History of Essex

On 19 May 1739 Jeremiah Dummer 1681-1739 (58) died at Essex.

Barking

On 21 Aug 1763 General Isaac Gascoyne 1763-1841 was born to Bamber Gascoyne 1725-1791 (38) at Barking.

1829. James Lonsdale Painter 1777-1839 (51). Portrait of General Isaac Gascoyne 1763-1841 (65).

All Hallows, Barking

All Hallows-by-the-Tower Church, All Hallows, Barking

On 10 Aug 1546 William Thynne -1546 died. He was buried at All Hallows-by-the-Tower Church, All Hallows, Barking.

On 26 Dec 1761 Crisp Gascoyne Lord Mayor London 1700-1761 (61) died. He was buried on 04 Jan 1762 in All Hallows-by-the-Tower Church, All Hallows, Barking.

Customs House, All Hallows, Barking

Wriothesley's Chronicle Volume 1 Henry VII. 1506. This yeare a great parte of the cittie of Norwich was burnt, and the towne of Berkwaye more then halfe burnt. Also a great fier in London betwene the Custome Howsse and Billinsgate, that did great hurte.

Barking Abbey

In 1252 Christine de Boseham was elected Abbot Barking.

1258. Letter XIII. Matilda Prioress of the Convent of Barking to Henry III. 1258. Letter XIII. Matilda Prioress of the Convent of Barking to Henry III (50).
To her most excellent lord Henry, by God's grace illustrious king of England, lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, Matilda, humble prioress of Barking, and of the convent of the same place, wishes health, with due reverence and honour, and the suflFrages of her prayers.
Since the lady our mother, venerable for her religion, the lady Christina, late abbess of our house, did on the Monday next after the Feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, in the forty-third year of your reign, of her own good and spontaneous will, yield up the government of the said abbey, on account of the infirmity and debility of her body, and was absolved from it by our venerable father Foulk, bishop of London (69), we now, being destitute of the solace of an abbess, send to you our beloved sisters and fellow-nuns, Roesia de Argentes, Joanna de Wantham, and Agnes Costentin, humbly and de voutly supplicating that the bowels of your compassion may be moved towards us, and that the condescension of your mercy will grant us permission to elect some other as our abbess, so that henceforth you may receive from the highest retributor a worthy reward, and we may be henceforth obligated more specially to ofier up the merited suflfrages of our prayers for you and yours. Given at Barking the Tuesday after the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, in the forty-third year of your reign.

On 13 Dec 1258 Maud de Leveland was elected Abbot Barking.

On 20 Apr 1377 Maud Montagu Abbess Barking was elected Abbot Barking.

Katherine Pole Abbot Barking -1473 was appointed Abbot Barking.

Church of St Margaret of Antioch, Barking

On 11 Sep 1625 Charles Montagu 1564-1625 (61) died. He was buried in Church of St Margaret of Antioch, Barking where there is a. Monument depicting him in a tent.

Custom House

John Evelyn's Diary 1671 September. 22 Sep 1671. I dined at the Treasurer's (41), where I had discourse with Sir Henry Jones (now come over to raise a regiment of horse), concerning the French conquests in Lorraine; he told me the King (41) sold all things to the soldiers, even to a handful of hay.
Lord Sunderland (30) was now nominated Ambassador to Spain.
After dinner, the Treasurer (41) carried me to Lincoln's Inn, to one of the Parliament Clerks, to obtain of him, that I might carry home and peruse, some of the Journals, which were, accordingly, delivered to me to examine about the late Dutch War. Returning home, I went on shore to see the Custom House, now newly rebuilt since the dreadful conflagration.

Barrington

Barrington Hall, Barrington

Belchamp St Paul

Around 1526 Margery Golding Countess Oxford 1526-1568 was born in Belchamp St Paul.

On 01 Aug 1548 John Vere 16th Earl Oxford 1516-1562 (32) and Margery Golding Countess Oxford 1526-1568 (22) were married at Belchamp St Paul. Margery Golding Countess Oxford 1526-1568 (22) by marriage Countess Oxford (2C 1141).

Blackmore

Blackwall

John Evelyn's Diary 1662 January. 16th January 1662. Having notice of the Duke of York's (28) intention to visit my poor habitation and garden this day, I returned, when he was pleased to do me that honor of his own accord, and to stay some time viewing such things as I had to entertain his curiosity. Afterward he caused me to dine with him at the Treasurer of the Navy's house, and to sit with him covered at the same table. There were his Highness (28), the Duke of Ormond (51), and several Lords. Then they viewed some of my grounds about a project for a receptacle for ships to be moored in, which was laid aside as a fancy of Sir Nicholas Crisp (63). After this, I accompanied the Duke (28) to an East India vessel that lay at Blackwall, where we had entertainment of several curiosities. Among other spirituous drinks, as punch, etc., they gave us Canary that had been carried to and brought from the Indies, which was indeed incomparably good. I returned to London with his Highness (28). This night was acted before his Majesty (31) "The Widow," a lewd play.

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 October. 09 Oct 1676. I went with Mrs. Godolphin (24) and my wife (41) to Blackwall, to see some Indian curiosities; the streets being slippery, I fell against a piece of timber with such violence that I could not speak nor fetch my breath for some space; being carried into a house and let blood, I was removed to the water-side and so home, where, after a day's rest, I recovered. This being one of my greatest deliverances, the Lord Jesus make me ever mindful and thankful!.

In 1673. Unknown Artist, possibly Matthew Dixon. Portrait of Margaret Blagge Maid of Honour 1652-1678 (20).

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 October. 31 Oct 1676. Being my birthday, and fifty-six years old, I spent the morning in devotion and imploring God's protection, with solemn thanksgiving for all his signal mercies to me, especially for that escape which concerned me this month at Blackwall. Dined with Mrs. Godolphin (24), and returned home through a prodigious and dangerous mist.

Boreham

On 14 Dec 1593 Henry Radclyffe 4th Earl of Sussex 1532-1593 (61) died. He was buried at Boreham. His son Robert Radclyffe 5th Earl of Sussex 1573-1629 (20) succeeded 5th Earl of Sussex.

Around 1580 based on a work of 1565.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Robert Radclyffe 5th Earl of Sussex 1573-1629 (6) wearing his Garter Collar and holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

Borley

On 18 Oct 1599 Frances Neville 1519-1599 (80) died at Borley.

Bradwell

In 1241 Roger Acquigny 1180-1241 (61) died at Bradwell.

Before 1284 Florence Acquigny 1222-1283 died at Bradwell.

Bradwell Juxta Coggleshall

In 1276 Thomas Dagworth 1st Baron Dagworth 1276-1352 was born at Bradwell Juxta Coggleshall.

Braintree

Halstead, Braintree

Brentwood

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 December. 23d December, 1658. I went with my wife (23) to keep Christmas at my cousin, George Tuke's, at Cressing Temple, in Essex. Lay that night at Brentwood.

Bruyn

On 16 May 1571 George Tyrrell 1530-1571 (41) died at Bruyn.

Chelmsford

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 July. 10th July 1656. I returned homeward, passing again through Colchester; and, by the way, near the ancient town of Chelmsford, saw New Hall, built in a park by Henry VII. and VIII., and given by Queen Elizabeth to the Earl of Sussex, who sold it to the late great Duke of Buckingham, and since seized on by Oliver Cromwell (57) (pretended Protector). It is a fair old house, built with brick, low, being only of two stories, as the manner then was; the gate-house better; the court, large and pretty; the staircase, of extraordinary wideness, with a piece representing Sir Francis Drake's action in the year 1580, an excellent sea-piece; the galleries are trifling; the hall is noble; the garden a fair plot, and the whole seat well accommodated with water; but, above all, I admired the fair avenue planted with stately lime trees, in four rows, for near a mile in length. It has three descents, which is the only fault, and may be reformed. There is another fair walk of the same at the mall and wilderness, with a tennis-court, and pleasant terrace toward the park, which was well stored with deer and ponds.

George Seymour was born to John Seymour 1425-1463 and Elizabeth Coker at Chelmsford.

Chrishall

Around 1357 Joan Cobham 1337-1357 (20) died at Chrishall.

