Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire

Hampshire is in South-East England.

786 Assassination of King Cynewulf

871 Battle of Basing

978 Murder of King Edward the Martyr

1001 First Battle of Alton

1051 Banishment of the Godwins

1100 Death of William Rufus Accession of Henry I

1101 Treaty of Alton

1415 Southampton Plot

1497 Cornish Rebellion

1497 Perkin Warbreck Plot

1591 Elizabeth's Royal Progress

1775 Birth of Jane Austen

In 495 Cerdic King Wessex landed with his son Cynric King Wessex in five ships at Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Alton

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1001. This year there was great commotion in England in consequence of an invasion by the Danes, who spread terror and devastation wheresoever they went, plundering and burning and desolating the country with such rapidity, that they advanced in one march as far as the town of Alton [Note. Not clear whether this is Alton, Hampshire]; where the people of Hampshire came against them, and fought with them. There was slain Ethelwerd, high-steward of the king (age 35), and Leofric of Whitchurch, and Leofwin, high-steward of the king, and Wulfhere, a bishop's thane, and Godwin of Worthy, son of Bishop Elfsy; and of all the men who were engaged with them eighty-one. Of the Danes there was slain a much greater number, though they remained in possession of the field of battle. Thence they proceeded westward, until they came into Devonshire; where Paley came to meet them with the ships which he was able to collect; for he had shaken off his allegiance to King Ethelred (age 35), against all the vows of truth and fidelity which he had given him, as well as the presents which the king had bestowed on him in houses and gold and silver. And they burned Teignton, and also many other goodly towns that we cannot name; and then peace was there concluded with them. And they proceeded thence towards Exmouth, Devon, so that they marched at once till they came to Pin-hoo; where Cole, high-steward of the king, and Edsy, reve of the king, came against them with the army that they could collect. But they were there put to flight, and there were many slain, and the Danes had possession of the field of battle. And the next morning they burned the village of Pin-hoo, and of Clist, and also many goodly towns that we cannot name. Then they returned eastward again, till they came to the Isle of Wight [Map]. The next morning they burned the town of Waltham, and many other small towns; soon after which the people treated with them, and they made peace.

After 25 Jul 1101 King Henry I "Beauclerc" England (age 33) and Robert Curthose III Duke Normandy (age 50), brothers, both sons of King William "Conqueror" I of England, signed the Treaty of Alton at Alton, Hampshire by which Robert Curthose III Duke Normandy (age 50) agreed to renounce his claim to the English throne in exchange for a yearly stipend and other concessions.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Alton, East Worldham

Around 1322 John Burghesh was born to Bartholomew "The Elder" Burghesh 1st Baron Burghesh (age 35) and Elizabeth Verdun Baroness Burghesh (age 22) at East Worldham, Alton.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Alton, Source of River Wey [Map]

The River Wey rises just west of the Alton [Map] in Hampshire and thereafter flows through, or near, Farnham, Surrey [Map] and Weybridge, Surrey [Map] after which it joins the River Thames around 2km west of Walton Bridge [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Ashe [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Barton Stacey [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Basingstoke

In 1613 Francis Palmes of Lindley (age 59) as sheriff, received Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland at Silchester, Hampshire [Map] and escorted her to Basingstoke, Hampshire, where she knighted him.

In 1685 George Wheler (age 33) was appointed Vicar of Basingstoke, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Basingstoke, Hackwood Park

On 17 Sep 1787 William Henry Vane 1st Duke Cleveland (age 21) and Catharine Margaret Powlett Countess Darlington (age 21) were married at her father's seat Hackwood Park, Hampshire. She the daughter of Harry Powlett 6th Duke Bolton (age 66) and Katherine Lowther Duchess of Bolton (age 51). He the son of Henry Vane 2nd Earl Darlington (age 60) and Margaret Lowther Countess Darlington (age 59). They were first cousins. He a great x 2 grandson of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Basingstoke, Sherbourne St John

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Basingstoke, Sherbourne St John, The Vyne [Map]

In 1440 William Sandys was born to Thomas Sandys (age 30) at The Vyne, Sherbourne St John [Map].

In 1470 William Sandys 1st Baron Sandys Vyne was born to William Sandys (age 30) and Margaret Cheney (age 17) at The Vyne, Sherbourne St John [Map].

Around 1520 Henry Sandys was born to Thomas Sandys 2nd Baron Sandys Vyne (age 23) and Elizabeth Manners Baroness Sandys Vyne at The Vyne, Sherbourne St John [Map].

In 1569 William Sandys 3rd Baron Sandys Vyne (age 24) was visited by Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 35) at The Vyne, Sherbourne St John [Map].

In 1754 John Chute (age 53) inherited The Vyne, Sherbourne St John [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Beaulieu [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Beaulieu Abbey [Map]

Annals of Margam. 1204. Rege Johanne fugiente in Angliam, Philippus Rex Francorum Normanniam occupat et Andegaviam. Misso convontu a Cistercio, et abbate5 eis præfecto, abbatia Belli Loci construitur. Cornubienses primo, deinde Devonienses, proinissa pecunia, gravissimum jugum forestariorum a se excutiunt.

King John fleeing to England, Philip, King of the Franks, occupies Normandy and Anjou. With a summons sent by the Cistercians, and the abbot5 in charge of them, the abbey of Beaulieu [Map] was built. The Cornish people, first, and then the Devonians, with money advanced, shake off the heavy yoke of the foresters.

Note 5. Hugh.

On 17 Jan 1240 Nicholas Cornwall died at Berkhamsted Castle, Hertfordshire [Map]. He was buried with his mother at Beaulieu Abbey [Map].

Letters. 1471. Letter XXXVIII. Anne Countess of Warwick (age 14) to the House of Commons.

To the right worshipful and discreet Commons of this present Parliament.

Sheweth unto your wisdoms and discretions the king's true liege woman, Anne countess of Warwick, which never offended his most redoubted highness; for she, immediately after the death of her lord and husband (age 17) - on whose soul God have mercy - for none offence by her done, but dreading only trouble, being that time within this realm, entered into the sanctuary of Beaulieu [Map] for surety of her person, to dispose for the weal and health of the soul of her said lord and husband, as right and conscience required her so to do; making within five days, or near thereabouts, after her entry into the said sanctuary, her labours, suits, and means to the king's highness for her safeguard, to be had as diligently and effectually as her power would extend. She not ceasing, but after her power continiling in such labours, suits, and means, insomuch that, in absence of clerks, she hath written letters in that behalf to the king's highness with her own hand, and not only making such labours, suits, and means to the king's highness, soothly also to the queen's (age 34) good grace, to my right redoubted lady the king's mother, to my lady the king's eldest daughter, to my lords the king's brethren, to my ladies the king's sisters, to my lady of Bedford (age 56), mother to the queen, and to other ladies noble of this realm; in which labours, suits, and means, she hath continued hitherto, and so will continue, as she owes to do, till it may please the king, of his most good and noble grace, to have consideration that, during the life of her said lord and husband, she was covert baron, which point she remits to your great wisdoms, and that after his decease, all the time of her being in the said sainctuary, she hath duly kept her fidelity and liegeance, and obeyed the king's commandments. Howbeity it hath pleased the king's highness, by some sinister information to his said highness made, to direct his most dread letters to the abbot of the monastery of Beaulieu, with right sharp commandment that such persons as his highness sent to the said monastery should have guard and strait keeping of her person, which was and is to her great heart's grievance, she specially fearing that the privileges and liberties of the church, by such keeping of her person, might be interrupted and violated, where the privileges of the said sanctuary were never so largely attempted unto this time, as is said; yet the said Anne and Countess, under protestations by her made, hath suffered strait keeping of her person and yet doth, that her fidelity and liegeance to the king's highness the better might be understood, hoping she might the rather have had largess to make suits to the king's highness in her own person for her livelihood and rightful inheritance, which livelihood and inheritance, with all revenues and profits thereto pertaining, with her jointure also, and dower of the earldom of Salisbury, fully and wholly hath been restrained from her, from the time of the death of her said lord and husband unto this day. And forasmuch as our sovereign lord the king of his great grace hath set and assembled his high court of Parliament for reformations, right, and equity to all his subjects and liege people duly to be ministered, the said Anne and Countess humbly beseecheth your great wisdom to ponder and weigh in your consciences her right and true title of her inheritance, as the earldom of Warwick and Spencer's lands, to which she is rightfully born by lineal succession, and also her jointure and dower of the earldom of Salisbury aforesaid. And to shew her your benevolence, that by the king's good grace and authority of this his noble Parliament she may to her foresaid livelihood and rightful inheritance duly be restored and it enjoy, as the laws of Almighty God and of this noble realm, right, also, and conscience doth require; beseeching heartily your great goodnesses, in the reverence of Almighty God and of his most blessed mother, will of grace to consider the poor estate she stands in, how in her own person she may not solicit the premises as she would, an she might, nor is of power any sufficient solicitor in this behalf to make; and though she might, as (she; may not, there is none that dare take it upon him; to have also this poor bill in your tender remembrance, that your perfect charity and good will may solicit the eflFect of the same, which to do, her power at this time may not extend. And shall pray and do pray to God for you.

