with claspes of gold covered with blacke cloth of golde.
Also I geve to my lord Prince (8) a bedde of arres of the Whele of Fortune and testour of the same, a counterpoint of arras and a tappett of arres with the pope.
Also I geve to my lord [his brother] Henry Duke of Yorke (3) b three tappettes of arres, oon of them of the life of Saint John Baptist, another of Mary Maudeleyn, and the thirde of the passion of our Lord and Saint George.
And if my body be buried at Fodringhay in the colege there with my most entierly best beloved lord and housbond (83), than I geve to the said colege a square canapie of crymeson clothe of gold with iiij. staves, twoo auter clothes of crymeson clothe of gold, twoo copes of crymeson cloth of gold, a chesibull and twoo tenucles of cryinyson clothe of golcrvith iij. abes, c twoo auter clothes of crymeson damaske browdered, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and iij. copes of blewe velwett brodered, with iij. abes, thre masse bokes, thre grayles, and vij. processioners.
Also I geve to the colege of Stoke Clare a chesibull and twoo tenucles of playn crymyson cloth of gold with iij. abes, twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, and fyve coopes of white damaske browdered, with iij. abes, twoo awter clothes of crymeson velwett upon the velwete (sic), a vestement of crymeson playne velvet, iiij. antiphoners, iiij. grayles, and sixe processioners.
Also I geve to the house of Sion two of the best coopes of crymyson clothe of gold.
Note. These next four people refer to her grand-daughters, children of Edward IV.
Also I geve to my doughter [his aunt] Brigitte (14) the boke of Legenda Aurea in velem, a boke of the life of Saint Kateryn of Sene, a boke of Saint Matilde.
Also I geve to my doughter [his aunt] Cecill (26) a portuous with claspes silver and gilte covered with purple velvet, and a grete portuous without note.
Also I geve to my doughter [his aunt] Anne (19) the largest bedde of bawdekyn, withe countrepoint of the same, the barge with bailies, tilde, and ores belonging to the same.
Also I geve to my doughter [his aunt] Kateryn (15) a traves of blewe satten.
Also I geve to my doughter of Suffolke (50) a the chare with the coveryng, all the quoshons, horses, and harneys belonging to the same, and all my palfreys.
Note. The next people are her grand-children, children of her daughter Elizabeth York Duchess Suffolk 1444-1503 (50).
Also I geve to my son of Suffolke (24) b a clothe of estate and iij. quoschons of purpull damaske cloth of gold.
Also I geve to my son Humfrey (21) c two awter clothes of blewe damaske brawdered and a vestyment of crymeson satten for Jh'us masse.
Also I geve to my son William (17) d a traves of white sarcenet, twoo beddes of downe, and twoo bolsters to the same.
Also I geve to my doughter Anne priores of Sion (19), a boke of Bonaventure and Hilton in the same in Englishe, and a boke of the Revelacions of Saint Burgitte.
Also I woll that all my plate not bequeithed be sold, and the money thereof be putte to the use of my burying, that is to sey, in discharging of suche costes and expensis as shalbe for carying of my body from the castell of Barkehampstede unto the colege of Fodringhey. And if any of the said plate be lefte unexpended I woll the said colege have it.
Also I geve to the colege of saint Antonies in London an antiphoner with the ruelles of musik in the later ynd.
Also I geve unto Master Richard Lessy all suche money as is owing unto me by obligations what soever they be, and also all such money as is owing unto me by the Shirfe of Yorkeshire, to helpe to bere his charges which he has to pay to the Kinges grace, trusting he shall the rather nyghe the said dettes by the help and socour of his said grace.
Also I geve to Master William Croxston a chesibull, stoles, and fanons of blake velwett, with an abe.
Also I geve to Master Eichard Henmershe a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of crymyson damaske, with an abe; and a chesibill, stoles and fanons of crymeson saten, with an abe.
Also I geve to Sir John More a frontell of purpull cloth of gold, a legend boke, and a colett boke.
Also I give to Sir Kandall Brantingham a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymson velvet, with an abe, the better of bothe.
Also I geve to Sir William Grave a chesibill, stoles, and fanons of white damaske, orfreys of crymeson velvett, with an abe; a masse-boke that servith for the closett, a prymour with claspes silver and gilt, covered with blewe velvett, and a sawter that servith for the closett covered with white ledder.
Also I geve to Sir John Blotte a gospell boke, a pistill covered with ledder, and a case for a corporax of grene playne velvett. Also I geve to Sir Thomas Clerk a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, fanons, of rede bawdeken, with iij. abes.
Also I geve to Sir William Tiler twoo coopes of rede bawdekyn.
Also I geve to Robert Claver iij. copes of white damaske brawdered, and a gowne of the Duchie b facion of playne blake velvett furred with ermyns.
Also I geve to John Bury twoo old copes of crymysyn satten cloth of gold, a frontell of white bawdekyn, twoo curteyns of rede sarcenett fringed, twoo curteyns of whit sarcenet fringed, a feder bed, a bolstour to the same, the best of feders, and two whit spervers of lynyn.
Also I geve to John Poule twoo auter clothes, a chesibull, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of white bawdekyn, with iij. abes; a short gowne of purple playne velvett furred with ermyns, the better of ij. and a kirtill of damaske with andelettes of silver and gilt furred.
Also I geve to John Smyth twoo auter clothes, a chesibill, twoo tenucles, stoles, and fanons of blew bawdekyn, with iij. abes. Also I geve to John Bury twoo copes of crymysyn clothe of gold that servith for Sondays.
Also I geve to John Walter a case for corporax of purple playne velvett, twoo cases for corporax of blewe bawdekyn, twoo auter clothes, a chesibill of rede and grene bawdekyn, a canapie of white sarcenett, iij. abes for children, and iiij. pair of parrours of white bawdekyn, twoo pair parrours of crymsyn velvett, twoo pair parrours of rede bawdekyn, a housling towell that servith for my selfe, twoo corteyns of blewe sarcenett fringed, a sudory of crymy-syn and white, the egges blak, a crose cloth and a cloth of Saint John Baptist of sarcenett painted, a long lantorn, a dext standing doble, twoo grete stondardes and ij. litill cofers.
Also I geve to John Peit-wynne twoo vestimentes of white damaske, a white bedde of lynnyn, a federbedde and a bolstour, and a short gowne of purple playne velvet furred with sabilles. Also I geve to Thomas Lentall six auter clothes of white sarcenett, with crosses of crymsyn velvet.
Also I geve to John Long iij. peces of bawdekyn of the lengur sorte. Also I geve to Sir [John] Verney knighte and Margarett his wiffe a a crosse [of] silver and guilte and berall, and in the same a pece of the holy crosse and other diverse reliques.
Also I geve to Dame Jane Pesemershe, widue, myne Inne that is called the George in Grauntham, during terme of her life; and after her decesse I woll that the reversion therof be unto the college of Fodringhay for evermore, to find a prest to pray for my Lord my housbond (83) and me.
