Royal Household

1236 Wedding of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence

1421 Coronation of Catherine of Valois

1689 Coronation William III and Mary II

Royal Household is in Court Positions.

King's Cupbearer

Around 1509 William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton 1490-1542 (19) was appointed King's Cupbearer.

Around 1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton 1490-1542.

Cupbearer

Wedding of Henry III and Eleanor of Provence

Chronica Majora 1236 The ceremonies at the marriage of Henry the Third. 19 Jan 1236. There were assembled at the king's (28) nuptial festivities such a host of nobles of both sexes, such numbers of religious men, such crowds of the populace, and such a variety of actors, that London, with its capacious bosom, could scarcely contain them. The whole city was ornamented with flags and banners, chaplets and hangings, candles and lamps, and with wonderful devices and extraordinary representations, and all the roads were cleansed from mud and dirt, sticks, and everything offensive. The citizens, too, went out to meet the king (28) and queen (13), dressed out in their ornaments, and vied with each other in trying the speed of their horses. On the same day, when they left the city for Westminster, to perform the duties of butler to the king (which office belonged to them by right of old, at the coronation), they proceeded thither dressed in silk garments, with mantles worked in gold, and with costly changes of raiment, mounted on valuable horses, glittering with new bits and saddles, and riding in troops arranged in order. They carried with them three hundred and sixty gold and silver cups, preceded by the king's trumpeters and with horns sounding, so that such a wonderful novelty struck all who beheld it with astonishment. The archbishop of Canterbury (61), by the right especially belonging to him, performed the duty of crowning, with the usual solemnities, the bishop of London assisting him as a dean, the other bishops taking their stations according to their rank. In the same way all the abbats, at the head of whom, as was his right, was the abbat of St. Alban's (for as the Protomartyr of England, B. Alban, was the chief of all the martyrs of England, so also was his abbat the chief of all the abbats in rank and dignity), as the authentic privileges of that church set forth. The nobles, too, performed the duties, which, by ancient right and custom, pertained to them at the coronations of kings. In like manner some of the inhabitants of certain cities discharged certain duties which belonged to them by right of their ancestors. The earl of Chester (29) carried the sword of St. Edward, which was called "Curtein", before the king, as a sign that he was earl of the palace, and had by right the power of restraining the king if he should commit an error. The earl was attended by the constable of Chester (44), and kept the people away with a wand when they pressed forward in a disorderly way. The grand marshal of England, the earl of Pembroke (39), carried a wand before the king and cleared the way before him both, in the church and in the banquet-hall, and arranged the banquet and the guests at table. The Wardens of the Cinque Ports carried the pall over the king, supported by four spears, but the claim to this duty was not altogether undisputed. The earl of Leicester (28) supplied the king with water in basins to wash before his meal; the Earl Warrenne performed the duty of king's Cupbearer, supplying the place of the earl of Arundel, because the latter was a youth and not as yet made a belted knight. Master Michael Belet was butler ex officio; the earl of Hereford (32) performed the duties of marshal of the king's household, and William Beauchamp (51) held the station of almoner. The justiciary of the forests arranged the drinking cups on the table at the king's right hand, although he met with some opposition, which however fell to the ground. The citizens of London passed the wine about in all directions, in costly cups, and those of Winchester superintended the cooking of the feast; the rest, according to the ancient statutes, filled their separate stations, or made their claims to do so. And in order that the nuptial festivities might not be clouded by any disputes, saving the right of any one, many things were put up with for the time which they left for decision at a more favourable opportunity. The office of chancellor of England, and all the offices connected with the king, are ordained and assized in the Exchequer. Therefore the chancellor, the chamberlain, the marshal, and the constable, by right of their office, took their seats there, as also did the barons, according to the date of their creation, in the city of London, whereby they each knew his own place. The ceremony was splendid, with the gay dresses of the clergy and knights who were present. The abbat of Westminster sprinkled the holy water, and the treasurer, acting the part of sub-dean, carried the Paten. Why should I describe all those persons who reverently ministered in the church to God as was their duty? Why describe the abundance of meats and dishes on the table & the quantity of venison, the variety of fish, the joyous sounds of the glee-men, and the gaiety of the waiters? Whatever the world could afford to create pleasure and magnificence was there brought together from every quarter.