In 1486 Anne Beauchamp 16th Countess Warwick (age 59) resided at Beaulieu Abbey [Map].

Wriothesley's Chronicle 1485-1509. Aug 1497... and in August Perkin Warbeck (age 23) landed in Cornewale,g and by pursuit fledd to Bowdley St. Marie [Map],h but by appoyntment he came to the Kinge, followinge the Courte.i

Note g. In Whitsand Bay; and, having sent his wife, the Lady Catherine Gordon, for safety to Mount St Michael, assumed the title of Richard IV.

Note h. The Sanctuary of Beaulieu [Map] in the New Forest, written in Arnold "Bewdeley sent wary," which has been erroneously transcribed in our MS. "St. Marie."

Note i. In Arnold this passage is, "and so remained following the Court."

Polydore Vergil. Around 20 Sep 1497. Learning of his enemies' departure, Henry (age 40) headed straight for Taunton, Somerset [Map]. Duke Edward of Buckingham (age 19) arrived there, a young man endowed with great spirit and virtue of character, and he was followed by a host of right noble knights with armor and all the other things requisite for warfare. In that number were Giles Briggs, Alexander Baynham, Maurice Berkeley, Robert Tames, John Guise, Robert Point, Henry Vernon, John Mortimer, Thomas Tremayle, Edward Sutton, Amyas Powlet (age 40), John Bicknell, John Sapcot, Hugh Luterell, John Wadham and his son Nicholas, John Speck, Richard Beauchamp of St. Amand, Francis Cheney, Rogerd Tokett, Thomas Long, Nicholas Lattimer, John d'Urbeville, William Storton, Roger Newberg, William Martin, Thomas Lind, Henry Rogers, Walter Hungerford, John Semery, Edward Carell, Maurice Borroughs, William Norris, John Langford, Richard Corbett, Thomas Blount, Richard Lacon, Thomas Cornwallis, and many other excellent soldiers. Meanwhile, when the king (age 40) had come up, either to avoid delaying the fight or fearing the fortune of war, he sent ahead Robert Lord Broke, Richard Thomas, and Giles Daubney (age 46) to begin the battle, while he followed after, so that, when he saw the battle begin, he could either come to the aid of his men or launch a simultaneous attack on the enemy rear. But the king's plan was unnecessary. For Peter (age 23) was so far from standing his ground, that after he learned the enemy were in arms, he furtively slipped away in the night and quickly fled to the asylum at Beaulieu Abbey [Map]. Whether he did this out of cowardice (with which he was well supplied), or because he suspected trickery, is not known, but it is well enough agreed that it was a good thing for the king that he was not compelled to come to blows with the Cornishmen, whose strength was so enhanced by despair that they had all determined on conquering or dying to the last man in that battle.

Perkin Warbreck was captured at Beaulieu Abbey [Map].

Polydore Vergil. While staying at Exeter, Devon [Map], the king scarcely imagined he had conquered or had removed all occasion for rebellion, unless he were to lay his hands on Peter, the head man of that plague. First he surrounded the asylum [Map] by two squadrons of horse so that no hope of escape would remain for Peter. Then, proposing a pardon and amnesty for everything he had done, he sent trusty messengers to make trial of the young man, to see if he would submit. Peter, now lacking in hope, lacking a home, lacking a fortune, when he saw he was enmeshed in these supreme difficulties because he was relying on that desperadoes' refuge, and calculated that all future ability gain to success had slipped through his hands, and had heard that a pardon was being offered, at length, relying on the faith of the nation, voluntarily came out of the asylum, and placed himself in Henry's power. And so this great rising was suddenly put down. Having waged this war with success and wonderfully happy, the king went to London. Wherever he went, men came running to have a look at Peter, a source of wonderment for everybody. For he, a foreign-born man relying on nothing else but the recommendation of his betters (although it was proclaimed otherwise), had dared cause trouble for such a great kingdom with his pranks and by his wily schemes, and had led so many people and sovereigns to believe the lies he had said about himself, not without their great harm.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Belmont

On 20 Dec 1802 Ulick Burgh 1st Marquess Clanricarde was born to John Thomas Burgh 13th Earl Clanricarde (age 58) at Belmont, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bentley

Around 1446 Robert Scrope was born to Henry Scrope 4th Baron Scrope of Bolton (age 27) and Elizabeth Scrope Baroness Scrope Bolton at Bentley, Hampshire.

In Apr 1485 Richard Scrope (age 43) died at Bentley, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bere Mill [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bickton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bishop's Waltham [Map]

On 27 Sep 1404 Bishop William of Wykeham (age 84) died at Bishop's Waltham [Map]. He was buried in a chantry chapel on the south side of Winchester Cathedral [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bishop's Waltham, Bishop Waltham's Palace [Map]

On 10 Oct 1344 Mary Plantagenet Duchess Brittany was born to King Edward III of England (age 31) and Philippa of Hainault Queen Consort England (age 30) at Bishop Waltham's Palace, Hampshire [Map]. Coefficient of inbreeding 3.00%.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bishop's Waltham, Durley Mill Bishops Waltham [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bishop's Waltham, Source of the River Hamble [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bishopstoke [Map]

Around 1589 Richard Dummer was born to Thomas Dummer at Bishopstoke, Hampshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bistern [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bossington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Botley [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bransbury [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Breamore [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Broadlands [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Broughton

In 1466 Bishop Oliver King (age 34) was appointed Rector of Broughton, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Bullington [Map]

John of Worcester. 1053. Rhys, the brother of Griffyth, king of South Wales, was put to death by order of king Edward (age 50) at a place called Bullington, Hampshire [Map], on account of the plundering inroads he had frequently made, and his head was brought to the king at Gloucester on the eve of our Lord's Epiphany [5th January]. In the same year, on the second day of the festival of Easter [12th April], which was celebrated at Winchester, Hampshire [Map], earl Godwin (age 52) came to his end while he was sitting at table with the king, according to his usual custom; for, being suddenly seized with a violent illness, he fell speechless from his seat. His sons, earl Harold (age 31), Tosti (age 27), and Gurth (age 21), perceiving it, carried him into the king's chamber, hoping that he would presently recover; but his strength failing, he died in great suffering on the fifth day afterwards [15th April], and was buried in the Old Minster. His son Harold (age 31) succeeded to his earldom, and Harold's (age 31) earldom was given to Algar, son of earl Leofric.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Burgate [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Burghclere

On 16 Apr 1833 Henry George Herbert 2nd Earl Carnarvon (age 60) died at Grosvenor Square, Belgravia. He was buried at Burghclere, Hampshire. His son Henry John George Herbert 3rd Earl Carnarvon (age 32) succeeded 3rd Earl Carnarvon, 3rd Baron Porchester. Henrietta Anna Howard-Molyneux-Howard Countess Carnarvon (age 28) by marriage Countess Carnarvon.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Buriton

In 1319 Peter Cornwall was born to Edmund Cornwall (age 39) at Buriton, Hampshire. He a great x 2 grandson of King John "Lackland" of England.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Burlesden [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Chauton

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Chilbolton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Clatford

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Clatford, Red Rice

On 04 Aug 1842 William Noel-Hill 3rd Baron Berwick (age 68) died at Red Rice, Clatford unmarried and without issue at Red Rice, Clatford. He was buried at St Eata's Church, Atcham. His brother Richard Noel-Hill 4th Baron Berwick (age 67) succeeded 4th Baron Berwick of Attingham in Shropshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Cobden Bridge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Compton

In 1516 John Philpot was born at Compton, Hampshire. He was educated at Winchester College , Winchester and New College, Oxford University.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Corhampton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Curbridge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Damerham [Map]

The River Allen rises at Martin, Hampshire [Map] from where it flows south-east through Damerham, Hampshire [Map] and Alderholt Mill [Map] to Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map] where it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Danebury

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Danebury Barrows [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Danebury Barrows, Danebury Barrow 1 [Map]

Danebury Barrow 1 is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wessex from the Air Plate 30. Reference No. 163. Geological Formation. Upper Chalk. County. Hants. 31 NW. (122: E. 12). Time and Date of Photograph. 6.4 p.m., 26th June. Parish. Nether Wallop. Height of Aeroplane. 3,300 ft. (1,006 metres), Latitude. 51° 8' 34" N. Longitude. 1° 32' 22" W. Speed of Shutter, 1/80th of a second. Height above Sea-level. A little over 300 ft. (91 metres).

