Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire

Radnorshire, Powys is in Powys.

950 Battle of Carno

1069 Battle of Mechain

1282 Battle of Orewin Bridge

1402 Battle of Bryn Glas

1921 Abermule Train Collision

Battle of Mechain

In 1069 at the Battle of Mechain fought in Radnorshire, Powys the brothers Maredudd Cadelling and Idwal Cadelling attempted to regain control of Radnorshire, Powys from brothers Bleddyn ap Cynfyn King Gwynedd King Powys and Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn Mathrafal. Rhiwallon ap Cynfyn Mathrafal and Idwal Cadelling were killed. Maredudd Cadelling died of exposure following the battle.

On 25 Jul 1290 Hawise "Lady of Powys" Mathrafal Baroness Cherleton was born to Owen de la Pole Mathrafal 1st Lord Powis (age 33) at Radnorshire, Powys.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Builth Wells [Map]

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 1. But here it is proper to mention what happened during the reign of king Henry the First to the lord of the castle of Radnor, in the adjoining territory of Builth [Map],15 who had entered the church of Saint Avan [Map] (which is called in the British language Llan Avan),16 and, without sufficient caution or reverence, had passed the night there with his hounds. Arising early in the morning, according to the custom of hunters, he found his hounds mad, and himself struck blind. After a long, dark, and tedious existence, he was conveyed to Jerusalem, happily taking care that his inward sight should not in a similar manner be extinguished; and there being accoutred, and led to the field of battle on horseback, he made a spirited attack upon the enemies of the faith, and, being mortally wounded, closed his life with honour.

Note 15. Buelth or Builth [Map], a large market town on the north-west edge of the county of Brecon, on the southern banks of the Wye, over which there is a long and handsome bridge of stone. It had formerly a strong castle, the site and earthworks of which still remain, but the building is destroyed.

Note 16. Llan-Avan [Map], a small church at the foot of barren mountains about five or six miles north-west of Buelth. The saint from whom it takes its name, was one of the sons of Cedig ab Cunedda; whose ancestor, Cunedda, king of the Britons, was the head of one of the three holy families of Britain. He is said to have lived in the beginning of the sixth century.

On 11 Dec 1282 an English force including John Giffard 1st Baron Giffard Brimpsfield (age 50), Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn Mathrafal Prince Powys Wenwynwyn (age 71) and Owen de la Pole Mathrafal 1st Lord Powis (age 25) defeated a Welsh force at Builth Wells [Map] during the Battle of Orewin Bridge. The Welsh leader Llewellyn "Last" Aberffraw (age 49) was killed effectively bringing to an end the independence of Wales.

Calendars. 27 Feb 1459. Ratification to the king’s uterine brother, Jasper, earl of Pembroke (age 27), in tail male, of letters patent dated 27 June, 31 Henry VI, granting to him and his heirs a fee farm of £113 6s. 8d. which the heirs of Roger de Mortuo Mari, late earl of March, render for the castle and cantred of Buelt [Map], and £42. from the fee farm of Hereford, which letters are invalid because by other letters dated 12 June, 29 Henry VI, the king granted to Humphrey, duke of Buckingham, in tail male, among other things, £35. 3s. 4d. from the fee farm of Hereford by the hands of the mayor, bailiffs, burgesses, men, sheriff or other receivers from 4 July, 28 Henry VI, for fourteen years, and by other letters dated 12 February, 16 Henry VI, the king granted to John Popham, "chivaler,” then treasurer of the houschold, 100 marks yearly for life from the fee farm of the castle and cantred of Bueld from Michaelmas then last by the hands of the heirs of Roger Mortymer, late earl of March; grant also to the earl in tail male of the 70 marks residue of the said £113. 6s. 8d. beyond the 100 marks granted to the said John from the said 27 June, and of the 100 marks immediately after the decease of John, and of the residue of the fee farm of Hereford beyond the said £35 3s. 4d. granted to the duke from the said 27 June, and of the whole farm immediately after the end of the said term of fourteen ycars. By K. etc. and of the said date by authority of Parliament.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Builth Wells, Builth Castle [Map]