Also I geve to Nicholas Talbott and Jane his wife a spone of gold with a sharp diamount in the ende, a dymy-sent of gold with a collumbine and a diamont in the same, a guirdill of blewe tissue harnessed with gold, a guirdill of gold with a bokull and a pendaunt and iiij. barres of gold, a hoke of gold with iij. roses, a pomeamber of gold garnesshed with a diamont, sex rubies and sex perles, and the surnap and towell to the same.
Also I geve to Richard Boyvile and Gresild his wife my charrett and the horses with the harnes that belongith therunto, a gowne with a dymy trayn of purpull saten furred with ermyns, a shorte gowne of purple saten furred with jennetes, a kirtill of white damaske with aunde lettes silver and gilte, a spone of gold, a dymysynt of gold with a columbyne garnesshed with a diainant, a saphour, an amatist, and viij. perles, a pomeamber of gold enameled, a litell boxe with a cover of gold and a diamant in the toppe.
Also I geve to Richard Brocas and Jane his wife a long gown of purpull velvett upon velvet furred with ermyns, a greate Agnus of gold with the Trinite, Saint Erasmus, and the Salutacion of our Lady; an Agnus of gold with our Lady and Saint Barbara; a litell goblett with a cover silver and part guild; a pair of bedes of white amber gauded with vj. grete stones of gold, part aneled, with a pair of bedes of x. stones of gold and v. of corall; a cofor with a rounde lidde bonde with iron, which the said Jane hath in her keping, and all other thinges that she hath in charge of keping.
Also I geve to Anne Pinchbeke all other myne Agnus unbequeithed, that is to sey, ten of the Trinite, a litell malmesey pott with a cover silver and parte guilte, a possenett with a cover of silver, a short gowne of playne russett velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of playne blewe velvett furred with sabilles, a short gowne of purple playn velvet furred with grey, a tester, a siler, and a countrepoint of bawdekyn, the lesser of ij.
Also I geve to Jane Lessy a dymysent of gold with a roos, garnisshed with twoo rubies, a guirdell of purple tissue with a broken bokull, and a broken pendaunt silver and guilte, a guirdill of white riband with twoo claspes of gold with a columbyne, a guirdell of blewe riband with a bokell and a pendaunt of gold, a litell pair of bedes of white amber gaudied with vij. stones of gold, an haliwater stope with a strynkkill silver and gilte, and a laier silver and part guilte.
Also I geve to John Metcalfe and Alice his wife all the ringes that I have, except such as hang by my bedes and Agnus, and also except my signet, a litell boxe of golde with a cover of golde, a pair of bedes of Ixj. rounde stones of golde gaudied with sex square stones of golde enemeled, with a crosse of golde, twoo other stones, and a scalop shele of geete honging by.
Also I geve to Anne Lownde a litell bokull and a litell pendaunt of golde for a guirdill, a litell guirdell of golde and silke with a bokill and a pendaunt of golde, a guirdell of white riband with aggelettes of golde enameled, a hoke of golde playne, a broken hoke of golde enameled, and a litell rounde bottumed basyn of silver.
Also I geve to the house of Asshe-rugge a chesibull and ij. tenucles of crymysyn damaske embrawdered, with thre abes.
Also I geve to the house of Saint Margaretes twoo auter clothes with a crucifix and a vestiment of grete velvet.
Also I geve to the parish church of Stoundon a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.
Also I geve to the parishe church of Much Barkehampstede a coope of blewe bawdekyn, the orffreys embrawdered.
Also I geve to the parish church of Compton by sides Guilford a eorporax case of blake cloth of gold and iiij. auter clothes of white sarcenett embrawdered with garters.
Also I geve to Alisaunder Cressener my best bedde of downe and a bolster to the same.
Also I geve to Sir Henry Haidon knyght a tablett and a cristall garnesshed with ix. stones and xxvij. perles, lacking a stone and iij. perles.
Also I geve to Gervase Cressy a long gown of playn blewe velvet furred with sabilles.
Also I geve to Edward Delahay twoo gownes of musterdevilers furred with mynckes, and iiij u of money.
Also I geve to Thomas Manory a short gowne of crymesyn playn velvet lyned, purfilled with blake velvet, and iiij ll in money.
Also I geve to John Broune all such stuf as belongith to the kechyn in his keping at my place at Baynardcastell in London, and iiij u in money.
Also I geve to William Whitington a short gown of russett cloth furred with matrons and calabour wombes, a kirtill of purpull silke chamblett with awndelettes silver and gilte, all such floures of brawdery werke and the cofer that they be kept in, and xls. in money.
Also I geve to all other gentilmen that be daily a waiting in my houshold with Mr. Richard Cressy and Robert Lichingham everich of theime iiij u in money.
Also I geve to every yoman that be daily ad waiting in my houshold with John Otley xls. in money.
Also I geve to every grome of myne xxvj s. viij d. in money. And to every page of myne xiij s. iiij d. in money.
Also I geve to Robert Harison xls. in money and all the gootes.
And if ther be no money founde in my cofers to perfourme this my will and bequest, than I will that myne executours, that is to sey the reverend fader in God Master Olyver King bisshop of Bath (63), Sir Reignolde Bray (55) knight, Sir Thomas Lovell, councellours to the Kinges grace, Master William Pikinham doctour in degrees dean of the colege of Stoke Clare, Master William Felde master of the colege of Fodringhey, and Master Richard Lessy dean of my chapell, havyng God in reverence and drede, unto whome I geve full power and auctorite to execute this my will and testament, make money of such goodes as I have not geven and bequeithed, and with the same to content my dettes and perfourme this my will and testament.
And the foresaid reverend fader in God, Sir Rignold Bray knyght, Sir Thomas Lovell knyght, Master William Pikenham, and Master William Felde, to be rewarded of suche thinges as shalbe delivered unto theme by my commaundement by the hondes of Sir Henry Haidon knyght stieward of my houshold and Master Richard Lessy, humbly beseching the Kinges habundant grace in whome is my singuler trust to name such supervisour as shalbe willing and favorabull diligently to se that this my present testament and will be perfittely executed and perfourmyd, gevyng full power also to my said executours to levey and receyve all my dettes due and owing unto me at the day of my dethe, as well of my receyvours as of all other officers, except such dettes as I have geven and bequeathed unto Master Richard Lessy aforesaid, as is above specified in this present will and testament.
And if that Master Richard Lessy cannot recover such money as I have geven to hym of the Shirffes of Yorkeshire and of my obligacions, than I will he be recompensed of the revenues of my landes to the sume of v c. marcs at the leest.
IN WITTENESSE HEROF I have setto my signet and signemanuell at my castell of Berkehamstede the last day of May the yere of our Lord abovesaid, being present Master Richard Lessy, Sir William Grant my confessour, Richard Brocas clerc of my kechyn, and Gervays Cressy. Proved at "Lamehithe" the 27 th day of August, A.D. 1495, and commission granted to Master Richard Lessy the executor in the said will mentioned to administer, &c. &c.