There are three barrows visible on this plate, two long barrows and one oval barrow.

The two long barrows [Danebury Barrow 1 [Map] and Danebury Barrow 2 [Map]] were discovered by Dr. Williams-Freeman, and are referred to in his book (Field Archaeology of Hampshire, 1915, p. 155). In spite of being annually ploughed over, they are both still in a good state of preservation. The dark lines of the parallel side-ditches can be clearly seen on the plate. The two barrows are 180 ft. apart; and lie about 600 yds. north-west of Danebury.

The south-western barrow is 213 ft. long: from the bottom of the ditch to the highest point of the barrow is 9 ft. 6 in., and the top of the ditch itself is i ft. 8 in. below the adjacent ground level. The orientation is 118° Magnetic (1924).

The north-eastern barrow is 177 ft. long and 6 ft. 7 in. high; the ditch is i ft. 3 in. below ground-level; and the orientation is 110° Magnetic (1924).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Danebury Barrows, Danebury Barrow 2 [Map]

Danebury Barrow 2 is also in South England Neolithic Long Barrows.

Wessex from the Air Plate 30. Reference No. 163. Geological Formation. Upper Chalk. County. Hants. 31 NW. (122: E. 12). Time and Date of Photograph. 6.4 p.m., 26th June. Parish. Nether Wallop. Height of Aeroplane. 3,300 ft. (1,006 metres), Latitude. 51° 8' 34" N. Longitude. 1° 32' 22" W. Speed of Shutter, 1/80th of a second. Height above Sea-level. A little over 300 ft. (91 metres).

There are three barrows visible on this plate, two long barrows and one oval barrow.

The two long barrows [Danebury Barrow 1 [Map] and Danebury Barrow 2 [Map]] were discovered by Dr. Williams-Freeman, and are referred to in his book (Field Archaeology of Hampshire, 1915, p. 155). In spite of being annually ploughed over, they are both still in a good state of preservation. The dark lines of the parallel side-ditches can be clearly seen on the plate. The two barrows are 180 ft. apart; and lie about 600 yds. north-west of Danebury.

The south-western barrow is 213 ft. long: from the bottom of the ditch to the highest point of the barrow is 9 ft. 6 in., and the top of the ditch itself is i ft. 8 in. below the adjacent ground level. The orientation is 118° Magnetic (1924).

The north-eastern barrow is 177 ft. long and 6 ft. 7 in. high; the ditch is i ft. 3 in. below ground-level; and the orientation is 110° Magnetic (1924).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Danebury Barrows, Danebury Barrow 3 [Map]

Danebury Barrow 3 is also in South England Bronze Age.

Wessex from the Air Plate 30. The oval barrow [Map] was discovered by me. Before I saw it from the air, I regarded it as a short long barrow. Its length is 110 ft.; its breadth 80 ft.; and its height 5 ft. 4 in. From the air, however, as this plate shows, it is plainly revealed as not a long barrow. It has interesting features, however; it is made of dug chalk, not scraped soil; and it is probable from the size and irregularity of the black belt marking the ditch, that the material of the mound was entirely derived from the surrounding ditch. That is an unusual feature in round barrows. Normally, the mound was piled first and the ditch dug afterwards; and it was generally far too small to have provided all the material for the mound." In the case of long barrows, as is well seen here, the material of the mound was always entirely derived from the side-ditches; and one would imagine that round or oval barrows constructed in the same way would, therefore, be earlier than the others; the encircling ditch being retained by custom after its original utilitarian purpose was forgotten. Unfortunately, the data for testing this a priori reasoning are not adequate. But one of the barrows on Handley Down excavated by General Pitt-Rivers may be described here, since in method of construction it seems to have resembled the oval barrow here— so far as we can infer from the air-photograph.

The barrow (no. 27) is described in vol. iv of the General's Excavations, pp. 136—8. It lay on Handley Down, Dorset, 104 yds. to the north of Wor Barrow, the celebrated long barrow that he excavated completely. ' It was found that beneath the mound a very irregular ditch had been dug, varying in depth from 2 ft. to 4½ ft. in different places, and of irregular width and outline, conforming only more or less to the fine of the bottom of the barrow, and having cavities and separate pits, evidently dug for the same purpose of obtaining chalk and earth for the barrow; but with no intention of forming a symmetrical ditch round it.' This irregularity resembles that of the side-ditches of Wor Barrow, which were fully cleared out. Evidence of early date was found in the character of the potsherds from the ditch and interior of the mound; all the potsherds (five in number) from the interior, found together at a depth of 1 ft. were of the General's 'No. 1 British' quality: and of those found in the ditch — 54 in were 'No. 1 British', one was 'beaker', and one of later date. It is safe to conclude that the barrow was not later than the period of the bulk of the potsherds, that is to say, than the neolithic period, or possibly, the Early Bronze Age. (No primary interment or cist seems to have been found.)

It is much to be desired that the oval barrow here portrayed should be excavated, under expert supervision, to determine the age of this type of mound.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Dogmersfield

On 09 May 1329 Bishop John Droxford aka Drokensford died at his episcopal manor-house at Dogmersfield, Hampshire. He was buried in St Katherine's Chapel, Wells Cathedral [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Droxford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, East Aston [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, East Meon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, East Stratton

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, East Stratton, Stratton Park House

On 03 Apr 1848 Thomas Baring 2nd Baronet (age 75) died at Stratton Park House. His son Francis Baring 1st Baron Northbrook (age 51) succeeded 3rd Baronet Baring of Larkbeer in Devon.

On 15 Nov 1904 Thomas Baring 1st Earl Northbrook (age 78) died at Stratton Park House. His son Francis Baring 2nd Earl Northbrook (age 53) succeeded 2nd Earl Northbrook, 3rd Baron Northbrook, 5th Baronet Baring of Larkbeer in Devon. Florence Anita Coote Countess Northbrook (age 43) by marriage Countess Northbrook.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Eastleigh

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Eastleigh, Hamble le Rice

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Eastleigh, Hamble le Rice, Sydney Lodge

On 02 Apr 1799 Charles Yorke 4th Earl of Hardwicke was born to Admiral Joseph Sydney Yorke (age 30) and Elizabeth Weake Rattray at Sydney Lodge, Hamble le Rice.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Easton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Empshott [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Exbury

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Exbury House

On 10 Feb 1744 Colonel William Mitford Historian was born to John Mitford1688-1761 (age 56) at Exbury House.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Exton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Farleigh Wallop

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Farleigh Wallop, St John's Church

In 1279 the advoson of St John's Church, Farleigh Wallop was was granted with the manor to Robert de Mortimer by Henry de Farley. This Robert and Joyce his wife brought suits against Nicholas bishop of Winchester and Henry de 'Farley,' both of whom appear not to have recognized their right of patronage.

On 12 Oct 1738 Bridget Bennet Viscountess Lymington (age 42) died. She was buried at St John's Church, Farleigh Wallop.

On 19 Nov 1749 John Wallop Viscount Lymington (age 31) died. He was buried at St John's Church, Farleigh Wallop.