On 31 May 1379 John Pole 1339-1379 (40) died at Chrishall.

Clavering

In 1144 John Fitzrichard 6th Baron Halton 1144-1190 was born to Richard Fitzeustace 1120-1163 (24) and Albreda Lissours 5th Baroness Pontefract -1194 at Clavering.

Around 1240 Robert Fitzroger 5th Baron Warkworth 1240-1310 was born to Roger Fitzjohn 4th Baron Warkworth -1249 at Clavering.

On 29 Apr 1310 Robert Fitzroger 5th Baron Warkworth 1240-1310 (70) died at Clavering.

In 1329 Margaret Zouche Baroness Warkworth 1251-1329 (73) died at Clavering.

Colchester

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 1648 May. 30th May 1648. There was a rising now in Kent, my Lord of Norwich (63) being at the head of them. Their first rendezvous was in Broome-field, next my house at Sayes Court, whence they went to Maidstone, and so to Colchester, where was that memorable siege.

On 28 Aug 1648 Colchester surrendered to Parliament forces after a three month siege.
Charles Lucas 1613-1648 and George Lisle surrendered, subjected to a trial and were shot and killed in Colchester Castle, Colchester.

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 July. 8th July 1656. To Colchester, a fair town, but now wretchedly demolished by the late siege, especially the suburbs, which were all burned, but were then repairing. The town is built on a rising ground, having fair meadows on one side, and a river with a strong ancient castle, said to have been built by King Coilus, father of Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, of whom I find no memory save at the pinnacle of one of their wool-staple houses, where is a statue of Coilus, in wood, wretchedly carved. The walls are exceedingly strong, deeply trenched, and filled with earth. It has six gates, and some watchtowers, and some handsome churches. But what was shown us as a kind of miracle, at the outside of the Castle, the wall where Sir Charles Lucas and Sir George Lisle, those valiant and noble persons who so bravely behaved themselves in the last siege, were barbarously shot, murdered by Ireton in cold blood, after surrendering on articles; having been disappointed of relief from the Scotch army, which had been defeated with the King at Worcester. The place was bare of grass for a large space, all the rest of it abounding with herbage. For the rest, this is a ragged and factious town, now swarming with sectaries. Their trading is in cloth with the Dutch, and baize and says with Spain; it is the only place in England where these stuffs are made unsophisticated. It is also famous for oysters and eringo root, growing hereabout, and candied for sale.
Went to Dedham, a pretty country town, having a very fair church, finely situated, the valley well watered. Here, I met with Dr. Stokes, a young gentleman, but an excellent mathematician. This is a clothing town, as most are in Essex, but lies in the unwholesome hundreds.
Hence to Ipswich, doubtless one of the sweetest, most pleasant, well-built towns in England. It has twelve fair churches, many noble houses, especially the Lord Devereux's; a brave quay, and commodious harbor, being about seven miles from the main; an ample market place. Here was born the great Cardinal Wolsey, who began a palace here, which was not finished.
I had the curiosity to visit some Quakers here in prison; a new fanatic sect, of dangerous principles, who show no respect to any man, magistrate, or other, and seem a melancholy, proud sort of people, and exceedingly ignorant. One of these was said to have fasted twenty days; but another, endeavoring to do the like, perished on the 10th, when he would have eaten, but could not.

Around 1590 based on a work of around 1520.Unknown Artist. French. Portrait of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey 1473-1530.

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 July. 10th July 1656. I returned homeward, passing again through Colchester; and, by the way, near the ancient town of Chelmsford, saw New Hall, built in a park by Henry VII. and VIII., and given by Queen Elizabeth to the Earl of Sussex, who sold it to the late great Duke of Buckingham, and since seized on by Oliver Cromwell (57) (pretended Protector). It is a fair old house, built with brick, low, being only of two stories, as the manner then was; the gate-house better; the court, large and pretty; the staircase, of extraordinary wideness, with a piece representing Sir Francis Drake's action in the year 1580, an excellent sea-piece; the galleries are trifling; the hall is noble; the garden a fair plot, and the whole seat well accommodated with water; but, above all, I admired the fair avenue planted with stately lime trees, in four rows, for near a mile in length. It has three descents, which is the only fault, and may be reformed. There is another fair walk of the same at the mall and wilderness, with a tennis-court, and pleasant terrace toward the park, which was well stored with deer and ponds.

Colchester Castle, Colchester

Siege of Colchester

On 28 Aug 1648 Colchester surrendered to Parliament forces after a three month siege.
Charles Lucas 1613-1648 and George Lisle surrendered, subjected to a trial and were shot and killed in Colchester Castle, Colchester.

Colne Priory

On 24 Jan 1360 John Vere 7th Earl Oxford 1312-1360 (47) died. He was buried at Colne Priory. His son Thomas Vere 8th Earl Oxford 1336-1371 (24) succeeded 8th Earl Oxford (2C 1141).

On 10 Mar 1513 John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (70) died at Hedingham Castle. He was buried at Colne Priory. His nephew John Vere 14th Earl Oxford 1499-1526 (13) succeeded 14th Earl Oxford (2C 1141).

On 14 Jul 1526 John Vere 14th Earl Oxford 1499-1526 (26) died. He was buried at Colne Priory. His second-cousin John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (55) succeeded 15th Earl Oxford (2C 1141). Christian Foderingay Countess Oxford 1481-1498 by marriage Countess Oxford (2C 1141).

Cressing Temple

John Evelyn's Diary 1658 December. 23d December, 1658. I went with my wife (23) to keep Christmas at my cousin, George Tuke's, at Cressing Temple, in Essex. Lay that night at Brentwood.

Dagenham

Valence House, Dagenham

Valence House Museum, Valence House, Dagenham

Danbury

Around 1478 Roger Darcy 1478-1508 was born to Thomas Darcy 1458-1485 (19) at Danbury.

In 1503 Richard Southwell 1503-1564 was born to Francis Southwell 1476-1512 (27) and Dorothy Tendering 1478-1520 (25) at Danbury.

Around 1575 based on a work of 1536.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Richard Southwell 1503-1564.

Around 1524 Mary Darcy 1524-1564 was born to Thomas Darcy 1st Baron Darcy Chiche 1506-1558 (17) and Elizabeth Vere Baroness Darcy Chiche 1512- at Danbury.

In 1540 Richard Southwell 1540-1600 was born to Richard Southwell 1503-1564 (37) and Thomasine Darcy 1507- at Danbury.

In 1540 Richard Southwell 1503-1564 (37) and Thomasine Darcy 1507- were married at Danbury.

Around 1544 Catherine Southwell 1544-1611 was born to Richard Southwell 1503-1564 (41) and Thomasine Darcy 1507- at Danbury.

Around 1549 Thomas Southwell 1549-1609 was born to Richard Southwell 1503-1564 (46) and Thomasine Darcy 1507- at Danbury.

After 1573 John Wentworth 1540-1588 and Dorothy Southwell 1543- were married at Danbury.

Danbury Place, Danbury

Debden

On 26 Mar 1613 Henry "Younger" Vane 1613-1662 was baptised at Debden.