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Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525. Portrait of Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 in the Masters Lodge St John's College. Commissioned by John Fisher Bishop of Rochester 1469-1535. Note the Beaufort Arms on the wall beneath which is the Beafort Portcullis. Repeated in the window. She is wearing widow's clothes, or possibly that of a convent; Gabled Headress with Lappets. On 29 Mar 2019, St John's College, Cambridge, which she founded, announced the portrait was original work by Wewyck.

On 20 Oct 1496 Philip "Handsome Fair" King Castile 1478-1506 (18) and [his future sister-in-law] Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555 (17) were married. They were second cousins once removed. He a great x 4 grandson of King Edward III England. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

Around 1497. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon or Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555.Around 1500. Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Joanna "The Mad" Trastámara Queen Castile 1479-1555.

On 21 Feb 1499 [his brother] Edmund Tudor 1st Duke Somerset 1499-1500 was born to [his father] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (42) and [his mother] Elizabeth York Queen Consort England 1466-1503 (33) at the Palace of Placentia being their sixth child. On 24 Feb 1499 he was christened at the Church of the Observant Friars. His godparents were [his grandmother] Margaret Beaufort Countess Richmond 1443-1509 (55), Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (21) and Richard Foxe Bishop 1448-1528 (51), then Bishop of Durham. [his brother] He is believed to have been created 1st Duke Somerset 3C 1499 on the same day although there is no documentation. On 19 Jun 1500 [his brother] he died at the Royal Palace, Hatfield; possibly of plague of which an outbreak was occuring. He was buried in Westminster Abbey.