The Welsh Castles and Towns of Edward I comprise a number of castles, some with associated planned towns, commissioned as a means of containing the Welsh. They included, from east to west, Flint Castle [Map], Rhuddlan, Conwy Castle [Map], Beaumaris Castle [Map], Caernarfon Castle [Map], Harlech Castle [Map] and Aberystwyth Castle [Map]. Those not on the coast include Chirk Castle [Map], Denbigh Castle and Town Walls and Builth Castle [Map]. Arguably, Holt Castle [Map] and Criccieth Castle [Map] should be included.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Carno

In 950 Iago ap Idwal Aberffraw (age 8) and Idwal "Ieuaf aka Junior" Aberffraw, sons of Idwal ap Anaward "Foel aka Bald" King Gwynedd, defeated the sons of Hywel at the Battle of Carno at Carno, Radnorshire.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Carreghofa Castle

In 1187 Cadwallon Mathrafal (age 10) attacked at Carreghofa Castle.

In 1187 Gwenwynwyn ap Owain Mathrafal Prince Powys Wenwynwyn (age 10) attacked at Carreghofa Castle.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Castle Crugerydd aka Cruker's [Map]

Castle Crugerydd aka Cruker's, Radnorshire [Map] is a roughly square enclosure, 40m across, defined by a bank and ditch, 63m by 60m overall, has a 26m diameter, 4.5m high ditched mound set over its NW angle (Source: Coflein). Motte and bailey. The motte is 26m diameter and 4.5m high with a flat summit 5m across. The bailey, which is 40m across, lies to the south-east and partly encloses the motte. There is an encircling ditch 5m wide and 1m deep with a bank 8m wide and 0.7m high internally. The entrance is across a causeway. Excavated 1936/37 when 13th century (?) pottery was recovered from the ditch of the motte. (Phillips, D W 1936;1938).

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 1. Early on the following morning, after the celebration of mass, and the return of Ranulph de Glanville (age 75) to England, we came to Cruker Castle,14 two miles distant from Radnor, where a strong and valiant youth named Hector, conversing with the archbishop about taking the cross, said, "If I had the means of getting provisions for one day, and of keeping fast on the next, I would comply with your advice;" on the following day, however, he took the cross. The same evening, Malgo, son of Cadwallon, prince of Melenia, after a short but efficacious exhortation from the archbishop, and not without the tears and lamentations of his friends, was marked with the sign of the cross.

Note 14. Cruker Castle [Map]. The corresponding distance between Old and New Radnor evidently places this castle at Old Radnor, which was anciently called Pen-y-craig, Pencraig, or Pen-crug, from its situation on a rocky eminence. Cruker is a corruption, probably, from Crug-caerau, the mount, or height, of the fortifications.

Note. The above original note 14 is confusing. Cruker Castle is situated six kilometres west-south-west of New Radnor.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Crew Green [Map]

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Glascwm [Map]

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 1. At Elevein, in the church of Glascum [Map],20 is a portable bell, endowed with great virtues, called Bangu,21 and said to have belonged to Saint David. A certain woman secretly conveyed this bell to her husband, who was confined in the castle of Raidergwy [Map],22 near Warthrenion, (which Rhys, son of Gruffydd, had lately built) for the purpose of his deliverance. The keepers of the castle not only refused to liberate him for this consideration, but seized and detained the bell; and in the same night, by divine vengeance, the whole town, except the wall on which the bell hung, was consumed by fire.

Note 20. Glascum is a small village in a mountainous and retired situation between Builth and Kington, in Herefordshire.

Note 21. Bangu. This was a hand bell kept in all the Welsh churches, which the clerk or sexton took to the house of the deceased on the day of the funeral: when the procession began, a psalm was sung; the bellman then sounded his bell in a solemn manner for some time, till another psalm was concluded; and he again sounded it at intervals, till the funeral arrived at the church.