Dedham

Siege of Colchester

John Evelyn's Diary 1656 July. 8th July 1656. To Colchester, a fair town, but now wretchedly demolished by the late siege, especially the suburbs, which were all burned, but were then repairing. The town is built on a rising ground, having fair meadows on one side, and a river with a strong ancient castle, said to have been built by King Coilus, father of Helena, mother of Constantine the Great, of whom I find no memory save at the pinnacle of one of their wool-staple houses, where is a statue of Coilus, in wood, wretchedly carved. The walls are exceedingly strong, deeply trenched, and filled with earth. It has six gates, and some watchtowers, and some handsome churches. But what was shown us as a kind of miracle, at the outside of the Castle, the wall where Sir Charles Lucas and Sir George Lisle, those valiant and noble persons who so bravely behaved themselves in the last siege, were barbarously shot, murdered by Ireton in cold blood, after surrendering on articles; having been disappointed of relief from the Scotch army, which had been defeated with the King at Worcester. The place was bare of grass for a large space, all the rest of it abounding with herbage. For the rest, this is a ragged and factious town, now swarming with sectaries. Their trading is in cloth with the Dutch, and baize and says with Spain; it is the only place in England where these stuffs are made unsophisticated. It is also famous for oysters and eringo root, growing hereabout, and candied for sale.
Went to Dedham, a pretty country town, having a very fair church, finely situated, the valley well watered. Here, I met with Dr. Stokes, a young gentleman, but an excellent mathematician. This is a clothing town, as most are in Essex, but lies in the unwholesome hundreds.
Hence to Ipswich, doubtless one of the sweetest, most pleasant, well-built towns in England. It has twelve fair churches, many noble houses, especially the Lord Devereux's; a brave quay, and commodious harbor, being about seven miles from the main; an ample market place. Here was born the great Cardinal Wolsey, who began a palace here, which was not finished.
I had the curiosity to visit some Quakers here in prison; a new fanatic sect, of dangerous principles, who show no respect to any man, magistrate, or other, and seem a melancholy, proud sort of people, and exceedingly ignorant. One of these was said to have fasted twenty days; but another, endeavoring to do the like, perished on the 10th, when he would have eaten, but could not.

Around 1590 based on a work of around 1520.Unknown Artist. French. Portrait of Cardinal Thomas Wolsey 1473-1530.

Earls Colne

On Dec 1263 Hugh Vere 4th Earl Oxford 1208-1263 (55) died. He was buried at Earls Colne. His son Robert Vere 5th Earl Oxford 1240-1296 (23) succeeded 5th Earl Oxford (2C 1141).

In 1420 Ralph Audley 1420-1485 was born at Earls Colne.

Around 1450 Geoffrey Audley 1450-1504 was born to Ralph Audley 1420-1485 (30) at Earls Colne.

Around 1488 Thomas Audley 1st Baron Audley Waldon 1488-1544 was born to Geoffrey Audley 1450-1504 (38) at Earls Colne.

East Horndon

On 04 Apr 1541 John Tyrrell 1508-1541 (33) died at East Horndon.

Elsenham

On 03 Mar 1322 Geoffrey Saye 1st Baron Say 1281-1322 (40) died at Elsenham. On 03 Mar 1322 His son Geoffrey Saye 2nd Baron Say 1309-1359 (13) succeeded 2nd Baron Say (1C 1313).

Epping

Copt Hall, Epping

In 1532 Thomas Heneage 1532-1595 was born to Robert Heneage 1500-1556 (32) at Copt Hall, Epping.

Epping Forest

John Evelyn's Diary 1669 September. 02 Sep 1669. I was this day very ill of a pain in my limbs, which continued most of this week, and was increased by a visit I made to my old acquaintance, the Earl of Norwich (54), at his house in Epping Forest, where are many good pictures put into the wainscot of the rooms, which Mr. Baker, his Lordship's predecessor there, brought out of Spain; especially the History of Joseph, a picture of the pious and learned Picus Mirandula, and an incomparable one of old Breugel. The gardens were well understood, I mean the potager. I returned late in the evening, ferrying over the water at Greenwich.

John Evelyn's Diary 1683 March. 16 Mar 1683. I went to see Sir Josiah Child's (52) prodigious cost in planting walnut trees about his seat, and making fish ponds, many miles in circuit, in Epping Forest, in a barren spot, as oftentimes these suddenly monied men for the most part seat themselves. He from a merchant's apprentice, and management of the East India Company's stock, being arrived to an estate (it is said) of £200,000; and lately married his daughter (17) to the eldest son (22) of the Duke of Beaufort, late Marquis of Worcester, with £50,000 portional present, and various expectations.
I dined at Mr. Houblon's (53), a rich and gentle French merchant, who was building a house in the Forest, near Sir J. Child's (52), in a place where the late Earl of Norwich dwelt some time, and which came from his lady, the widow of Mr. Baker. It will be a pretty villa, about five miles from Whitechapel.

Faulkbourne

On 05 Jul 1449 John Montgomery -1449 died at Faulkbourne.

John Montgomery -1449 was born at Faulkbourne.

Felstead

Felstead School, Felstead

Around 1645 Hender Robartes 1635-1688 (9) educated at Felstead School, Felstead.

Around 1646 Robert Robartes 1634-1682 (11) educated at Felstead School, Felstead.

Finchingfield

On 07 Jul 1585 Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel, 4th Earl Surrey, 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 was born to Philip Howard 20th Earl Arundel 1557-1595 (28) and Anne Dacre Countess Arundel 1557-1630 (28) at Finchingfield.

Frinton Manor

In Aug 1734 George Lynn 1707-1758 (27) and Forename Not Known Bellamy were married by which he came into possession of Frinton Manor.

Gaynes Park

Gosfield

Around 1460 Roger Wentworth 1460-1528 was born to Henry Wentworth 1429-1483 (31) and Elizabeth Howard 1421-1483 (42) at Gosfield.

In 1496 Henry Wentworth 1496-1545 was born to Roger Wentworth 1460-1528 (36) and Anne Tyrrell 1480-1534 (16) at Gosfield.

In 1564 John Wentworth 1564-1613 was born to John Wentworth 1540-1588 (24) and Dorothy Southwell 1543- at Gosfield.

Before 10 Aug 1593 Cecily Wentworth Countess Winchelsea 1593-1642 was born to John Wentworth 1564-1613 and Cicely Unton 1561-1618. On 10 Aug 1593 Cecily Wentworth Countess Winchelsea 1593-1642 was baptised in Gosfield.

On 10 Feb 1613 John Wentworth 1564-1613 (49) died at Gosfield.

Great Hallingbury

On 27 Nov 1556 Henry Parker 11th Baron Marshal, 10th Baron Morley 1481-1556 (75) died at Great Hallingbury. His grandson Henry Parker 12th Baron Marshal, 11th Baron Morley 1533-1577 (23) succeeded 12th Baron Marshal, 11th Baron Morley.

On 01 Jul 1622 William Parker 4th Baron Monteagle, 14th Baron Marshal, 13th Baron Morley 1575-1622 (47) died at Great Hallingbury. His son Henry Parker 15th Baron Marshal, 14th Baron Morley, 5th Baron Monteagle 1600-1655 (22) succeeded 15th Baron Marshal, 14th Baron Morley.

Great Thornton

Around 1390 James Tyrrell 1290-1390 (100) died at Great Thornton.