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Proxy Marriage of Prince Arthur and Catherine of Aragon

On 19 May 1499 Arthur Prince of Wales (12) and [his future wife] Catherine of Aragon (13) were married by proxy at Tickenhill Manor Bewdley. Roderigo de Puebla stood in for Catherine. The service was performed by John Arundel Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry.

Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Catherine of Aragon.

Trial and Execution of Perkin Warbreck and Edward Earl of Warwick

On 28 Nov 1499 Edward "Last Plantagenet" York 17th Earl Warwick 1475-1499 (24) was executed at Tower Hill.
Documentation held in Spain apparently describes [his future wife] Catherine of Aragon's (13) parents [his future father-in-law] Ferdinand II King Aragon 1452-1516 (47) and [his future mother-in-law] Isabella Queen Castile 1451-1504 (48) expressing concern that Edward "Last Plantagenet" York 17th Earl Warwick 1475-1499 (24) was a potential claimant to throne, and being reluctant for their daughter to marry Arthur Prince of Wales (13) whilst there was a threat to his (13) accession causing [his father] Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509 (42) to use Perkin Warbreck's (25) attempted escape with Edward "Last Plantagenet" York 17th Earl Warwick 1475-1499 (24) as a means to an end.

Around 1490. Possibly Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Isabella Queen Castile 1451-1504.Around 1502. Possibly Juan de Flandes Painter 1440-1519. Portrait of Isabella Queen Castile 1451-1504.

In 1500 Manuel "Fortunate" I King Portugal 1469-1521 (30) and [his future sister-in-law] Maria Trastámara Queen Consort Portugal 1482-1517 (18) were married. They were second cousins. He a great x 3 grandson of King Edward III England. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England. [his future sister-in-law] She by marriage Queen Consort Portugal.

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (13).

Around 1500. Unknown Painter. Portrait of Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502.

Marriage of Arthur Tudor and Catherine of Aragon

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1501. This yeare, the 14th day of November, Prince Arthure (14) was married at Paules Churche, in London, to the [his future father-in-law] Kinge of Spaynes (48) third daughter, named [his future wife] Katheryne (15). And in Easter weeke followinge the saide Prince Arthure (14) deceased at Ludlowe, in Wales, and was buried at Worcester. See Marriage of Arthur Tudor and Catherine of Aragon, Death of Prince Arthur.

On 14 Nov 1501 Arthur Prince of Wales (15) and [his wife] Catherine of Aragon (15) were married at St Paul's Cathedral by Henry Deane Archbishop of Canterbury -1503 assisted by William Warham Bishop of London (51). They were half third cousins once removed. He a son of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England. and a further eighteen bishops.
[his aunt] Cecily York Viscountess Welles 1469-1507 (32) bore the train, Thomas Grey 2nd Marquess Dorset 1477-1530 (24) was Chief Answerer. Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (18) and Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham 1478-1521 (23) attended.
Thomas Englefield Speaker of the House of Commons 1453-1514 was appointed Knight of the Bath.
Immediately after their marriage Arthur Prince of Wales (15) and [his wife] Catherine of Aragon (15) resided at Tickenhill Manor Bewdley for a month.
Thereafter they travelled to Ludlow.

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Before 1532 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1450-1532.Around 1620 based on a work of 1526.Unknown Painter. Portrait of William Warham Archbishop of Canterbury 1450-1532.

Death of Prince Arthur

On 02 Apr 1502 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (15) died at Ludlow Castle. See Death of Prince Arthur. The cause of death unknown other than being reported as "a malign vapour which proceeded from the air". [his wife] Catherine of Aragon (16) had recovered.

After 02 Apr 1502 Prince Arthur's heart was buried in St Laurence's Church Ludlow. See Death of Prince Arthur.

On 23 Apr 1502 Prince Arthur's (15) funeral was held at St Laurence's Church Ludlow presided over by William Smyth Bishop of Lincoln 1460-1514 (42). George Grey 2nd Earl Kent 1454-1505 (48), George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (34), Richard Grey 3rd Earl Kent 1481-1524 (21), John Grey 2nd Baron Grey Powis 1485-1504 (17) and Richard Pole 1462-1504 (40) attended. Thomas Howard 2nd Duke Norfolk 1443-1524 (59) was Chief Mourner. Edward Howard 1476-1513 (26) and Robert Radclyffe 1st Earl of Sussex 1483-1542 (19) carried The Canopy.

Before 25 Apr 1502 Prince Arthur's body was transported from Ludlow to Worcester Cathedral via the River Servern in a special wagon upholstered in black and drawn by six horses, also caparisoned in black.