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In 1540 Richard Manners Esquire to the Body 1509-1551 (31) was appointed Cupbearer.

After Aug 1614 George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 was appointed Cupbearer to James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

Before 1628 Michiel Janszoon van Mierevelt Painter 1566-1641. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628.In 1616 William Larkin Painter 1582-1619. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628 wearing his Garter Robes and Leg Garter.Around 1620 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628.In 1619 Cornelius Johnson Painter 1593-1661. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628.Around 1625 Peter Paul Rubens Painter 1577-1640. Portrait of George Villiers 1st Duke of Buckingham 1592-1628. Around 1600 Nicholas Hilliard Painter 1547-1619 painted the portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.Around 1605 John Critz Painter 1551-1642. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 with Garter Collar and Leg Garter.In 1621 Daniel Mijtens Painter 1590-1648. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625 wearing his Garter Collar and Leg Garter.Around 1632 Anthony Van Dyck Painter 1599-1641. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.In 1583 Pieter Bronckhorst Painter -1583. Portrait of James I King England and Ireland VI King Scotland 1566-1625.

In 1650 Charles Lyttelton 3rd Baronet 1628-1716 (22) was appointed Cupbearer to Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 (19) while the King was in exile.

Around 1642. William Dobson Painter 1611-1646. Portrait of the future Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Before 1691. John Riley Painter 1646-1691. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685.Around 1665 John Greenhill Painter 1644-1676. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his Garter Robes.Around 1661 John Michael Wright Painter 1617-1694. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685 in his coronation robes.Before 11 Jul 1671 Adriaen Hanneman Painter 1603-1671. Portrait of Charles II King England Scotland and Ireland 1630-1685. 1675. Hendrick Danckerts Painter 1625-1680. Portrait of Royal Gardener John Rose presenting a pineappel to King Charles II

Knight of the Body

Before 1483 Ralph Hastings -1495 was appointed Knight of the Body to Edward IV King England 1442-1483.

Around 1483 John Conyers Sheriff of Yorkshire 1411-1490 (72) was appointed Knight of the Body to Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30).

Before Sep 1483 Marmaduke Constable 1457-1518 was appointed Knight of the Body to Richard III King England 1452-1485.

Before May 1486 Marmaduke Constable 1457-1518 was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Around 1510 Meynnart Wewyck Painter 1460-1525 is believed to have painted the portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.Around 1520 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

In 1516 Philip Boteler 1492-1545 (24) was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (24).

1536 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.1540 Hans Holbein The Younger Painter 1497-1543. Miniature portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.Around 1525 Unknown Painter. Netherlands. Portrait of Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.

Henry Willoughby 1451-1528 was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VII King England and Ireland 1457-1509.

Henry Willoughby 1451-1528 was appointed Knight of the Body to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.

Carver

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 28 Jul 1461. Westminster Palace. Appointment, during good behaviour, of John Howard (36), knight, as one of the king's carvers, receiving 40lyearly, viz 20l from the far of the town of Ipswich, co Suffolk, ad 20l from the issues of the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. By p.s.

Chief Butler of England

In 1407 John Tiptoft 1st Baron Tiptoft -1443 was appointed Chief Butler of England.

Coronation of Catherine of Valois

On 23 Feb 1421 Catherine of Valois (19) was crowned Queen Consort England at Westminster Abbey. Robert Willoughby 6th Baron Willoughby de Eresby 1385-1452 (36) was appointed Chief Butler of England. James I (26) attended, and was honoured by sitting immediately on the queen's left at the coronation banquet.

Close Rolls Edward IV Edward V Richard III 1476 1485. 14 Aug 1483 Francis Lovell 1st Viscount Lovell 1456-1488 (27) was appointed Chief Butler of England. Richard III King England 1452-1485 (30). Westminster Palace. Grant for life to the king's kinsman Francis Lovell (27), knight, viscount Lovel, the king's chamberlain, of the office of Chief Butler of England, void by the death of Anthony, late earl Rivers (43), receiving fees of 100l yearly from the customs and prises of wines and other issues of his office, with all other profits. By p.s.