Harwich

The Chronicles of Froissart Chapter X - How that the queen Isabel arrived in England with sir John of Hainault in her company. 1326. THUS was sir John of Hainault (38) moved in his courage and made his assembly, and prayed the Hainowes to be ready at Hal, and the Brabances at Breda, and the Hollanders to be at Dordrecht at a day limited. Then the queen of England (31) took leave of the earl of Hainault (40) and of the countess (32), and thanked them greatly of their honour, feast and good cheer that they had made her, kissing them at her departing. Thus this lady (31) departed and her son (13) and all her company with Sir John of Hainault (38), who with great pain gat leave of his brother, saying to him: 'My lord and brother, I am young and think that God hath purveyed for me this enterprise for mine advancement. I believe and think verily that wrongfully and sinfully this lady hath been chased out of England, and also her son. It is alms and glory to God and to the world to comfort and help them that be comfortless, and specially so high and so noble a lady as this is, who is daughter to a king and descended of a royal king; we be of her blood and she of ours. I had rather renounce and forsake all that I have and go serve God over the sea and never to return into this country, rather than this good lady should have departed from us without comfort and help. Therefore, dear brother, suffer me to go with your good-will, wherein ye shall do nobly, and I shall humbly thank you thereof, and the better thereby I shall accomplish all the voyage.' And when the good earl of Hainault had well heard his brother (38), and perceived the great desire that he had to his enterprise, and saw well it might turn him and his heirs to great honour hereafter, said to him: 'My fair brother, God forbid that your good purpose should be broken or let: therefore in the name of God I give you leave'; and kissed him, straining him by the hand in sign of great love. Thus he departed and rode the same night to Mons in Hainault with the queen of England (31). What should I make long process? They did so much by their journeys that they came to Dordrecht in Holland, whereas their special assembly was made. And there they purveyed for ships great and small, such as they could get, and shipped their horses and harness and purveyance, and so commended themselves into the keeping of God and took their passage by sea. In Sanses de Boussoit, the lord of Vertaing, the lord of Potelle, the lord Villers, the' lord of Hennin, the lord of Sars, the lord of Bousies, the lord of Aubrecicourt, the lord of Estrumel, and sir Wulfart of Ghistelles, and divers other knights and squires, all in great desire to serve their master. And when they were all departed from the haven of Dordrecht, it was a fair fleet as for the quantity, and well ordered, the season was fair and clear and right temperate, and at their departing with the first flood they came before the dikes of Holland; and the next day they drew up their sails and took their way in coasting Zealand ; and their intents were to have, taken land at Dongport ;1 but they could not, for a tempest took them in the sea, that put them so far out of their course that they wist not of two days where they were: of the which God did them great grace, for if they had taken land at the port whereas they had thought, they had been all lost, for they had fallen in the hands of their enemies, who knew well of their coming, and abode them there to have put them all to death. So it was that about the end of two days the tempest ceased, and the mariners perceived land in England and drew to that part right joyously, and there took land on the sands without any right haven or port at Harwich, as the English chronicle saith, the 24th day of September, the year of our Lord MCCCXXVI., and so abode on the sands three days with little purveyance of victual, and unshipped their horses and harness, nor they wist not in what part of England they were in, other in the power of their friends or in the power of their enemies. On the fourth day they took forth their way in the adventure of God and of Saint George, as such people as had suffered great disease of cold by night and hunger and great fear, whereof they were not as then clean rid. And so they rode forth by hills and dales on the one side and on the other, till at the last they found villages and a great abbey of black monks, the which is called SaintEdmund, whereas they three days refreshed themselves.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 10th September 1677. To divert me, my Lord (59) would needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with one Mr. Mann by the way, who was Recorder of the town. There were in our company my Lord Huntingtower (28), son to the Duchess of Lauderdale (50), Sir Edward Bacon, a learned gentleman of the family of the great Chancellor Verulam, and Sir John Felton, with some other knights and gentlemen. After dinner came the bailiff and magistrates in their formalities with their maces to compliment my Lord (59), and invite him to the town-house, where they presented us a collation of dried sweetmeats and wine, the bells ringing, etc. Then, we went to see the town, and first, the Lord Viscount Hereford's (3) house, which stands in a park near the town, like that at Brussels, in Flanders; the house not great, yet pretty, especially the hall. The stews for fish succeeded one another, and feed one the other, all paved at bottom. There is a good picture of the blessed virgin in one of the parlors, seeming to be of Holbein, or some good master. Then we saw the Haven, seven miles from Harwich. The tide runs out every day, but the bedding being soft mud, it is safe for shipping and a station. The trade of Ipswich is for the most part Newcastle on Tyne coals, with which they supply London; but it was formerly a clothing town. There is not any beggar asks alms in the whole place, a thing very extraordinary, so ordered by the prudence of the magistrates. It has in it fourteen or fifteen beautiful churches: in a word, it is for building, cleanness, and good order, one of the best towns in England. Cardinal Wolsey was a butcher's son of Ipswich, but there is little of that magnificent Prelate's foundation here, besides a school and I think a library, which I did not see. His intentions were to build some great thing. We returned late to Euston, having traveled about fifty miles this day.
Since first I was at this place, I found things exceedingly improved. It is seated in a bottom between two graceful swellings, the main building being now in the figure of a Greek II with four pavilions, two at each corner, and a break in the front, railed and balustered at the top, where I caused huge jars to be placed full of earth to keep them steady upon their pedestals between the statues, which make as good a show as if they were of stone, and, though the building be of brick, and but two stories besides cellars and garrets covered with blue slate, yet there is room enough for a full court, the offices and outhouses being so ample and well disposed. the King (47)'s apartment is painted à fresco, and magnificently furnished. There are many excellent pictures of the great masters. The gallery is a pleasant, noble room; in the break, or middle, is a billiard table, but the wainscot, being of fir, and painted, does not please me so well as Spanish oak without paint. The chapel is pretty, the porch descending to the gardens. The orange garden is very fine, and leads into the greenhouse, at the end of which is a hall to eat in, and the conservatory some hundred feet long, adorned with maps, as the other side is with the heads of the Cæsars, ill cut in alabaster; above are several apartments for my Lord, Lady, and Duchess, with kitchens and other offices below, in a lesser form; lodgings for servants, all distinct for them to retire to when they please and would be in private, and have no communication with the palace, which he tells me he will wholly resign to his son-in-law and daughter, that charming young creature.
The canal running under my Lady's (43) dressing room chamber window, is full of carps and fowl, which come and are fed there. The cascade at the end of the canal turns a cornmill that provides the family, and raises water for the fountains and offices. To pass this canal into the opposite meadows, Sir Samuel Morland (52) has invented a screw bridge, which, being turned with a key, lands you fifty feet distant at the entrance of an ascending walk of trees, a mile in length,—as it is also on the front into the park,—of four rows of ash trees, and reaches to the park pale, which is nine miles in compass, and the best for riding and meeting the game that I ever saw. There were now of red and fallow deer almost a thousand, with good covert, but the soil barren and flying sand, in which nothing will grow kindly. The tufts of fir, and much of the other wood, were planted by my direction some years before. This seat is admirably placed for field sports, hawking, hunting, or racing. The mutton is small, but sweet. The stables hold thirty horses and four coaches. The out-offices make two large quadrangles, so as servants never lived with more ease and convenience; never master more civil. Strangers are attended and accommodated as at their home, in pretty apartments furnished with all manner of conveniences and privacy.
There is a library full of excellent books; bathing rooms, elaboratory, dispensary, a decoy, and places to keep and fat fowl in. He had now in his new church (near the garden) built a dormitory, or vault, with several repositories, in which to bury his family.
In the expense of this pious structure, the church is most laudable, most of the houses of God in this country resembling rather stables and thatched cottages than temples in which to serve the Most High. He has built a lodge in the park for the keeper, which is a neat dwelling, and might become any gentleman. The same has he done for the parson, little deserving it for murmuring that my Lord put him some time out of his wretched hovel, while it was building. He has also erected a fair inn at some distance from his palace, with a bridge of stone over a river near it, and repaired all the tenants' houses, so as there is nothing but neatness and accommodations about his estate, which I yet think is not above £1,500 a year. I believe he had now in his family one hundred domestic servants.
His lady (43) (being one of the Brederode's daughters, grandchild to a natural son of Henry Frederick, Prince of Orange) [Note. Evelyn confused here. Elisabeth Nassau-Beverweert Countess Arlington 1633-1718 (43) was the daughter of Louis Nassau-Beverweert 1602-1665 who was the illegitimate son of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625. Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 was the younger brother of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.] is a good-natured and obliging woman. They love fine things, and to live easily, pompously, and hospitably; but, with so vast expense, as plunges my Lord (59) into debts exceedingly. My Lord (59) himself is given into no expensive vice but building, and to have all things rich, polite, and princely. He never plays, but reads much, having the Latin, French, and Spanish tongues in perfection. He has traveled much, and is the best bred and courtly person his Majesty (47) has about him, so as the public Ministers more frequent him than any of the rest of the nobility. While he was Secretary of State and Prime Minister, he had gotten vastly, but spent it as hastily, even before he had established a fund to maintain his greatness; and now beginning to decline in favor (the Duke being no great friend of his), he knows not how to retrench. He was son of a Doctor of Laws, whom I have seen, and, being sent from Westminster School to Oxford, with intention to be a divine, and parson of Arlington, a village near Brentford, when Master of Arts the Rebellion falling out, he followed the King (47)'s Army, and receiving an HONORABLE WOUND IN THE FACE, grew into favor, and was advanced from a mean fortune, at his Majesty's (47) Restoration, to be an Earl and Knight of the Garter, Lord Chamberlain of the Household, and first favorite for a long time, during which the King (47) married his natural son, the Duke of Grafton (13), to his only daughter (22) and heiress, as before mentioned, worthy for her beauty and virtue of the greatest prince in Christendom. My Lord is, besides this, a prudent and understanding person in business, and speaks well; unfortunate yet in those he has advanced, most of them proving ungrateful. The many obligations and civilities I have received from this noble gentleman, extracts from me this character, and I am sorry he is in no better circumstances.
Having now passed near three weeks at Euston, to my great satisfaction, with much difficulty he suffered me to look homeward, being very earnest with me to stay longer; and, to engage me, would himself have carried me to Lynn-Regis, a town of important traffic, about twenty miles beyond, which I had never seen; as also the Traveling Sands, about ten miles wide of Euston, that have so damaged the country, rolling from place to place, and, like the Sands in the Deserts of Lybia, quite overwhelmed some gentlemen's whole estates, as the relation extant in print, and brought to our Society, describes at large.