On 25 Apr 1502 Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (15) was buried in the Chantry Chapel of Prince Arthur in Worcester_Cathedral.
William Smyth Bishop of Lincoln 1460-1514 (42) presided.
George Grey 2nd Earl Kent 1454-1505 (48) and George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (34) received Arthur's Coat of Arms, Richard Grey 3rd Earl Kent 1481-1524 (21) received Arthur's shield, John Grey 2nd Baron Grey Powis 1485-1504 (17) received Arthur's sword, pommel forwards. Gruffydd ap Rhys ap Thomas Deheubarth 1478-1521 (24) carried Prince Arthur's banner.
Gerald Fitzgerald 9th Earl Kildare 1487-1534 (15) rode Arthur's courser as the Man at Arms, in Arthur's full armour, carrying Arthur's poleaxe, pointed down, through the Nave to the Altar where he was stripped of Arthur's (15) clothes.
The Chapel is to the right of the High Altar in the Chancel. It is decorated with heraldic carvings symbolising the houses of York, Lancaster, Beaufort and Catherine of Aragon's Pomegranate. His Purbeck marble tomb chest is decorated with the arms of England. Heis buried beneath the cathedral's floor several feet away from the tomb that visitors can see.

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On 25 Apr 1503 Prince Arthur's (16) body was buried at Worcester Cathedral.
George Talbot 4th Earl Shrewsbury 4th Earl Waterford 1468-1538 (35) attended.

Marriage of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon

Wriothesley's Chronicle Henry VII. 1509. This yeare, in Aprill, died [his father] King Henry the Vllth (51) at Richmond; and his [his brother] Sonne King Henry the VIII (17) was proclaymed Kinge on St. Georges daye, in the same moneth. And in June follwinge the [his brother] King (17) was married to [his wife] Queene Katherin (23), late wife of his brother Prince Arthure (22), and were both crowned on Mid-sommer day. See Marriage of King Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, Coronation of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon.

On 23 Jun 1509 [his brother] Henry VIII (17) and [his wife] Catherine of Aragon (23) were married at the Church of the Observant Friars. They were half third cousins once removed. He a son of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509. She a great x 3 granddaughter of King Edward III England.

In 1521 Gruffydd ap Rhys ap Thomas Deheubarth 1478-1521 (43) died. He was buried at Worcester Cathedral next to his childhood friend Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 (34).

Letters and Papers Foreign and Domestic Henry VIII August 1527. 16 Jul 1529. 5778. THE DIVORCE.
i. Deposition of Mary (31) wife of Henry Bourchier earl of Essex, taken at Stanstede, on Thursday, 15 July 1529, in the presence of Robert Johnson, notary public (of Norwich diocese). Her age is 44 years and over. She says that prince Arthur (42) and [his wife] Katharine (43) lived as man and wife together; that the two occupied the same bed after the wedding, at London House, and were generally reputed as man and wife.
ii. Deposition of Agnes (52) widow of Thomas late duke of Norfolk (86), taken on Friday, 16 July 1529, in the church of St. Mary, of the Cluniac priory of Thetford, by Sampson Mychell, canon, in the presence of John [Fletcher] and [William] Molyneux, M.A., her chaplain. Her age is 52 years and over. She knew Henry VII. and his queen Elizabeth from the time she was 15, and remembers Katharine coming from Spain, and the marriage of Arthur and Katharine in St. Paul's. "He was then about the stature that the young [earl of] Derby is now at, but not fully so high as the same Earl is." Also, that the said prince Arthur (42) and [his wife] [princess Ka]theryne (43), now being Queen, were brought to bed the next night after the said marriage; for this deponent did see them lie... me in one bed the same night, in a chamber within the said palace being prepared for them, and that this deponent left them so [lying to]gether there the said night.

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Calendar of State Papers Spain Volume 5 Part 2 1531-1533. 15 Apr 1533. 1061. Eustace Chapuys (43) to the Emperor (33).
Lastly, upon my urging upon him that his marriage had been pre-arranged by the King, his father [Henry VII.], and by the Catholic king of Spain [Ferdinand], both of whom were the wisest of their age, and would have never consented to it had there been the least shade of scruple respecting prince Arthur (46) — which after all was the principal ground of complaint — he again insisted on his determination to act as he pleased in the matter without attending to considerations of any sort whatever, adding that you yourself had shewn him the way to disobey the Pope's injunctions by your appealing four years ago to a future Council. Upon which I told him that he himself could not do better than follow your example and appeal to that very Council, and since he alleged that he was ready to imitate you in this respect, I must warn him that no prince in the world had more respect than you had for His Holiness, or deeper fear of his excommunications, for upon one occasion you had been one whole Holy Week without attending Divine service.
These last words of mine had great effect upon the [his brother] King (41), who no doubt thought that I meant to reproach him for not having obeyed the Papal excommunication and interdict once fulminated against him; he, therefore, was a little hurt and said to me in rather an angry tone of voice: "If you go on like that you will make me lose my temper." I begged him to tell me how I could have offended him, warmly protesting that I had no such intention; then he lowered his voice a little and spoke less harshly, though, notwithstanding all my entreaties, he would never say how or in what I had offended him, and I must say that the rest of our conference passed without any visible signs of ill-humour on his part.
Thus encouraged I asked him whether in the event of Spaniards and Flemings, as good Christians, refusing for fear of the Papal interdict to hold communication, or carry on trade with his subjects, they would be amenable to the penalties described in the statute, and what sort of crime could be imputed to them. He remained for a while thoughtful and startled, not knowing what to answer, which being observed by me I preferred asking leave to retire to remaining where I was and waiting for his answer. I, therefore, said to him: "If such be the state of things I will not trouble Your Highness any more and lose my time; I will withdraw." He then said "adieu" to me in a gracious manner, but retained Hesdin, to whom he addressed the following words; "You have heard what the Emperor's ambassador has just said respecting the Papal excommunication and the stopping of trade between my subjects and the Spaniards and Flemings; but I can tell you that the ecclesiastical censures do not on this occasion fall upon me, but upon the Emperor himself who has so long opposed me, and prevented my new marriage, thus making me live in sin and against the prescriptions of Mother Church. The excommunication, moreover, is of such a nature that the Pope himself could not raise it without my consent; but, pray, do not mention this to the ambassador." This will give Your Majesty an idea of the King's blindness in these matters. Hesdin only replied that the affair was of too much importance for him to mix himself up with it.