On 22 Nov 1762 John Wallop 1st Earl Portsmouth (age 72) died. He was buried at St John's Church, Farleigh Wallop. His grandson John Wallop 2nd Earl Portsmouth (age 20) succeeded 2nd Earl Portsmouth, 2nd Viscount Lymington, 2nd Baron Wallop of Farley Wallop Hampshire.

On 14 Jul 1853 John Wallop 3rd Earl Portsmouth (age 85) died. He was buried at St John's Church, Farleigh Wallop. His brother Newton Wallop aka Fellowes 4th Earl of Portsmouth (age 81) succeeded 4th Earl Portsmouth, 4th Viscount Lymington, 4th Baron Wallop of Farley Wallop Hampshire. He died six months later. Catherine Fortescue Countess Portsmouth (age 66) by marriage Countess Portsmouth.

Around 1873 St John's Church, Farleigh Wallop was rebuilt in a Gothic style.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Farnborough

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Farnborough, St Peter's Church

On 03 Nov 1690 Richard Power 1st Earl Tyrone (deceased) was buried in St Peter's Church, Farnborough.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Fordingbridge [Map]

In 1375 Amice Pembridge (age 45) died at Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map].

In Nov 1517 Edward Willoughby (age 26) died at Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map].

The River Allen rises at Martin, Hampshire [Map] from where it flows south-east through Damerham, Hampshire [Map] and Alderholt Mill [Map] to Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map] where it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Sweatfords Water rises a kilometre north-west of Rockbourne, Hampshire [Map] from where it flows south-west to Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map] where it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Fordingbridge, Alderholt Mill [Map]

The River Allen rises at Martin, Hampshire [Map] from where it flows south-east through Damerham, Hampshire [Map] and Alderholt Mill [Map] to Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map] where it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Forton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Freefolk [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Gosport

On 10 Aug 1730 Admiral Richard King 1st Baronet was born to Curtis King (age 30) and Mary Barnett (age 27) at Gosport, Hampshire.

On 14 Feb 1778 John Amherst (age 60) died in Gosport, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hale [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hale, St Mary's Church [Map]

St Mary's Church, Hale [Map]. Memorial sculpted by Joesph Wilton to Henry Archer d. 1768 who was 5 times MP for Warwick and commemorated in St Mary's Hale, Hants. In 1734 he was appointed a Trustee of Georgia in America.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hamble le Rice [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Harley Wintney

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Harley Wintney, Elvetham Hall [Map]

On 22 Oct 1591 Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland (age 58) arrived in Elvetham Hall, Hampshire [Map] where she was entertained in magnificent style by Edward Seymour 1st Earl Hertford (age 52).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hartley Maudit

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hartley Maudit, St Leonard's Church [Map]

St Leonard's Church, Hartley Maudit [Map]. The Stewart ancestry proudly displayed at Hartley Mauditt, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Highclere

Highclere Castle

In 30 Jul 1692 Robert Sawyer (age 59) died at his home Highclere Castle.

In 1928 Reginald Lee Fendall Wendell (age 30) died at Highclere Castle.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hill Head [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hinton Ampner

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hinton Ampner, All Saints Church [Map]

On 20 Apr 1985 Ralph Stawell Dutton 8th Baron Sherborne (age 86) died unmarried. He was buried at All Saints Church, Hinton Ampner [Map]. Baron Sherborne extinct. He gave his estates, including Hinton Ampner House, Winchester, to the National Trust.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hinton Ampner House

On 25 Dec 1982 Charles Dutton 7th Baron Sherborne (age 71) died. His second cousin once removed Ralph Stawell Dutton 8th Baron Sherborne (age 84) succeeded 8th Baron Sherborne and inherited Hinton Ampner House, Winchester.

On 20 Apr 1985 Ralph Stawell Dutton 8th Baron Sherborne (age 86) died unmarried. He was buried at All Saints Church, Hinton Ampner [Map]. Baron Sherborne extinct. He gave his estates, including Hinton Ampner House, Winchester, to the National Trust.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Houghton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Hursley

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Ibsley [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Itchen [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Kimbridge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, King's Somborne

King's Somborne, Hampshire was included in the Domesday Book in 1086 when it was claimed by the King's bailiff by the King in lordship and known as "Sunburne". As a part of the Crown's lands, it was not assessed for taxation. The book records 25 villagers, eight smallholders, two slaves and seven freedmen. Three mills and two churches are also reported and land for ten ploughs in addition to meadow land and pasture.

The London Gazette 19271. Whitehall, May 8, 1835

The King has been pleased to give and grant unto the Reverend John Barker (age 31), Clerk, Master of Arts, Vicar of Kingsomborne, in the county of Southampton, only surviving son and heir of John Barker, late of Wareham, in the county of Dorset, Esq. by Mary his wife, only daughter of the Reverend Sir Charles Mill, some time of Mottisfont, in the said county of Southampton, Bart, and sister of Sir Charles Mill, late of Bury-house, in the parish of Eling, in the said last-mentioned county, Bart, all deceased, His royal licence and authority that, in compliance with a proviso in the last will and testament of his maternal uncle, the said Sir Charles Mill, and in testimony of his grateful and affectionate respect for the memory of the said testator, he, the said John Barker (age 31), and his issue may take and use the surname of Mill as his and their surname, in addition to and after that of Barker, and that he and they may also bear the arms of Mill; such arms being first duly exemplified according to the laws of arms, and recorded in the Heralds' Office, otherwise the said royal licence and permission to be void and of none effect.

And His Majesty has been further pleased to command, that this concession and declaration be registered in His College of Arms.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Kingsclere

Around 1450 Edward Dinley was born at Kingsclere, Hampshire.

On 25 Jan 1583 James Christopher Allen was born to Christopher Allen (age 22) in Kingsclere, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Knowle [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Leckford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Liss [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Lymington

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Lymington, Milford Lodge

On 08 May 1857 Thomas Legh (age 64) died at Milford Lodge, Lymington. His nephew William John Legh 1st Baron Newton (age 28) inherited his estates including Lyme Hall [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Madddoxford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mansbridge Bridge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mapledurwell

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mapledurwell, Source of the River Loddon [Map]

The River Loddon is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins just west of Wargrave [Map]. Its rises at Mapledurwell [Map] in Hampshire and flows broadly north passing Stratfield Saye House [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Martin [Map]

The River Allen rises at Martin, Hampshire [Map] from where it flows south-east through Damerham, Hampshire [Map] and Alderholt Mill [Map] to Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map] where it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Meonstoke [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Middleton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mislingford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mortimer's Hall

In 1442 Robert Mortimer was born at Mortimer's Hall, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mottisfont [Map]

On 28 Oct 1628 William Sandys (age 53) died. He was buried at Mottisfont, Hampshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Mottisfont Abbey [Map]

On 20 Feb 1860 John Barker aka Barker-Mill 1st Baronet (age 56) died at Mottisfont Abbey [Map]. Baronet Barker of Mottisfont in Southampton extinct.

On 02 Jan 1884 Jane Swinburne Lady Barker-Mill (age 86) died at Mottisfont Abbey [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Netley Marsh

In 508 Natanleod King Britons was killed by Cerdic King Wessex and 5000 of his men, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle at Netley Marsh, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Netley

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, New Cheriton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, New Forest

Before 1075 Richard Normandy (age 21) was killed whilst hunting at New Forest, Hampshire. He was buried at Winchester Cathedral [Map].

On 02 Aug 1100 William "Rufus" II King England (age 44) was killed whilst hunting, not known whether accidentally or otherwise, in the New Forest, Hampshire. His brother King Henry I "Beauclerc" England (age 32) succeeded I King England. The brothers Robert Beaumont 1st Earl of Leicester Count Meulan (age 60) and Henry Beaumont 1st Earl Warwick (age 50), and Roger de Clare (age 34) and Gilbert de Clare (age 34) were present.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Northam Bridge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Nursling

On 28 Dec 1725 Charles Knollys 5th Earl Banbury (age 22) and Martha Hughes (age 21) were married at Nursling, Hampshire. He the son of Charles Knollys 4th Earl Banbury (age 63) and Mary Woods (age 41).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Old Alresford

On 16 Jun 1820 Arthur George Onslow was born to Arthur George Onslow 3rd Earl Onslow (age 42) and Charlotte Hanmer Countess Onslow at Old Alresford, Hampshire.