In 1623 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641 (56). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (38).

Around 1634 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641 (34). Portrait of Frederick Henry Orange-Nassau II Prince Orange 1584-1647 (49).

Before 27 Jun 1641 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of Maurice Orange-Nassau I Prince Orange 1567-1625.

Hatfield Broad Oak

Hatfield Chase

Battle of Hatfield Chase

On 12 Oct 633 King Penda's alliance of Gwynedd and Mercia defeated the Northumbrians at the Battle of Hatfield Chase at Hatfield Chase.
Eadfrith Deira -633 was captured.

John Evelyn's Diary 1676 June. 02 Jun 1676. I went with my Lord Chamberlain (58) to see a garden, at Enfield town; thence, to Mr. Secretary Coventry's (48) lodge in the Chase. It is a very pretty place, the house commodious, the gardens handsome, and our entertainment very free, there being none but my Lord and myself. That which I most wondered at was, that, in the compass of twenty-five miles, yet within fourteen of London, there is not a house, barn, church, or building, besides three lodges. To this Lodge are three great ponds, and some few inclosures, the rest a solitary desert, yet stored with no less than 3,000 deer. These are pretty retreats for gentlemen, especially for those who are studious and lovers of privacy.
We returned in the evening by Hampstead, to see Lord Wotton's (33) house and garden (Bellsize House), built with vast expense by Mr. O'Neale, an Irish gentleman who married Lord Wotton's mother, Lady Stanhope. The furniture is very particular for Indian cabinets, porcelain, and other solid and noble movables. The gallery very fine, the gardens very large, but ill kept, yet woody and chargeable. The soil a cold weeping clay, not answering the expense.

Havering

Pirgo, Havering

In 1570 Henry Denny 1540-1574 (30) and Elizabeth Grey were married at Pirgo, Havering.

Havering-atte-Bower

On 04 Mar 1238 Joan Plantagenet 1210-1238 (27) died at Havering-atte-Bower. She was buried at Tarrant Abbey.

On 09 Feb 1321 Richard Fitzalan 10th Earl Arundel, 8th Earl Surrey 1306-1376 (15) and Isabel Despencer Countess Arundel 1312-1356 (9) were married at Havering-atte-Bower. Isabel Despencer Countess Arundel 1312-1356 (9) by marriage Countess Arundel (Sussex).

Hedingham Castle

On 23 Apr 1408 John Vere 12th Earl Oxford 1408-1462 was born to Richard Vere 11th Earl Oxford 1385-1417 (22) and Alice Sergeaux Countess Oxford at Hedingham Castle.

On 10 Mar 1513 John Vere 13th Earl Oxford 1442-1513 (70) died at Hedingham Castle. He was buried at Colne Priory. His nephew John Vere 14th Earl Oxford 1499-1526 (13) succeeded 14th Earl Oxford (2C 1141).

In 1580 Frances Vere 1580-1609 was born to Geoffrey Vere and Elizabeth Hardkyn at Hedingham Castle.

In 1591 Edward Vere 17th Earl Oxford 1550-1604 (40) sold Hedingham Castle to his father-in-law William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (70) in trust for his three daughters Elizabeth Vere Countess Derby 1575-1627 (15), Bridget Vere Baroness Norreys Rycote 1564-1631 (26) and Susan Vere Countess Montgomery 1587-1628 (3) by his firts wife Anne Cecil Countess Oxford 1556-1588.

Around 1650 based on a work of 1575.Unknown Artist. Portrait of Edward Vere 17th Earl Oxford 1550-1604.

Around 1565 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598 (44). His right-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

After 1590 Unknown Artist. Portrait of William Cecil 1st Baron Burghley 1520-1598. His left-hand is holding the Lord Treasurer Staff of Office.

In 1609 Elizabeth Trentham Maid of Honour Countess Oxford -1612 purchased Hedingham Castle from her late husband's three daughters by his first wife so that Hedingham Castle remained in the estate of her son Henry Vere 18th Earl Oxford 1583-1604.

Around 1625 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Henry Vere 18th Earl Oxford 1583-1604.

Henham

In 1247 Robert Fitzwalter 1st Baron Fitzwalter 1247-1326 was born to Walter Fitzrobert 1204-1258 (43) and Ida II Longespée 1222-1262 (25) at Henham.

In 1248 Ela Longespee Fitzrobert 1248-1297 was born to Walter Fitzrobert 1204-1258 (44) and Ida II Longespée 1222-1262 (26) at Henham.

In 1275 Christiana Fitzwalter Baroness Marshal 1275-1315 was born to Robert Fitzwalter 1st Baron Fitzwalter 1247-1326 (28) and Devorgille Burgh 1256-1284 (19) at Henham.

High Beach

Holy Innocents Church, High Beach

On 14 Sep 1879 Charles Baring Bishop of Durham 1807-1879 (72) died at Wimbledon. He was buried at Holy Innocents Church, High Beach.

High Easter

In 1506 Geoffrey Gates 1506-1553 was born at High Easter.

On 22 Aug 1553 Geoffrey Gates 1506-1553 (47) died at High Easter.

Horkesley

Leyton

Around 1552 Margaret Bourchier 1st Baroness Bryan 1468-1552 (84) died at Leyton.

On 26 Aug 1722 George Carpenter 2nd Baron Carpenter 1657-1749 (20) and Elizabeth Petty Baroness Carpenter were married at Leyton.

St Mary's Church, Leyton

On 15 Aug 1612 Michael Hicks 1543-1612 (68) died. He was buried in St Mary's Church, Leyton.

Little Dunmow

On 14 Jun 1464 Elizabeth Chidiock Baroness Cobham Sternborough 1404-1464 (60) died. She was buried at Little Dunmow.

Little Easton

Low Leyton

On 04 Dec 1606 Charles Morrison 1587-1628 (19) and Mary Hicks Baronetess Cooper were married at Low Leyton.

Maldon

Around 1294 Henry Darcy 1294-1338 was born to Norman Darcy 1266-1296 (28) at Maldon.

Around 1360 Thomas Darcy 1360-1405 was born to Thomas Darcy 1330-1359 at Maldon.

Around 1417 Robert Darcy 1417-1469 was born to Robert Darcy 1376-1448 (41) at Maldon.

On 02 Nov 1469 Robert Darcy 1417-1469 (52) died at Maldon.

On 24 Jan 1505 Elizabeth Tyrrell 1440-1505 (65) died at Maldon.

On 30 Dec 1508 Roger Darcy 1478-1508 (30) died at Maldon.

In 1630 Thomas Plume Vicar 1630-1704 was born in Maldon.

Morley

Moulsham

Around 1521 Walter Mildmay 1521-1589 was born to Thomas Mildmay 1485-1566 (36) at Moulsham.

Mountnessing

In 1545 Henry Wentworth 1496-1545 (49) died at Mountnessing.