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1548. Titian Painter 1488-1576. Equestrian Portrait of Charles V Holy Roman Emperor 1500-1558.1519. Bernard Van Orley Painter 1491-1541. Portrait of Charles V Holy Roman Emperor 1500-1558.

Calendar of State Papers Spain Volume 5 Part 2 1531-1533. 15 Apr 1533. 1061. Eustace Chapuys (43) to the Emperor (33).
After this we came to speak about the [his wife] Queen (47) and to argue whether she had or had not been known by prince Arthur (46), and after responding victoriously to the suppositions and conjectures which he alleged in support of his opinion, I produced such arguments in proof of the contrary that he really knew not what to answer. Which arguments having been brought forward on more than one occasion I will not trouble Your Majesty with a reproduction of them, and will only say "que venant a reprendre le dit seigneur roy ce que plusieurs fois il auoit confesse, que la royne demeura pucelle du dit prince Arthus, et voyant quil ne le pouvoit nyer, il dit quil lauoit plusieurs fois dit mais que ce nauoit este que en ieu, et que lhome en iouant et banquetant dit souvent pluseures (sic) choses que ne sont veritables." Having said as much as if he had obtained a great success, or found some subtle point towards the gaining of his cause, he began to recover his self-possession and said confidently to me: "Now I think I have given you full satisfaction on all points; what else do you want?" Whatever the [his brother] King (41) might say the satisfaction was not all-sufficing, but it served me admirably, much more than he himself could imagine, to dispute certain premises he had laid down. I told him that I flattered myself that I was the ambassador of the prince who desired most his welfare, profit, and honour, as well as the tranquillity of his kingdom. I had brought with me Master Hesdin, there present, who was, and acknowledged himself to be, his affectionate servant— as did also all Your Majesty's officers—that he might be present at the conference and hear what his answer was; but I would promise most solemnly that nothing that might be said at that audience should be reported to you unless he himself wished, for I consented to the said Hesdin giving me the lie if I ever attempted to write to Your Majesty anything he (the King) did dislike. This I said to the [his brother] King (41) that I might inspire greater confidence and make him open his heart more fully (lui fere deslier le sac). The better to gain his confidence I told him how happy I had once considered myself at being chosen by Your Majesty to represent your person near so great and magnanimous a king, hoping that his Privy Council, taking due cognizance of the affairs pending between the two crowns, everything should go on smoothly. Now, on the contrary, affairs had taken such a disorderly turn, and were in such confusion that I considered myself unhappy in having to represent Your Majesty, inasmuch as I had continually assured you in my despatches that whatever countenance the [his brother] King (41) put on, and whatever he did his heart and the affection he bore Your Majesty were not affected, and that he would never think of doing anything that might give occasion to suspect that he intended living otherwise than in peace and amity with Your Imperial Majesty. At these words, and without waiting to hear the rest, as if he wished to avoid alt further conversation on this delicate subject, the [his brother] King (41) frowned, and moving his head to and fro, said rather abruptly: "Before I listen to such representations, I must know from whom they proceed, whether from the Emperor, your master, or from yourself; for if they be private remarks of your own I shall know how to answer them." And upon my answering that it was superfluous to ask whether I could have received commission to complain of facts and things which had only taken place a week ago, the intelligence of which would require a full month to be transmitted, and perhaps, too, four successive despatches of mine before it was believed—my general charge and instructions being to maintain by all best means the peace and friendship between Your Majesty and him, and especially to watch over the [his wife] Queen's (47) affairs, since from them depended in a great measure that very friendship—the [his brother] King (41) replied that you yourself had nothing to do with the laws, statutes, and constitutions of his kingdom, and that in spite of all opposition he would pass such laws and ordinances in his dominions as he thought proper, adding many other things in the same strain. My reply was that Your Majesty neither could nor would hinder any such legislative measures, but on the contrary would, if necessary, help him in them unless they personally affected the [his wife] Queen (47), whom he wanted to compel to renounce her appeal [to Rome] and submit entirely to the judgment of the prelates of his kingdom who, either won by promises or threatened with that punishment which had already attained those who upheld the [his wife] Queen's (47) right, could not fail to decide in his favour and against her. After this I repeated what I had told him on previous occasions in Your Majesty's name, that is to say: that the fact of the case being determined here, in England, as he wished, would in nowise remove hereafter the doubts about the succession for the reasons above explained, He, himself, considering how unreasonable and illegal it would be to have the case tried and decided in England, when the authority of the Holy Apostolic See was concerned, had from the beginning of the suit asked the Papal permission for the two cardinals (Campeggio and York) to take cognizance of the case here. Even after that he had allowed the [his wife] Queen (47) to appeal to Rome, and in the course of time not satisfied with that had himself, and through others, solicited the [his wife] Queen (47) to consent to the case being tried out of Rome, not here in England, for he knew that to be a most unreasonable demand, but in a neutral place. For these reasons I said the [his wife] Queen (47) cannot and ought not to be tied by laws and statutes to which no one hardly had consented, and which had been carried by compulsion. To this remark of mine the [his brother] King (41) replied half in a passion (demy appassione): "All persuasions and remonstrances are absolutely in vain. Had I known that the audience you applied for had no other object than to speak to me of these things I certainly should have found some excuse to break through the established rule, and escape from such objurgations." But on my representing to him the object of my calling, and telling him that he was positively bound to listen not only to what an ambassador of Your Majesty, but the commonest mortal, had to say to him in a case of this sort, and the courteous and humane manner in which you had always treated his ambassadors, he was obliged to retract, and said that as regarded the commission granted to the two cardinals he could not deny that he himself had applied for it, but that was, he said, under a promise made by the Pope that the cause should never be revoked [from England]; but since His Holiness withdrew all the commissions he had previously given, he (the King) did likewise reject the offer to have the case tried and sentenced in a neutral place, for he wished it to be determined here and not elsewhere. As to his consent to the [his wife] Queen's (47) appeal he had only given it conditionally, and provided the statutes and constitutions of the kingdom allowed of it, not otherwise, and said that lately a prohibitive one had been made in Parliament which the [his wife] Queen (47) herself, as an English subject, was bound to obey. Hearing this I could not help observing that laws and constitutions had no retroactive power, and that they could only be enforced in the future. As to the [his wife] Queen (47) being an English subject I owned that she being his legitimate wife was really and truly such, and that consequently all debate about constitutions and appeals was not only superfluous but out of the question; but that if the [his wife] Queen (47), however, was, as he asserted, not his wife, she could not be called an English subject, for she only resided in this country in virtue of her marriage, not otherwise, and Common Law establishes that the claimant is to bring his action before the tribunal of the country whereof the defendant is a native. The [his wife] Queen (47) might as well ask to have her case tried in Spain, but this she had never attempted, contenting herself that the court to which he himself had firstly applied as claimant should take cognizance of the affair, that being the only true and irrefragable tribunal in her case. And upon his replying that he had not sent for her, and that his brother, the prince of Wales, had first taken her to wife and consummated marriage, I remarked that if he himself had not sent for her he had after his brother's demise kept her by him, and prevented her from going away at the request of her father, the Catholic king of Spain, through his ambassador at this court, Hernand Duque de Estrada, as I could prove by his letters. These, however, the [his brother] King (41) refused to peruse, and again repeated: "She must have patience and obey the laws of this kingdom." Then he added that Your Majesty in return for so many services and favours had done him the greatest possible injury by hindering his new marriage, and preventing his having male succession. That the [his wife] Queen (47) was no more his wife than she was mine, and that he would act in this business just as he pleased, in spite of all opposition and grumbling, and that if Your Majesty capriciously attempted to cause him annoyance he would try to defend himself with the help of his friends.