On 07 Mar 1853 William Onslow 4th Earl Onslow was born to George Augustus Cranley Onslow (age 39) and Mary Harriet Anne Loftus at Old Alresford, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Old Basing [Map]

Assers Life of Alfred 871. 22 Jan 871. 40. Battle of Basing.89 After90 fourteen days had elapsed King Æthelred (age 24) and his brother Alfred (age 22) joined their forces, and marched to Basing91 to fight with the heathen. Having thus assembled, battle was joined, and they held their own for a long time, but the heathen gained the victory, and held possession of the battle-field. After this fight, another army of heathen came from beyond sea, and joined them.

Note 89. From the Chronicle.

Note 90. Before this sentence occurs the following in the Latin: Quibus cum talia præsentis vitæ dispendia alienigenis perperam quærentibus non sufficerent. This may represent a sentence in the author's draft that was intended, owing to change of construction, to be omitted (Stevenson).

Note 91. In Hampshire.

On 22 Jan 871 King Æthelred of Wessex (age 24) was defeated by the Viking army at the Battle of Basing at Old Basing, Hampshire [Map].

On 07 Mar 1429 Thomas Poynings 5th Baron St John Basing (age 78) died at Old Basing, Hampshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Old Basing, Basing House

In Aug 1603 during a plague in London the royal court moved to Basing House, Old Basing. Francis Palmes of Lindley (age 49) entertained courtiers at his house nearby at Lancelevy, Sherfield on Loddon. The party included Lady Anne Clifford (age 13), her mother Margaret Clifford (age 43), Countess of Cumberland and Elizabeth Bourchier, Countess of Bath, who used Lancelevy as a base to visit Anne of Denmark (age 28) and Arbella Stuart (age 28).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Old Basing, Sherfield on Loddon

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Old Basing, Sherfield on Loddon, Lancelevy

In Aug 1603 during a plague in London the royal court moved to Basing House, Old Basing. Francis Palmes of Lindley (age 49) entertained courtiers at his house nearby at Lancelevy, Sherfield on Loddon. The party included Lady Anne Clifford (age 13), her mother Margaret Clifford (age 43), Countess of Cumberland and Elizabeth Bourchier, Countess of Bath, who used Lancelevy as a base to visit Anne of Denmark (age 28) and Arbella Stuart (age 28).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Old Basing, St Mary's Church [Map]

St Mary's Church, Old Basing [Map]. There are several large and small wall monuments (one by John Flaxman 1784), hatchments (one with the Royal Coat of Arms of 1660).

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Overton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Ovington [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Owlesbury

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Owlesbury, St Andrew's Church [Map]

On 16 Mar 1166 King Henry "Curtmantle" II of England (age 33) travelled from St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury [Map] to Falaise, Calvados, Basse Normandie.

On 10 Feb 1732 George Carpenter 1st Baron Carpenter (age 75) died. He was buried at St Andrew's Church, Owlesbury [Map]. His son George Carpenter 2nd Baron Carpenter (age 37) succeeded 2nd Baron Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary. Elizabeth Petty Baroness Carpenter by marriage Baroness Carpenter of Killaghy in County Tipperary.

Portchester Castle, Hampshire

Around 1200 Robert St John was born at Portchester Castle, Hampshire [Map].

On 31 Jul 1415, when King Henry V of England (age 28) was in Portchester Castle, Hampshire [Map] preparing to invade France, Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March 7th Earl Ulster (age 23) revealed the Southampton Plot to him. Henry Scrope 3rd Baron Scrope Masham (age 42), Thomas Grey of Werke and Heaton (age 30), and Richard of Conisbrough 1st Earl Cambridge (age 30) were intending to replace King Henry V of England (age 28) with Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March 7th Earl Ulster (age 23) as King of England based on Edmund Mortimer 5th Earl March 7th Earl Ulster (age 23) having a better claim to the throne being descended from Edward III's second son Lionel Plantagenet 1st Duke of Clarence whereas King Henry V of England (age 28) was descended from the third son John of Gaunt 1st Duke Lancaster.

Robert Willoughby 6th Baron Willoughby (age 30), Richard de Vere 11th Earl of Oxford (age 29), Thomas Montagu 1st Count Perche 4th Earl Salisbury (age 27) and Thomas Camoys 1st Baron Camoys (age 64) sat in judgement.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Privett

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 755. This year Cynewulf, with the consent of the West-Saxon council, deprived Sebright, his relative, for unrighteous deeds, of his kingdom, except Hampshire; which he retained, until he slew the alderman who remained the longest with him. Then Cynewulf drove him to the forest of Andred [Note. The Weald in South-East England], where he remained, until a swain stabbed him at Privett, and revenged the alderman, Cumbra. The same Cynewulf fought many hard battles with the Welsh; and, about one and thirty winters after he had the kingdom, he was desirous of expelling a prince called Cyneard, who was the brother of Sebright. But he having understood that the king was gone, thinly attended, on a visit to a lady at Merton28, rode after him, and beset him therein; surrounding the town without, ere the attendants of the king were aware of him. When the king found this, he went out of doors, and defended himself with courage; till, having looked on the etheling, he rushed out upon him, and wounded him severely. Then were they all fighting against the king, until they had slain him. As soon as the king's thanes in the lady's bower heard the tumult, they ran to the spot, whoever was then ready. The etheling immediately offered them life and rewards; which none of them would accept, but continued fighting together against him, till they all lay dead, except one British hostage, and he was severely wounded. When the king's thanes that were behind heard in the morning that the king was slain, they rode to the spot, Osric his alderman, and Wiverth his thane, and the men that he had left behind; and they met the etheling at the town, where the king lay slain. The gates, however, were locked against them, which they attempted to force; but he promised them their own choice of money and land, if they would grant him the kingdom; reminding them, that their relatives were already with him, who would never desert him. To which they answered, that no relative could be dearer to them than their lord, and that they would never follow his murderer. Then they besought their relatives to depart from him, safe and sound. They replied, that the same request was made to their comrades that were formerly with the king; "And we are as regardless of the result," they rejoined, "as our comrades who with the king were slain." Then they continued fighting at the gates, till they rushed in, and slew the etheling and all the men that were with him; except one, who was the godson of the alderman, and whose life he spared, though he was often wounded. This same Cynewulf reigned one and thirty winters. His body lies at Winchester, and that of the etheling at Axminster. Their paternal pedigree goeth in a direct line to Cerdic. The same year Ethelbald, king of the Mercians, was slain at Seckington; and his body lies at Repton [Map]. He reigned one and forty years; and Bernred then succeeded to the kingdom, which he held but a little while, and unprosperously; for King Offa the same year put him to flight, and assumed the government; which he held nine and thirty winters. His son Everth held it a hundred and forty days. Offa was the son of Thingferth, Thingferth of Enwulf, Enwulf of Osmod, Osmod of Eawa, Eawa of Webba, Webba of Creoda, Creoda of Cenwald, Cenwald of Cnebba-, Cnebba of Icel, Icel of Eomer, Eomer of Angelthew, Angelthew of Offa, Offa of Wermund, Wermund of Witley, Witley of Woden.

Note 28. The minuteness of this narrative, combined with the simplicity of it, proves that it was written at no great distance of time from the event. It is the first that occurs of any length in the older MSS. of the "Saxon Chronicle".

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Quidhampton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Ringwood [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Ringwood, Moyles Court

On 22 Feb 1902 Reverend Frederic Fane (age 76) died at Moyles Court.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Rockbourne [Map]

Sweatfords Water rises a kilometre north-west of Rockbourne, Hampshire [Map] from where it flows south-west to Fordingbridge, Hampshire [Map] where it joins the Wiltshire River Avon.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Romsey [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Romsey Abbey [Map]

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 971. This year died Edmund Atheling (age 5), and his body lies at Rumsey [Map].

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1086. Then he went into Normandy; and Edgar Etheling (age 35), the relation of King Edward, revolted from him, for he received not much honour from him; but may the Almighty God give him honour hereafter. And Christina (age 29), the sister of the etheling (age 35), went into the monastery of Rumsey [Map], and received the holy veil.