Newport

Samuel Pepy's Diary 1667 October. 08 Oct 1667. Tuesday. Up pretty betimes, though not so soon as we intended, by reason of Murford’s not rising, and then not knowing how to open our door, which, and some other pleasant simplicities of the fellow, did give occasion to us to call him Sir Martin Marrall, and W. Hewer (25) being his helper and counsellor, we did call him, all this journey, Mr. Warner, which did give us good occasion of mirth now and then. At last, rose, and up, and broke our fast, and then took coach, and away, and at Newport did call on Mr. Lowther, and he and his friend, and the master of the house, their friend, where they were, a gentleman, did presently get a-horseback and overtook us, and went with us to Audley-End, and did go along with us all over the house and garden: and mighty merry we were. The house indeed do appear very fine, but not so fine as it hath heretofore to me; particularly the ceilings are not so good as I always took them to be, being nothing so well wrought as my Lord Chancellor’s are; and though the figure of the house without be very extraordinary good, yet the stayre-case is exceeding poor; and a great many pictures, and not one good one in the house but one of Harry the Eighth, done by Holben; and not one good suit of hangings in all the house, but all most ancient things, such as I would not give the hanging-up of in my house; and the other furniture, beds and other things, accordingly. Only the gallery is good, and, above all things, the cellars, where we went down and drank of much good liquor; and indeed the cellars are fine: and here my wife (26) and I did sing to my great content. And then to the garden, and there eat many grapes, and took some with us and so away thence, exceeding well satisfied, though not to that degree that, by my old esteem of the house, I ought and did expect to have done, the situation of it not pleasing me. Here we parted with Lowther and his friends, and away to Cambridge, it being foul, rainy weather, and there did take up at the Rose, for the sake of Mrs. Dorothy Drawwater, the vintner’s daughter, which is mentioned in the play of Sir Martin Marrall. Here we had a good chamber, and bespoke a good supper; and then I took my wife (26), and W. Hewer (25), and Willet, it holding up a little, and shewed them Trinity College and St. John’s Library, and went to King’s College Chapel, to see the outside of it only; and so to our inne, and with much pleasure did this, they walking in their pretty morning gowns, very handsome, and I proud to find myself in condition to do this; and so home to our lodging, and there by and by, to supper, with much good sport, talking with the Drawers concerning matters of the town, and persons whom I remember, and so, after supper, to cards; and then to bed, lying, I in one bed, and my wife (26) and girl in another, in the same room, and very merry talking together, and mightily pleased both of us with the girl. Saunders, the only violin in my time, is, I hear, dead of the plague in the late plague there.

North Ockendon

Around 1445 John Poyntz 1445- was born to Henry Poyntz 1415- at North Ockendon.

Ongar

Miles, Ongar

Pirgo

In 1559 Margaret Grey 1559-1604 was born to John Grey 1524-1564 (35) and Mary Browne at Pirgo.

On 07 Jan 1570 Thomas Cheeke 1570-1659 was born to Henry Cheeke 1548-1586 (22) at Pirgo.

Pleshey

Around 1471 Henry Stafford 1425-1471 (46) was buried at Pleshey.

Pleshy Castle

In 1276 Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 was born to Humphrey Bohun 3rd Earl Hereford, 2nd Earl Essex 1249-1298 (27) and Maud Fiennes Countess Essex, Countess Hereford 1254-1298 (22) at Pleshy Castle.

On 31 Dec 1298 Humphrey Bohun 3rd Earl Hereford, 2nd Earl Essex 1249-1298 (49) died. He was buried at Pleshy Castle. His son Humphrey Bohun 4th Earl Hereford, 3rd Earl Essex 1276-1322 (22) succeeded 4th Earl Hereford (6C 1199), 3rd Earl Essex (3C 1239).

In 1324 Eleanor of Woodstock Plantagenet 1318-1355 (5) was placed into the care of her cousin Eleanor Clare Baroness Zouche Mortimer 1292-1337 (31). She was subsequently placed into the care of Ralph Monthermer 1st Baron Monthermer 1270-1325 (54) (he had formerly been married to her aunt Joan of Acre and Isabel Despencer Baroness Hastings, Baroness Bergavenny -1334 with her younger sister Joan of the Tower (2) at Pleshy Castle.

On 06 Apr 1395 William Stafford 4th Earl Stafford 1375-1395 (19) died at Pleshy Castle. He was buried at Tonbridge. His brother Edmund Stafford 5th Earl Stafford 1378-1403 (17) succeeded 5th Earl Stafford (1C 1351), 6th Baron Stafford (1C 1299).

Epiphany Rising

On 16 Jan 1400 John Holland 1st Duke Exeter 1352-1400 (48) was executed at Pleshy Castle. His son John Holland 2nd Duke Exeter 1395-1447 (4) succeeded 2nd Earl Huntingdon (4C 1388). He (48) was captured by Joan Fitzalan Countess Essex, Hereford and Northampton 1347-1419 (53) whose brother Richard Fitzalan 9th Earl Surrey, 11th Earl Arundel 1346-1397 John Holland had had executed three years before. She arranged for the children of her dead brother to witness the execution of John Holland 1st Duke Exeter 1352-1400 (48) at Pleshy Castle; her primary seat.

Purleigh

On 01 Feb 1632 John Washington 1632-1677 was born to Lawrence Washington 1602-1653 (30) and Amphilis Twigden 1609-1654 (23) at Purleigh.

Quendon

On 27 Aug 1236 Maud Mandeville Countess Hereford 1177-1236 (59) died in Quendon.

Raleigh

Around 1111 Ralph Essex 1111-1157 was born at Raleigh.

Rayne

In 1579 Henry Capell 1579-1622 was born to Arthur Capell 1557-1632 (22) and Margaret Grey 1559-1604 (20) at Rayne.

On 29 Apr 1622 Henry Capell 1579-1622 (43) died at Rayne.

Redbridge

Wanstead, Redbridge

On 29 May 1750 Richard Tylney 1st Earl Tylney 1680-1780 (70) was buried at Wanstead, Redbridge.

Rickling

On 19 Apr 1197 Beatrice Mandeville 1105-1197 (92) died at Rickling.

Rochford

On 12 Jun 1567 Richard Rich 1st Baron Rich Leez 1497-1567 (70) died at Rochford. His son Robert Rich 2nd Baron Rich Leez 1537-1581 (30) succeeded 2nd Baron Rich Leez. Elizabeth Baldry Baroness Rich Leez by marriage Baroness Rich Leez.

Rochford Hall, Rochford

Romsford

Around 1480 Giles Capell of Rayne Hall 1480-1556 was born to William Capell Lord Mayor 1446-1515 (34) and Margaret Arundell 1456-1519 (24) at Romsford.

Saffron Walden

On 23 Dec 1513 Unknown Smith 1513-1577 was born at Saffron Walden.

On 30 Apr 1544 Thomas Audley 1st Baron Audley Waldon 1488-1544 (56) died. He was buried at Saffron Walden.

On 19 Dec 1563 William "Belted" Howard 1563-1640 was born to Thomas Howard 4th Duke Norfolk 1536-1572 (27) and Margaret Audley Duchess Norfolk 1540-1564 (23) at Saffron Walden.

On 13 Aug 1582 Theophilus Howard 2nd Earl Suffolk 1582-1640 was born to Thomas Howard 1st Earl Suffolk 1561-1626 (20) and Catherine Knyvet Countess Suffolk 1564-1638 (18) at Saffron Walden.

On 08 Oct 1587 Thomas Howard 1st Earl Berkshire 1587-1669 was born to Thomas Howard 1st Earl Suffolk 1561-1626 (26) and Catherine Knyvet Countess Suffolk 1564-1638 (23) at Saffron Walden.

On 28 May 1626 Thomas Howard 1st Earl Suffolk 1561-1626 (64) died at Charing Cross. He was buried at Saffron Walden. His son Theophilus Howard 2nd Earl Suffolk 1582-1640 (43) succeeded 2nd Earl Suffolk (4C 1603). Elizabeth Home Countess Suffolk by marriage Countess Suffolk (4C 1603).

Audley End House, Saffron Walden

John Evelyn's Diary 1670 July. 23 Jul 1670. We returned from Burrow Green to London, staying some time at Audley End to see that fine palace. It is indeed a cheerful piece of Gothic building, or rather antico moderno, but placed in an obscure bottom. The cellars and galleries are very stately. It has a river by it, a pretty avenue of limes, and in a park.
This is in Saffron Walden parish, famous for that useful plant, with which all the country is covered.
Dining at Bishop Stortford, we came late to London.