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Death of Catherine of Aragon

On 07 Jan 1536 [his wife] Catherine of Aragon (50) died at Kimbolton Castle in the arms of her great friend María de Salinas Baroness Willoughby Eresby 1490-1539 (46).

Death of Prince Frederick

On 06 Nov 1612 Henry Frederick Stewart Prince of Wales 1594-1612 (18) died. The death of the heir to the throne significant; compare William Adelin Normandy Duke Normandy 1103-1120, Edward "Black Prince" Plantagenet Prince of Wales 1330-1376, Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502, Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751, perhaps Edward York Prince of Wales 1473-1484.

Before 1619 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Henry Frederick Stewart Prince of Wales 1594-1612 in his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.After 07 Feb 1612 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Princess Elizabeth Stewart Queen Bohemia 1596-1662. Elizabeth's standing collar of reticella is worked with the Royal coat of arms with its lion and unicorn supporters. She wears a gown of Italian silk brocade. The black armband is thought to be a sign of mourning for her brother Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales who died on 07 Feb 1612.In 1750 Thomas Hudson Painter 1701-1779. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.In 1754 Jean Etienne Liotard Painter 1702-1789. Portrait of Frederick Louis Hanover Prince of Wales 1707-1751.

[his nephew] Arthur Stewart 1st Duke Rothesay 1509-1510 was created 1st Duke Rothesay.