In 1521 John Hussey 1st Baron Hussey Sleaford 1465-1537 (56) was appointed Chief Butler of England.

Gentlemen

Keeper

Privy Purse

John Evelyn's Diary 11 July 1675. 11 Jul 1675. We heard the speeches, and saw the ceremony of creating doctors in Divinity, Law and Physic. I had, early in the morning, heard Dr. Morison, Botanic Professor, read on divers plants in the Physic Garden; and saw that rare collection of natural curiosities of Dr. Plot's, of Magdalen Hall, author of "The Natural History of Oxfordshire", all of them collected in that shire, and indeed extraordinary, that in one county there should be found such variety of plants, shells, stones, minerals, marcasites, fowls, insects, models of works, crystals, agates, and marbles. He was now intending to visit Staffordshire, and, as he had of Oxfordshire, to give us the natural, topical, political, and mechanical history. Pity it is that more of this industrious man's genius were not employed so to describe every county of England; it would be one of the most useful and illustrious works that was ever produced in any age or nation.
I visited also the Bodleian Library and my old friend, the learned Obadiah Walker (59), head of University College, which he had now almost rebuilt, or repaired. We then proceeded to Northampton, where we arrived the next day.
In this journey, went part of the way Mr. James Graham (26) (since Privy Purse to the Duke (41)), a young gentleman exceedingly in love with Mrs. Dorothy Howard (24), one of the maids of honor in our company. I could not but pity them both, the mother not much favoring it. This lady was not only a great beauty, but a most virtuous and excellent creature, and worthy to have been wife to the best of men. My advice was required, and I spoke to the advantage of the young gentleman, more out of pity than that she deserved no better match; for, though he was a gentleman of good family, yet there was great inequality.

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Ladies

Chief Lady of the Bedchamber

In Dec 1558 John Astley Master of the Jewel House 1507-1595 (51) was appointed Master of the Jewel House. Katherine "Kat" Champernowne 1502-1565 (56) was appointed Chief Lady of the Bedchamber to .

Catherine Carey 1524-1569 was appointed Chief Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Around 1562 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of (probably) Catherine Carey 1524-1569. Around 1546. William Scrots Painter 1517-1553. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland before her accession painted for her father.Around 1570 Hans Eworth Painter 1520-1574. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.In 1579 George Gower Painter 1540-1596. The Plimton Sieve Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.Around 1585 William Segar Painter 1554-1663. Ermine Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.Around 1592 Marcus Gheeraerts Painter 1562-1636. The Ditchley Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.After 1585 Unknown Painter. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.Around 1563 Steven van der Meulen Painter -1564. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

First Lady of the Bedchamber

Before 1572 Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603 was appointed First Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

In 1590 Robert "The Elder" Peake Painter 1551-1619. Portrait of Katherine Carey Countess Nottingham 1550-1603.

After 19 Oct 1670 Flower Backhouse Countess Clarendon -1700 was appointed First Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714 her niece.

In 1703 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.Before 24 May 1711 John Closterman Painter 1660-1711. Possibly school of. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.In 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.Around 1705. Michael Dahl Painter 1659-1743. Portrait of Queen Anne of England Scotland and Ireland 1665-1714.

Principal Lady in Waiting

Coronation William III and Mary II

On 22 Apr 1689 Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (29) was appointed Principal Lady in Waiting to Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) as well as Groom of the Stool and Mistress of the Robes attracting a salary of £1200 per annum (£800 and £400 respectively).

Around 1676 Peter Lely Painter 1618-1680. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.Around 1686 Willem Wissing Painter 1656-1687. Portrait of Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694.

Lady of the Jewels

John Evelyn's Diary 31 March 1661. 31 Mar 1661. This night, his Majesty (30) promised to make my wife (26) Lady of the Jewels (a very honorable charge) to the future Queen (but which he never performed).