Note 22. Rhaiadyr [Map], called also Rhaiader-gwy, is a small village and market-town in Radnorshire. The site only of the castle, built by prince Rhys, A.D. 1178, now remains at a short distance from the village; it was strongly situated on a natural rock above the river Wye, which, below the bridge, forms a cataract.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Knighton [Map]

On 22 Jun 1402 Owain ap Gruffudd "Glyndŵr" Mathrafal Prince Powys (age 43) defeated the army of Edmund Mortimer (age 25) at Knighton, Radnorshire [Map], who was captured, at the Battle of Bryn Glas.

King Henry IV of England (age 35) made no attempt to ransom Edmund Mortimer (age 25) and, as a consequence, Edmund Mortimer (age 25) changed his allegiance, and subsequently married Owain's (age 43) daughter.

Walter Devereux (age 41) died from wounds.

The River Teme rises around three miles south of Dolfor [Map] in Powys. For much of its upper course it forms the border between England and Wales. It passes through, or near, Felindre, Radnoshire [Map], Knighton, Radnorshire [Map], Leintwardine, Herefordshire [Map], Bromfield, Shropshire [Map], Ludlow, Shropshire [Map], Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire [Map], Stanford Bridge, Worcestershire [Map], Shelsey Beauchamp, Worcestershire [Map], Leigh, Worcestershire [Map] and Bransford, Worcestershire [Map] after which it joins the River Severn around 3 km south of Worcester, Worcestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Knighton, Felindre [Map]

The River Teme rises around three miles south of Dolfor [Map] in Powys. For much of its upper course it forms the border between England and Wales. It passes through, or near, Felindre, Radnoshire [Map], Knighton, Radnorshire [Map], Leintwardine, Herefordshire [Map], Bromfield, Shropshire [Map], Ludlow, Shropshire [Map], Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire [Map], Stanford Bridge, Worcestershire [Map], Shelsey Beauchamp, Worcestershire [Map], Leigh, Worcestershire [Map] and Bransford, Worcestershire [Map] after which it joins the River Severn around 3 km south of Worcester, Worcestershire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Llanbister Radnorshire

On 22 Nov 1621 Thomas Knightley (age 80) died in Llanbister Radnorshire, Powys. He was buried in St Cynllo's Church Llanbister Radnorshire, Powys.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, St Cynllo's Church Llanbister Radnorshire

On 22 Nov 1621 Thomas Knightley (age 80) died in Llanbister Radnorshire, Powys. He was buried in St Cynllo's Church Llanbister Radnorshire, Powys.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Llanstephan [Map]

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Llanstephan Suspension Bridge [Map]

In 1922 a suspension bridge, known as Lady Milford's Bridge, was built across the nearby River Wye 1922 by David Rowell & Company at Llanstephan Suspension Bridge [Map]. The eponymous Lady Milford was Ethel Georgina Speke Baroness Milford.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Meifod Radnorshire

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, St Tysilio Meifod Radnorshire

In 1160 Madog ap Maredudd Mathrafal Prince Powys died at Whittington Castle, Shropshire [Map]. He was buried at St Tysilio Meifod Radnorshire, Powys.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Newbridge-on-Wye [Map]

Newbridge-on-Wye [Map] was historically a stop off point for drovers, who moved livestock from place to place. Newbridge-on-Wye proved to be an ideal location for drovers to stop and rest because it afforded a safe crossing-point on the River Wye. This led to a settlement forming, including a large number of pubs.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Newtown Radnorshire

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Newtown Radnorshire, Abermule

On 26 Jan 1921 an express and stopping train collided at Abermule, Newtown.

Seventeen people were killed including Herbert Lionel Henry Vane-Tempest (age 58), a director of the railway.