History of England by Polydore Vergil Book 26 Henry VII Chapter 37. While these things were happening elsewhere, with great congratulation [his father] King Henry gave an audience to those ambassadors of King Charles, whom I have previously recorded were kept back so as not to come to him while the Cornish business was brewing. He received an embassy from Prince Philippe of Flanders with equal friendliness, for they had come in search of friendship and a treaty, which he was most happy to grant, for this was very opportune amidst his domestic troubles. Having thus gained peace with his neighboring nations, he finally wrote a letter giving great thanks to Ferdinand and Isabella for having arranged this recent peace between himself and the King of Scots, and suitably rewarded their representative Pedro. This concord of kings occurred in the year of human salvation 1497, the twelfth of [his father] Henry’s reign. But Pedro de Ayala remained at [his father] Henry’s court, taking this occasion to arrange a betrothal between his son Arthur Prince of Wales and Ferdinand’s daughter Catherine soon thereafter, at a time and place to be decided after the girl had become nubile. I return to the King of Scots.

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Death of Edward IV

Mémoires de Philippe de Commynes Chapter 6 Section 8. Dès l'heure que le roy Edouard fut mort, le Roy nostre maistre en fut adverty, et n'en feit nulle joye quant il le sceut:
From the hour that [his grandfather] King Edward IV died, the King our master was made aware, and took no joy in it [Note. Not clear what il le sceut means!]
et peu de jours après receut lettres du duc de Clocestre, qui s'estoit faict roy d'Angleterre1, et se signoit Richard, lequel avoit faict mourir les deux filz du roy Edouard son frère.
And few days after he received letters from the Duke of Gloucester, who had become the King of England, and signed Richard, who had caused the death of the two sons [Note. The Princes in the Tower [his uncle] Edward V King England 1470- and [his uncle] Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473-] of [his grandfather] King Edward his brother.
Lequel roy Richard requeroit l'amytié du Roy, et croy qu'il eust bien voulu ravoir reste pension;
King Richard wanted the friendship of the King, and belived he would continue to receive the pension;
mais le Roy ne voulut respondre à ses lettres, ne ouyr le messagier, et l'estima très cruel et mauvais:
but the King didn't want to respond to the letters, nor hear the messanger, and considered him very cruel and bad:
car, après le trespas dudict roy Edouard, ledict duc de Clocestre avoit faict hommaige à son nepveu, comme à son roy et souverain seigneur, et incontinent après commit ce cas.
since, after the [Note. didict? Possibly dudit ie said] crime against King Edward, the Duke of Gloucester gave homage to his nephew, as his King and sovereign lord, and [Note. incontinent?] after commited this case.
Et, en plain parlement d'Angleterre, feit desgrader deux filles dudict roy Edouard et desclarer bastardes, soubz couleur3 qu'il prouva par ung evesque de Bas4 en Angleterre
And, in the parliament of England, had degraded the two daughters of the said [his grandfather] King of England and declared them bastards, on the pretext of the evidence of a Bishop of Bath in England
(qui aultresfois avoit eu grant credit avec ledict roy Edouard, et puis le desappoincta, et le tint en prison, et puis le ranconna d'une somme d'argent):
(who formerley had great credit with the King Edward then disappointed him, and held him in prison, and then ransomed himself with a sum of money)
lequel evesque disoit que ledict roy Edouard avoit promis foy de mariaige à une dame d'Angleterre (qu'il nommoit)5 pour ce qu'il en estoit amoureux, pour en avoir son plaisir;
which Bishop said that [his grandfather] King Edward had promised [Note. foy? ] marriage to an English lady [who he named] who he was in love with, to have his pleasure; [See Edward IV marries Eleanor Talbot possibly].
et en avoit faict la promesse en la main dudict evesque, et, sur ceste promesse, coucha avec elle: et ne le faisoit que pour la tromper.
and had made this promise in the presence of the Bishop, and, on this promise, slept with her: and did this to deceive her. See The Princes of the Tower described as Illegitimate.
Toutesfois telz jeux sont bien dangereux, tesmoing ces enseignes. J'ay veu beaucoup de gens de court qui, une bonne adventure qui leur eust pleu en tel cas, ilz ne l'eussent point perdue par faulte de promettre.
Nevertheless such games are very dangerous, [Note. tesmoing?] these signs. I saw alot of courtiers who, having the opportunity of such an adventure, would not have lost it for the sake of a promise.
Et ce mauvais evesque garda ceste vengeance en son cueur, par adventure vingt ans; mais il luy en meschut:
And this bad Bishop guarded revenge in his heart, for twenty years; but he is in [Note. meshut?]:
car il avoit ung filz, qu'il aymoit fort, à qui ledict roy Richard vouloit faire de grans biens et luy faire espouser l'une de ces deux filles, desgradees de leur dignité, laquelle de présent est royne d'Angleterre et a deux beaux enfans.
because he had a son, who he loved very much, whom King Richard wished to do great things and to marry one of the two daughters, beneath their dignity, one of whom is now the present [his mother] Queen of England and has two beautiful children [Note. Arthur Tudor Prince of Wales 1486-1502 and [his sister] Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541].

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1876. John Everett Millais Painter Baronet 1829-1896. "The Two Princes". An imagined portrait of the Princes in the Tower Edward V King England 1470- and Richard of Shrewsbury 1st Duke York 1473-.Around 1525 Unknown Painter. French. Portrait of an Unknown Woman formerly known as Margaret Tudor Queen Scotland 1489-1541.

[his nephew] Alexander Stewart 1st Duke Ross 1514-1515 was created 1st Duke Ross.