John Evelyn's Diary 1677 September. 13th September 1677. My Lord's coach conveyed me to Bury, and thence baiting at Newmarket, stepping in at Audley-End to see that house again, I slept at Bishop-Stortford, and, the next day, home. I was accompanied in my journey by Major Fairfax, of a younger house of the Lord Fairfax, a soldier, a traveler, an excellent musician, a good-natured, well-bred gentleman.

John Evelyn's Diary 1654 August. Catherine-Hall, though a mean structure, is yet famous for the learned Bishop Andrews, once Master. Emanuel College, that zealous house, where to the hall they have a parlor for the Fellows. The chapel is reformed, ab origine, built north and south, and meanly erected, as is the library.
Jesus College, one of the best built, but in a melancholy situation. Next to Christ-College, a very noble erection, especially the modern part, built without the quadrangle toward the gardens, of exact architecture.
The Schools are very despicable, and Public Library but mean, though somewhat improved by the wainscoting and books lately added by the Bishop Bancroft's library and MSS. They showed us little of antiquity, only King James's Works, being his own gift, and kept very reverently.
The market place is very ample, and remarkable for old Hobson, the pleasant carrier's beneficence of a fountain. But the whole town is situate in a low, dirty, unpleasant place, the streets ill-paved, the air thick and infected by the fens, nor are its churches, (of which St. Mary's is the best) anything considerable in compare to Oxford.
From Cambridge, we went to Audley-End, and spent some time in seeing that goodly place built by Howard, Earl of Suffolk, once Lord Treasurer. It is a mixed fabric, between antique and modern, but observable for its being completely finished, and without comparison is one of the stateliest palaces in the kingdom. It consists of two courts, the first very large, winged with cloisters. The front had a double entrance; the hall is fair, but somewhat too small for so august a pile. The kitchen is very large, as are the cellars, arched with stone, very neat and well disposed; these offices are joined by a wing out of the way very handsomely. The gallery is the most cheerful and I think one of the best in England; a fair dining-room, and the rest of the lodgings answerable, with a pretty chapel. The gardens are not in order, though well inclosed. It has also a bowling-alley, a noble well-walled, wooded and watered park, full of fine collines and ponds: the river glides before the palace, to which is an avenue of lime trees, but all this is much diminished by its being placed in an obscure bottom. For the rest, is a perfectly uniform structure, and shows without like a diadem, by the decorations of the cupolas and other ornaments on the pavilions; instead of rails and balusters, there is a border of capital letters, as was lately also on Suffolk House, near Charing-Cross, built by the same Lord Treasurer.
This house stands in the parish of Saffron Walden, famous for the abundance of saffron there cultivated, and esteemed the best of any foreign country.

In 1598 Unknown Artist. Portrait of Thomas Howard 1st Earl Suffolk 1561-1626 (36).

Widdington, Saffron Walden

Amberden Hall, Widdington, Saffron Walden

On Jul 1216 Robert Mortimer-Woodham 1169-1216 (47) died at Amberden Hall, Widdington, Saffron Walden.

Sawston

In 1602 Henry Hastings 1578-1649 (24) and Dorothy Huddlestone 1576- were married at Sawston.

St Osyth's

In 1593 Penelope Darcy Baronetess Gage 1593-1661 was born to Thomas Darcy 1st Earl Rivers 1565-1640 (28) and Mary Kitson Countess Rivers 1567-1644 (25) at St Osyth's.

On 01 Jun 1723 Richard Savage-Nassau 1723-1780 was born to Frederick Nassau 1682-1738 (41) at St Osyth's.

Chiche, St Osyth's

St Osyth's Priory, St Osyth's

On 28 Jun 1558 Thomas Darcy 1st Baron Darcy Chiche 1506-1558 (51) died at Wivenhoe. He was buried at St Osyth's Priory, St Osyth's. His son John Darcy 2nd Baron Darcy Chiche -1581 succeeded 2nd Baron Darcy Chiche.

Stanway

In 1580 William Bonham 1580-1629 was born to Thomas John Bonham 1545-1629 (35) at Stanway.

Stanway Hall, Stanway

Before 1482 Thomas Bonham 1481-1532 was born at Stanway Hall, Stanway.

In 1490 Catherine Marney 1490-1535 was born to Henry Marney 1st Baron Marney 1447-1523 (43) and Thomasine Arundell at Stanway Hall, Stanway.

In 1545 Thomas John Bonham 1545-1629 was born to Willam Bonham 1513-1547 (32) at Stanway Hall, Stanway.

Stratford

In 1839 Louisa Cockburn 1839-1869 was born to Alexander Cockburn 1802-1880 (36) at Stratford.

Tendring

In 1446 Anne Howard 1446-1474 was born to John Howard 1st Duke Norfolk 1425-1485 (21) and Katherine Moleyns -1465 in Tendring.

In 1522 William Drury 1522-1589 was born to John Drury 1479-1556 (43) at Tendring.

Terling

In 1440 Thomas Cornwall 1440-1479 was born to Otis Cornwall 1409-1469 (31) at Terling.

In 1460 Laurence Cornwall 1460- was born to Thomas Cornwall 1440-1479 (20) at Terling.

In 1479 Thomas Cornwall 1440-1479 (39) died at Terling.

Around 1494 Robert Rochester 1494-1557 was born at Terling.

In 1546 George Cornwall 1546-1616 was born to Richard Cornwall 1530-1585 (16) at Terling. His birth date usually given as 1539 an his father's as 1530. George's birth date changed to 1546.

On 19 Jan 1578 Nicholas Tufton 1st Earl Isle Thanet 1578-1631 was born to John Tufton 1st Baronet Tufton 1544-1624 (34) and Christian Browne Baronetess Tufton at Terling.

Laurence Cornwall 1460- died at Terling.

Theydon Garnon

Gaynes Park Hall, Theydon Garnon

Around 1460 William Fitzwilliam Sheriff of London 1460-1534 was born in Gaynes Park Hall, Theydon Garnon.

Around 1490 William Fitzwilliam 1490-1552 was born to William Fitzwilliam Sheriff of London 1460-1534 (30) in Gaynes Park Hall, Theydon Garnon.

Thornton

Thornton Hall, Thornton

Around 1500 Humphrey Tyrrell 1500-1548 was born to William Tyrrell 1465-1510 (35) and Elizabeth Bradbury 1490-1530 (10) at Thornton Hall, Thornton.

On 15 Jan 1548 Humphrey Tyrrell 1500-1548 (48) died at Thornton Hall, Thornton.

Thunderley

Around 1572 Henry Mordaunt 1531-1572 (41) died at Thunderley. His grandson Robert Mordaunt 2nd Baronet Massingham Parva -1638 succeeded 2nd Baronet Massingham Parva.

Thurrock

Around 1203 Hugh Grey 1203-1230 was born to Henry Grey 1161-1219 (42) at Thurrock.

Tilbury

On 06 Sep 1640 Lionel Tollemache 2nd Baronet Talmash 1591-1640 (49) died at Tilbury. He was buried at Church of St Mary, Helmingham. On 06 Sep 1640 His son Lionel Tollemache 3rd Baronet Talmash 1624-1669 (16) succeeded 3rd Baronet Talmash of Helmingham in Suffolk. Elizabeth Murray Duchess Lauderdale 1626-1698 (13) by marriage Lady Talmash of Helmingham in Suffolk.

Tolleshunt

Around 1538 Thomas Darcy 1538-1586 was born to Thomas Darcy 1511-1558 (27) in Tolleshunt.

In 1560 Thomas Darcy 1560-1593 was born to Thomas Darcy 1538-1586 (22) in Tolleshunt.

Tiptree Priory, Tolleshunt

Around 1511 Thomas Darcy 1511-1558 was born to Anthony Darcy 1470-1540 (41) in Tiptree Priory, Tolleshunt.