"The driver of the down train was oiling his engine at the moment when the tablet holder was handed to his fireman by relief-stationmaster Lewis. It is clear that neither he nor the fireman could have examined the tablet before the train started from Abermule. It is also clear that neither Lewis, Jones, nor Thompson could have looked at the tablet instrument for the Abermule-Newtown section, otherwise they would have seen the indicator showed that a tablet had been withdrawn for an up train. After the down train had started (about 12.3 p.m.), presumably when he returned to the booking office to send the "entering section" bell signal for the down train to Newtown, and the "out of section" bell signal to Montgomery, the terrible mistake that had been made was discovered by Thompson, and Lewis realised that he had given the Montgomery - Abermule tablet to the down train. Lewis telephoned to Newtown to ask if the express had left, and was informed by Brock that it had left at 11.59 when he had sent the "entering section" bell signal. A vain attempt was made to attract the attention of the enginemen of the down train, by lowering and raising the up distant signal, but probably by the time this was attempted, the train had passed the signal post, about 660 yards from the loop points...

When [fireman] Owen recovered, he found himself on the ground just behind the second vehicle (No. 310) of his train, which was lying across the railway on top of the first. He saw driver Jones on the opposite side just behind and underneath the third vehicle, which was leaning over towards the slope of the cutting. He got across the framing, and found Jones more seriously injured than himself, and anxiously enquiring whether they had the right tablet. He assured him on the point, but a little later, as his driver was still anxious, he went to look for the tablet and crept under the frame of No. 7730 for the purpose. After a little search he found both tablet holders lying on the ground to the left (north) of the track alongside the wreckage of the two engines. He picked them up and found that one of the tablets for the Montgomery-Abermule section had evidently been carried by the down train. He then returned and showed them to his driver to relieve his anxiety. He subsequently handed the tablet holders to traffic controller Morgan, who travelled in the down train. Morgan eventually passed them for custody to chief traffic inspector George. The latter, immediately after the accident, returned on foot to Abermule, where he arrived at 12.18 p.m. and arranged by telephone for the dispatch of medical and nursing assistance from Newtown."

Herbert Lionel Henry Vane-Tempest: On 06 Jul 1862 he was born to George Henry Vane-Tempest 5th Marquess Londonderry and Mary Cornelia Edwards Marchioness Londonderry. The Times. 02 Feb 1905. The funeral of Lord Henry Vane-Tempest took place yesterday in the family vault in St. Peter's, Montgomeryshire. The Bishop of Bangor, assisted by the Rev J. Williams, rector of the parish, and the Rev. S. J. Evans, officiated. The principal mourmers were the Marquis and Marchioness of Londonderry (brother and sister-in-law), Lord Herbert Vane-Tempest (brother), and Mr. Beaumont, M.P., and Lady Aline Beaumont (brother-in-law and sister). Continues. 09 Feb 1915. Times Newspaper Obituaries. The news of the death of the Marquess of Londonderry, which occurred at Wynyard, Stockton-on-Tees, yesterday morning, will be received with profound regret far beyond the circle of his personal friends or of the members of the Unionist Party. Lord Londonderry had not been entirely well for some little time past. For a fortnight, it seems, he had been suffering from sciatica. Last week he caught a chill, from which pneumonia developed. On Sunday his condition was seen to be critical. During the night he collapsed, and the end came at 9.30 yesterday morning. Lady Londonderry, who had been in constant attendance on him during his illness, was present at the last, as also were Lady Ilchester and Lord Herbert Vane-Tempest.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Old Radnor [Map]