Mother of the Maids

Diary of Samuel Pepys 09 May 1660. 09 May 1660. Up very early, writing a letter to the King, as from the two Generals of the fleet, in answer to his letter to them, wherein my Lord do give most humble thanks for his gracious letter and declaration; and promises all duty and obedience to him. This letter was carried this morning to Sir Peter Killigrew (67)1, who came hither this morning early to bring an order from the Lords' House to my Lord, giving him power to write an answer to the King. This morning my Lord St. John (61) and other persons of honour were here to see my Lord, and so away to Flushing. After they were gone my Lord and I to write letters to London, which we sent by Mr. Cook, who was very desirous to go because of seeing my wife before she went out of town. As we were sitting down to dinner, in comes Noble with a letter from the House of Lords to my Lord, to desire him to provide ships to transport the Commissioners to the King, which are expected here this week. He brought us certain news that the King was proclaimed yesterday with great pomp, and brought down one of the Proclamations, with great joy to us all; for which God be praised. After dinner to ninepins and lost 5s. This morning came Mr. Saunderson (74)1, that writ the story of the King, hither, who is going over to the King. He calls me cozen and seems a very knowing man. After supper to bed betimes, leaving my Lord talking in the Coach with the Captain.
Note 1. Sir Peter Killigrew (67), Knight, of Arwenack, Cornwall, was known as "Peter the Post", from the alacrity with which he despatched "like wild fire" all the messages and other commissions entrusted to him in the King's (29) cause. His son Peter (26), who succeeded his uncle as second baronet in 1665, was M.P. for Camelford in 1660.
Note 2. Afterwards Sir William Sanderson, gentleman of the chamber, author of the "History of Mary Queen of Scots, James I., and Charles I". His wife, Dame Bridget (56), was mother of the maids.

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Before 1676 Bridget Tyrrell 1604-1681 was appointed Mother of the Maids.

Maid of Honour

Commissioners

Master

Mistress

Mistress of the Robes

Before 22 Sep 1604 Dorothy Stafford 1526-1604 was appointed Mistress of the Robes to Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland.