On 05 Feb 1911 Amalia Mary Maud Cassel (age 31) died of tuberculosis. She was buried at Romsey Abbey [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Ropley

On 12 Feb 1766 Archbishop William Howley was born at Ropley, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Rotherwick

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Sheet [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Silchester [Map]

In 1613 Francis Palmes of Lindley (age 59) as sheriff, received Queen Elizabeth I of England and Ireland at Silchester, Hampshire [Map] and escorted her to Basingstoke, Hampshire, where she knighted him.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Silchester Roman Fort [Map]

Ermine Street 41a travels from Silchester Roman Fort [Map] to Speen, Newbury [Map].

The Port Way, Margary's RM4, starts in London and travels through Silchester Roman Fort [Map] aka Calleva Atrebatum, Old Sarum [Map], Badbury Rings [Map], Dorchester, Dorset [Map], Poole Harbour, Dorset [Map] to Exeter, Devon [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Solent

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Solent, Spithead

Travels through the middle settlements in North America Chapter 1. 27 Apr 1759. On Friday the 27th of April 1759, I embarked, in company with several North American gentlemen, on board the Dispatch, captain Necks, for Virginia; and the next day we set sail from Spithead, Solent, under convoy of his majesty's ship the Lynn, captain Sterling, commander, with thirty-three fail of trading vessels. We came to an anchor in the evening in Yarmouth Road, and the next day sailed with a fresh easterly wind through the Needles.

In Feb 1789 Henry Paulet (age 21) was made junior lieutenant aboard HMS Crown at Spithead, Solent. HMS Crown became the flagship of Commodore William Cornwallis (age 45), who sailed with a squadron to India. Paulet reached Tenerife with the ship, but on the squadron's arrival there he was transferred to the frigate HMS Phoenix in exchange for one of the Phoenix's lieutenants. Paulet completed the voyage to India with the Phoenix, but shortly after his arrival he learnt that he was not to be taken back aboard the Crown. He was invalided back to Britain aboard the East Indiaman Houghton.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Solent, The Horse Sand

Pepy's Diary. 11 Jan 1661. Office day. This day comes news, by letters from Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map], that the Princess Henrietta (age 16) is fallen sick of the meazles on board the London, after the Queen (age 51) and she was under sail. And so was forced to come back again into Portsmouth, Hampshire [Map] harbour; and in their way, by negligence of the pilot, run upon the Horse Sand. The Queen (age 51) and she continue aboard, and do not intend to come on shore till she sees what will become of the young Princess. This news do make people think something indeed, that three of the Royal Family should fall sick of the same disease, one after another.

Pepy's Diary. 20 Oct 1666. He says that Hubberd that commanded this year the Admiral's ship is a proud conceited fellow (though I thought otherwise of him), and fit to command a single ship but not a fleete, and he do wonder that there hath not been more mischief this year than there hath. He says the fleete come to anchor between the Horse and the Island [Map], so that when they came to weigh many of the ships could not turn, but run foul of the Horse, and there stuck, but that the weather was good. He says that nothing can do the King (age 36) more disservice, nor please the standing officers of the ship better than these silly commanders that now we have, for they sign to anything that their officers desire of them, nor have judgment to contradict them if they would.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Solent, The Needles

Travels through the middle settlements in North America Chapter 1. 27 Apr 1759. On Friday the 27th of April 1759, I embarked, in company with several North American gentlemen, on board the Dispatch, captain Necks, for Virginia; and the next day we set sail from Spithead, Solent, under convoy of his majesty's ship the Lynn, captain Sterling, commander, with thirty-three fail of trading vessels. We came to an anchor in the evening in Yarmouth Road, and the next day sailed with a fresh easterly wind through the Needles.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Someroy

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Someroy, Harbridge

On 06 Sep 1876 Edward Villiers 5th Earl Clarendon (age 30) and Caroline Elizabeth Agar Countess Clarendon (age 19) were married at Harbridge, Someroy. She by marriage Countess Clarendon. She the daughter of James Charles Agar 3rd Earl Normanton (age 57) and Caroline Susan Augusta Barrington Countess Normanton (age 41). He the son of George William Villiers 4th Earl Clarendon and Katherine Grimston Countess Clarendon. She a great x 5 granddaughter of King Charles II of England Scotland and Ireland.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Sopley [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, South Harewood [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, South Stoneham

On 14 Nov 1739 Hans Sloane Stanley was born to William Sloane (age 43) at South Stoneham, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Southampton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Southampton, All Saints Church

On 06 Jul 1841 Captain Ebenezer Jones (age 43) and Caroline Rainier (age 33) were married at All Saints Church, Southampton.

On 31 Oct 1852 Elizabeth Crow of Middlesex died. She was buried at All Saints Church, Southampton.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Southampton, King Edward VI School

Around 1579 Bishop Arthur Lake (age 9) educated at King Edward VI School, Southampton.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, North Gate Southampton [Map]

On 02 Aug 1415 Thomas Grey of Werke and Heaton (age 30) was beheaded at North Gate Southampton, Hampshire [Map] for his role in the Southampton Plot.

On 05 Aug 1415 two executions of those involved in the Southampton Plot took place at the North Gate aka Bargate [Map]:

Richard of Conisbrough 1st Earl Cambridge (age 30) was beheaded. His son Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke York (age 3) succeeded 2nd Earl Cambridge.

Henry Scrope 3rd Baron Scrope Masham (age 42) was beheaded. His brother John Scrope 4th Baron Scrope Masham (age 27) succeeded 4th Baron Scrope Masham.

Southampton Castle

In 1361 Richard Pembridge (age 41) was appointed Constable of Southampton Castle.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Southampton, St Mary's Area

In 634 Bishop Birinus of Dorchester came to England landing at Hamwic where he founded St Mary's Church, Southampton. He was appointed Bishop of Dorchester.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Southampton, St Mary's Area, St Mary's Church

In 634 Bishop Birinus of Dorchester came to England landing at Hamwic where he founded St Mary's Church, Southampton. He was appointed Bishop of Dorchester.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Steventon

On 16 Dec 1775 Jane Austen was born to George Austen (age 44) and Cassandra Leigh (age 36) in Steventon, Hampshire. She was baptised on 05 Apr 1775 at St Nicholas' Church, Steventon at which her father was rector; the delay being caused by adverse weather.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Steventon, St Nicholas' Church

On 16 Dec 1775 Jane Austen was born to George Austen (age 44) and Cassandra Leigh (age 36) in Steventon, Hampshire. She was baptised on 05 Apr 1775 at St Nicholas' Church, Steventon at which her father was rector; the delay being caused by adverse weather.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Stockbridge [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Stoke Charity [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Stoneham Park

On 07 Aug 1613 Thomas Fleming (age 69) died in Stoneham Park, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Stratfield Saye Estate [Map]

In 1706 John Pitt was born to George Pitt (age 43) in Stratfield Saye Estate, Hampshire [Map].

In 1754 Louisa Pitt was born to George Pitt 1st Baron Rivers (age 32) in Stratfield Saye Estate, Hampshire [Map].

In 1787 John Pitt (age 81) died in Stratfield Saye Estate, Hampshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Stratfield Saye Estate, Stratfield Saye House [Map]

The River Loddon is a tributary of the River Thames which it joins just west of Wargrave [Map]. Its rises at Mapledurwell [Map] in Hampshire and flows broadly north passing Stratfield Saye House [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Sutton Scotney [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Sydmontham

In Apr 1661 Anne Kingsmill Countess Winchelsea was born to William Kingsmill at Sydmontham, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Testwood

On 14 Dec 1590 John West was born to Thomas West 2nd Baron De La Warr (age 34) and Anne Knollys Baroness De La Warr (age 35) at Testwood, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Tichbourne [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Timsbury [Map]

On 08 Oct 1892 Ralph Heneage Dutton (age 71) died. He was buried at Timsbury, Hampshire [Map]. On 27 Feb 1895 Isabella Mansfield (age 70) died. Memorials in Saint Mary Magdalene's Church, Sherborne [Map] to Ralph Heneage Dutton (age 71) and Isabella Mansfield (age 67).

Ralph Heneage Dutton: On 05 Aug 1821 he was born to John Dutton 2nd Baron Sherborne at Sherborne, Gloucestershire. On 03 Aug 1838 Ralph Heneage Dutton and Isabella Mansfield were married. In 1857 Ralph Heneage Dutton was elected MP South Hampshire. In 1865 Ralph Heneage Dutton was elected MP Cirencester.