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 1. The archbishop proceeded to Radnor [Map], on Ash Wednesday (Caput Jejunii), accompanied by Ranulph de Glanville (age 75), privy counsellor and justiciary of the whole kingdom, and there met Rhys (age 55),11 son of Gruffydd, prince of South Wales, and many other noble personages of those parts; where a sermon being preached by the archbishop, upon the subject of the Crusades, and explained to the Welsh by an interpreter, the author of this Itinerary, impelled by the urgent importunity and promises of the king, and the persuasions of the archbishop and the justiciary, arose the first, and falling down at the feet of the holy man, devoutly took the sign of the cross. His example was instantly followed by Peter, bishop of St. David's,12 a monk of the abbey of Cluny, and then by Eineon, son of Eineon Clyd,13 prince of Elvenia, and many other persons. Eineon rising up, said to Rhys, whose daughter he had married, "My father and lord! with your permission I hasten to revenge the injury offered to the great father of all." Rhys himself was so fully determined upon the holy peregrination, as soon as the archbishop should enter his territories on his return, that for nearly fifteen days he was employed with great solicitude in making the necessary preparations for so distant a journey; till his wife, and, according to the common vicious licence of the country, his relation in the fourth degree, Guendolena, (Gwenllian), daughter of Madoc, prince of Powys, by female artifices diverted him wholly from his noble purpose; since, as Solomon says, "A man's heart deviseth his way, but the Lord directeth his steps." As Rhys before his departure was conversing with his friends concerning the things he had heard, a distinguished young man of his family, by name Gruffydd, and who afterwards took the cross, is said thus to have answered: "What man of spirit can refuse to undertake this journey, since, amongst all imaginable inconveniences, nothing worse can happen to any one than to return."

Note 11. Rhys ap Gruffydd (age 55) was grandson to Rhys ap Tewdwr, prince of South Wales, who, in 1090 [Note. 1093?], was slain in an engagement with the Normans. He was a prince of great talent, but great versatility of character, and made a conspicuous figure in Welsh history. He died in 1196, and was buried in the cathedral of St. David's [Map]; where his [Rhys ap Gruffydd's (age 55)] effigy, as well as that of his son Rhys Gryg (age 22), still remain in a good state of preservation.

Note 12. Peter de Leia, prior of the Benedictine monastery of Wenlock [Map], in Shropshire, was the successful rival of Giraldus for the bishopric of Saint David's, vacant by the death of David Fitzgerald, the uncle of our author; but he did not obtain his promotion without considerable opposition from the canons, who submitted to the absolute sequestration of their property before they consented to his election, being desirous that the nephew should have succeeded his uncle. He was consecrated in 1176, and died in 1199.

Note 13. In the Latin of Giraldus, the name of Eineon is represented by Aeneas, and Eineon Clyd by Aeneas Claudius.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Powis Castle

In 1447 Gruffudd Vychan (age 52) was beheaded at Powis Castle.

Around 1573 William Herbert 1st Baron Powis was born to Edward Herbert (age 26) and Mary Stanley (age 23) at Powis Castle.

On 15 Apr 1822 Percy Egerton Herbert was born to Edward Herbert 2nd Earl Powis (age 37) and Lucy Graham Countess Powis (age 28) at Powis Castle.

On 24 Jun 1827 Robert Charles Herbert was born to Edward Herbert 2nd Earl Powis (age 42) and Lucy Graham Countess Powis (age 33) at Powis Castle.

On 17 Jan 1848 Edward Herbert 2nd Earl Powis (age 62) died. he had been shot accidentally in the thigh ten days before by his son George Herbert (age 22) during a pheasant shoot at Powis Castle. He died His son Edward Herbert 3rd Earl Powis (age 29) succeeded 3rd Earl Powis.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Rhayader [Map]

