History of Sittingbourne

Sittingbourne is in Kent.

Diary of Henry Machyn July 1557. 03 Jul 1557. The iij day of July the Kyng (30) and the Quen (41) toke ther gornay [journey] toward Dover, and lay all nyghtt at Syttyngborne.

Around 1573 Sofonisba Anguissola Painter 1532-1625. Portrait of Philip Around 1560 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of Philip Around 1550. Titian Painter 1488-1576. Portrait of Philip Around 1554. Titian Painter 1488-1576. Portrait of Philip Around 1594. Juan Pantoja de La Cruz Painter 1553–1608. Portrait of Philip Around 1554 Antonis Mor Painter 1517-1577. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558. Around 1556 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Mary Tudor I Queen England and Ireland 1516-1558.

In 1599 Henry Clifford 1561-1599 (38) died at Sittingbourne.

John Evelyn's Diary 12 October 1641. 12 Oct 1641. From Dover, I that night rode post to Canterbury. Here I visited the cathedral, then in great splendour, those famous windows being entire, since demolished by the fanatics. The next morning, by Sittingboume, I came to Rochester, and thence to Gravesend, where a light-horseman (as they call it) taking us in, we spent our tide as far as Greenwich. From hence, after we had a little refreshed ourselves at the College, (for by reason of the contagion then in London we balked the inns,) we came to London landing at Arundel-stairs. Here I took leave of his Lordship (56), and retired to my lodgings in the Middle Temple, being about two in the morning, the 14th of October.

In 1618 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646. In 1630 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646 and wearing his Garter Collar. Around 1629 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of Thomas Howard 21st Earl Arundel 4th Earl Surrey 1st Earl Norfolk 1585-1646.

John Evelyn's Diary 06 November 1643. 06 Nov 1643. Lying by the way from Wotton at Sir Ralph Whitfield's, at Blechingley (whither both my brothers had conducted me), I arrived at London on the 7th, and two days after took boat at the Tower-wharf, which carried me as far as Sittingbourne, though not without danger, I being only in a pair of oars, exposed to a hideous storm: but it pleased God that we got in before the peril was considerable. From thence, I went by post to Dover, accompanied with one Mr. Thicknesse, a very dear friend of mine.

John Evelyn's Diary 10 November 1675. 10 Nov 1675. Being the day appointed for my Lord Ambassador (47) to set out, I met them with my coach at New Cross. There were with him my Lady his wife, and my dear friend, Mrs. Godolphin (23), who, out of an extraordinary friendship, would needs accompany my lady to Paris, and stay with her some time, which was the chief inducement for permitting my son (20) to travel, but I knew him safe under her inspection, and in regard my Lord (47) himself had promised to take him into his special favor, he having intrusted all he had to my care.

Thus we set out three coaches (besides mine), three wagons, and about forty horses. It being late, and my Lord (47) as yet but valetudinary, we got but to Dartford, the first day, the next to Sittingbourne.

At Rochester, the major, Mr. Cony, then an officer of mine for the sick and wounded of that place, gave the ladies a handsome refreshment as we came by his house.

In 1673. Unknown Painter, possibly Matthew Dixon. Portrait of Margaret Blagge Maid of Honour 1652-1678.

Watling Street 1b Canterbury to Rochester. From Durovernum the road continues in a north-east direction through Upper Harbledown, Boughton Street, Durolevo, Key Street, Gillingham to Durobrivae where it crosses the River Medway.

Milton Creek is a creek that flows from Sittingbourne past Milton Regis to the River Swale.

Milton Regis, Sittingbourne, Kent

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1050-1065. 1052. Then proceeded they to the Nore, and so toward London; but some of the ships landed on the Isle of Sheppey, and did much harm there; whence they steered to Milton Regis, and burned it all, and then proceeded toward London after the earls. When they came to London, there lay the king (49) and all his earls to meet them, with fifty ships. The earls (73) then sent to the king (49), praying that they might be each possessed of those things which had been unjustly taken from them. But the king (49) resisted some while; so long that the people who were with the earl (51) were very much stirred against the king (49) and against his people, so that the earl (51) himself with difficulty appeased them. When King Edward (49) understood that, then sent he upward after more aid; but they came very late. And Godwin (51) stationed himself continually before London with his fleet, till he came to Southwark; where he abode some time, until the flood (74) came up. On this occasion he also contrived with the burgesses that they should do almost all that he would. When he had arranged his whole expedition, then came the flood; and they soon weighed anchor, and steered through the bridge by the south side. The land-force meanwhile came above, and arranged themselves by the Strand; and they formed an angle with the ships against the north side, as if they wished to surround the king's (49) ships. The king (49) had also a great land-force on his side, to add to his shipmen: but they were most of them loth to fight with their own kinsmen—for there was little else of any great importance but Englishmen on either side; and they were also unwilling that this land should be the more exposed to outlandish people, because they destroyed each other. Then it was determined that wise men should be sent between them, who should settle peace on either side. Godwin (51) went up, and Harold (30) his son, and their navy, as many as they then thought proper. Then advanced Bishop Stigand with God's assistance, and the wise men both within the town and without; who determined that hostages should be given on either side.

Milton Creek is a creek that flows from Sittingbourne past Milton Regis to the River Swale.

Milton Regis Abbey Sittingbourne, Kent

Seaxburh Wuffingas Queen Consort Kent -699 founded Milton Regis Abbey Sittingbourne.