Diary of Samuel Pepys 26 July 1662. 26 Jul 1662. Sir W. Batten (61), Mr. Pett (51), and I at the office sitting all the morning.
So dined at home, and then to my office again, causing the model hanging in my chamber to be taken down and hung up in my office, for fear of being spoilt by the workmen, and for my own convenience of studying it.
This afternoon I had a letter from Mr. Creed, who hath escaped narrowly in the King's yacht, and got safe to the Downs after the late storm; and that there the King (32) do tell him, that he is sure that my Lord is landed at Callis safe, of which being glad, I sent news thereof to my Lord Crew, and by the post to my Lady into the country.
This afternoon I went to Westminster; and there hear that the King (32) and Queen (23) intend to come to White Hall from Hampton Court next week, for all winter.
Thence to Mrs. Sarah, and there looked over my Lord's lodgings, which are very pretty; and White Hall garden and the Bowling-ally (where lords and ladies are now at bowles), in brave condition. Mrs. Sarah told me how the falling out between my Baroness Castlemaine's (21) and her Lord was about christening of the child lately1, which he would have, and had done by a priest: and, some days after, she had it again christened by a minister; the King (32), and Lord of Oxford, and Duchesse of Suffolk, being witnesses: and christened with a proviso, that it had not already been christened. Since that she left her Lord, carrying away every thing in the house; so much as every dish, and cloth, and servant but the porter. He is gone discontented into France, they say, to enter a monastery; and now she is coming back again to her house in Kingstreet. But I hear that the Queen (23) did prick her out of the list presented her by the King (32);2 desiring that she might have that favour done her, or that he would send her from whence she come: and that the King (32) was angry and the Queen (23) discontented a whole day and night upon it; but that the King (32) hath promised to have nothing to do with her hereafter. But I cannot believe that the King (32) can fling her off so, he loving her too well: and so I writ this night to my Lady to be my opinion; she calling her my lady, and the lady I admire. Here I find that my Lord hath lost the garden to his lodgings, and that it is turning into a tennis-court. Hence by water to the Wardrobe to see how all do there, and so home to supper and to bed.
Note 1. The boy was born in June at Baroness Castlemaine's (21) house in King Street. By the direction of Lord Castlemaine, who had become a Roman Catholic, the child was baptized by a priest, and this led to a final separation between husband and wife. Some days afterwards the child was again baptized by the rector of St. Margaret's, Westminster, in presence of the godparents, the King (32), Aubrey De Vere (35), Earl of Oxford, and Barbara, Countess of Suffolk (40), first Lady of the Bedchamber to the Queen (23) and Baroness Castlemaine's (21) aunt. The entry in the register of St. Margaret's is as follows: "1662 June 18 Charles Palmer Ld Limbricke, s. to ye right honorble Roger Earl of Castlemaine by Barbara" (Steinman's "Memoir of Barbara, Duchess of Cleveland", 1871, p. 33). The child was afterwards called Charles Fitzroy, and was created Duke of Southampton in 1674. He succeeded his mother in the dukedom of Cleveland in 1709, and died 1730.
Note 2. By the King's command Lord Clarendon (53), much against his inclination, had twice visited his royal mistress with a view of inducing her, by persuasions which he could not justify, to give way to the King's determination to have Baroness Castlemaine's (21) of her household.... Lord Clarendon (53) has given a full account of all that transpired between himself, the King (32) and the Queen (23), on this very unpleasant business ('Continuation of Life of Clarendon,' 1759, ff. 168-178). Steinman's Memoir of Duchess of Cleveland, p. 35. The day at length arrived when Baroness Castlemaine's (21) was to be formally admitted a Lady of the Bedchamber. The royal warrant, addressed to the Lord Chamberlain (60), bears date June 1, 1663, and includes with that of her ladyship, the names of the Duchess of Buckingham (23), the Countesses of Chesterfield and Bath (22), and the Countess Mareshall. A separate warrant of the same day directs his lordship to admit the Countess of Suffolk as Groom of the Stole and first Lady of the Bedchamber, to which undividable offices she had, with the additional ones of Mistress of the Robes and Keeper of the Privy Purse, been nominated by a warrant dated April 2, 1662, wherein the reception of her oath is expressly deferred until the Queen's (23) household shall be established. We here are furnished with the evidence that Charles would not sign the warrants for the five until Catherine had withdrawn her objection to his favourite one. Addenda to Steinman's Memoir of Duchess of Cleveland (privately printed), 1874, p. i.

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Coronation William III and Mary II

On 22 Apr 1689 Elizabeth Butler Countess Derby 1660-1717 (29) was appointed Principal Lady in Waiting to Mary Stewart II Queen England Scotland and Ireland 1662-1694 (26) as well as Groom of the Stool and Mistress of the Robes attracting a salary of £1200 per annum (£800 and £400 respectively).

From 1913 to 1925 Winifred Anna Dallas Yorke Duchess Portland 1863-1954 (61) was Mistress of the Robes to Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925 (68).

1912. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Winifred Anna Dallas Yorke Duchess Portland 1863-1954.1912. Philip de László Painter 1869-1937. Portrait of Winifred Anna Dallas Yorke Duchess Portland 1863-1954.In 1902 John Singer Sargent Painter 1856-1925. Portrait of Winifred Anna Dallas Yorke Duchess Portland 1863-1954.1901. Luke Fildes Painter 1843-1927. Coronation Portrait of Alexandra Glücksburg Queen Consort England 1844-1925.

Lord Chamberlain of the Household

Vice-Chamberlain of the Household

Lord Great Chamberlain

Patent Rolls Edward IV 1461. 07 May 1461. Middleham Castle. Appointment for life of the said earl (32) as great chamberlain of England, with the accustomed fees. By other latters patent.

On 19 Dec 1526 John Vere 15th Earl Oxford 1471-1540 (55) was appointed Lord Great Chamberlain.