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Rhayader, Nant-Gwillt

1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. Sep 1811 to Feb 1813. [Percy Bysshe Shelley] ... sailed thence to Dublin, where Shelley was eager, and in some degree prominent, in the good cause of Catholic emancipation, conjoined with repeal of the union; crossed to Wales, and lived at Nant-Gwillt, near Rhayader, then at Lynmouth [Map] in Devonshire, then at Tanyrallt in Carnarvonshire. All this was between September 1811 and February 1813. At Lynmouth an Irish servant of Shelley's was sentenced to six months' imprisonment for distributing and posting up printed papers, bearing no printer's name, of an inflammatory or seditious tendency - being a Declaration of Rights composed by the youthful reformer, and some verses of his named The Devil's Walk. At Tanyrallt Shelley was (according to his own and Harriet's account, confirmed by the evidence of Miss Westbrook, the elder sister, who continued an inmate in most of their homes) attacked on the night of 26th February by an assassin who fired three pistol-shots. It was either a human assassin or (as Shelley once said) " the devil." The motive of the attack was undefined; the fact of its occurrence was generally disbelieved, both at the time and by subsequent inquirers. Shelley was full of wild unpractical notions; he dosed himself occasionally with laudanum as a palliative to spasmodic pains; he was given to strange assertions and romancing narratives (several of which might properly be specified here but for want of space), and was not incapable of conscious fibbing. His mind no doubt oscillated at times along the line which divides sanity from insane delusion. It is now, however, at last proved that he did not invent such a monstrous story to serve a purpose. The Century Magazine for October 1905 contained an article entitled "A Strange Adventure of Shelley's," by Margaret L. Croft, which shows that a shepherd close to Tanyrallt, named Robin Pant Evan, being irritated by some well-meant acts of Shelley in terminating the lives of dying or diseased sheep, did really combine with two other shepherds to scare the poet, and Evan was the person who played the part of "assassin." He himself avowed as much to members of a family, Greaves, who were living at Tanyrallt between 1847 and 1865. This was the break-up of the residence of the Shelleys at Tanyrallt; they revisited Ireland, and then settled for a while in London.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Rhayader Castle [Map]

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 1. At Elevein, in the church of Glascum [Map],20 is a portable bell, endowed with great virtues, called Bangu,21 and said to have belonged to Saint David. A certain woman secretly conveyed this bell to her husband, who was confined in the castle of Raidergwy [Map],22 near Warthrenion, (which Rhys, son of Gruffydd, had lately built) for the purpose of his deliverance. The keepers of the castle not only refused to liberate him for this consideration, but seized and detained the bell; and in the same night, by divine vengeance, the whole town, except the wall on which the bell hung, was consumed by fire.

Note 20. Glascum is a small village in a mountainous and retired situation between Builth and Kington, in Herefordshire.

Note 21. Bangu. This was a hand bell kept in all the Welsh churches, which the clerk or sexton took to the house of the deceased on the day of the funeral: when the procession began, a psalm was sung; the bellman then sounded his bell in a solemn manner for some time, till another psalm was concluded; and he again sounded it at intervals, till the funeral arrived at the church.

Note 22. Rhaiadyr [Map], called also Rhaiader-gwy, is a small village and market-town in Radnorshire. The site only of the castle, built by prince Rhys, A.D. 1178, now remains at a short distance from the village; it was strongly situated on a natural rock above the river Wye, which, below the bridge, forms a cataract.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, St Harmon

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, St Harmon, St Garmon's Church [Map]

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 1. In this same province of Warthrenion, and in the church of Saint Germanus [Map],18 there is a staff of Saint Cyric,19 covered on all sides with gold and silver, and resembling in its upper part the form of a cross; its efficacy has been proved in many cases, but particularly in the removal of glandular and strumous swellings; insomuch that all persons afflicted with these complaints, on a devout application to the staff, with the oblation of one penny, are restored to health. But it happened in these our days, that a strumous patient on presenting one halfpenny to the staff, the humour subsided only in the middle; but when the oblation was completed by the other halfpenny, an entire cure was accomplished. Another person also coming to the staff with the promise of a penny, was cured; but not fulfilling his engagement on the day appointed, he relapsed into his former disorder; in order, however, to obtain pardon for his offence, he tripled the offering by presenting three-pence, and thus obtained a complete cure.

Note 18. The church of Saint Germanus [Map] is now known by the name of Saint Harmans, and is situated three or four miles from Rhaiadyr, in Radnorshire, on the right-hand of the road from thence to Llanidloes; it is a small and simple structure, placed on a little eminence, in a dreary plain surrounded by mountains.

Note 19. Several churches in Wales have been dedicated to Saint Curig, who came into Wales in the seventh century.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Welshpool [Map]

Around 1547 Edward Herbert was born to William Herbert 1st Earl Pembroke (age 46) and Anne Parr Countess Pembroke (age 31) at Welshpool [Map].