Isabella Mansfield: On 30 Dec 1824 she was born to John Mansfield.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Tufton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Twyford [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Upton Grey

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Upton Grey, St Mary's Church

In 1650 Dorothy Bulstrode Lady in Waiting (age 58) died. She was buried in St Mary's Church, Upton Grey.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Warblington Havant

Around 1358 Eleanor Montagu was born to John Montagu 1st Baron Montagu, Baron Monthermer (age 28) and Margaret Monthermer Baroness Montagu 3rd Baroness Monthermer at Warblington Havant, Hampshire. She a great x 2 granddaughter of King Edward "Longshanks" I of England.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Warblington Havant, St Thomas à Becket Church

Monumental Effigies. A Lady of the Warblington Family in Warblington Church, Hampshire.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Warnford [Map]

Around Jun 1376 Luke Poynings 4th Baron St John Basing (age 59) died at Warnford, Hampshire [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, West Meon [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, West Stratton [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Wherwell

On 12 Feb 1594 Herbert Pelham (age 48) and Elizabeth West (age 20) were married at Wherwell, Hampshire. The difference in their ages was 27 years.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Wherwell Abbey [Map]

William of Malmesbury Book 2 Chapter 9. 18 Mar 978. Meanwhile king Edward (age 16) conducted himself with becoming affection to his infant brother (age 12) and his step-mother (age 33); he retained only the name of king, and gave them the power; following the footsteps of his father's piety, and giving both his attention and his heart to good council. The woman (age 33), however, with that hatred which a step-mother only can entertain, began to meditate a subtle stratagem, in order that not even the title of king might be wanting to her child, and to lay a treacherous snare for her son-in-law [step-son], which she accomplished in the following manner. He was returning home, tired with the chase and gasping with thirst from the exercise, while his companions were following the dogs in different directions as it happened, when hearing that they dwelt in a neighbouring mansion, the youth proceeded thither at full speed, unattended and unsuspecting, as he judged of others by his own feelings. On his arrival, alluring him to her with female blandishment, she made him lean forward, and after saluting him while he was eagerly drinking from the cup which had been presented, the dagger of an attendant pierced him through. Dreadfully wounded, with all his remaining strength he clapped spurs to his horse in order to join his companions; when one foot slipping, he was dragged by the other through the trackless paths and recesses of the wood, while the streaming blood gave evidence of his death to his followers. Moreover, they then commanded him to be ingloriously interred at Wareham; envying him even holy ground when dead, as they had envied him his royal dignity while living. They now publicly manifested their extreme joy as if they had buried his memory with his body; but God's all-seeing eye was there, who ennobled the innocent victim by the glory of miracles. So much is human outweighed by heavenly judgment. For there lights were shown from above; there the lame walked; there the dumb resumed his fticulty of speech; there every malady gave way to health. The fame of this pervading all England, proclaimed the merits of the martyr. The murderess excited by it, attempted a progress thither; and was already urging forward the horse slie had mounted, when she perceived the manifest anger of God; for the same creature which she had heretofore constantly ridden, and which was used to outstrip the very wind in speed, now by command of God, stood motionless. The attendants, both with whips and clamours, urged him forward that he might carry his noble mistress with his usual readiness; but their labour was in vain. They changed the horse; and the same circumstance recurred. Her obdurate heart, though late, perceived the meaning of the miracle; wherefore, what she was not herself permitted to do, she suffered to be performed by another: for that Elferius, whom I before blamed for destroying the monasteries, repenting of his rashness, and being deeply distressed in mind, took up the sacred corpse from its unworthy burial-place, and paid it just and distinguished honours at Shaftesbury [Map]. He did not escape unpunished, however, for, within a year afterwards, he was eaten of the vermin which we call lice. Moreover, since a mind unregulated is a torment to itself, and a restless spirit endures its own peculiar punishment in this life, Elfthrida declining from her regal pride, became extremely penitent; so that at Werewell [Map], for many years, she clothed her pampered body in hair-cloth, slept at night upon the ground without a pillow; and mortified her flesh with every kind of penance. She was a beautiful woman; singularly faithful to her husband; but deserving punishment from the commission of so great a crime. It is believed and commonly reported, that from her violence to Edward, the country for a long time after groaned under the yoke of barbarian servitude.

986. The Benedictine nunnery of Wherwell [Map] was founded about 986 by Elfrida (age 41), the widow of King Edgar, in expiation for her part in the murders of her first husband Ethelwolf and of her son-in-law King Edward. Here she spent the latter part of her life in penitence, and here she was buried.

Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. 1051. This year came Archbishop Robert hither over sea with his pall from Rome, one day before St. Peter's eve: and he took his archiepiscopal seat at Christ-church on St. Peter's day, and soon after this went to the king. Then came Abbot Sparhawk to him with the king's writ and seal, to the intent that he should consecrate him Bishop o[oe] London; but the archbishop refused, saying that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to the archbishop again for the same purpose, and there demanded episcopal consecration; but the archbishop obstinately refused, repeating that the pope had forbidden him. Then went the abbot to London, and sat at the bishopric which the king had before given him, with his full leave, all the summer and the autumn. Then during the same year came Eustace (age 36), who had the sister of King Edward (age 48) to wife, from beyond sea, soon after the bishop, and went to the king; and having spoken with him whatever he chose, he then went homeward. When he came to Canterbury eastward, there took he a repast, and his men; whence he proceeded to Dover, Kent [Map]. When he was about a mile or more on this side Dover, Kent [Map], he put on his breast-plate; and so did all his companions: and they proceeded to Dover. When they came thither, they resolved to quarter themselves wherever they lived. Then came one of his men, and would lodge at the house of a master of a family against his will; but having wounded the master of the house, he was slain by the other. Then was Eustace (age 36) quickly upon his horse, and his companions upon theirs; and having gone to the master of the family, they slew him on his own hearth; then going up to the boroughward, they slew both within and without more than twenty men. The townsmen slew nineteen men on the other side, and wounded more, but they knew not how many. Eustace (age 36) escaped with a few men, and went again to the king (age 48), telling him partially how they had fared. The king (age 48) was very wroth with the townsmen, and sent off Earl Godwin (age 50), bidding him go into Kent with hostility to Dover, Kent [Map]. For Eustace (age 36) had told the king that the guilt of the townsmen was greater than his. But it was not so: and the earl (age 50) would not consent to the expedition, because he was loth to destroy his own people. Then sent the king after all his council, and bade them come to Gloucester nigh the after-mass of St. Mary. Meanwhile Godwin (age 50) took it much to heart, that in his earldom such a thing should happen. Whereupon be began to gather forces over all his earldom, and Earl Sweyne (age 30), his son, over his; and Harold (age 29), his other son, over his earldom: and they assembled all in Gloucestershire, at Langtree, Gloucestershire, a large and innumerable army, all ready for battle against the king; unless Eustace (age 36) and his men were delivered to them handcuffed, and also the Frenchmen that were in the castle. This was done seven nights before the latter mass of St. Mary, when King Edward (age 48) was sitting at Gloucester. Whereupon he sent after Earl Leofric, and north after Earl Siward (age 41), and summoned their retinues. At first they came to him with moderate aid; but when they found how it was in the south, then sent they north over all their earldom, and ordered a large force to the help of their lord. So did Ralph also over his earldom. Then came they all to Gloucester to the aid of the king (age 48), though it was late. So unanimous were they all in defence of the king (age 48), that they would seek Godwin's (age 50) army if the king (age 48) desired it. But some prevented that; because it was very unwise that they should come together; for in the two armies was there almost all that was noblest in England. They therefore prevented this, that they might not leave the land at the mercy of our foes, whilst engaged in a destructive conflict betwixt ourselves. Then it was advised that they should exchange hostages between them. And they issued proclamations throughout to London, whither all the people were summoned over all this north end in Siward's (age 41) earldom, and in Leofric's, and also elsewhere; and Earl Godwin (age 50) was to come thither with his sons to a conference; They came as far as Southwark, Surrey [Map], and very many with them from Wessex; but his army continually diminished more and more; for they bound over to the king (age 48) all the thanes that belonged to Earl Harold (age 29) his son, and outlawed Earl Sweyne (age 30) his other son. When therefore it could not serve his purpose to come to a conference against the king (age 48) and against the army that was with him, he went in the night away. In the morning the king (age 48) held a council, and proclaimed him an outlaw, with his whole army; himself (age 50) and his wife, and all his three sons - Sweyne (age 30) and Tosty (age 25) and Grith (age 19). And he went south to Thorney67, with his wife, and Sweyne (age 30) his son, and Tosty (age 25) and his wife (age 18), a cousin of Baldwin of Bruges (age 38) [Note. Judith Flanders Duchess Bavaria (age 18) was a sister of Baldwin "The Good" V Count Flanders (age 38)], and his son Grith (age 19). Earl Harold (age 29) with Leofwine (age 16) went to Bristol, Gloucestershire [Map] in the ship that Earl Sweyne (age 30) had before prepared and provisioned for himself; and the king (age 48) sent Bishop Aldred from London with his retinue, with orders to overtake him ere he came to ship. But they either could not or would not: and he then went out from the mouth of the Avon; but he encountered such adverse weather, that he got off with difficulty, and suffered great loss. He then went forth to Ireland, as soon as the weather permitted. In the meantime the Welshmen had wrought a castle in Herefordshire, in the territory of Earl Sweyne (age 30), and brought as much injury and disgrace on the king's (age 48) men thereabout as they could. Then came Earl Godwin (age 50), and Earl Sweyne (age 30), and Earl Harold (age 29), together at Beverstone [Map], and many men with them; to the intent that they might go to their natural lord, and to all the peers that were assembled with him; to have the king's (age 48) counsel and assistance, and that of all the peers, how they might avenge the insult offered to the king (age 48), and to all the nation. But the Welshmen were before with the king (age 48), and betrayed the earls, so that they were not permitted to come within the sight of his eyes; for they declared that they intended to come thither to betray the king (age 48). There was now assembled before the king (age 48)68 Earl Siward (age 41), and Earl Leofric, and much people with them from the north: and it was told Earl Godwin (age 50) and his sons, that the king (age 48) and the men who were with him would take counsel against them; but they prepared themselves firmly to resist, though they were loth to proceed against their natural lord. Then advised the peers on either side, that they should abstain from all hostility: and the king (age 48) gave God's peace and his full friendship to each party. Then advised the king (age 48) and his council, that there should be a second time a general assembly of all the nobles in London, at the autumnal equinox: and the king (age 48) ordered out an army both south and north of the Thames, the best that ever was. Then was Earl Sweyne (age 30) proclaimed an outlaw; and Earl Godwin (age 50) and Earl Harold (age 29) were summoned to the council as early as they could come. When they came thither and were cited to the council, then required they security and hostages, that they might come into the council and go out without treachery. The king (age 48) then demanded all the thanes that the earls had; and they put them all into his hands. Then sent the king (age 48) again to them, and commanded them to come with twelve men to the king's (age 48) council. Then desired the earl again security and hostages, that he might answer singly to each of the things that were laid to his charge. But the hostages were refused; and a truce of five nights was allowed him to depart from the land. Then went Earl Godwin (age 50) and Earl Sweyne (age 30) to Bosham [Map], and drew out their ships, and went beyond sea, seeking the protection of Baldwin (age 38); and there they abode all the winter. Earl Harold (age 29) went westward to Ireland, and was there all the winter on the king's (age 48) security.