Chamberlain

Richard Woodville 1385-1441 was appointed Chamberlain to John Lancaster 1st Duke Bedford 1389-1435.

Esquire to the Body

Receiver of the Chamber

From 1391 to 1398 Guy Mone Aka Mohun Bishop of St David's -1407 was appointed Receiver of the Chamber.

Treasurer of the Royal Household

In 1406 John Tiptoft 1st Baron Tiptoft -1443 was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household.

In 1422 William Phelip 1383-1441 (39) was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household.

In May 1431 John Tyrrell Speaker 1382-1437 (49) was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household.

In 1439 Roger Fiennes 1384-1449 (54) was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household.

In 1458 Thomas Tuddenham 1401-1462 (56) was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household. He was buried at Austin Friars.

In 1525 William Fitzwilliam 1st Earl of Southampton 1490-1542 (35) was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547 (33).

Francis Knollys 1512-1596 was appointed Treasurer of the Royal Household to Henry VIII King England and Ireland 1491-1547.

Treasurer of the Navy

On 05 Apr 1627 Sackville Crowe 1st Baronet 1595-1671 (31) was appointed Treasurer of the Navy which position he held until 21 Jan 1630.

In 1639 Henry Vane "The Younger" 1613-1662 (25) was appointed Treasurer of the Navy.

Around 1658 Gilbert Soest Painter 1605-1681. Portrait of Henry Vane "The Younger" 1613-1662.

John Evelyn's Diary 15 July 1660. 15 Jul 1660. Came Sir George Carteret (50) and lady (58) to visit us: he was now Treasurer of the Navy.

John Evelyn's Diary 22 June 1665. 22 Jun 1665. We waited on the Chancellor of the Exchequer (43), and got an Order of Council for our money to be paid to the Treasurer of the Navy for our Receivers.

In 1673 Edward Seymour 4th Baronet Seymour 1633-1708 (40) was appointed Treasurer of the Navy.

John Evelyn's Diary 25 July 1684. 25 Jul 1684. I din'd at Lord Falkland's (28), Treasurer of the Navy, where after dinner we had rare musiq, there being, amongst others, Sign Pietro Reggio, and Sigr John Battist, both famous, one for his voice, the other for playing on ye harpsicord, few if any in Europe exceeding him. There was also a Frenchman who sung an admirable basse.

John Evelyn's Diary 23 October 1686. 23 Oct 1686. Went with the Countess of Sunderland (40) to Cranbourne, a lodge and walk of my Lord Godolphin's (41) in Windsor park. There was one room in the house spared in the pulling down the old one, because the late Duchess of York (49) was born in it; the rest was built and added to it by Sir George Carteret (76), Treasurer of the Navy; and since, the whole was purchased by my Lord Godolphin (41), who spoke to me to go see it, and advise what trees were fit to be cut down to improve the dwelling, being environed with old rotten pollards, which corrupt the air. It stands on a knoll which though insensibly rising, gives it a prospect over the Keep of Windsor, about three miles N. E. of it. The ground is clayey and moist; the water stark naught; the park is pretty; the house tolerable, and gardens convenient. After dinner, we came back to London, having two coaches both going and coming, of six horses apiece, which we changed at Hounslow.

In 1699 Thomas Littleton 3rd Baronet 1647-1709 (51) was appointed Treasurer of the Navy which post he held for life.

Between Apr 1783 and Dec 1783 Charles Townshend 1st Baron Bayning 1728-1810 (54) was appointed Treasurer of the Navy.

Tutor

In 1375 Guichard d'Angle 1st Earl Huntingdon -1380 was appointed Tutor to Richard II.

Before 1806 Joseph Allen Bishop 1770-1845 was appointed Tutor to John Charles Spencer 3rd Earl Spencer 1782-1845 which post he held until 1836.

1837. Thomas Phillips Painter 1770-1845. Portrait of Joseph Allen Bishop 1770-1845.

Vice Chamberlain to the Prince of Wales

Charles Nassau Thomas Vice Chamberlain to the Prince was appointed Vice Chamberlain to the Prince of Wales.