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Welshpool, St Mary's Church

On 10 Sep 1772 Henry Herbert 1st Earl Powis (age 69) died at Bath, Somerset [Map]. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Welshpool. His son George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis (age 17) succeeded 2nd Earl Powis.

On 16 Jan 1801 George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert 2nd Earl Powis (age 45) died at York House Hotel Albermarle Street. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Welshpool. Earl Powis extinct. In 1784 his sister Henrietta Antonia Herbert 3rd Countess Powis (age 42) had married Edward Clive 1st Earl Powis (age 46) who was created Earl Powis in 1784.

On 07 May 1891 Edward Herbert 3rd Earl Powis (age 72) died unmarried at 45 Berkeley Square, Mayfair. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Welshpool. His nephew George Herbert 4th Earl Powis (age 28) succeeded 4th Earl Powis. Violet Ida Evelyn Lane-Fox Countess Powis (age 26) by marriage Countess Powis.

On 23 Mar 1943 Mervyn Horatio Herbert 17th Baron Darcy of Knayth (age 38) died whilst on active service. He was buried at St Mary's Church, Welshpool.

He was participating in a training night exercise when his Mosquito intercepted a Stirling bomber returning from a leaflet dropping raid in Europe, following which the Mosquito crashed into the ground near Manningtree [Map], killing both Herbert and his navigator Albert Eastwood; possibly a friendly fire incident?

Davina Darcy 18th Baroness Darcy of Knayth (age 4) succeeded 18th Baroness Darcy of Knayth.

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Welshpool, Strata Marcella [Map]

The Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales: Book 1 Chapter 5. It is worthy of remark, that Barnabas placed the Gospel of St. Matthew upon sick persons, and they were healed; from which, as well as from the foregoing circumstance, it appears how great a dignity and reverence is due to the sacred books of the gospel, and with what danger and risk of damnation every one who swears falsely by them, deviates from the paths of truth. The fall of Enoch, abbot of Strata Marcella [Map],70 too well known in Wales, was revealed to many the day after it happened, by Melerius, who, being asked how he knew this circumstance, said, that a demon came to him disguised as a hunter, and, exulting in the prospect of such a victory, foretold the ruin of the abbot, and explained in what manner he would make him run away with a nun from the monastery. The end in view was probably the humiliation and correction of the abbot, as was proved from his shortly returning home so humbled and amended, that he scarcely could be said to have erred. Seneca says, "He falls not badly, who rises stronger from his fall." Peter was more strenuous after his denial of Christ, and Paul after being stoned; since, where sin abounds, there will grace also superabound. Mary Magdalen was strengthened after her frailty. He secretly revealed to Canon, the good and religious abbot of Alba-domus, his opinion of a certain woman whom he had seen; upon which the holy man confessed, with tears in his eyes, his predilection for her, and received from three priests the discipline of incontinence. For as that long and experienced subtle enemy, by arguing from certain conjectural signs, may foretell future by past events, so by insidious treachery and contrivance, added to exterior appearances, he may sometimes be able to discover the interior workings of the mind.

Note 70. The Cistercian abbey here alluded to was known by the several names of Ystrat Marchel, Strata Marcella [Map], Alba domus de Stratmargel, Vallis Crucis, or Pola, and was situated between Guilsfield and Welshpool, in Montgomeryshire. Authors differ in opinion about its original founder. Leland attributes it to Owen Cyveilioc, prince of Powys, and Dugdale to Madoc, the son of Gruffydh, giving for his authority the original grants and endowments of this abbey. According to Tanner, about the beginning of the reign of king Edward III., the Welsh monks were removed from hence into English abbeys, and English monks were placed here, and the abbey was made subject to the visitation of the abbot and convent of Buildwas, in Shropshire.

In 1197 Owain Cyfeiliog Mathrafal (age 67) died. He was buried at Strata Marcella [Map].

Europe, British Isles, Wales, Powys, Radnorshire, Wenwynwyn

Around 1286 Gruffydd ap Gwenwynwyn Mathrafal Prince Powys Wenwynwyn (age 75) died at Wenwynwyn.