Uttlesford

Great Chesterford

Woodcock and Flatfoot Race at Newmarket

09 Oct 1671 - Use of the Term Miss. 09 Oct 1671 and 10 Oct 1671. I went, after evening service, to London, in order to a journey of refreshment with Mr. Treasurer (41), to Newmarket, where the King (41) then was, in his coach with six brave horses, which we changed thrice, first, at Bishop-Stortford, and last, at Chesterford; so, by night, we got to Newmarket, where Mr. Henry Jermain (35) (nephew to the Earl of St. Alban (66)) lodged me very civilly. We proceeded immediately to Court, the King (41) and all the English gallants being there at their autumnal sports. Supped at the Lord Chamberlain's; and, the next day, after dinner, I was on the heath, where I saw the great match run between Woodcock and Flatfoot, belonging to the King (41), and to Mr. Eliot, of the bedchamber, many thousands being spectators; a more signal race had not been run for many years.
This over, I went that night with Mr. Treasurer (41) to Euston, a palace of Lord Arlington's (53), where we found Monsieur Colbert (46) (the French Ambassador), and the famous new French Maid of Honor, Mademoiselle Querouaille (22), now coming to be in great favor with the King (41). Here was also the Countess of Sunderland (25), and several lords and ladies, who lodged in the house.
During my stay here with Lord Arlington (53), near a fortnight, his Majesty (41) came almost every second day with the Duke (37), who commonly returned to Newmarket, but the King (41) often lay here, during which time I had twice the honor to sit at dinner with him (41), with all freedom. It was universally reported that the fair lady —— [Note. Probably Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (22)], was bedded one of these nights, and the stocking flung, after the manner of a married bride; I acknowledge she was for the most part in her undress all day, and that there was fondness and toying with that young wanton; nay, it was said, I was at the former ceremony; but it is utterly false; I neither saw nor heard of any such thing while I was there, though I had been in her chamber, and all over that apartment late enough, and was myself observing all passages with much curiosity. However, it was with confidence believed she was first made a Miss, as they called these unhappy creatures, with solemnity at this time.
On Sunday, a young Cambridge divine preached an excellent sermon in the chapel, the King (41) and the Duke of York (37) being present.

Before 1723 Godfrey Kneller Painter 1646-1723. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 07 Dec 1680 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

In 1670 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (35). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (20).

In 1673 Henri Gascar 1635-1701 (38). Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734 (23).

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Before 01 Jan 1701 Henri Gascar 1635-1701. Portrait of Louise Kéroualle 1st Duchess Portsmouth 1649-1734.

Wakering

Around 1282 Hugh Neville 1170-1282 died at Wakering.

Waldon

Waldon Priory, Waldon

Around 1166 William Mandeville 2nd Earl Essex -1166 died. William Mandeville 2nd Earl Essex -1166 was buried at Waldon Priory, Waldon. His brother Geoffrey Mandeville 3rd Earl Essex, Count Aumale -1189 succeeded 3rd Earl Essex (1C 1139).

Walter

Woodhouse, Walter

In 1404 Elizabeth Chidiock Baroness Cobham Sternborough 1404-1464 was born to John Chidiock 5th Lord Fitzpayn 1375-1415 (29) at Woodhouse, Walter.

Waltham

In 1133 Alice Essex 1133-1174 was born to Ralph Essex 1111-1157 (22) and Alice Vere Baroness Warkworth -1185 at Waltham.

Waltham Abbey, Waltham

In 1308 John Burgh 1286-1313 (22) and Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (12) were married at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

de Clare and de Burgh Double Marriage

On 29 Sep 1308 (possibly 30th) in a Double Marriage de Clare siblings married de Burgh siblings at Waltham Abbey, Waltham in the presence of King Edward II of England (24). John Burgh 1286-1313 (22) and Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (13) were married John Burgh 1286-1313 (22) and Elizabeth Clare Lady Verdun 1295-1360 (13) were married.

Around 1460 Robert Cheney 1460-1494 was born to John Cheney 1415-1467 (45) at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

In 1490 Robert Cheney 1490-1526 was born to Robert Cheney 1460-1494 (30) at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

Around 1494 Robert Cheney 1460-1494 (34) died at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

In 1520 Robert Cheney 1520-1567 was born to Robert Cheney 1490-1526 (30) at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

On 26 Oct 1526 Robert Cheney 1490-1526 (36) died at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

In 1550 John Cheney 1550-1594 was born to Robert Cheney 1520-1567 (30) at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

In 1551 Ralph Cheney 1551-1559 was born to Robert Cheney 1520-1567 (31) at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

Around 1556 William Cheney 1556-1610 was born to Robert Cheney 1520-1567 (36) at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

On 13 Mar 1567 Robert Cheney 1520-1567 (47) died at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

On 01 Apr 1610 William Cheney 1556-1610 (54) died at Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

Around 1650 Thomas Dangerfield 1650-1722 was born in Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

Abbey House, Waltham Abbey, Waltham

Around 1595 Edward Denny 1st Earl Norwich 1569-1637 (25) built at Abbey House, Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

Waltham Abbey Church, Waltham Abbey, Waltham

On 12 Feb 1600 Edward Denny 1547-1600 (53) died. He was buried at Waltham Abbey Church, Waltham Abbey, Waltham.

Walthamstow

Before 1465 George Monoux Lord Mayor 1464-1544 was born at Walthamstow.

Daniel Whistler Doctor -1684 was born in Walthamstow.

Warley Magna

John Evelyn's Diary 1649 May. 12th May 1649. I purchased the manor of Warley Magna, in Essex: in the afternoon went to see Gildron's collections of paintings, where I found Mr. Endymion Porter (62), of his late Majesty's bedchamber.

West Horndon

Before 1350 Thomas Tyrrell 1349-1406 was born to Walter Tyrrell 1320-1386 at West Horndon.

In 1406 Thomas Tyrrell 1349-1406 (56) died at West Horndon.

In 1431 Elizabeth Fitzlewis 1431-1500 was born to Lewis Fitzlewis 1405-1442 (26) in West Horndon.

On 11 Oct 1613 John Petre 1st Baron Petre 1549-1613 (63) died at West Horndon and was buried in St Edmund and St Mary's Church, Ingatestone, Blackmore. His son William Petre 2nd Baron Petre 1575-1637 (38) succeeded 2nd Baron Petre.

Wethersfield

Codham Hall, Wethersfield

On 22 Mar 1483 Henry Wentworth 1429-1483 (54) died at Codham Hall, Wethersfield.

Witham

Witham Place, Witham

On 30 Sep 1728 Francis Jerome Talbot 1728-1813 was born to George Talbot 1670-1733 (58) and Mary Fitzwilliam 1685-1752 (43) at Witham Place, Witham.

Wivenhoe

Around 1318 Margaret Sutton 1318-1370 was born to John Sutton 1st Baron Sutton Holderness 1270-1338 (47) and Constantia Sampson Baroness Lexington 1273-1346 (45) at Wivenhoe.

On 19 Dec 1507 William Beaumont 2nd Viscount Beaumont 1438-1507 (69) died at Wivenhoe. He was buried at Wivenhoe.

On 28 Jun 1558 Thomas Darcy 1st Baron Darcy Chiche 1506-1558 (51) died at Wivenhoe. He was buried at St Osyth's Priory, St Osyth's. His son John Darcy 2nd Baron Darcy Chiche -1581 succeeded 2nd Baron Darcy Chiche.

Woodford

On 22 Oct 1559 Ralph Cheney 1551-1559 (8) died at Woodford.

On 29 May 1735 Robert Long 5th Baronet Long 1705-1767 (30) and Emma Tylney Baronetess Long 1707- were married at Woodford. Emma Tylney Baronetess Long 1707- by marriage Lady Long of Westminster in London.

Woodford Hall, Woodford

On 22 Jan 1721 Charlotte Lee Baroness Baltimore 1679-1721 (41) died at Woodford Hall, Woodford.

Woodham Ferrers

On 18 May 1445 William Ferrers 5th Baron Ferrers Groby 1372-1445 (73) died at Woodham Ferrers. His granddaughter Elizabeth Ferrers 6th Baroness Ferrers Groby 1419-1483 (26) succeeded 6th Baron Ferrers Groby.

Woodham Mortimer

In 1143 Robert Mortimer-Woodham 1143- was born at Woodham Mortimer.

Around 1169 Robert Mortimer-Woodham 1169-1216 was born to Robert Mortimer-Woodham 1143- and Maud Meschin at Woodham Mortimer.