It was from Thorney69 that Godwin (age 50) and those that were with him went to Bruges [Map], to Baldwin's (age 38) land, in one ship, with as much treasure as they could lodge therein for each man. Wonderful would it have been thought by every man that was then in England, if any person had said before this that it would end thus! For he was before raised to such a height, that he ruled the king (age 48) and all England; his sons were earls, and the king's (age 48) darlings; and his daughter (age 25) wedded and united to the king (age 48). Soon after this took place, the king (age 48) dismissed the lady (age 25) who had been consecrated his queen, and ordered to be taken from her all that she had in land, and in gold, and in silver, and in all things; and committed her to the care of his sister at Wherwell [Map]. Soon after came Earl William (age 23) from beyond sea with a large retinue of Frenchmen; and the king (age 48) entertained him and as many of his companions as were convenient to him, and let him depart again. Then was Abbot Sparhawk driven from his bishopric at London; and William (age 23) the king's priest was invested therewith. Then was Oddy appointed earl over Devonshire, and over Somerset, and over Dorset, and over Wales; and Algar, the son of Earl Leofric, was promoted to the earldom which Harold (age 29) before possessed.

Note 67. The ancient name of Westminster; which came into disuse because there was another Thorney in Cambridgeshire.

Note 68. i.e. at Gloucester, according to the printed Chronicle; which omits all that took place in the meantime at London and Southwark.

Note 69. Now Westminster.

John of Worcester. 08 Sep 1051. Meanwhile, Godwin (age 50) and his sons [Note. Sweyn (age 30), Harold (age 29), Tostig (age 25), Gyrth (age 19), Leofwine (age 16) and Wulfnoth (age 11); it isn't clear whether all were present?], with their respective armies, entered Gloucestershire after the feast of the nativity of St. Mary [8th September], and encamping at a place called Langtreo, sent envoys to the king at Gloucester, demanding the surrender of count Eustace (age 36) and his followers, as well as of the Normans and men of Boulogne, who were in possession of the castle on the cliff at Dover, Kent [Map], on pain of hostilities. The king, alarmed for a time at this message, was in great distress, and in the utmost perplexity what to do. But when he found that the troops of the earls Leofric, Siward (age 41), and Ralph were on their march, he replied with firmness that he would by no means consent to give up Eustace (age 36) and the rest who were demanded. On hearing this, the envoys returned from their bootless errand. As they were departing, the army entered Gloucester, so exasperated, and unanimously ready to fight, that, if the king had given permission, they would have instantly engaged earl Godwin's (age 50) army. But earl Leofric considering that all the men of greatest note in England were assembled either on his side or the other, it appeared to him and some others a great folly to fight with their own countrymen, and he proposed that, hostages having been given by both parties, the king and Godwin (age 50) should meet at London on a day appointed, and settle their controversy in a legal way. This advice being approved, and after the exchange of messages, hostages having been given and received, the earl (age 50) returned into Wessex; and the king assembled a more powerful army from the whole of Mercia and Northumbria, and led it to London. Meanwhile, Godwin (age 50) and his sons came to Southwark with a vast multitude of the people of Wessex; but his army gradually dwindling away and deserting him, he did not venture to abide the judgment of the king's court, but fled, under cover of night. When, therefore, the morning came, the king, in his witan, with the unanimous consent of the whole army, made a decree that Godwin (age 50) and his five sons should be banished. Thereupon he and his wife Githa, and Tosti (age 25) and his wife Judith (age 18), the daughter of Baldwin, count of Flanders, and two of his. other sons, namely, Sweyn (age 30) and Gurth (age 19), went, without loss of time, to Thorney, where a ship had been got ready for them. They quickly laded her with as much gold, silver, and other valuable articles as she could hold, and, embarking in great haste, directed her course towards Flanders and Baldwin (age 39) the count. His sons Harold (age 29) and Leofwine (age 16), making their way to Brycgstowe [Map], went on board a ship which their brother Sweyn (age 30) had prepared for them, and crossed over to Ireland. The king (age 48) repudiated the queen Edgitha (age 25), on account of his wrath against her father Godwin (age 50), and sent her in disgrace, with only a single handmaid, to Wherwell [Map], where she was committed to the custody of the abbess.67

Note 67. She was a sister of the king.

In Sep 1141 John Fitzgilbert (age 36) took refuge at Wherwell Abbey [Map].

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Whitchurch [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Whitchurch, Hurstbourne Priors

In 1558 Robert Oxenbridge (age 50) bought at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

Around 1568 Robert Oxenbridge was born to Robert John Oxenbridge at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

On 22 Jan 1591 Robert John Oxenbridge died at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

In 1616 Robert Oxenbridge (age 48) died at Hurstbourne Priors, Whitchurch.

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Wickham [Map]

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Wintney

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Wintney, Hartley

Europe, British Isles, South-East England, Hampshire, Wintney, Hartley, West Green House

On 11 Mar 1939 Evelyn Katrine Gwenfra Williams Duchess Wellington (age 84) died at West Green House, Hartley.